15/03/2018 BBC News at Ten


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15/03/2018

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Tonight at Ten:

0:00:090:00:10

Three of Britain's closest allies

strongly criticise Russia,

0:00:100:00:12

following the chemical attack

on a former spy in Salisbury.

0:00:120:00:18

During the day, Theresa May visited

Salisbury, meeting members

0:00:180:00:20

of the emergency services

and welcoming the support she's had

0:00:200:00:22

from the USA, France and Germany.

0:00:220:00:24

This happened in the UK,

but it could have happened anywhere,

0:00:240:00:29

and we take a united

stance against it.

0:00:290:00:32

In Moscow - where Vladimir Putin

is facing a presidential election -

0:00:320:00:35

they're still denying any

involvement in the attack.

0:00:350:00:43

What rational person could imagine

that a few days before

0:00:440:00:47

the presidential election,

the Russian Federation suddenly

0:00:470:00:48

decides to do something like that?

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And Moscow has again

warned it will retaliate,

0:00:500:00:52

following the explusion of some

Russian diplomats from the UK.

0:00:520:00:54

Also tonight:

0:00:540:00:55

In Syria, thousand of civilians

have fled the rebel area

0:00:550:00:58

of Eastern Ghouta, on the seventh

anniversary of the start

0:00:580:01:00

of the Syrian conflict.

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We'll be hearing the story

of a seven-year-old who was born

0:01:040:01:07

in the year the conflict began.

0:01:070:01:09

Tests on a fire door

from Grenfell Tower have shown

0:01:090:01:11

that it was far less flame-resistant

than it was claimed to be.

0:01:110:01:16

In Florida, a newly-built pedestrian

bridge has collapsed,

0:01:160:01:18

killing a number of people.

0:01:180:01:19

Many are still trapped.

0:01:190:01:23

And at the Emirates tonight,

Arsenal have been playing AC Milan

0:01:230:01:25

in the Europa League.

0:01:250:01:29

And coming up on

Sportsday on BBC News:

0:01:290:01:30

The Irish dominate at Cheltenham,

while trainer Willie Mullins

0:01:300:01:33

and Penhill were the big winners

on Day Three of the festival.

0:01:330:01:41

Good evening.

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Three of Britain's closest allies

have declared their strong support

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for Theresa May's response

to the poisoning of a former Russian

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spy and his daughter in Salisbury.

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The United States, France

and Germany blamed Russia

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for the chemical attack,

which they said was an attack

0:02:110:02:14

on British sovereignty.

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During the day, Theresa May visited

Salisbury for the first time

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since the incident and met health

officials and members

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of the emergency services,

including the police officer

0:02:200:02:22

who attended the scene

and is still in hospital -

0:02:220:02:29

as our diplomatic correspondent,

James Landale, reports.

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His report contains flashing lights.

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This was Theresa May's

first visit to Salisbury

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since the nerve agent attack.

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A chance to be briefed by the police

and public health officials.

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But also a chance to meet

members of the public,

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to chat, to reassure.

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And, yes, even to do this.

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She visited the scene of the attack

on the former Russian intelligence

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officer Sergei Skripal

and his daughter, Yulia.

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The restaurant where they ate.

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The park bench, under a tent,

where they were found.

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The Prime Minister thanked some

of the police officers who'd first

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responded to the call.

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Thank you.

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What you did is what the police

do day in and day out.

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You go to a routine call,

as you say, you don't

0:03:190:03:21

know what you'll find.

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Then, at the local hospital,

she met and thanked

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Detective Sergeant Nick Bailey,

who's still recovering

0:03:260:03:28

from exposure to the nerve agent.

0:03:280:03:33

She said she'd expelled

23 Russian diplomats

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for this despicable attack,

but was ready to do more.

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There are other measures

we're looking at.

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And if we face further provocation

from Russia, there are further

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measures that we can deploy.

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But what is important

in the international arena,

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and we have taken this into Nato,

the United Nations and we will be

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taking it into the European Union,

is that allies are standing

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alongside us.

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And saying this is part

of a pattern of activity

0:04:080:04:10

that we have seen from Russia.

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That united stance came

in a joint statement

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from the leaders of Britain,

France, Germany and the US,

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all blaming Russia unequivocally.

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I spoke with the Prime Minister

and we are in deep discussions.

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A very sad situation.

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It certainly looks like

the Russians are behind it.

