21/03/2018 BBC News at Ten


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21/03/2018

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Tonight at Ten: Another plunge

in relations between Britain

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and Russia, as Boris Johnson

compares President Putin

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to Adolf Hitler.

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In Moscow, foreign diplomats

are summoned to hear an official

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denial of any involvement

in the chemical attack

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which happened in Salisbury.

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During the day, as inspectors

continued their investigation

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in the Salisbury area,

the Foreign Secretary suggested that

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Russia would use the forthcoming

World Cup like Adolf Hitler had used

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the Olympics in 1936.

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What is going to happen in Moscow,

in the World Cup, in all the venues,

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yes, I think the comparison

with 1936 is certainly right.

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We'll have reaction from Moscow

and from Washington,

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where President Trump has

congratulated Mr Putin

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on his re-election.

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Also tonight:

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More than a million NHS workers

in England are set to get pay

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rises worth at least 6.5%

over three years.

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It's nice for us to be recognised

for all that hard work.

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But, obviously, it doesn't detract

away from the last few

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years, where we actually

haven't had anything.

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Mark Zuckerberg has admitted that

Facebook made mistakes

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in mishandling data belonging

to some 50 million of its users.

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A senior police officer says

the rise in people killed

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and injured by knife crime should be

causing far more public concern.

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And a family from Bristol

is set a challenge -

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to see if they can live

without single-use

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plastic for ten days.

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Coming up on BBC News.

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Fresh from his first tournament

victory in 18 months,

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Rory McIlroy struggles in his first

match since at the World

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Matchplay in Texas.

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Good evening.

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The tensions between Britain

and Russia have deepened

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following Boris Johnson's latest

reflections on the chemical

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attack in Salisbury,

when a former Russian spy

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and his daughter were poisoned.

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The Foreign Secretary -

answering questions

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from a parliamentary committee -

drew parallels between

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President Putin and Adolf Hitler,

and suggested that Mr Putin

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would try to use the forthcoming

football World Cup in Russia in much

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the same way that Adolf Hitler used

the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin.

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Moscow said that Mr Johnson was

"poisoned with hatred and malice."

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Our Moscow correspondent,

Steve Rosenberg, has more details.

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It was an invitation

that some had refused.

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REPORTER:

Ambassador, why

are you taking part in this meeting?

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But these foreign diplomats had

accepted, to come and hear

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Moscow's side of the story

on the nerve agent attack.

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Britain sent a diplomat

to the Foreign Ministry,

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but the British Ambassador stayed

away.

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This is what he missed.

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TRANSLATION:

The British authorities

are either unable to ensure

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protection from such a terrorist

act on their territory

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or they themselves,

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directly or indirectly,

I'm not accusing anyone,

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have directed this attack

against a Russian citizen.

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Hello my name is Emma Nottingham,

I'm from the British Embassy.

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Off camera, the British

diplomat hits back.

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Sergei Skripal and his daughter

Yulia were poisoned with a military

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grade Novichok nerve agent of a type

developed by Russia,

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in what we see as an attempted

assassination attempt.

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"What's going on in their

heads", he replies.

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"Take a break from your Russophobia

and your island mentality."

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ARCHIVE:

Berlin's great day

dawns with the arrival

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of the Olympic Flame...

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In Britain, a Labour MP suggested

that Vladimir Putin would use

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the World Cup like Adolf Hitler had

used the 1936 Olympics -

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to cover up, as he put it,

a brutal, corrupt regime.

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The Foreign Secretary agreed.

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I think the comparison with 1936

is certainly right and I think it's

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an emetic prospect, frankly,

to think of Putin glorying

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in this sporting event.

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Tonight, Moscow reacted to

Boris Johnson's comments with fury.

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The Russian Foreign Ministry said

the Foreign Secretary was "poisoned

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with hatred and malice,

incompetence and loutishness."

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Meanwhile, Russia's

propaganda machine tries

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to discredit Sergei Skripal.

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We witnessed this bizarre webcast,

where two convicted murderers

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claimed to be ex-cellmates

of the former double agent.

