19/03/2018 BBC News at Ten


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


19/03/2018

The latest national and international news, with reports from BBC correspondents worldwide.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 19/03/2018. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Tonight at Ten:

0:00:030:00:05

A big step on the road to Brexit,

as broad agreement is reached

0:00:050:00:09

on the UK's transition period.

0:00:090:00:12

Relief after a weekend

of intensive talks

0:00:120:00:15

as Britain sees opportunities ahead,

but the EU warns of major

0:00:150:00:17

issues yet to be resolved.

0:00:170:00:21

The deal we struck today,

on top of that agreed in December,

0:00:210:00:24

should give us confidence that

a good deal for the United Kingdom

0:00:240:00:28

and the European Union

is closer than ever before.

0:00:280:00:32

TRANSLATION:

A decisive step

remains a decisive step.

0:00:320:00:36

But we're not at

the end of the road.

0:00:360:00:43

No one in Westminster Bridge tends

this is the end, but in government

0:00:430:00:47

tonight, sighs of relief that the

Brexit talks have cleared this

0:00:470:00:50

hurdle.

0:00:500:00:52

We'll have more reaction.

0:00:530:00:54

We'll consider the unresolved

question of the Irish

0:00:540:00:56

border and the dismay

in Britain's fishing industry.

0:00:560:00:58

Also tonight:

0:00:580:00:59

Investigators widen their search

in the spy poisoning case,

0:00:590:01:01

as international chemical weapons

experts arrive in the UK.

0:01:010:01:06

The minicab service, Uber,

suspends all tests of self-driving

0:01:060:01:12

cars after a woman in Arizona

is killed in a collision.

0:01:120:01:16

Doctors take a major step

towards curing macular degeneration,

0:01:160:01:21

the most common form

of blindness in the UK.

0:01:210:01:24

And, following a suspected

drink-driving crash,

0:01:240:01:30

the ITV presenter, Ant McPartlin,

goes back into treatment and steps

0:01:300:01:32

down from his television work.

0:01:320:01:35

Coming up on sports day on BBC News,

Britain's Winter Paralympian 's have

0:01:380:01:44

returned home having reached their

pregames target of seven medals.

0:01:440:01:53

Good evening.

0:02:040:02:08

Britain and the European Union

have reached broad agreement

0:02:080:02:10

on a transition period after Brexit.

0:02:100:02:13

But there are still important

issues to be resolved.

0:02:130:02:18

In today's documents,

highlighted in green

0:02:180:02:19

is what's been agreed.

0:02:190:02:22

In yellow,

what's close to agreement.

0:02:220:02:25

And in white, the parts

still being negotiated.

0:02:250:02:30

Agreed so far is that

EU citizens arriving in the UK

0:02:300:02:33

before December 2020

will have the same rights

0:02:330:02:35

as those here now,

as will British citizens living

0:02:350:02:37

in the EU.

0:02:370:02:40

And the UK will be able

to negotiate new trade deals

0:02:400:02:44

during that transition period.

0:02:440:02:46

But not agreed is the key

issue of the border

0:02:460:02:50

between Northern Ireland

and the Republic,

0:02:500:02:51

as our Europe editor

Katya Adler reports.

0:02:510:02:57

In the quest to resolve

relations after Brexit,

0:02:570:02:59

today was a big moment

between the EU and UK.

0:02:590:03:03

A historic handshake to seal a deal,

not a final Brexit deal,

0:03:030:03:07

but the long-awaited agreement

on transition to ease

0:03:070:03:09

the UK from leaving the EU

to life on the outside.

0:03:090:03:17

The EU and UK's chief Brexit

negotiators were visibly relieved.

0:03:170:03:23

They'd been under big pressure

from business on both

0:03:230:03:25

sides of the Channel.

0:03:250:03:27

Businesses need not delay

investment decisions or rushed

0:03:270:03:32

through contingency plans based

on guesses about the future deal.

0:03:320:03:36

Instead, they now have certainty

about the terms that will apply

0:03:360:03:38

immediately after our withdrawal.

0:03:380:03:40

Certainty? Not quite.

0:03:400:03:45

An oft repeated phrase

in these Brexit negotiations is...

0:03:450:03:49

Nothing is agreed

until everything is agreed.

0:03:490:03:54

The transition deal is part

and parcel of the UK's complex wider

0:03:540:03:58

withdrawal agreement from the EU

as these slides show.

0:03:580:04:03

Areas highlighted in green

indicate where hard-fought

0:04:030:04:05

agreement has been reached.

0:04:050:04:08

But some of the most controversial

issues remain unresolved.

0:04:080:04:14

So, when it comes to the transition

deal, what exactly has been agreed?