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Something that should

never, ever happen.

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And we're taking it very seriously,

as I think are many others.

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The joint statement is significant

because it shows the Foreign Office

0:04:450:04:47

and Downing Street are convincing

Britain's allies that the Salisbury

0:04:470:04:50

attack is different,

that it represents an escalation

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of Russia's hostile behaviour.

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And, as such, those allies

are now ready to crank up

0:04:550:04:57

the pressure on Moscow.

0:04:570:05:00

That diplomacy continued at Nato

headquarters in Brussels,

0:05:000:05:02

where British officials briefed

allies about what they

0:05:020:05:06

called Russia's 'reckless

and unlawful behaviour'.

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And promised to support other

countries facing similar threats.

0:05:090:05:14

And in the Netherlands,

ministers confirmed that officials

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from the chemical weapons watchdog,

the OPCW, would get access to

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samples of the nerve agent to verify

that it was developed in Russia.

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They would get that access

here at the military research

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laboratory at Porton Down,

where the Novichok was identified.

0:05:330:05:37

Today, the Defence Secretary

announced Porton Down will get

0:05:370:05:40

another £45 million in funding.

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And the Russians would

get short shrift.

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If you're a nation and another

nation has launched a nerve agent

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attack on your people,

I think we have every right to tell

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Russia to shut up and go away.

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Meanwhile, near Salisbury,

the investigation and

0:05:520:05:53

decontamination process continues.

0:05:530:05:59

The graves of Mr Skripal's wife

and son were still being inspected

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and two vehicles were recovered

from near the home of DS Bailey.

0:06:020:06:09

James Landale, BBC News.

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In Moscow, the Russian Government

says that President Putin

0:06:110:06:13

will decide soon what action to take

- in response to the expulsion

0:06:130:06:16

of 23 Russian diplomats,

thought to be intelligence officers

0:06:160:06:21

from the UK.

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The Foreign Minister,

Sergei Lavrov, accused Britain

0:06:220:06:24

of acting in a boorish way,

and insisted again that

0:06:240:06:26

Russia was not involved

in the Salisbury attack -

0:06:260:06:30

as our correspondent

Steve Rosenberg reports.

0:06:300:06:37

Well, in three days' time, Russians

go to the polls to elect a new

0:06:370:06:40

President. And there is little doubt

that Vladimir Putin will be the

0:06:400:06:44

winner. The Kremlin insists that

President Putin is focused

0:06:440:06:48

completely on the election campaign,

but the nerve agent attack in

0:06:480:06:52

Salisbury has sparked, on the Eve of

the vote, a diplomatic war with

0:06:520:06:56

Britain, and the next move is

Vladimir Putin's.

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Vladimir Putin's.

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It may be feeling like a Cold War,

but in Moscow today,

0:07:010:07:04

there was a warm reception

for the President.

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Vladimir Putin the star guest

at a youth conference.

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Lots of smiles, but no mention

of diplomatic expulsions.

0:07:100:07:14

The Kremlin leader keeping his

plans for retaliation

0:07:140:07:15

against Britain to himself.

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Across town, at the British Embassy,

they waited for news.

0:07:200:07:26

Would Moscow expel

British diplomats?

0:07:260:07:29

The UK had expelled 23 Russians.

0:07:290:07:37

And the news on Russian TV -

Britain has been Russia's

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enemy for centuries.

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The message to viewers -

the UK cannot be trusted.

0:07:410:07:46

Russia's Foreign Minister,

Sergei Lavrov, claimed

0:07:460:07:50

Britain was using the poisoning

of Sergei Skripal to distract

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attention from Brexit.

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Then, pictures from the Kremlin.

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The President meeting his security

chiefs to discuss UK sanctions.

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Moscow's response expected soon.

0:08:010:08:06

Russia may be coming under

increasing international pressure,

0:08:060:08:08

but the language coming out

of the Kremlin is

0:08:080:08:10

increasingly defiant.

0:08:100:08:14

Vladimir Putin's spokesman today

described Britain's stance

0:08:140:08:18

as 'destructive and provocative'.

0:08:180:08:19

The President, he said,

would take the final decision

0:08:190:08:22

on how Russia responds.

0:08:220:08:24

And just when you think relations

can't get any worse,

0:08:240:08:30

the Defence Secretary tells

Russia to 'shut up'.

0:08:300:08:32

The reaction in Moscow?

