16/03/2018 BBC News at Ten


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16/03/2018

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Police launch a murder inquiry

after another Russian exile

0:00:060:00:08

is targeted in London.

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Nikolai Glushkov, a Russian

businessman, was found dead

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in his home on Monday,

it appears he was strangled.

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The police are keeping guard

outside his house tonight,

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they say there is nothing yet

to link his death to

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the attack on Sergei Skripal.

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With Mr Skripal and his daughter

still critical in hospital,

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the Foreign Secretary blames

Vladimir Putin for

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the nerve agent attack.

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Our quarrel is with Putin's Kremlin,

and with his decision -

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and we think it overwhelmingly

likely that it was his decision.

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The Kremlin retaliates by calling

Mr Johnson's comments

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shocking and unforgivable.

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Also tonight...

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The Iraqi teenager found guilty

of the Parsons Green tube bombing,

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who was on the government's

anti-radicalisation

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programme at the time.

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Thee African countries, home to most

of the continent's elephants,

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call for all ivory to be banned.

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They say even antique ivory should

be banned.

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More elephants are being killed

every year than are being born.

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It's still a big crisis

for Africa's elephants.

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And the three mile duel that

saw Native River win

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the Gold Cup at Cheltenham.

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Coming up on Sportsday on BBC News,

Liverpool and Manchester City

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will meet in the last eight

of the Champions League,

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the first all-English

quarterfinal since 2011.

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Good evening.

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Detectives from Scotland Yard

are treating as murder the death

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in London of a Russian

exile and businessman.

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Nikolai Glushkov, who was 68, was

found dead at his home on Monday.

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A postmortem concluded he'd suffered

compression of the neck,

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suggesting he'd been strangled.

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His death, just a week

after the poisoning of a former

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Russian spy and his daughter

in Salisbury, is being investigated

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by counter-terrorism police.

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They say there's no evidence

at the moment to link the two cases.

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Our home affairs correspondent

Tom Symonds has more.

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It was an ominous development,

given what has happened elsewhere.

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Monday night, a 68-year-old man

found dead, his body taken

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for a postmortem examination.

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Ominous because Nikolai Glushkov

was Russian, a political exile,

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number one on that country's list

of people it would like

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sent back to Russia.

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Not that his neighbours had much

idea of his background.

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I think he presented

as a normal Englishman.

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I didn't know he was Russian.

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It's horrible to be on your

doorstep, for one thing,

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About to happen to him, it must be a

horrible thing to have happened. The

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daughter must be terribly upset.

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All week, his house has been

the subject of a detailed search.

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The tents were for protecting

items of interest.

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The pathologist has concluded that

Nikolai Glushkov died as a result

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of compression of the neck,

suggesting strangulation,

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but detectives are clear

they are keeping an open mind.

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They'll be looking at all aspects

of his life, and of course his past.

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But the stakes for them are high,

not least because of the possible

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consequences for Britain's

relationship with Russia.

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In the 1990s, Glushkov was director

of Russia's state airline, Aeroflot,

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but in 1999 he was charged

with fraud and money-laundering.

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After five years in prison,

he fled to the UK and was

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given political asylum.

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Among his friends here

was the Russian billionaire

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Boris Berezovsky, a prominent critic

of Vladimir Putin, found dead

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in 2013 at his former

wife's Berkshire home.

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The coroner recorded an open

verdict, but Nikolai Glushkov

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was convinced that Berezovsky

and other Russian exiles

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had been murdered.

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This week, Glushkov was due

to appear in court in London.

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The Russian authorities

were continuing to pursue him

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for more than £100 million

of Aeroflot's money.

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Did his past make him a target?

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Russia's sternest critics have no

problem believing that.

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Mr Glushkov's death fits

into a wider pattern of the last 12

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years or so of Kremlin opponents

dropping dead across Europe.

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The consequences for the Kremlin of

this were limited for far too long.

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The UK response has recently been

much stronger but there's

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still an awful lot more

that we could do.