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On air they accused him of drug

addiction, even paedophilia.

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But after the show, one of them

admits to me he saw nothing.

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"It was just empty gossip."

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The poisoning in Salisbury has

spawned an information war,

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one Moscow is determined to win.

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Steve Rosenberg, BBC News, Moscow.

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In a moment we'll speak

to our North America editor,

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Jon Sopel, but first

to our diplomatic

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correspondent, James Landale,

at the Foreign Office.

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James, what is your reading of

relations between London and Moscow

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right now?

Well, Huw, in recent days

there have been Harare shall words

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between Russian and British

politicians. Comparing Vladimir

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Putin to Adolf Hitler probably tops

the list. To realise just how

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incendiary the comparison is you

have to remember millions upon

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millions of Russians died fighting

Adolf Hitler's Nazis. Now the

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Foreign Office here has been keen to

keep this an international

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confrontation, they have been

marshalling allies against what they

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see as Russia's international

pattern of aggressive material. That

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is why the British Government hasn't

retaliated against Russia's decision

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to expel 23 British diplomats. They

want to keep it from being seen as

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some kind of bilateral spat between

London and Moscow. The problem, is

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Mr Johnson's remarks risk doing

exactly that. Tomorrow, when Theresa

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May goes to Brussels, she will have

just a little bit more work to do to

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reassure European allies who might

be feeling a bit fearful now of

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getting caught up in an increasingly

diplomatic cross fire between London

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and Moscow.

James many thanks, James

Landale at the Foreign Office for

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us. Straight to Washington and Jon

Sopel is there. Jon, is it fair to

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say the signals from The White House

towards Moscow are slightly conle

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conning?

If I was allowed to scratch

my head on the Ten O'Clock News I

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would. Frankly, it's bewildering the

mixed messages we are getting.

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Donald Trump in the past couple

hoursals tweeted -- hours has

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tweeted. Forget the fake news media

we know as a result of a leak from

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The White House that his own

briefing document counselling

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against congratulating Putin put

because there are questions marks

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over whether it was a free and fair

election. Many Republicans are

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furious with the President over

this. But then the President had a

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conversation with Emmanuel Macron

today. This is the official readout

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from the White House, "the President

reiterated their solidarity with the

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United Kingdom in the wake of

Russia's use of chemical weapons

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against private citizens on British

soil and agreed on the need to take

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action to hold Russia accountable."

One interpretation is that you have

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Donald Trump looking both ways in

regard to Russia policy. The other

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way of looking at it is that he's

not critical of Vladimir Putin at

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all.

Jon, many thanks again. Jon

Sopel, our North America editor

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there in Washington.

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More than a million NHS workers

in England can expect pay rises

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if they agree to a deal agreed

between most trades unions

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and the Government.

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The past five years have seen a pay

cap and a pay freeze.

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The deal would see wages increase

between 6.5% and 29% over the next

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three years with the exception

of doctors, dentists

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and senior leaders.

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The biggest rises would go to those

on the lowest end of the scale -

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cleaners, porters and catering staff

- who will see an immediate

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£2,000 added to their pay

packets this year.

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The salary increases are expected

to cost around £4 billion,

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but won't come out of the NHS

budget, they will come

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from Treasury funds.

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Our political editor,

Laura Kuenssberg, has more details.

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Porters, paramedics, nurses,

who care for millions of patients.

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The staff who keep the NHS going are

finally to have a bigger pay rise.

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It's nice for us to be recognised

for all that hard work.

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But obviously, it doesn't detract

away from the last few

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years, where we actually

haven't had anything.

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Most of us live on a strict budget.

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That can ease off a bit

and the future will look

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better and brighter.

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I have two young children,

so having this pay rise will help

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out even more with childcare,

things like that.

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I'll be able to do more things.

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Scrap the cap!

Scrap the cap!

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For five years, there have been

calls to do just that.

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Aside from some automatic rises,

the limit on public-sector

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pay increases, of 1%,

meant wages fell behind.

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THE SPEAKER:

The Secretary of State

for Health and Social Care,

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Secretary Jeremy Hunt.