0:04:140:04:19

It will be time limited,

lasting 21 months after Brexit day.

0:04:190:04:23

During that time, the UK will

continue to pay into the EU budget,

0:04:230:04:26

and will keep full access

to the European single

0:04:260:04:28

market and Customs union.

0:04:280:04:31

The UK will have to follow all EU

regulations, and though

0:04:310:04:35

it may voice concerns,

it will no longer be

0:04:350:04:37

at the decision-making table.

0:04:370:04:42

The UK will be allowed

to sign new trade deals,

0:04:420:04:44

but can't implement them

until the transition period is over.

0:04:440:04:48

What has not yet been

agreed is what happens

0:04:480:04:51

in Ireland after Brexit,

how to avoid a hard border

0:04:510:04:54

between Northern Ireland

and the Irish Republic.

0:04:540:04:59

This issue could bring

the whole Brexit deal,

0:04:590:05:00

including transition, tumbling down.

0:05:000:05:02

The UK hopes an ambitious EU and UK

trade deal will solve the problem.

0:05:020:05:09

But just in case, Ireland

and the rest of the EU insist

0:05:090:05:17

on a backstop agreement

where Northern Ireland stays

0:05:180:05:21

in the customs union

and parts of the single market.

0:05:210:05:24

Ireland's Deputy Prime Minister was

in Brussels today to press his case.

0:05:240:05:27

What Ireland has always asked

for was that we would essentially

0:05:270:05:30

have an insurance mechanism,

so that I and others can say

0:05:300:05:35

to people in Northern Ireland

and in Ireland, look,

0:05:350:05:38

we are not to have any border

infrastructure on this island again.

0:05:380:05:42

So, a lot done, but more to do

for the EU's Brexit chief.

0:05:420:05:46

Good news today?

0:05:460:05:48

As you see, spring has sprung

with the floor spreading even

0:05:480:05:52

to these often frosty

Brexit negotiations.

0:05:520:05:57

Progress on transition

today was hailed in there

0:05:570:05:59

as a big step forward,

but it's not all good

0:05:590:06:01

news for the government.

0:06:010:06:02

It's clear now, there won't be

a final trade deal between the EU

0:06:020:06:05

and UK at the end of

these Brexit talks.

0:06:050:06:07

The transition will be used

to hammer out more details.

0:06:070:06:10

And to get this far,

the UK has had to make some

0:06:100:06:13

pretty big concessions.

0:06:130:06:14

Like fishing.

0:06:140:06:17

Far from taking back

control after Brexit

0:06:170:06:19

as promised by the Gottman,

EU quotas will continue

0:06:190:06:21

during the transition period,

allowing EU countries to fish

0:06:210:06:23

in UK waters.

0:06:230:06:26

-- by the government.

0:06:260:06:29

But it's not all over yet.

0:06:290:06:33

EU leaders still need to sign off

on the transition deal.

0:06:330:06:38

They're expected to do that

at a summit here later this week.

0:06:380:06:41

Katya Adler BBC News, Brussels.

0:06:410:06:45

The Brexit secretary, David Davis,

said agreement on the transitional

0:06:450:06:48

arrangements would mean that British

business could now invest

0:06:480:06:51

with confidence and that the UK

would be free to negotiate

0:06:510:06:54

new trade deals.

0:06:540:06:55

Business groups have given

the agreement a broad welcome

0:06:550:06:57

but many have called for further

details on what the UK's

0:06:570:07:03

relationship with the EU will look

like, once the transitional period

0:07:030:07:06

ends, as our business editor

Simon Jack explains.

0:07:060:07:11

For businesses both big and small,

today's news was just

0:07:110:07:14

what the doctor ordered.

0:07:140:07:16

Although not a cure-all for business

anxiety as we head out

0:07:160:07:20

of the European Union,

it was welcomed today by the boss

0:07:200:07:22

of Glaxo Smith Kline

as a dose of common sense.

0:07:220:07:26

We certainly welcome this pragmatic

approach to transition.

0:07:260:07:30

It's absolutely critical to secure

the supply of medicines and vaccines

0:07:300:07:34

for the people here

and in Europe who need them.

0:07:340:07:37

But we're also looking

forward to more precision

0:07:370:07:38

on the details of the end state

of the relationship.

0:07:380:07:41

And in that end state,

if you like, what's the most

0:07:410:07:44

important thing for GSK?

0:07:440:07:46

That we get the security

of supply to the people that

0:07:460:07:50

need our medicines and our vaccines

is absolutely critical,

0:07:500:07:52

and the right kind of alignment

with the regulators.

0:07:520:07:55

Harmonising rules on drugs

between the UK and the EU

0:07:550:07:58

is critical to a company that

employs 16,000 people in the UK.