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It's not only a mistake,

it's worse than a mistake

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because it's stupid.

0:08:380:08:43

Or it's done on purpose,

it's a provocation, they want

0:08:430:08:45

the Russians to be provoked.

0:08:450:08:46

Criticism of Russia, too, by Nato.

0:08:460:08:48

It agrees Moscow was behind

the Salisbury attack.

0:08:480:08:53

All of us agree that the attack

was a clear breach of international

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norms and agreements.

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This is unacceptable.

0:09:000:09:01

It has no place

in a civilised world.

0:09:010:09:05

Tonight, Russia is feeling

increasingly isolated

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and in a new Cold War it blames

on the West.

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In a moment, we'll

speak to our security

0:09:170:09:19

correspondent, Gordon Corera.

0:09:190:09:22

But first, live to Washington

and our North America

0:09:220:09:24

editor, Jon Sopel.

0:09:240:09:28

A notable change of tone in

Washington, what is behind it?

0:09:280:09:34

Well, you could argue that Theresa

May has been more successful than

0:09:340:09:37

the US intelligence services because

she has convinced Donald Trump that

0:09:370:09:40

the Russians have been up to no good

and for the past 15 months, Donald

0:09:400:09:45

Trump has been very wary, almost

open in refusing to accept that.

0:09:450:09:49

What was striking was the statement

issued last night by the White House

0:09:490:09:54

press secretary, full square behind

Theresa May and the need to expel

0:09:540:09:57

the diplomats and the belief that

Russia was behind it. Then the most

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unlikely thing this morning, a joint

letter signed by Trump, the leader

0:10:020:10:07

of France and Germany and Britain.

And one other thing as well, America

0:10:070:10:11

has announced that it is imposing

its own sanctions on 19 individuals

0:10:110:10:18

and private entities. Not connected

directly with the Salisbury attack,

0:10:180:10:22

but with the hacking of the US

election in 2016 and Russian

0:10:220:10:27

involvement in that. I think that

has come today because the Americans

0:10:270:10:33

want to send a sign to Russia as

well as the French and the Germans,

0:10:330:10:37

it is not Britain alone against

Vladimir Putin. There are a lot of

0:10:370:10:40

mighty powers who think what

happened in Salisbury overstepped

0:10:400:10:43

the mark.

Many thanks. Can we talk

about that, Gordon, the basis for

0:10:430:10:52

the consensus? Can we assume France,

Germany and the United States have

0:10:520:10:55

seen the intelligence and agree with

it?

Britain has been busy showing

0:10:550:11:00

this assessment with different

allies and that is based on a number

0:11:000:11:03

of things. The technical element,

which shows written says this was a

0:11:030:11:09

Russian developed nerve agent, a

Novichok. And the broad assessment

0:11:090:11:14

that not only did Russia have the

means in terms of that agent, but

0:11:140:11:17

the motive, having made calls to

kill what it considers traitors, and

0:11:170:11:22

the track record using

unconventional weapons. The use of

0:11:220:11:27

polonium to kill Alexander

Litvinenko. That is not a direct

0:11:270:11:30

trail of evidence of what happened,

but it is enough clearly for allies

0:11:300:11:35

and it was important in the

statement they said, there was no

0:11:350:11:40

plausible alternative explanation

other than Moscow's involvement.

0:11:400:11:43

There will be an independent,

scientific analysis done by the

0:11:430:11:46

chemical weapons inspectors from the

OPCW, but that is slow and it took

0:11:460:11:53

months for them to come to

conclusions about Syrian chemical

0:11:530:11:55

weapons and British professionals

were clear, they wanted to maintain

0:11:550:12:00

the initiative. If you look back to

the Litvinenko case, they felt

0:12:000:12:03

played by the Russians, played for

time inviting the police to Moscow

0:12:030:12:08

and making their life very

difficult. This time, British

0:12:080:12:10

officials wanted to keep up the

momentum and they will be encouraged

0:12:100:12:14

by the way that has gone with allies

today and they will hope the

0:12:140:12:17

Russians will be on the back foot as

they work out how to respond.

Once

0:12:170:12:21

again, thanks very much. And thanks

very much from the White House.

0:12:210:12:26

In Syria, thousands of people

are fleeing the rebel-held

0:12:260:12:27

enclave of Eastern Ghouta,

as government forces

0:12:270:12:29

intensify their offensive.