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And the election left the Tories

in no doubt about the irritation.

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So...

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Today's agreement on a new pay deal

reflects public appreciation

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for just how much they have done

and continue to do.

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Rarely has a pay raise been

so well-deserved for NHS staff,

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who have never worked harder.

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When a nurse pleaded

with the Prime Minister for a pay

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rise on national television,

she was told there was

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no magic money tree.

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So, can he tell us how this pay

rise will be paid for?

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Has the Prime Minister's

horticultural skills grown

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said magic money tree?

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Taxpayers' money for the rises

will come from the Treasury to start

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with, not out of existing health

budgets, so the big

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unions are on board.

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It's not solved the problems,

it's a start, and we would expect it

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to be the start of a new process

that recognises the hard work

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of our nurses and our people

who work in our health service,

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that recognises the value

and that we value those

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people for what we do.

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But staff still have

to approve the deal.

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And with inflation, it might not

make up the difference.

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I think the devil is in the detail,

and our members that met

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yesterday were absolutely

going through the details

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and couldn't see how this

was going to claw back years

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of pay cuts.

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Perhaps for NHS staff in England,

these rises can't come fast enough.

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Remember, limits on pay have been

in place for years -

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part of the Conservatives' efforts

to balance the nation's books.

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But public money

will still be tight.

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This is an easing of

a squeeze, not the end.

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Scotland and Wales are likely

to follow the Westminster move,

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and it adds volume to calls

for rises in other parts

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of the public sector.

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Money round here's still tight,

but the cap no longer fits.

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Laura Kuenssberg, BBC

News, Westminster.

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Facebook has admitted making

mistakes in midhandling data

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belonging to some 50 million

of its users.

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Chief executive Mark Zuckerberg,

in his first response

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to the controversy over the use

of data, has promised tougher steps

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to prevent what he called "bad

actors" from getting access

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to people's private information.

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Facebook, the world's biggest

social media network,

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is facing growing pressure in Europe

and the United States

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about allegations that a British

firm, Cambridge Analytica,

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accessed users' information

for political purposes,

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notably to help Donald Trump's

presidential campaign.

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Our business editor,

Simon Jack, has the latest.

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Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg

broke his silence tonight

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on a scandal that has engulfed

the social media giant.

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In a Facebook post, he said

the company had a responsibility

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to protect your data and admitted

the company had made mistakes.

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He described how a British academic

had invented an app inviting

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Facebook users to do

a personality test.

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300,000 people downloaded it,

it collected personal

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information on them and also

all of their Facebook friends,

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harvesting data on 50 million users.

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That data was obtained

by a British consultancy,

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Cambridge Analytica,

in 2014 - a move Zuckerberg

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described tonight as "a breach

of trust" - and it was later

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allegedly used in the Trump

election campaign.

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A campaign the company's executive

took a lot of credit

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for when secretly filmed,

an apparent shock to

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the original app designer.

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Never in our wildest dreams did

we think anything we did would be

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used in the Donald Trump campaign.

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This is 2014, well before anybody

would think Mr Trump would be

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a serious candidate.

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So, at the time, like, I didn't know

who their clients were going to be,

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I didn't really know

the specific use case.

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I did know it was going to be used

for political purposes,

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but beyond that, you know,

it was well above my pay grade.

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Should have asked!

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Could this small consultancy

really have altered

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the course of US history?

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Unlikely, says a man who worked

on Barack Obama's 2008 election.

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Data can be misused to increase

divisions and stoke fears

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as they themselves have said,

and that is why it needs to be

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regulated more carefully,

and ethical behaviour needs

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to be enforced.

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But elections are decided by a whole

range of factors and I think

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Cambridge Analytica over

claimed their impact.

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Zuckerberg says Facebook

will conduct a full audit of apps

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with suspicious activity,

ban apps that break the rules

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or refuse to be audited and make it

harder for developers to access data

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in the future.

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Perhaps the biggest change

will be our awareness of what we're

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agreeing to when we hit "I agree."

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The conversation we should be having

is, what happens to our data?

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How much are we

comfortable to share?