0:07:580:08:01

GSK is already spending £50 million

per year on its Brexit planning.

0:08:010:08:05

For business, this is a really

important, really welcome moment

0:08:050:08:09

in the whole Brexit process.

0:08:090:08:12

A little bit of breathing room to

prepare for life outside of the EU.

0:08:120:08:16

But as big businesses like banks

and pharmaceutical companies

0:08:160:08:19

are spending hundreds

of millions of pounds

0:08:190:08:23

on their contingency plans -

what could, what should,

0:08:230:08:25

and what are smaller businesses

doing to prepare?

0:08:250:08:33

Meet the boss of this

brewery in Suffolk.

0:08:340:08:35

And Charlie Adam,

who runs skateboard

0:08:350:08:36

company Shiner in Bristol.

0:08:360:08:44

For Charlie, exports

to the EU account for over

0:08:450:08:47

50% of his business.

0:08:470:08:48

Once outside the EU,

he fears customs paperwork

0:08:480:08:50

could cost him £25,000 per week.

0:08:500:08:51

He is glad of the extra

preparation time, but is still

0:08:510:08:54

worried about the future.

0:08:540:08:56

The transitional deal really helps

with us extending the time to be

0:08:560:08:59

able to set everything

up for Brexit.

0:08:590:09:00

The reality is, we still have

to deal with Brexit, and we don't

0:09:000:09:04

know what the final solution

is going to be, partly

0:09:040:09:06

because we don't know

what all of the problems are.

0:09:060:09:10

He also employs workers from the EU.

0:09:100:09:13

Any more that he hires

before the end of 2020

0:09:130:09:15

will definitely be allowed to stay.

0:09:150:09:20

Meanwhile, at the brewery,

Steve thinks transition is useful,

0:09:200:09:22

and gives him time to plan

for business beyond the EU.

0:09:220:09:26

I think it's a helpful

thing for us to have,

0:09:260:09:29

because it buys us a bit

of stability for a period of time

0:09:290:09:32

to work out what we need to do.

0:09:320:09:34

It also gives us the opportunity

to explore markets further

0:09:340:09:37

which are outside of the EU.

0:09:370:09:38

I think the whole business

is optimistic, because actually

0:09:380:09:41

we've got good products,

we've got some interesting

0:09:410:09:43

products, and actually

the world's there to be taken.

0:09:430:09:47

There are major

sticking points ahead.

0:09:470:09:52

Big questions remain unanswered.

0:09:520:09:55

But as the gruelling process

of Brexit rumbles on,

0:09:550:09:57

now the key milestone has been met.

0:09:570:09:59

And, for now, businesses

will drink to that.

0:09:590:10:01

Simon Jack, BBC News.

0:10:010:10:02

Let's speak to our political

editor Laura Kuenssberg,

0:10:020:10:04

who's at Westminster.

0:10:040:10:05

What's the level of compromise?

0:10:050:10:12

There certainly have been

compromises, whether you find it an

0:10:120:10:16

unacceptable climb-down, whether you

find them sensible concessions, or

0:10:160:10:20

inevitable compromises, it probably

depends on what you felt about

0:10:200:10:24

Brexit when you went to the polls

back in 2016. But there certainly

0:10:240:10:29

has been a lot of budging, a little

bit on the Brussels side.

0:10:290:10:35

Significant amounts in Westminster

over the recent months, but two

0:10:350:10:39

things are true. First off, looking

at what has been agreed today, the

0:10:390:10:43

fact that people who wanted to leave

the EU will have to wait two years

0:10:430:10:47

after Brexit day for there to be any

significant changes to immigration,

0:10:470:10:52

for the fact that some Tory MPs

furious tonight about what they see

0:10:520:10:58

as a compromise too far when it

comes to fishing rights. It is the

0:10:580:11:01

case that today feels different to

what was promised back in the days

0:11:010:11:05

of the referendum. But what is also

true is for the government these

0:11:050:11:11

compromises are worth it. In order

to get this deal moved onto next

0:11:110:11:14

phase, they work desperately keen in

recent months to get the transition

0:11:140:11:20

signed off, and they were clear,

having listened to businesses around

0:11:200:11:24

the country, they didn't want Brexit

next year to come as a sudden shock

0:11:240:11:29

to the system. Certainly, there have

been compromises, and certainly,

0:11:290:11:33

there will be probably many more on

the roads to this. But tonight, the

0:11:330:11:37

government believes they have

achieved a decisive step.

0:11:370:11:43

An international team

of chemical weapons experts has

0:11:430:11:46

arrived in Salisbury

to examine the nerve

0:11:460:11:50

agent used to poison

the former Russian spy,

0:11:500:11:52

Sergei Skripal, and

his daughter, Yulia.