0:12:290:12:34

Doctors there have been sending

out desperate messages,

0:12:340:12:36

saying they are overwhelmed

by the number of casualties.

0:12:360:12:41

President Assad's forces

have now retaken large

0:12:410:12:43

parts of Eastern Ghouta -

the last rebel stronghold

0:12:430:12:45

near the capital, Damascus.

0:12:450:12:46

This report by our Middle East

editor, Jeremy Bowen,

0:12:460:12:48

contains some distressing scenes.

0:12:480:12:56

Thousands are fleeing

parts of Eastern Ghouta,

0:12:560:13:02

tredging into an uncertain future

that looks better now than

0:13:020:13:04

the deadly present.

0:13:040:13:05

In this war, half Syria's population

has fled or been driven from their

0:13:050:13:08

homes.

0:13:080:13:09

These people are among the latest.

0:13:090:13:11

Many families will have

been displaced before.

0:13:110:13:13

They've

spent weeks hiding

0:13:130:13:14

in basements from the shelling.

0:13:140:13:18

Eastern Ghouta is the size

of Manchester, and this isn't

0:13:180:13:21

happening everywhere.

0:13:210:13:24

One armed group has bought some

quiet by negotiating a

0:13:240:13:26

transfer of power.

0:13:260:13:32

But many tens of thousands

of civilians are still besieged.

0:13:320:13:39

This was filmed by Omar, a cameraman

who gives his material to the BBC.

0:13:390:13:42

The attack happened

outside his building.

0:13:420:13:47

TRANSLATION:

I was telling

myself that this rocket

0:13:470:13:49

was going to kill me.

0:13:490:13:51

For a second, I was talking

to myself, saying I'm

0:13:510:13:54

about to die.

0:13:540:13:57

A small boy was caught up in it.

0:13:570:14:01

He's deaf, so he hadn't heard

warnings to take cover.

0:14:010:14:05

Omar, the cameraman,

worried the boy would bleed to death

0:14:050:14:08

and told us the eight minutes it

took for the ambulance to arrive

0:14:080:14:11

were the worst he had

endured since the battle

0:14:110:14:13

for Eastern Ghouta began.

0:14:130:14:19

Omar carried him to the ambulance,

where he was squeezed in

0:14:190:14:22

next to the bodies of the dead.

0:14:220:14:25

Omar has seen a lot of death.

0:14:250:14:29

He said the boy was a soul

he wanted to save.

0:14:290:14:32

We have been following

Dr Amani Ballour,

0:14:320:14:34

a paediatrician in an underground

0:14:340:14:35

hospital, who spends every day

with the wounded and the dying.

0:14:350:14:42

In that place, they are all

fighting fear, aware

0:14:420:14:44

that regime soldiers

are

0:14:440:14:45

advancing into Eastern Ghouta.

0:14:450:14:48

Dr Amani sent a message.

0:14:480:14:56

TRANSLATION:

It's the worst

it's been for many days,

0:14:590:15:03

the shelling is brutal -

bombs, rockets,

0:15:030:15:05

all kinds of weapons.

0:15:050:15:06

This may be my last message.

0:15:060:15:07

The injured are everywhere,

the operating theatres

0:15:070:15:09

are full of wounded people.

0:15:090:15:10

We don't have enough

doctors to help them all,

0:15:100:15:12

our own homes have been shelled.

0:15:120:15:16

A small amount of aid is being

brought into Eastern Ghouta.

0:15:160:15:19

All the talk of a humanitarian

ceasefire has been ignored.

0:15:190:15:26

This war started seven years ago.

0:15:260:15:29

Its horror goes on.

0:15:290:15:32

Jeremy Bowen, BBC News.

0:15:320:15:37

And for many of those who've managed

to flee the violence in Syria,

0:15:370:15:40

the shadow of war remains.

0:15:400:15:41

Rouaa and Mustafa -

two seven year olds -

0:15:410:15:43

were born in the year

the conflict began.

0:15:430:15:45

Our correspondent, Caroline Hawley,

has been following their stories.

0:15:450:15:53

Rouaa and her friend Hoda are part

of a whole generation of Syrians

0:15:530:15:56

growing up as refugees.

0:15:560:15:59

Her family fled Eastern Ghouta

in 2013, after a chemical attack.

0:15:590:16:02

A nappy soaked in vinegar

is all her parents have

0:16:020:16:08

to try to protect her.

0:16:080:16:14

This is home now, she says.