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Who are we comfortable

to share it with?

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And what do we think

about how that's done?

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So this feels like it's been

a real light bulb moment,

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where people are understanding that

it's not just clicking "like"

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on Facebook, what you are doing

there is giving data away.

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Facebook's value has fallen

by $50 billion since Monday,

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and today's announcement didn't

see that reverse.

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Evidence, perhaps, of lasting

damage on Facebook's brand

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and its users' trust.

0:14:540:14:55

Simon Jack, BBC News.

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In a moment, we'll be speaking

to our economics editor,

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Kamal Ahmed, who's in Brussels

to talk about the tax that big

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technology companies pay.

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But first our media editor,

Amol Rajan, is at Facebook

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headquarters in California.

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What do you make of the response we

got from Facebook this evening?

It

0:15:170:15:23

was long overdue. In fairness to

Mark Zuckerberg, his reputation has

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taken a hammering over the last few

days when he remained silent. I have

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been tough on him. Today he

announced substantial changes like

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the restriction on data for apt

development and the fact it will be

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easier for users to work out what

data will be vulnerable. Those are

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significant changes. I spoke to

Chris Cox, the chief product officer

0:15:460:15:50

he said he was clear there had been

a big breach of trust. What Mark

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Zuckerberg said in his blog post had

three audiences. There was a staff

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audience, they look to Mark

Zuckerberg as a deity and they are

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reassured. Over the Atlantic,

questions are any beginning to be

0:16:060:16:11

answered. Then there is the public.

The public at large feel that the

0:16:110:16:15

reputation of Facebook for safety

with personal data has taken a

0:16:150:16:18

hammering and it will take more than

a blog post to fix that.

0:16:180:16:25

Let's go now to Brussels. On the

theme of these big companies under

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pressure, there is another dimension

to this tonight.

Absolutely.

0:16:310:16:38

Controversy is for big, digital,

global giants like Facebook and

0:16:380:16:42

Google are not just about data, the

other big issue is tax. Today the

0:16:420:16:47

European Commission here in Brussels

announced really radical plans to

0:16:470:16:52

make these big, digital companies

that operate around the world and

0:16:520:16:56

here in Europe, of course, pay more

tax. They want them to pay tax the

0:16:560:17:01

amount of users they have, the

amount of revenues they gain. The

0:17:010:17:08

claim is, under these proposals,

they could be paid up to £4 billion

0:17:080:17:11

more tax across Europe and a chunk

of that could come to Britain.

0:17:110:17:15

Traditional businesses effective tax

rate is about 23% with digital

0:17:150:17:20

businesses effective tax rate is

9.5%. That is the issue the European

0:17:200:17:25

Commission wants to solve. Will it

happen? The commission I spoke to

0:17:250:17:31

today said he wanted agreement by

the end of the year and the UK will

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be ably participant. The Treasury

has said it wants to go down this

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route. This is the big test. On data

we have heard what governments and

0:17:410:17:46

regulators want and contacts we have

heard what governments and

0:17:460:17:51

regulators want to do. The question

now, by the end of the year, will

0:17:510:17:56

anything really of substance change?

Many thanks.

0:17:560:18:02

A brief look at some

of the day's other news stories.

0:18:020:18:05

More than 30 people have been killed

in a suicide bomb attack

0:18:050:18:07

in the Afghan capital,

Kabul.

0:18:070:18:09

At least 65 others were injured.

0:18:090:18:10

The blast happened as crowds

were leaving a shrine.

0:18:100:18:12

A man charged with a series

of bombings in Austin,

0:18:120:18:15

Texas has died after blowing

himself up in his car

0:18:150:18:17

following a police chase.

0:18:170:18:19

He's been named as

23-year-old Mark Conditt.

0:18:190:18:23

Two people were killed in six parcel

bomb attacks during the past month.

0:18:230:18:29

More than 100 Nigerian schoolgirls

abducted by Islamist

0:18:290:18:31

militants last month in the town

of Dapchi have been freed.

0:18:310:18:35

Five girls are said to have died

in captivity and another,

0:18:350:18:38

the only Christian in the group,

has not been released.