0:11:520:11:54

The BBC understands

British investigators have

0:11:540:11:57

broadened their search to include

a car that Yulia Skripal

0:11:570:11:59

is believed to have travelled

in as our diplomatic correspondent

0:11:590:12:02

James Landale reports.

0:12:020:12:07

The focus today shifted

to the village of Durrington,

0:12:070:12:10

ten miles north of Salisbury,

where investigators removed a car

0:12:100:12:15

that was used to pick up

Yulia Skripal from the airport

0:12:150:12:18

the day before she and her father

Sergei were attacked

0:12:180:12:20

with a nerve agent.

0:12:200:12:24

Nearby, at the military research

complex at Porton Down,

0:12:240:12:27

inspectors from the global chemical

weapons watchdog, the OPCW,

0:12:270:12:30

were due to start analysing

the nerve agent that British experts

0:12:300:12:33

believe came from Russia.

0:12:330:12:39

In Brussels, the Foreign Secretary

and to brief EU counterparts,

0:12:390:12:41

saying Russian denials

were increasingly absurd.

0:12:410:12:46

This is a classic Russian strategy

of trying to conceal the needle

0:12:460:12:49

of truth in a haystack

of lies and obfuscation.

0:12:490:12:53

There is scarcely a country

round the table here in Brussels

0:12:530:12:58

that has not been affected in recent

years by some kind of malign

0:12:580:13:02

or disruptive Russian behaviour.

0:13:020:13:07

EU foreign ministers

issued a statement expressing

0:13:070:13:11

their unqualified solidarity

with the UK, and taking

0:13:110:13:19

its assessment that Russia

was to blame extremely seriously.

0:13:190:13:21

The EU and Nato speaking as one.

0:13:210:13:24

What is absolutely clear is our full

solidarity with the United Kingdom,

0:13:240:13:27

and our extreme concern

about what has happened.

0:13:270:13:29

It is really unacceptable.

0:13:290:13:30

All 29 Nato allies stand united.

0:13:300:13:34

We stand in solidarity

with the United Kingdom.

0:13:340:13:36

And the UK is not alone.

0:13:360:13:41

But in Moscow, as President Putin

began his fourth term,

0:13:410:13:43

the defiance continued.

0:13:430:13:48

His Foreign Ministry

dismissing the EU statement

0:13:480:13:50

as an anti-Russian reflex.

0:13:500:13:54

As for Russia's diplomats in London,

well, some of these officials

0:13:540:13:57

and their families will be heading

home tomorrow, 23 in all.

0:13:570:14:05

With a similar number of British

diplomats leaving Moscow shortly.

0:14:070:14:08

Tomorrow, the National Security

Council will meet to decide

0:14:080:14:11

Britain's next step.

0:14:110:14:12

There is a live debate

within government, should

0:14:120:14:14

they retaliate and escalate,

or simply do nothing?

0:14:140:14:16

Should they kick yet more Russian

diplomats out of the Embassy here,

0:14:160:14:19

or should they find new ways

of penalising Russia?

0:14:190:14:21

The risk for Britain is that

a bilateral confrontation

0:14:210:14:24

with Russia might overshadow

attempts to maintain

0:14:240:14:26

international pressure.

0:14:260:14:29

Back in Salisbury, the police

tonight revealed the full scale

0:14:290:14:33

of the investigation,

with 250 counterterrorism officers

0:14:330:14:37

examining 4,000 hours of CCTV, 800

exhibits and 400 witness statements.

0:14:370:14:39

Detectives said this

could last many months.

0:14:390:14:45

James Landale, BBC News.

0:14:450:14:51

One of the biggest inquiries

into the alleged abuse of teenage

0:14:510:14:55

recruits in the British

Army has collapsed

0:14:550:14:57

after a judge stopped the first

of three court martials.

0:14:570:15:00

It had been alleged

that 16 instructors,

0:15:000:15:04

all sergeants or corporals,

mistreated 28 school leavers

0:15:040:15:06

at the Army Foundation College

in Harrogate in North Yorkshire.

0:15:060:15:08

But the judge said a 3-year

investigation by the Royal Military

0:15:080:15:11

Police had been seriously flawed.

0:15:110:15:15

Uber, the minicab service,

has suspended all tests

0:15:150:15:17

of self-driving cars,

after a woman in Arizona

0:15:170:15:19

was killed in a collision.

0:15:190:15:20

At the time of the accident,

the vehicle was running

0:15:200:15:22

in autonomous mode,

with an 'operator' at the wheel.

0:15:220:15:24

Uber described what happened

as 'incredibly sad',

0:15:240:15:26

and said it was 'fully co-operating'

with local authorities.