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But it's clear to take the strongest

possible action Britain will have

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to rely on the gathering

of solid evidence.

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So the world watches another complex

investigation unfolds.

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Tonight, we have spoken to Lord

Bell, the former advertising

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executive and PR executive. He has

told us he is a friend of Mr

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Glushkov, and he says he is

concerned that his friend's passed

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might have put him on the list of

people that Russia might suspect of

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working against his country. In

fact, we have got to the point where

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the police and security services are

reassessing their previous view that

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Russian exiles were at a low risk.

So much so, that the police are

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starting to contact some of those

Russian exiles to discuss their

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safety.

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Tom Symons, in south-west London.

Thank you.

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A direct attack by the the Foreign

Secretary on the Russian President

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has triggered a swift and angry

response in return.

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Boris Johnson says he believes it's

"overwhelmingly likely" that

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President Putin was personally

responsible for directing

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the use of a nerve agent

on the former spy Sergei Skripal

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and his daughter in Salisbury.

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The Kremlin has called his comments

shocking and unforgivable.

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Our diplomatic correspondent

James Landale's report contains

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some flashing images.

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Boris Johnson brought

the Polish Foreign Minister

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to a Battle of Britain Museum today,

a memorial to a war

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fought in the air.

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Every single plane that Britain

had, was up in the sky.

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And the Foreign Secretary used

the opportunity to push forward

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Britain's current battle with Russia

- fought this time over

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the airwaves, blaming Vladimir Putin

personally for the nerve agent

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attack in Salisbury.

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Our quarrel is with Putin's Kremlin,

and with his decision

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- and we think is overwhelmingly

likely that it was his decision -

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to direct the use of a nerve agent

on the streets of the UK,

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on the streets of Europe,

for the first time since

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the Second World War.

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That is why we are

at odds with Russia.

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Today, President Putin visited

a medical centre in St Petersburg

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ahead of Sunday's elections.

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His spokesman issued an angry

statement, accusing Mr Johnson

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of a shocking and unpardonable

breach of diplomatic etiquette.

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The Kremlin confirmed that

some British diplomats,

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based here at the embassy in Moscow,

would be expelled,

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an announcement officials said

could come at any moment.

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A response to the UK's decision

to expel 23 Russian intelligence

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officers who will leave London next

Tuesday.

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Once again, Russia's Foreign

Minister denied any involvement

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in the Salisbury attack.

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TRANSLATION:

I don't

really want to comment

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on the current situation any more.

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Let it stay on the conscience

of those who have started this

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shameless, groundless,

Russophobic game.

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And as for the undiplomatic language

or the Defence Secretary,

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Gavin Williamson?

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TRANSLATION:

He says Russia should

go away and shut up.

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Well, maybe he lacks education?

I don't know.

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Officials here at the Foreign Office

believe that the robustness

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of Britain's response and the unity

of the Western allies

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has surprised Russia,

and they say they are ready for any

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form of retaliation

coming from Moscow.

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As one source said, "We've got more

stuff in the locker."

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It's now almost two weeks

since the former Russian

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intelligence officer Sergei Skripal

and his daughter, Yulia,

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were poisoned with something

London's Russian ambassador named

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today as Novichok A234,

a delayed casualty nerve agent.

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Downing Street said officials

from the chemical weapons watchdog

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would come to Britain imminently

to start verifying the nerve agent.

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The investigation in Salisbury

focused on Mr Skripal's car,

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potentially containing clues

about how he and his

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daughter were poisoned.

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The police here were still

in their protective gear,

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still investigating,

still making the streets safe.

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James Landale, BBC News.

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An Iraqi teenager who smuggled

himself into Britain

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on a lorry to seek asylum has been

found guilty of the London

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tube bombing at Parson's Green.

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18-year-old Ahmed Hassan

left his bomb on a packed

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underground train during rush hour.

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The device only partially detonated,

but injured 50 people.

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It's emerged that Hassan

was on the government's

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de-radicalisation programme

"Prevent" while he was

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plotting the attack.