0:18:380:18:42

The Government denies paying

Boko Haram a ransom.

0:18:420:18:47

The Archbishop of Canterbury has

told an inquiry into child abuse

0:18:470:18:50

that he is ashamed of the Church

of England's handling of the issue.

0:18:500:18:52

Justin Welby said listening

to three weeks of evidence

0:18:520:18:55

about abuse in the Church had

left him horrified.

0:18:550:18:57

The inquiry is looking

at abuse that took place

0:18:570:18:59

in the diocese of Chichester.

0:18:590:19:04

A senior police officer has told BBC

News that the rise in people killed

0:19:040:19:08

and injured by knife crime should be

causing far more public concern.

0:19:080:19:12

He says that because many

victims are black,

0:19:120:19:15

not enough is being done

to prevent it.

0:19:150:19:18

This year, there have been 26 fatal

stabbings in London.

0:19:180:19:20

The BBC has also seen new figures

from the NHS showing a significant

0:19:200:19:24

increase in those being treated

in hospital for stabbing injuries.

0:19:240:19:29

Our special correspondent

Lucy Manning has the story.

0:19:290:19:33

Seven days, six murders,

all by knives.

0:19:330:19:36

Police in East London

investigate another last night.

0:19:360:19:40

Knives now being used too

often, killing too many.

0:19:400:19:45

Just a few miles away,

this bedroom was full of life,

0:19:450:19:49

but that life is gone.

0:19:490:19:52

They are parents who lost

their son last month.

0:19:520:19:55

Now it's empty.

0:19:550:20:00

Nothing is here.

0:20:000:20:05

He died for nothing.

0:20:050:20:11

When I come into this room,

Hasan's smell comes in my nose.

0:20:110:20:15

Everywhere, it has that smell.

0:20:150:20:18

Hasan's mother, Amina,

can now only stroke his picture.

0:20:180:20:22

Everyone is lost too much, Hasan.

0:20:220:20:24

A lot of people loved him.

0:20:240:20:25

He was handsome.

0:20:250:20:26

He was very honest.

0:20:260:20:28

And he was 19 years old.

0:20:280:20:30

He had a plan for the future.

0:20:300:20:32

Hasan was a student,

studying Criminology,

0:20:320:20:33

when he was stabbed.

0:20:330:20:37

It's two minutes that

changed Hasan's life,

0:20:370:20:39

my life, my family's life.

0:20:390:20:42

Police!

0:20:420:20:46

Stay where you are!

0:20:460:20:47

Police!

0:20:470:20:49

5am, West London, police

burst through the doors.

0:20:490:20:51

Officers are stepping up trying

to stop knives being used,

0:20:510:20:55

but admit they haven't been able

to stop knife crime rising.

0:20:550:20:59

Knuckle-dusters and drugs

are removed from the house

0:20:590:21:01

and a sword is recovered.

0:21:010:21:05

There has been a significant

increase of knife crime and that's

0:21:050:21:08

what we are tackling and have been

tackling over the last year or so.

0:21:080:21:13

So it's gone up, and I think we

should all be concerned about that.

0:21:130:21:16

26 people murdered by knives

in London so far this year,

0:21:160:21:20

including six teenagers,

prompting this frank admission.

0:21:200:21:25

I do fear sometimes that

because the majority of those that

0:21:250:21:29

are injured or killed are coming

from certain communities -

0:21:290:21:34

and very often, the black

communities in London -

0:21:340:21:37

it doesn't get the sense

of collective outrage that it ought

0:21:370:21:40

to do and really get everyone

to a place where we all are doing

0:21:400:21:44

everything we can to prevent

this from happening.

0:21:440:21:48

The BBC's obtained the latest

provisional NHS figures for England,

0:21:480:21:51

showing more than 4,000 stabbing

victims treated in the ten months

0:21:510:21:55

until the end of January this year.

0:21:550:21:58

That's 520 more people and a 14%

increase on the same

0:21:580:22:01

period the year before.

0:22:010:22:04

London hospitals like Barts,

Imperial and King's College

0:22:040:22:06

treated the most.