0:15:260:15:28

Our technology correspondent

Dave Lee reports from San Francisco.

0:15:280:15:36

It was late Sunday night when,

according to police,

0:15:370:15:40

Elaine Herzberg was struck

by Uber's self-driving car.

0:15:400:15:44

The 49-year-old was crossing

the road, but not using

0:15:440:15:46

the pedestrian zone.

0:15:460:15:48

There was a driver behind the wheel,

but Uber said the vehicle

0:15:480:15:51

was in full autonomous mode,

meaning it was handling

0:15:510:15:53

all aspects of the driving.

0:15:530:15:59

Miss Herzberg was taken to hospital,

but died from her injuries.

0:15:590:16:02

Taking to Twitter,

Uber's Chief Executive,

0:16:020:16:03

Dara Khosrowshahi, said the news

from Arizona was "incredibly sad".

0:16:030:16:07

Adding...

0:16:070:16:10

As part of its licensing agreement,

Uber must keep detailed logs in case

0:16:140:16:17

of an incident like this.

0:16:170:16:19

Although Miss Herzberg is the first

pedestrian to be killed

0:16:190:16:21

by an autonomous vehicle,

her death comes one year

0:16:210:16:24

after Uber temporarily

took its self-driving cars off

0:16:240:16:26

the road following an accident

that left a Volvo SUV

0:16:260:16:28

on its side in Arizona.

0:16:280:16:32

The programme was later reinstated.

0:16:320:16:35

There are so many motor vehicle

deaths in the United States,

0:16:350:16:37

and generally every year.

0:16:370:16:41

And the ultimate goal

of self-driving cars

0:16:410:16:42

is to eliminate those entirely.

0:16:420:16:43

But these are complex systems that

are just sort of starting

0:16:430:16:46

to navigate the roads.

0:16:460:16:50

Arizona has positioned

itself as a testing ground

0:16:500:16:52

for this new technology.

0:16:520:16:53

But incidents like this will no

doubt concerned those who do not

0:16:530:16:56

believe these systems are yet safe

enough to be on our roads.

0:16:560:17:04

Experts in this technology will tell

you that the bigger picture is that

0:17:100:17:14

this technology is making our roads

safer and has the potential to

0:17:140:17:17

greatly reduce the number of

accidents, but that will be little

0:17:170:17:21

comfort to the family of a woman who

was essentially killed by a computer

0:17:210:17:25

that perhaps was not working in the

way it was designed.

Thank you. Our

0:17:250:17:32

technology correspondent there in

San Francisco.

0:17:320:17:35

Doctors have restored the sight

of two patients with the most common

0:17:350:17:39

form of blindness in the UK.

0:17:390:17:39

More than 600,000 people in the UK

suffer from age-related macular

0:17:390:17:42

degeneration and doctors hope

the treatment could be widely

0:17:420:17:44

available within a few years.

0:17:440:17:47

The team at Moorfields Eye Hospital

in London used surgery to insert

0:17:470:17:50

stem cells at the back of the eye.

0:17:500:17:52

Our medical correspondent

Fergus Walsh has the story.

0:17:520:18:00

I will occlude now the left-eyed...

0:18:030:18:07

Before his pioneering

stem cell treatment,

0:18:070:18:09

Douglas Waters was completely blind

in his right eye.

0:18:090:18:10

Now he can see.

0:18:100:18:11

"Everyone wanted to go outside

when the rain finally stopped."

0:18:110:18:15

That's perfect.

0:18:150:18:16

So this is an amazing

improvement, Mr Waters.

0:18:160:18:19

I just couldn't believe it.

0:18:190:18:22

Each morning, I picked things out

in the bedroom to look at

0:18:220:18:25

out in the garden.

I'd do this...

0:18:250:18:27

It's unbelievable.

0:18:270:18:30

I'm completely chuffed,

I suppose you could say!

0:18:300:18:32

And so is his surgeon.

0:18:320:18:34

Two patients with age-related

macular degeneration had the sight

0:18:340:18:37

restorming treatment

at Moorfields Eye

0:18:370:18:38

Hospital in London.

0:18:380:18:44

We're able to show that we've taken

someone who could not read at all,

0:18:440:18:47

they couldn't, in fact,

see the book they were reading from,

0:18:470:18:51

and taken them to reading around 60

to 80 words per minute

0:18:510:18:54

with their normal reading glasses.

0:18:540:18:56

For us, this is

a fantastic breakthrough.

0:18:560:18:59

And it could help other

patients with age-related

0:18:590:19:01

macular degeneration,

who can lose all

0:19:010:19:02

their central vision.

0:19:020:19:07

So what causes AMD?