0:16:140:16:17

One room for the whole family

to eat, sleep and study in.

0:16:170:16:25

And even after nearly five years

here, she still hasn't got used

0:16:250:16:28

to the camp's shared toilets.

0:16:280:16:31

But here, she is at least safe.

0:16:340:16:37

Her cousin, Mohammed,

was killed in an air strike

0:16:370:16:39

in Eastern Ghouta this week.

0:16:390:16:46

Her father's thighbone

was shattered by a sniper's

0:17:030:17:05

bullet and he can't work.

0:17:050:17:07

Her sister was hit by shrapnel.

0:17:070:17:11

They're just one of so many

families scarred inside

0:17:110:17:13

and out by Syria's war.

0:17:130:17:17

A barrel bomb killed Mustafa's

parents, broke both of his hips

0:17:170:17:20

and lodged a piece of shrapnel

in his brain.

0:17:200:17:23

He has severe nerve damage

down his left side.

0:17:230:17:27

It's hard for him trying

to keep up with his peers,

0:17:270:17:30

but he's determined.

0:17:300:17:36

Back at home, his grandmother

brings out a photograph

0:17:360:17:38

of his father, Ibrahim.

0:17:380:17:46

But Mustafa is now losing

the memory of what his parents

0:17:490:17:52

were actually like.

0:17:520:17:58

Once a week, Mustafa

comes for physiotherapy.

0:18:170:18:20

Beside him is Benin.

0:18:200:18:22

She lost her father,

two brothers and a sister

0:18:220:18:24

when a shell landed on her home.

0:18:240:18:27

Syrian children have paid

a catastrophic price for the war.

0:18:270:18:32

And yet, in art therapy,

Mustafa draws himself smiling.

0:18:320:18:35

Despite everything he's been

through, everything he's up against,

0:18:350:18:38

I've never once seen him complain.

0:18:380:18:43

Caroline Hawley, BBC News.

0:18:430:18:51

A number of people have died -

and many are believed

0:18:510:18:54

trapped under rubble -

after a newly-built

0:18:540:18:56

pedestrian bridge collapsed

in the US city of Miami.

0:18:560:18:58

A major rescue

operation is under way.

0:18:580:19:00

The bridge, weighing

nearly a thousand tonnes,

0:19:000:19:01

was opened last Saturday -

as our correspondent,

0:19:010:19:03

Gary O'Donoghue, reports.

0:19:030:19:11

The bridge just clap stowed of

nowhere. There are cars stuck under

0:19:110:19:14

there.

0:19:140:19:16

Scrambling to rescue the trapped

and injured after 950 tonnes

0:19:160:19:19

of the newly-installed pedestrian

bridge crashed down

0:19:190:19:20

onto the road below.

0:19:200:19:21

A number of vehicles were crushed

as the bridge came down,

0:19:210:19:24

shortly before 2pm.

0:19:240:19:27

The emergency services,

dashing to help those

0:19:270:19:28

pinned under the concrete.

0:19:280:19:30

The footbridge had only

just been completed,

0:19:300:19:33

designed to take students

from the Florida International

0:19:330:19:37

University safely across a six-lane

highway to their accommodation.

0:19:370:19:44

What was soon to become an iconic,

staple part of the connectivity

0:19:440:19:46

between the city and the University

has actually turned out

0:19:460:19:49

to be a national tragedy.

0:19:490:19:51

Our hearts are extended out

to those, the victims that

0:19:510:19:55

were actually able to be transported

away, as well as those that may not

0:19:550:19:59

be walking away from the scene.

0:19:590:20:03

The collapsed section of the bridge

was only put in place last Saturday,

0:20:030:20:05

using a method known as advanced

bridge construction,

0:20:050:20:09

designed to be fast and cause

the least disruption

0:20:090:20:11

as possible to traffic.

0:20:110:20:18

This is crazy, God bless everyone

involved.

0:20:180:20:21

The National Transportation Safety

Board says it is sending

0:20:210:20:23

investigators to the scene,

and the building company employed

0:20:230:20:25

to put up the bridge, MCM,

says it will co-operate fully.

0:20:250:20:30

A brief look at some of the day's

other other news stories.

0:20:300:20:33

Following the death of an Egyptian

student in Nottingham,

0:20:330:20:36

Egypt is to send a delegation

of parliamentarians to Britain.