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The Government says

there are lessons to be

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learned from the case.

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June Kelly reports.

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Ahmed Hassan, buying batteries

and screwdrivers in Asda.

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Everyday items, but for

a violent extremist,

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part of his bomb-making kit.

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He's asked for ID.

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He may have looked young but Hassan

is said to be mature,

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highly intelligent and calculating.

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CCTV cameras captured his journey,

as the following morning he left

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home early with his bomb in a bag

and a murderous plan in his head.

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He was setting off to cause carnage

on the London Underground system.

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He made for a train and then,

a few stops down the District Line,

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he got off, empty-handed,

his bomb on a timer left behind.

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Just after the train pulled

into Parsons Green station,

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the bomb detonated, creating

a massive fireball which rolled

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down the carriage.

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Passengers were left burning

and screaming in pain.

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A gassy flare ran up

above my head, singed my hair.

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There was panic all

around me on the train.

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People were diving off the train.

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Fortunately the doors were open

so I managed to get off the train.

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My initial reaction was that there

was a fault on the train

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rather than a device.

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Hassan had strapped

shrapnel to the device -

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nuts, bolts, screws and knives -

to cause maximum death and injury.

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It was said to be pure luck that his

bomb only partially exploded.

0:10:340:10:38

This computer-generated

graphic shows the scene

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in the carriage after the attack.

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He had used the explosive TATP,

known as Mother of Satan.

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At Parsons Green, a major emergency

operation got under way.

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Terrified passengers

were taken off the train,

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injured commuters carried out

of the station.

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Meanwhile, the teenage bomber left

London and went on the run.

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The year before, he declared

it was his duty to hate Britain

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because his father had been killed

by coalition forces in Iraq.

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At the time of his attack

he was on the Government's

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de-radicalisation programme,

Prevent, aimed at turning people

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away from terrorism.

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He was very cunning and devious and,

on the face of it, Hassan

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was engaged on the programme,

but coming back to his devious

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nature, he kept it very secretive

in relation to what he was doing,

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what he was planning,

and nobody around him actually

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knew what his plot was.

0:11:320:11:38

Armed police!

0:11:380:11:40

24 hours on from the attack,

firearms officers were surrounding

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Hassan's house in Sunbury in Surrey.

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Inside were his petrified

elderly foster parents,

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Penny and Ron Jones.

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This was a couple who had received

MBEs from the Queen for fostering

0:11:490:11:52

hundreds of children.

0:11:520:11:55

Ahmed Hassan repaid them

for giving him a home by secretly

0:11:550:11:58

building a bomb in their kitchen.

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And it came out in court

that the teenager staying

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in their spare bedroom had told

immigration officials he had been

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kidnapped and trained to kill

by the Islamic State group.

0:12:060:12:11

It is understood the Joneses

were not given his full story.

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After the bombing,

Hassan headed for Dover.

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He was arrested as he tried to flee

the country which had given him

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a home and an education,

but for which he felt only hatred.

0:12:220:12:25

He will be sentenced next week.

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People are going to be wondering how

a young man who was on a programme

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designed to prevent getting involved

in terrorist activity was making a

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bomb while on the programme?

It is

an astonishing story. It was with an

0:12:400:12:46

elite immigration official interview

when he said he had been kidnapped

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and trained to kill by the Islamic

State group. A charity worker from

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Barnardos was sitting on that

interview and raise the alarm, not

0:12:520:12:54

immigration officials. That was a

failing. When orders were told by

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somebody from the Prevent

deradicalisation programme that

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there was no cause for concern and

they should look out for signs of

0:13:020:13:05

strange behaviour, such as him

hanging black flags in his room. At

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that stage, he was living in a

Barnardos home. It was decided he

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should go on the Prevent programme.