0:19:070:19:09

So if we open the eye,

the macula is at the back.

0:19:090:19:12

It's the part of the retina

responsible for central vision.

0:19:120:19:16

If we pull out a section,

here are the light-sensitive cells,

0:19:160:19:19

the rods and cones.

0:19:190:19:23

AMD is triggered when a crucial

layer of support cells,

0:19:230:19:24

seen here in green, die.

0:19:240:19:29

As a result, patients gradually lose

the validity to read

0:19:290:19:31

or to recognise faces.

0:19:310:19:35

Scientists use stem cells

from a human embryo and turn them

0:19:350:19:38

into the support cells needed.

0:19:380:19:42

They were put onto a tiny patch

like this, which was placed

0:19:420:19:44

at the back of Douglas's eye.

0:19:440:19:47

You can see it here.

0:19:470:19:49

The stem cells were

paired his vision.

0:19:490:19:56

The stem cells repaired his vision.

0:19:560:19:58

Regenerative medicine's goal

was to restore a person's help.

0:19:580:20:00

I think this is one of the first

indications from generative medicine

0:20:000:20:03

that that can be achieved.

0:20:030:20:06

It can stop people from going blind.

0:20:060:20:10

Douglas, who is 86, says the stem

cell therapy has given him

0:20:100:20:12

renewed independence.

0:20:120:20:15

Moorfields says it should be no more

expensive than other AMD treatments,

0:20:150:20:18

and potentially could help

save the sight of

0:20:180:20:20

thousands of patients.

0:20:200:20:21

Fergus Walsh, BBC News.

0:20:210:20:29

The UK's Information Commissioner

Elizabeth Denham says

0:20:290:20:31

she will seek a warrant to look

at the databases and servers used

0:20:310:20:34

by the data mining company

Cambridge Analytica.

0:20:340:20:38

A former employee at the firm claims

they were handed the personal

0:20:380:20:41

data of 50 million Facebook users

which was then used to influence

0:20:410:20:43

the 2016 US Presidential election.

0:20:430:20:48

Facebook's shares finished nearly

seven percent down after a turbulent

0:20:480:20:51

day on the New York stock exchange.

0:20:510:20:52

Both Cambridge Analytica

and Facebook deny any wrongdoing.

0:20:520:21:00

The ITV presenter, Ant McPartlin,

says he will seek further treatment

0:21:050:21:07

after he was arrested on suspicion

of drink driving.

0:21:070:21:09

He was detained yesterday afternoon

following a collision involving

0:21:090:21:12

three cars in south west London.

0:21:120:21:13

ITV says his Saturday night

programme with partner

0:21:130:21:15

Declan Donnelly will not be

broadcast this weekend,

0:21:150:21:17

as our entertainment correspondent

Lizo Mzimba reports.

0:21:170:21:24

Moments after the Mini

he was driving was involved

0:21:240:21:26

in a collision with two

other cars, Ant McPartlin

0:21:260:21:29

at the scene of the crash.

0:21:290:21:32

When police arrived,

he was taken away under arrest

0:21:320:21:35

after failing a breath test.

0:21:350:21:37

A number of people were treated

for minor injuries, and a child

0:21:370:21:40

passenger in one car taken

to hospital for a

0:21:400:21:42

precautionary checkup.

0:21:420:21:45

I think it's time

for me to say hello...

0:21:450:21:48

The evening before, Ant McPartlin

had been presenting ITV's

0:21:480:21:50

Saturday Night Takeaway.

0:21:500:21:57

He returned to television last year

after going into rehab to treat an

0:21:570:22:02

addiction to alcohol and

prescription painkillers.

0:22:020:22:04

This afternoon,

the broadcaster said:

0:22:040:22:06

"ITV have taken a joint

session with Ant

0:22:060:22:07

and Dec's team not to broadcast

Saturday Night Takeaway

0:22:070:22:10

this weekend.

0:22:100:22:13

We will be reviewing options for the

last two episodes of the series

0:22:130:22:18

which would not feature Ant who is

taking time off to seek treatment.

0:22:180:22:22

Over more than 20 years.

0:22:220:22:25

Ant, together with Dec,

has become one of

0:22:250:22:27

TV's most successful presenters.

0:22:270:22:28

The pair have won dozens

of awards and earned

0:22:280:22:30

millions, thanks to their

popularity with viewers.

0:22:300:22:34

ITV said they hoped the presenter

would get the help he needs.

0:22:340:22:37

The police say enquiries

into the collision are continuing.