0:20:360:20:39

Mariam Moustafa died

in hospital yesterday,

0:20:390:20:40

a month after being attacked

in the city centre.

0:20:400:20:45

Police say they're aware

of suggestions on social media

0:20:450:20:47

that she was the victim of a hate

crime, but they're not

0:20:470:20:50

currently treating the attack

as being racially motivated.

0:20:500:20:55

Neville Hord has been jailed

for at least 30 years -

0:20:550:20:57

after admitting stabbing to death

the daughter of his former partner

0:20:570:21:01

at an Aldi supermarket in Skipton

just before Christmas.

0:21:010:21:05

30-year-old Jodie Willsher died

after being stabbed 11 times.

0:21:050:21:09

Prosecutors described Hord's motive

for the killing as 'revenge'.

0:21:090:21:15

A government inspector

has recommended that

0:21:150:21:18

Northamptonshire County Council,

which has faced serious

0:21:180:21:20

financial problems,

should be abolished,

0:21:200:21:22

and replaced with two new councils.

0:21:220:21:24

The Conservative council has

accepted the findings,

0:21:240:21:26

and its leader has resigned.

0:21:260:21:32

HSBC has revealed that its female

staff in the UK earned 59%

0:21:320:21:35

less than their male

colleagues last year.

0:21:350:21:38

Bonuses at the bank awarded

to men were 86% higher

0:21:380:21:41

than those given to women.

0:21:410:21:44

HSBC said less than a quarter of

senior roles were filled by women.

0:21:440:21:51

Police investigating the fire

at Grenfell Tower in west London,

0:21:520:21:56

which claimed the lives of 71

people, say tests on a front door

0:21:560:21:59

from one of the flats,

showed it was far less

0:21:590:22:02

fire-resistant than intended.

0:22:020:22:04

Survivors of the blaze have

described the finding as

0:22:040:22:07

'shocking' as our home affairs

correspondent Tom Symonds reports.

0:22:070:22:12

Could what happened

here be the result of

0:22:120:22:14

corporate manslaughter?

0:22:140:22:15

That is what the police

are investigating.

0:22:150:22:18

Highly technical work,

including the test of a door

0:22:180:22:20

from a Grenfell flat.

0:22:200:22:22

One that was undamaged in the fire.

0:22:220:22:26

In this standard test,

heat is applied to one side

0:22:260:22:28

and the door must

hold for 30 minutes.

0:22:280:22:30

Here, there's some smoke, but this

door easily passes the test.

0:22:300:22:35

The sample from Grenfell

lasted 15 minutes.

0:22:350:22:39

The police informed the government,

which has consulted its own experts.

0:22:390:22:42

The response...

0:22:420:22:45

There is no change

to fire safety advice

0:22:450:22:47

that the public should follow.

0:22:470:22:49

I, nevertheless, fully appreciate

that this news will be

0:22:490:22:54

troubling for many people,

not least all those affected

0:22:540:22:56

by the Grenfell tragedy.

0:22:560:23:00

That is why, based on expert advice,

we have begun the process

0:23:000:23:03

of conducting further tests

and we will continue to consult

0:23:030:23:07

with the expert panel

to identify the implications

0:23:070:23:08

of these further tests.

0:23:080:23:10

This picture is from

before the fire.

0:23:100:23:14

Flats appear to have

had a variety of doors,

0:23:140:23:16

but they were fairly new.

0:23:160:23:20

The doors were replaced in 2012,

not as part as the major

0:23:200:23:23

refurbishment of Grenfell Tower.

0:23:230:23:24

After that work there

was a safety inspection.

0:23:240:23:28

The investigators will want to know

were the doors properly assessed?

0:23:280:23:32

For the survivors, understanding why

it happened is vital.

0:23:320:23:36

It's very important for Grenfell

survivors and the bereaved families

0:23:360:23:40

to feel that we can honour

the memory of those who have died.

0:23:400:23:43

One way we can bring justice

is to make sure that regulations

0:23:430:23:48

and progressive policies ensure that

people feel safe in their homes once

0:23:480:23:51

again and that means

tightening the regulations.

0:23:510:23:55

But those questions will come later.

0:23:550:23:57

For now, this is still the scene

of a criminal investigation.

0:23:570:24:00

Tom Symonds, BBC News,

at Grenfell Tower.