Surrey County Council, responsible

0:13:140:13:19

for his welfare at that point, we

are told that they did not involve a

0:13:190:13:24

specialist Home Office mentor to

oversee him on that programme. While

0:13:240:13:30

he was on that programme, he was

actually building his bomb. Surrey

0:13:300:13:34

County Council said they apologise,

they realise that there were

0:13:340:13:37

failings in the case and that

lessons have been learned. They also

0:13:370:13:40

apologised to his foster parents.

0:13:400:13:43

The father of a female engineering

student allegedly attacked

0:13:430:13:45

by a group of women in Nottingham

has called for justice

0:13:450:13:48

for his daughter.

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18-year-old Mariam Moustafa died

on Wednesday, nearly a month

0:13:490:13:51

after she was assaulted on a bus

in the city centre.

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The case has caused outrage in Egypt

where Mariam's family are from.

0:13:550:13:58

Nottinghamshire Police says

there is nothing to suggest

0:13:580:14:00

it was a hate crime,

though they are

0:14:000:14:04

keeping an open mind.

0:14:040:14:05

Sima Kotecha reports

from Nottingham.

0:14:050:14:08

18-year-old Mariam Moustafa, an

engineering student in Nottingham.

0:14:080:14:12

Her family are from Egypt and came

here for a better life.

0:14:120:14:17

Her sister and father

described her as loving,

0:14:170:14:19

cheerful and intelligent.

0:14:190:14:24

Mariam was always looking

at, looking forward

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to being in engineering.

0:14:260:14:28

She was a hard worker.

0:14:280:14:30

She always put all her effort

into being in engineering.

0:14:300:14:35

In February, as the teenager

was making her way to see her mother

0:14:350:14:38

and sister, she was attacked.

0:14:380:14:41

She caught a bus on this street

to try and get away from the girls.

0:14:410:14:44

However, they followed her.

0:14:440:14:45

Police say she was

punched several times.

0:14:450:14:47

She died on Wednesday.

0:14:470:14:51

This footage on social media shows

what happened on the bus.

0:14:510:14:56

You, move out my way.

You, move out of my way.

0:14:560:15:00

Yesterday, police said there was no

information to suggest

0:15:000:15:03

it was a hate crime,

but that they were

0:15:030:15:05

keeping an open mind.

0:15:050:15:07

However, today, they acknowledged

there had been a previous incident

0:15:070:15:10

involving Mariam and that the family

had expressed concern about it.

0:15:100:15:15

Officers said they were

reviewing that case.

0:15:150:15:19

Mariam was discharged

from hospital after the attack,

0:15:190:15:22

but then she fell ill

and was readmitted.

0:15:220:15:24

That's when she went into a coma.

0:15:240:15:27

The family gave us these pictures.

0:15:270:15:31

For me, I still can't

believe that she's gone.

0:15:310:15:34

I still feel like she's around me,

I feel like she's going to come

0:15:340:15:37

knocking on the door saying,

"Mallak, I'm here."

0:15:370:15:39

But that's not happening.

0:15:390:15:44

The Egyptian government,

as well as her family,

0:15:440:15:46

have called on the UK authorities

to bring those who did

0:15:460:15:51

this to justice quickly.

0:15:510:15:52

A 17-year-old girl was arrested

on suspicion of assault,

0:15:520:15:54

but has been released

on conditional bail.

0:15:540:15:59

In a tweet this afternoon,

the Foreign Secretary,

0:15:590:16:01

Boris Johnson, assured the Egyptian

authorities that Nottinghamshire

0:16:010:16:04

Police was investigating the case.

0:16:040:16:09

Sima Kotecha, BBC News, Nottingham.

0:16:090:16:15

As we heard earlier,

the Russian leader Vladimir Putin

0:16:150:16:17

was out on the campaign trail today,

ahead of the country's Presidential

0:16:170:16:20

election, on Sunday.

0:16:200:16:21

Mr Putin is hoping to win his

fourth term in office -

0:16:210:16:24

he's the clear favourite

in the opinion polls which show him

0:16:240:16:26

on nearly 70% of the vote -

his next nearest rival is on 7%.