0:22:370:22:45

It is not just about a pretty big

hole in ITV's Saturday night

0:22:450:22:51

schedule, from Britain's got talent

through to I'm a celebrity, so much

0:22:510:22:56

of ITV's prime time entertainment is

built on the popularity of the

0:22:560:23:00

double act. Over the coming days and

weeks at ITV, they will be assessing

0:23:000:23:06

exactly what the long-term

probabilities will be for Ant's

0:23:060:23:11

long-term future. Thank you for the

update.

0:23:110:23:15

President Trump has

outlined plans to combat

0:23:150:23:17

America's opioid epidemic,

including introducing the death

0:23:170:23:19

penalty for drug dealers

in certain circumstances.

0:23:190:23:23

Over-prescription of

opioid painkillers,

0:23:230:23:24

such as morphine and codeine,

has created a nationwide

0:23:240:23:26

addiction crisis with

patients turning to heroin

0:23:260:23:28

and other street drugs

when their prescriptions stop.

0:23:280:23:30

Our North America editor

Jon Sopel reports.

0:23:300:23:38

During the election campaign,

Donald Trump called New Hampshire

0:23:410:23:43

a drug-infested den.

0:23:430:23:46

Today, he has gone back

to the Granite State

0:23:460:23:48

to show his rock solid determination

to deal with America's appalling

0:23:480:23:51

opioid crisis and by using the most

Draconian measures possible.

0:23:510:23:59

If we do not get tough on the drug

dealers, we're wasting our time.

0:24:030:24:07

Remember that, we are wasting our

time. That toughness includes the

0:24:070:24:12

death penalty.

APPLAUSE.

0:24:120:24:14

But it is not just about

the criminal justice system.

0:24:140:24:17

He wants opioid prescriptions cut

by a third and the drugs companies

0:24:170:24:20

held more accountable.

0:24:200:24:24

This crisis is hitting every

community, rich and poor, black and

0:24:240:24:29

white, young and old, urban and

rural. The biggest cause of death is

0:24:290:24:34

drug overdose amongst the under 50s

in America. And two thirds of those

0:24:340:24:40

deaths are caused by opioid abuse.

That is $110 right there.

0:24:400:24:46

America for decades has had

a war on drugs and, yes,

0:24:460:24:49

it has resulted in hundreds

of thousands of mainly black

0:24:490:24:51

and Latinos men being incarcerated,

but it has had zero success

0:24:510:24:54

in reducing dependency

or use of illegal drugs

0:24:540:24:56

or prescription drugs.

0:24:560:25:01

Thank you, please be seated.

0:25:010:25:05

This court in Buffalo,

New York State, looks unremarkable,

0:25:050:25:06

but has become the first in America

to deal with only one type

0:25:060:25:10

of case, opioid addiction.

0:25:100:25:13

I will release you today and I need

you to report here tomorrow...

0:25:130:25:18

The judge, himself once an addict,

is determined to rethink the way

0:25:180:25:20

America handles opioid abuse.

0:25:200:25:24

I think we made a tremendous mistake

in the 1960s and 70s and 80s and 90s

0:25:240:25:30

of locking people up and we are not

going to make that same mistake now,

0:25:300:25:34

because we have the research and

data to show that you cannot lock up

0:25:340:25:38

an addiction.

0:25:380:25:42

Carly Mayor had to be

resuscitated three times

0:25:420:25:44

in one week at the height

of her addiction to opioids.

0:25:440:25:47

When someone cares about you, what

your problems are, how we can help

0:25:470:25:51

you, it remind you that deep inside

there is a person, that needs and

0:25:510:25:56

deserves love.

0:25:560:25:58

Much has been made of how polarised

politics has become in the US.

0:25:580:26:01

On this, though, there is broad

agreement that simply locking

0:26:010:26:03

people up is not enough,

but finding the correct

0:26:030:26:05

policy prescription,

to deal with the abuse

0:26:050:26:07

of prescription drugs

is proving elusive.

0:26:070:26:08

Jon Sopel, BBC News, Washington.

0:26:080:26:15

It's three years since the start

of the war in Yemen.

0:26:150:26:18

Houthi rebels, supported by Iran

remain in control of large

0:26:180:26:20

parts of the country,

including the capital Sana'a.

0:26:200:26:24

Opposing them are forces loyal

to the former president,

0:26:240:26:26

who are being backed

by an Arab Coalition,

0:26:260:26:28

led by the Saudis supported

by western powers including the UK.

0:26:280:26:33

The BBC's chief international

correspondent Lyse Doucet has been

0:26:330:26:35

to Yemen to meet some

of the children affected

0:26:350:26:38

by the conflict.

0:26:380:26:39

Her report starts in the government

controlled town of Marib.

0:26:390:26:47

We travelled into Yemen

with the Saudis.

0:26:480:26:52

They wanted us to see the suffering

being inflicted by their enemy.