0:24:000:24:05

The Anglo-Dutch consumer company

Unilever, the third-biggest firm

0:24:050:24:08

in the UK, has denied that Brexit

is a factor in its decision

0:24:080:24:12

to base its new headquarters

in Rotterdam rather than London.

0:24:120:24:17

The firm, which owns

well-known brands such

0:24:170:24:19

as Marmite and Hellmann's,

insisted it's fully committed

0:24:190:24:21

to its British operations.

0:24:210:24:24

Our business editor Simon Jack

is at the firm's current

0:24:240:24:26

headquarters in London.

0:24:260:24:30

When they say it is not to do with

Brexit what do you make of that?

I

0:24:300:24:35

think they've got good reasons why

that is a credible explanation.

0:24:350:24:40

Since 1930 this rather beautiful

building Unilever house has been the

0:24:400:24:46

UK headquarters of the maker of

Marmite, of Dove and personal and

0:24:460:24:52

throw those decades it's adding

another headquarters in Rotterdam in

0:24:520:24:55

the Netherlands. Today the company,

historic move, said its future,

0:24:550:25:02

there is only room for one

headquarters and it's not going to

0:25:020:25:05

be here. So why are they doing it?

They say they need to save money and

0:25:050:25:10

be more streamlined, be more agile.

Just last year they had a nasty

0:25:100:25:13

shock when they were the subject to

one of the biggest takeover bids in

0:25:130:25:17

history when the US giant Kraft

Heinz tried to buy them. A lot of

0:25:170:25:22

people see under Dutch law that

takeover would have been more

0:25:220:25:26

difficult to actually pull off.

There is more protection afforded

0:25:260:25:29

under Dutch law. It does not mean

Unilever is leaving the UK, seven

0:25:290:25:33

and a half thousand jobs here and

will stay, they will run two

0:25:330:25:37

divisions, but it does mean Unilever

will fall out of the FTSE 100 index

0:25:370:25:42

of leading shares. They say it's not

to do with Brexit. Having said that,

0:25:420:25:47

the Prime Minister and the Business

Secretary lobbied very hard for this

0:25:470:25:50

not to happen because they know full

well that with just over a year to

0:25:500:25:57

go before we leave the European

Union this move will send a very

0:25:570:26:02

uncomfortable and very unpleasant

message to the rest of the corporate

0:26:020:26:05

sector and very, very sensitive

time.

Thank you very much, our

0:26:050:26:11

business editor Simon Jack at

Unilever headquarters in London.

0:26:110:26:15

The Danish prime minister has told

the BBC that Britain can rely

0:26:150:26:18

upon its European neighbours,

in moments of crisis.

0:26:180:26:20

Lars Lokke Rasmussen said that

although Britain had

0:26:200:26:22

decided to leave the EU,

they still had the

0:26:220:26:24

closest ties possible.

0:26:240:26:25

And he warned that the EU

would be sending a very

0:26:250:26:28

clear message to Russia,

in relation to the Salisbury attack,

0:26:280:26:30

when it meets next week.

0:26:300:26:32

Our Europe editor

Katya Adler reports.

0:26:320:26:37

Denmark is one of the UK's

closest European allies,

0:26:370:26:41

a fellow nonconformist,

rather Eurosceptic nation.

0:26:410:26:44

Today, as we walked

through the Danish Parliament,

0:26:440:26:48

Prime Minister Rasmussen wanted

to talk first about the Salisbury

0:26:480:26:50

attack and whether the EU

would take concrete action.

0:26:500:26:53

I think it's time to step up

and speak out very loud and very

0:26:530:26:57

clear to Russia that we will not

accept this because this is a threat

0:26:570:27:01

to everybody's security.

0:27:010:27:05

This is in a way the first

real test after Brexit.

0:27:050:27:08

12 months of very

bad-tempered negotiations.

0:27:080:27:10

Can the UK still rely

on its European allies

0:27:100:27:12

in a moment of crisis?

0:27:120:27:16

Yes.

0:27:160:27:17

I'm absolutely convinced that

Britain can rely on Europe.

0:27:170:27:19

Even though the British have decided

to leave the EU as an institution,

0:27:190:27:23

Britain is still a part of Europe.

0:27:230:27:28

Because so far Britain

has been disappointed

0:27:280:27:30

by its traditional allies,

in that in the Brexit negotiations,

0:27:300:27:32

Denmark, the Netherlands, Ireland,

in the negotiations have chosen,

0:27:320:27:35

if you like, the EU over ally UK.