0:16:260:16:32

So why is Mr Putin so popular?

0:16:320:16:33

Our Moscow correspondent,

Steve Rosenberg travelled

0:16:330:16:36

to Karabash in the Russian rust belt

to find out.

0:16:360:16:43

The West fears the Kremlin

is spreading disorder,

0:16:430:16:46

but at home many see Vladimir Putin

as a cog that keeps Russia moving.

0:16:460:16:54

This is Carol Karabash,

rust belt Russia.

0:16:540:17:02

This is Karabash, rust belt Russia.

0:17:020:17:03

Karabash overwhelms the senses,

from the smoke of copper

0:17:030:17:07

works to the biting cold.

0:17:070:17:08

Outside, it's 20 below.

0:17:080:17:09

Inside, the heat hits you.

0:17:090:17:11

This is Russian fire and fury.

0:17:110:17:16

Many here support Vladimir Putin,

not because he's forged a great

0:17:160:17:19

country, but at least one that feels

more stable than 1990s Russia

0:17:190:17:24

after the fall of communism.

0:17:240:17:30

"Stability will continue under

Putin", Sergei says.

0:17:300:17:35

"There is no one else

worth voting for".

0:17:350:17:39

And yet real incomes

in Russia are falling,

0:17:390:17:41

the economy stagnating.

0:17:410:17:45

So the government

appeals to patriotism.

0:17:450:17:48

It tells the people, "We are

a player on the world stageW.

0:17:480:17:54

It tells the people,

"We are a player on the world stage.

0:17:540:17:57

That's little comfort to Nina.

0:17:570:17:58

Her biggest concern is making it

home, because no one clears the ice

0:17:580:18:01

outside her apartment block.

0:18:010:18:04

Nina complains her heating

bills are getting bigger,

0:18:040:18:08

but she doesn't blame the Kremlin

and she doesn't want

0:18:080:18:10

a new president.

0:18:100:18:12

For the retired maths teacher,

it's a simple equation.

0:18:120:18:15

No change equals no risk.

0:18:150:18:21

"I'll vote for Putin", Nina says,

"so that life doesn't get any worse.

0:18:210:18:26

"As long as we have no war here,

that's what matters".

0:18:260:18:30

Under Vladimir Putin,

you see two very different Russias.

0:18:300:18:33

There is Russia, the military

and cyber superpower,

0:18:330:18:37

flexing its muscles

on the international stage.

0:18:370:18:40

And there is another Russia,

where more than 20 million people

0:18:400:18:43

live below the poverty line,

and where life is a daily struggle.

0:18:430:18:49

Tatiana can afford the basics,

like milk, but not much else.

0:18:490:18:55

Her pension is barely

enough to live on.

0:18:550:18:57

She has to borrow to get by.

0:18:570:19:02

When I visit Tatiana at home,

I meet her daughter, Natalia.

0:19:020:19:07

She has been unemployed for four

years, but she still has

0:19:070:19:10

faith in the Kremlin.

0:19:100:19:14

"I'm for Putin", Natalia says.

0:19:140:19:16

"At least Putin tries his best".

0:19:160:19:24

Many Russians fear change.

0:19:240:19:27

They worry that change can bring

greater instability.

0:19:270:19:30

And those in power

exploit that fear.

0:19:300:19:33

That benefits Vladimir Putin.

0:19:330:19:37

It allows the Kremlin to argue it's

safer to stick to the same path.

0:19:370:19:44

Steve Rosenberg, BBC News, Karabash.

0:19:440:19:52

A brief look at some

of the day's other news stories.

0:19:520:19:55

As many as 70,000 people have fled

two separate offensives

0:19:550:19:57

in Syria in recent days.

0:19:570:19:59

The UN estimates almost 50,000

people have left the northern town

0:19:590:20:01

of Afrin in the last few days,

while activists say 20,000

0:20:010:20:05

have escaped rebel-held

Eastern Ghouta, near Damascus.