0:26:520:27:00

They took us to meet these boys,

robbed of their childhood,

0:27:020:27:05

forced to fight alongside grown men.

0:27:050:27:13

Children in Yemen are

recruited by all sides,

0:27:130:27:15

but especially the Houthis.

0:27:150:27:20

Pasha was 13 when his best friend

was shot dead in front of him.

0:27:200:27:28

So many children so young have been

dragged into this destructive war.

0:27:500:27:54

But even in war, there are rules.

0:27:540:27:57

And in Yemen, they're being broken

time and again by all sides.

0:27:570:28:04

These children live in Sana,

the capital controlled by Houthis.

0:28:040:28:08

Their families sought refuge

here after their home

0:28:080:28:10

was bombed by the Saudis.

0:28:100:28:13

Coalition air strikes have

reportedly caused the greatest

0:28:130:28:15

number of child casualties.

0:28:150:28:18

Six-year-old Lamees

wants them to stop.

0:28:180:28:26

There was no place to

hide for Yaya's family.

0:28:400:28:46

Five children killed,

only 17-year-old Yaya

0:28:520:28:54

and a brother left.

0:28:540:28:57

Back in government-held Marib,

these men will always live

0:29:080:29:10

with the cost of this conflict.

0:29:100:29:14

So often, it's the youngest

to lose the most.

0:29:140:29:20

These little boys are being fitted

with prosthetics at this

0:29:200:29:22

Saudi funded clinic.

0:29:220:29:25

11-year-old Abdullah mistook

a landmine for a toy.

0:29:250:29:32

Nine-year-old Ali Youssef

wants to be a goalkeeper

0:29:480:29:50

when he grows up, believing this

point hold him back.

0:29:500:29:58

when he grows up, believing this

won't hold him back.

0:30:000:30:02

Yemen's conflict has

had a crippling effect

0:30:020:30:04

on all its people.

0:30:040:30:05

The youngest growing up

knowing nothing but war.

0:30:050:30:07

Lyse Doucet, BBC News, Yemen.

0:30:070:30:10

Britain's Paralympic

team arrived home today

0:30:110:30:13

after their most successful winter

games.

0:30:130:30:14

Menna Fitzpatrick and her guide

Jen Kehoe became Britain's most

0:30:140:30:16

decorated winter Paralympians

with 1 gold, 2 silver

0:30:160:30:18

and a bronze in South Korea.

0:30:180:30:20

Our sports correspondent

Andy Swiss reports.

0:30:200:30:28

CHEERING AND APPLAUSE.

0:30:340:30:36

They left as hopefuls, they have

returned as history makers.

0:30:360:30:39

Jen Kehoe, Menna Fitzpatrick,

plus extra luggage.

0:30:390:30:41

Four medals including the best

they saved until last.

0:30:410:30:45

Fitzpatrick, who has

less than 5% vision,

0:30:450:30:46

following her guide to gold

in the slalom, now Britain's

0:30:460:30:50

most decorated winter

Paralympians, they told me

0:30:500:30:52

it is barely sinking in.

0:30:520:30:56

It means everything to me.

0:30:560:30:57

I have always had a dream

since I was little,

0:30:570:30:59

to come away with a medal

in the Paralympic games.

0:30:590:31:03

And 2018 was always that goal,

ever since I first started.

0:31:030:31:07

So, I am immensely

proud to have done it.

0:31:070:31:12

Hopefully it will inspire others

to go out there and do the same

0:31:120:31:15

and get out and try something,

you never know where

0:31:150:31:17

it is going to lead.

0:31:170:31:23

This is a simulation

of what Fitzpatrick sees

0:31:230:31:25

when she is skiing.

0:31:250:31:27

Following her guide's bright orange

bib at up to 70 miles an hour.

0:31:270:31:31

For her parents, who first

took her skiing when she was five,

0:31:310:31:34

how things have changed.

0:31:340:31:36

She used to follow me

down the slope, wearing

0:31:360:31:38

a bright orange coat.

0:31:380:31:40

She described it as following

an orange blob down the slope.

0:31:400:31:43

She used to shout at me to wait

for her and now I am having to shout

0:31:430:31:47

to her to wait for me.

0:31:470:31:48

We are as proud as punch, aren't we,

we are proud as punch.

0:31:480:31:51

Yeah.

0:31:510:31:52

Absolutely.

0:31:520:31:53

We haven't stopped smiling all week!

0:31:530:31:55

And the pair are already

targeting the next games.

0:31:550:31:57

For now, though, they say they will

celebrate with a cup of tea.

0:31:570:32:00

Andy Swiss, BBC News, Heathrow.

0:32:000:32:07

Newsnight's about to begin over

on BBC Two in a few moments.

0:32:070:32:32