0:22:060:22:09

213 were treated in Birmingham, 181

in Manchester and 133 in Liverpool.

0:22:090:22:16

What would you like to see

the police and the Government doing

0:22:160:22:19

to stop so much knife crime?

0:22:190:22:23

They're not doing good enough.

0:22:230:22:25

This is a serious problem, honestly.

0:22:250:22:27

There's a lot of people that

are dying that's 17 years old,

0:22:270:22:30

18 years old, 20 years old.

0:22:300:22:32

They're dying for nothing.

0:22:320:22:35

After the stabbings,

the flowers, but they don't

0:22:350:22:37

last, and everyone -

but the families - move on.

0:22:370:22:40

I don't want anyone

else hurt any more.

0:22:400:22:43

I don't want...

0:22:430:22:45

any mothers and fathers

crying any more.

0:22:450:22:49

Lucy Manning, BBC News.

0:22:490:22:57

It is six months since Hurricane

Maria devastated Puerto Rico. Aid

0:22:580:23:04

agencies say life for many of the

residents remains a day-to-day

0:23:040:23:08

struggle. Many of them I get to have

their electricity reconnected. Our

0:23:080:23:13

correspondent reports from the

central town for that there is

0:23:130:23:17

resentment towards the US government

for what is seen by many Puerto Rico

0:23:170:23:24

Ricans as a lack of urgency to the

response.

0:23:240:23:28

Imagine having to depend on a

generator to keep your mother alive.

0:23:280:23:31

That's the way Carmen has been

living for six months.

0:23:310:23:33

She, like so many here,

all American citizens, has

0:23:330:23:38

had no electricity

since Hurricane Maria.

0:23:380:23:43

Every time the generator fails,

her mother's respirator shuts down.

0:23:430:23:46

TRANSLATION:

I've been

crying all the time.

0:23:460:23:48

I thought my mother would die

because I couldn't help her.

0:23:480:23:51

It's horrible.

0:23:510:23:53

Me and her are struggling so much

to fight this situation.

0:23:530:23:58

It was the most devastating

hurricane to hit Puerto

0:23:580:24:01

Rico in living memory,

plunging more than 3 million

0:24:010:24:04

people into darkness,

and into a humanitarian crisis.

0:24:040:24:10

Maria obliterated infrastructure

right across this island.

0:24:100:24:14

People are crossing

a river in the way they

0:24:140:24:16

have not done for years

here because the bridge

0:24:160:24:18

was totally destroyed.

0:24:180:24:21

For so many people,

in so many ways across

0:24:210:24:25

Puerto Rico, life has been set

back decades.

0:24:250:24:28

This bridge is being rebuilt.

0:24:280:24:30

But the pace of recovery

across what is an American territory

0:24:300:24:34

has been painfully slow.

0:24:340:24:36

Puerto Ricans expected far

more help from the US.

0:24:360:24:41

And it's hard not to wonder,

if this school had

0:24:410:24:44

been in Texas or Florida,

whether the children would have gone

0:24:440:24:47

this long without electricity.

0:24:470:24:49

Unable to use computers

as they used to, often

0:24:490:24:52

in unwashed uniforms, and unable

to work at home after dark.

0:24:520:24:59

This teacher, Maria Isabel Santana,

0:24:590:25:01

told us she was upset by the impact

it was having on her students,

0:25:010:25:05

saying there were already months

behind in their learning.

0:25:050:25:10

But the misery is not

just about power.

0:25:100:25:16

There was so much damage

done to homes as well.

0:25:160:25:22

Many though have been given

little more than blue

0:25:220:25:24

tarpaulin to repair them.

0:25:240:25:26

So many who can have

just left the island,

0:25:260:25:29

scrawling their contact details

on the buildings they abandoned.

0:25:290:25:31

Evelyn Cruz knows

more than anyone the

0:25:310:25:32

psychological impact

of staying here.

0:25:320:25:34

Her brother, Julio,

took his life just last month.

0:25:340:25:36

She says it's because

he was overwhelmed by

0:25:360:25:38

the conditions since the hurricane.