0:20:050:20:11

Police in Miami are continuimg

to search under a collapsed

0:20:110:20:14

footbridge, 24 hours after it fell

onto an eight-lane motorway near

0:20:140:20:16

Florida International University.

0:20:160:20:19

At least six people

were killed, and nine injured.

0:20:190:20:21

The bridge was only

completed last Saturday.

0:20:210:20:29

Police in East Sussex are responding

to a report of a shooting at a

0:20:330:20:37

property in Saint Leonards. People

are advised to stay away and remain

0:20:370:20:42

indoors but the incident is not

thought to be terror related.

0:20:420:20:46

The former President

of South Africa, Jacob Zuma,

0:20:460:20:48

will face prosecution for 16

charges of corruption.

0:20:480:20:49

Mr Zuma denies the charges, which

relate to a multi-billion-pound arms

0:20:490:20:52

deal before he took office

and include counts of fraud

0:20:520:20:54

and money laundering.

0:20:540:20:56

Three African countries that

are home to the majority

0:20:560:20:58

of the continent's elephants have

signed a petition asking Britain

0:20:580:21:00

and the rest of the EU to ban

the legal trade in antique ivory.

0:21:000:21:04

At a wildlife summit in Botswana,

the country's president said

0:21:040:21:07

a complete trade ban would help

protect the remaining elephants.

0:21:070:21:10

He criticised Donald Trump for

lifting a ban on hunting trophies,

0:21:100:21:13

saying he was

"encouraging poaching".

0:21:130:21:17

Our Africa correspondent Alastair

Leithead reports from Botswana.

0:21:170:21:24

Botswana is the last sanctuary

for Africa's elephants.

0:21:240:21:28

Half of the animals left

on the continent live

0:21:280:21:31

here and on its borders.

0:21:310:21:34

But conservationists say

the continuing trade in tusks,

0:21:340:21:37

be it legal or illegal,

to feed the market for ivory

0:21:370:21:40

in China, means the elephants

are still seriously endangered.

0:21:400:21:45

Thousands of elephants

are still being killed

0:21:450:21:47

for their ivory across Africa every

year, leaving orphans,

0:21:470:21:49

like these guys.

0:21:490:21:52

Although the scale of the poaching

is down from what it was a few years

0:21:520:21:55

ago, more elephants are being killed

every year than are being born.

0:21:550:22:00

It's still a big crisis

for Africa's elephants.

0:22:000:22:03

We haven't passed the worst

of the poaching crisis.

0:22:030:22:05

I fear the worst is yet to come.

0:22:050:22:09

The political will to address these

issues, unfortunately is not there.

0:22:090:22:12

It has been in Botswana,

and if our neighbours can learn

0:22:120:22:15

from Botswana's example,

I feel that we can address

0:22:150:22:17

this poaching crisis.

0:22:170:22:24

This is one way to address

it, cracking down hard

0:22:240:22:26

on the poachers and traffickers.

0:22:260:22:28

A demonstration at the Giants Club

Summit shows how lessons learned

0:22:280:22:31

in counterterrorism are now

being used for anti-poaching.

0:22:310:22:35

Making sure animals are worth

more alive is important,

0:22:350:22:37

but many here think ending

trade is key.

0:22:370:22:43

This ivory ornament was bought

at auction in the UK as an antique,

0:22:430:22:46

and therefore legal to sell.

0:22:460:22:48

But radiocarbon dating proved

it was from an elephant

0:22:480:22:51

killed 13 years ago.

0:22:510:22:53

If the experts can't

tell, then how on earth

0:22:530:22:56

are the public supposed to know?

0:22:560:22:57

And I think the default setting

when you have that level

0:22:570:23:00

of uncertainty simply has to be,

"We can't afford to sell ivory".

0:23:000:23:05

That's why a global petition

is pushing for an EU and UK ban

0:23:050:23:08

of antique ivory sales,

now signed by three

0:23:080:23:10

African presidents.