0:27:350:27:39

Well, I wouldn't put it that way.

0:27:390:27:42

Even though I love Britain,

I mean, I have to be aware

0:27:420:27:48

of what the Danish interest

is in this case.

0:27:480:27:51

I have to protect my business

environment in the same way that

0:27:510:27:54

Theresa May has to protect

the British business community.

0:27:540:27:57

And you believe that

changing rules for the UK

0:27:570:28:00

would damage the single market?

0:28:000:28:02

That could be the case.

0:28:020:28:06

It could be, you know,

followed by other countries wanting

0:28:060:28:14

to go down the same lane,

if we allow this kind

0:28:160:28:19

of cherry picking.

0:28:190:28:20

But Denmark is keen on some

cherry picking of its own.

0:28:200:28:23

It's one of the world's biggest

exporters of fish but Danish

0:28:230:28:25

fishermen rely heavily on access

to UK waters.

0:28:250:28:27

They want that to

continue after Brexit.

0:28:270:28:30

This is definitely something

we have to negotiate.

0:28:300:28:32

I mean, that's what it's

all about, negotiating.

0:28:320:28:35

So will there be that give and take?

0:28:350:28:39

My point of departure

is that we have to reach out

0:28:390:28:41

for a balanced agreement.

0:28:410:28:43

Let's look at this idea

the transition deal.

0:28:430:28:47

The UK is hoping for that to be

confirmed at the EU's leaders summit

0:28:470:28:50

on Thursday and Friday.

0:28:500:28:51

You will be there.

0:28:510:28:53

Will it be a yes?

0:28:530:28:56

I will echo those who say

that we need to send a clear signal

0:28:560:29:00

about a transitional agreement

so that we can postpone

0:29:000:29:04

uncertainty until 2020.

0:29:040:29:09

That Brexit uncertainty

is disruptive for Denmark

0:29:090:29:11

and the rest of Europe

as well as the UK.

0:29:110:29:16

Whatever is decided at next week's

EU summit, months of tough

0:29:160:29:19

negotiations still lie ahead.

0:29:190:29:21

Katya Adler, BBC News, Copenhagen.

0:29:210:29:25

Football, and Arsenal have

been playing tonight

0:29:250:29:27

in the Europa League.

0:29:270:29:33

They have beaten AC Milan at the

Emirates I 3-1 to get to the

0:29:330:29:38

quarterfinals.

0:29:380:29:40

It's been a dark

winter in Islington.

0:29:400:29:42

Arsenal's league season went into

a tunnel and ended up in a hole.

0:29:420:29:45

But they found escapism in Europe.

0:29:450:29:47

Last week they beat AC Milan

2-0, a morale boost,

0:29:470:29:51

but also a mental test,

for in the second leg Milan

0:29:510:29:53

knew they could change

the mood in a moment.

0:29:530:29:55

Calhanoglu with a strike

to shake the try.

0:29:550:29:59

How were those nerves?

0:29:590:30:03

Well, how about this for a settler?

0:30:030:30:05

Not two minutes later

Danny Welbeck broke and fell.

0:30:050:30:07

A plea, a pause.

0:30:070:30:08

A penalty.

0:30:080:30:09

Back to Welbeck.

0:30:090:30:10

Pressure.

0:30:100:30:11

In a kick a stadium exhaled.

0:30:110:30:13

Arsenal aren't always suitable

for before the watershed.

0:30:130:30:18

Though always a chance of jump

scares courtesy of a desperate Milan

0:30:180:30:21

with nothing to lose.

0:30:210:30:26

Arsenal ensured they had

nothing to gain either.

0:30:260:30:28

Xhaka aimed for one corner

and somehow scored in the other.

0:30:280:30:31

Safety.

0:30:310:30:32

Then time for luxury.

0:30:320:30:33

They queued up for a

third, Welbeck got it.

0:30:330:30:35

A competition which was never

supposed to be a priority

0:30:350:30:38

for Arsenal has helped them regain

a little of their identity.

0:30:380:30:40

Patrick Gearey, BBC News.

0:30:400:30:42

Newsnight is coming up on BBC Two.

0:30:420:30:46

Here is an Ollie.

Tonight we talk to the excelled

0:30:460:30:51

Russian oligarch who believes blood

and Putin has lost control of the

0:30:510:30:56

Russian state. During the night on

BBC Two.

0:30:560:30:59