0:25:380:25:43

TRANSLATION:

All the disasters

in real life, it affected him.

0:25:430:25:48

Seeing so much need.

0:25:480:25:55

-- Maria left.

0:25:550:25:56

Knowing all the bad news.

0:25:560:25:57

Being without electricity.

0:25:570:25:58

Seeing all the desolation

and all the people leaving.

0:25:580:26:00

It affected him mentally.

0:26:000:26:02

And there has been a massive spike

in Puerto Ricans attempting

0:26:020:26:05

suicide since the storm.

0:26:050:26:09

In many ways, people here can accept

the devastation of a force of

0:26:090:26:12

nature like Hurricane Maria much

more than they can understand

0:26:120:26:14

the suffering they are

still going through now.

0:26:140:26:18

Aleem Maqbool, BBC News,

Morovis, Puerto Rico.

0:26:180:26:23

The pilot of the jet that

crashed at the Shoreham

0:26:230:26:26

Air Show in 2015 is to

be charged with the

0:26:260:26:28

manslaughter by gross

negligence of the 11 people

0:26:280:26:30

who died on the ground.

0:26:300:26:32

Andrew Hill is also accused

of endangering an aircraft

0:26:320:26:36

and is due to appear before

magistrates next month.

0:26:360:26:38

For the latest, let's

join our correspondent,

0:26:380:26:40

Duncan Kennedy at East Sussex Police

headquarters in Lewes.

0:26:400:26:48

Yes. It is nearly three years since

the air crash in Shoreham. Tonight

0:26:480:26:57

the families came to the Sussex

Police headquarters for a private

0:26:570:27:01

meeting with the Crown Prosecution

Service. They were told the pilot,

0:27:010:27:05

Andy Hill, who survived the crash is

to be prosecuted for manslaughter by

0:27:050:27:11

gross negligence.

0:27:110:27:12

This was the worst airshow disaster

in Britain since 1952.

0:27:120:27:17

A vintage jet taking part in an air

display crashed next

0:27:170:27:20

to the A27 in Shoreham.

0:27:200:27:21

11 men on the ground were killed.

0:27:210:27:24

At least 11 other

people were injured.

0:27:240:27:27

Tonight, the families of those

who died came to Sussex Police

0:27:270:27:30

headquarters to meet

the Crown Prosecution Service.

0:27:300:27:34

They were told that Andy Hill,

the pilot, would now be prosecuted.

0:27:340:27:39

I have found there is sufficient

evidence to charge Mr Hill

0:27:390:27:42

with manslaughter by gross

negligence of the 11 men who died.

0:27:420:27:47

I have also authorised a further

charge against Mr Hill

0:27:470:27:49

of endangering an aircraft contrary

to Article 137

0:27:490:27:52

of the Air Navigation Order 2009.

0:27:520:27:57

Lawyers for the families involved

say the decision by the CPS

0:27:570:28:00

to prosecute comes after nearly

three years of grief and loss.

0:28:000:28:06

The decision by the Crown

Prosecution Service is very much

0:28:060:28:09

welcomed and the families now hope

that this criminal procedure

0:28:090:28:12

and process can progress

as swiftly as possible.

0:28:120:28:17

This memorial to the 11 men who died

has been placed on this bridge

0:28:170:28:20

near the crash site.

0:28:200:28:22

Tonight, the Crown Prosecution

Service said that Andy Hill,

0:28:220:28:25

the pilot, would be charged

and appear in court in due course.

0:28:250:28:30

The inquest into the men's deaths

is now likely to be postponed

0:28:300:28:33

until after any court case.

0:28:330:28:36

Duncan Kennedy, BBC News, in Sussex.

0:28:360:28:42

A major new study has warned

that the quantity of plastic

0:28:420:28:45

in the world's oceans

will treble within a decade,

0:28:450:28:47

unless urgent action is taken.

0:28:470:28:50

So, in the first of a three-part

series, we've set one family

0:28:500:28:53

from Bristol a challenge -

to see if they can live without

0:28:530:28:56

single-use plastic for ten days.