0:23:100:23:14

Well, I think the way we are moving

now, when you look at the other

0:23:140:23:17

countries coming on board,

for example, like China.

0:23:170:23:19

I think they are setting a wonderful

example for others to follow,

0:23:190:23:22

whether it is the UK,

the European Union or anyone else

0:23:220:23:25

involved in the trade.

0:23:250:23:28

Banning the legal ivory trade

won't stop the illegal killing

0:23:280:23:31

and orphaning of elephants,

but it's another step towards making

0:23:310:23:33

ivory a less acceptable ornament.

0:23:330:23:37

Alistair Leithead,

BBC News, Botswana.

0:23:370:23:41

The first polar bear cub born

in Britain for a quarter

0:23:410:23:44

of a century has been

filmed for the first time

0:23:440:23:46

in the Scottish Highlands.

0:23:460:23:47

As you can see, mum and cub,

born in December, are doing well.

0:23:470:23:50

The footage was captured by remote

cameras for a Channel 4 documentary.

0:23:500:23:53

Highland Wildlife Park is yet

to find out if the cub is a boy

0:23:530:23:56

or a girl, but it's

already proving to be

0:23:560:23:59

a confident little

character, and very cute.

0:23:590:24:07

In a thrilling two-horse race duel,

Native River ridden by champion

0:24:070:24:09

jockey Richard Johnson has beaten

the favourite Might Bite to win

0:24:090:24:12

the Gold Cup at Cheltenham.

0:24:120:24:16

It's Johnson's second Gold Cup win,

0:24:160:24:18

and comes nearly two

decades after his first.

0:24:180:24:20

Andy Swiss was there

to see all the action.

0:24:200:24:24

# Life could be so sweet

on the sunny side of the street.#

0:24:240:24:29

In racing you need that bit

of optimism and with what seemed

0:24:290:24:32

like the most open of Gold Cups...

0:24:320:24:33

Any more bets?

0:24:330:24:35

Punters certainly required it.

0:24:350:24:38

So many factors,

not least the soggy,

0:24:380:24:40

stamina-sapping conditions.

0:24:400:24:42

But while there were 15

runners, this proved

0:24:420:24:44

the ultimate two-horse race.

0:24:440:24:47

In the white nose band Native River,

and next to him Might Bite.

0:24:470:24:50

The rest mere observers

as fence after fence,

0:24:500:24:54

furlong after furlong,

they slugged it out.

0:24:540:24:55

Going into the last,

they were seemingly inseparable...

0:24:550:25:00

Who will prevail up

the Cheltenham Hill?

0:25:000:25:01

Native River and Might Bite...

0:25:010:25:04

But on that final, gruelling

gradient it was Native River

0:25:040:25:07

who edged ahead, a remarkable duel

and a remarkable victory.

0:25:070:25:11

He wins the Gold Cup!

0:25:110:25:15

For jockey Richard Johnson,

a second Gold Cup win,

0:25:150:25:17

some 18 years after his first.

0:25:170:25:19

This was even sweeter.

0:25:190:25:22

I'm still a bit speechless now.

0:25:220:25:25

The first time I don't think

I realised how amazing

0:25:250:25:28

it was and how hard it is.

0:25:280:25:30

18 years later, you realise just

to get one of these horses to ride,

0:25:300:25:33

let alone to win the race,

is very difficult.

0:25:330:25:37

And delight too for Dorset

trainer Colin Tizzard -

0:25:370:25:39

once a dairy farmer and now part

of a Gold Cup-winning team thanks

0:25:390:25:43

to a horse seemingly

enjoying his big moment.

0:25:430:25:49

Well, the Gold Cup has seen some

dramatic duels over the years,

0:25:490:25:51

and this was right up there,

on a day when leading

0:25:510:25:55

from the start produced

the perfect finish.

0:25:550:25:58

Andy Swiss, BBC News, Cheltenham.

0:25:580:26:03

That's it.

0:26:030:26:04

Now on BBC One, it's time

for the news where you are.

0:26:040:26:25