0:28:560:29:00

Our correspondent, Jon Kay,

has been to visit them.

0:29:000:29:06

So, what's for tea in

the Evans household tonight?

0:29:060:29:09

Plastic, and plastic, and plastic.

0:29:090:29:12

And more plastic.

0:29:120:29:16

Liz, Andy and their girls

want to live with less of this.

0:29:160:29:19

But how?

0:29:190:29:26

Plastic, plastic, plastic...

0:29:260:29:28

Plastic, plastic, plastic.

0:29:280:29:30

They're going to try

living without single-use

0:29:300:29:32

plastic for ten days.

0:29:320:29:33

We're up for it, but...

0:29:330:29:38

I can't see how you can do it,

as a modern family.

0:29:380:29:41

And look at the bottles

of lemonade that we like.

0:29:410:29:44

Milk!

0:29:440:29:45

Tomorrow is bin day.

0:29:450:29:46

We're doing well at recycling,

but where does it go from us?

0:29:460:29:49

They were inspired by

watching Blue Planet 2.

0:29:490:29:53

It will take years,

and years, and years.

0:29:530:29:55

It'll probably still be that

same bottle when you're

0:29:550:29:57

Mummy and Daddy's age.

0:29:570:30:01

Shower gel for Chloe.

0:30:010:30:02

Shower gel for Ella.

0:30:020:30:03

Shampoo for the puppy.

0:30:030:30:05

Going plastic-free...

0:30:050:30:08

Moisturisers...

0:30:080:30:09

..is going to mean some big changes.

0:30:090:30:11

We're just plastic weirdos!

0:30:110:30:14

I don't think you are weird.

0:30:140:30:16

I think this is pretty

typical of most households.

0:30:160:30:19

Yeah, but when you start to think

about it, that's when you realise

0:30:190:30:22

how reliant on it we are.

0:30:220:30:23

We make our own toothpaste.

0:30:230:30:25

How do you do that?

0:30:250:30:28

To get some tips, they've come

to meet the Williams family,

0:30:280:30:30

who've been living without

plastic for two years.

0:30:300:30:33

We're so used to being told

we need a spray for this

0:30:330:30:35

and a bottle for that...

0:30:350:30:37

They use bars of shampoo,

home-made deodorant.

0:30:370:30:40

They have a little wooden

stick in the middle.

0:30:400:30:43

Even special earbuds.

0:30:430:30:46

It just keeps anything fresh.

0:30:460:30:48

And waxed paper,

instead of clingfilm.

0:30:480:30:50

Andrew and I do work

on a fairly tight budget.

0:30:500:30:53

Liz wants reassurance that it

won't break the bank

0:30:530:30:55

when they try doing this.

0:30:550:30:57

Well, we think it's probably

a bit cheaper, don't we?

0:30:570:30:59

Yeah.

0:30:590:31:00

We haven't done a complete

comparison, but our gut feeling

0:31:000:31:03

is that it's cheaper.

0:31:030:31:04

So windscreen wash now is water,

a little bit of detergent...

0:31:040:31:07

Like a spoonful, yeah.

0:31:070:31:09

Vinegar, and it works a treat.

0:31:090:31:10

Saving you money.

0:31:100:31:12

But will the Evanses grind

their coffee, instead of buying

0:31:120:31:15

pods, and use a strainer,

rather than tea bags

0:31:150:31:18

containing plastic?

0:31:180:31:20

I think it's brilliant.

0:31:200:31:21

Absolutely brilliant.

0:31:210:31:22

You look quite blown away by this!

0:31:220:31:23

Yes, I am!

0:31:230:31:24

Ooh, there's the fruit and veg.

0:31:240:31:26

Tomorrow, we'll follow

their ten-day challenge.

0:31:260:31:28

I've got a stinking cold.

0:31:280:31:29

And it's not easy.

0:31:290:31:32

I've just been up to the chemist.

0:31:320:31:35

Everything's packaged

and in blinkin' plastic!

0:31:350:31:36

Jon Kay, BBC News, Bristol.

0:31:360:31:44

A quick reminder

0:31:440:31:46