14/03/2018 BBC World News America


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14/03/2018

In-depth reports on the major international and US news of the day with Katty Kay.


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This is BBC World News America.

0:00:080:00:10

Reporting from Washington,

I'm Laura Trevelyan.

0:00:100:00:13

A return to the Cold War chill.

0:00:130:00:15

Britain's Prime Minister expels

23 Russian diplomats,

0:00:150:00:16

in retaliation for the poisoning

of a former Russian spy in the UK.

0:00:160:00:25

They have treated the use of

military grade nerve agent in Europe

0:00:250:00:30

with sarcasm, contempt and defiance.

0:00:300:00:34

Across this nation, US students make

the case for gun control -

0:00:340:00:37

walking out of their classrooms,

one month after the

0:00:370:00:39

Parkland shooting.

0:00:390:00:48

I discovered that black holes are

not that black after all.

0:00:480:00:52

I discovered that black holes

are not that black after all.

0:00:520:00:54

And, remembering

a scientific genius.

0:00:540:00:55

How Stephen Hawking's

discoveries changed our

0:00:550:00:57

understanding of the universe.

0:00:570:01:07

Welcome to our viewers on public

television here in America,

0:01:080:01:10

and also around the world.

0:01:100:01:12

In the biggest expulsion

since the Cold War, Britain

0:01:120:01:14

is to kick out 23 Russian diplomats.

0:01:140:01:22

Theresa May has pointed the finger

at Moscow over the poisoning

0:01:220:01:25

of a former Russian double agent

and his daughter in England.

0:01:250:01:27

In response, she's going to crack

down on Russian spies,

0:01:270:01:30

criminals and corrupt elites

who are sheltering in Britain.

0:01:300:01:32

It's the most dramatic action

against Moscow in 30 years.

0:01:320:01:34

Here's our political

editor, Laura Kuenssberg.

0:01:340:01:40

It was right to offer Russia

the opportunity to provide

0:01:400:01:47

an explanation, but their response

has demonstrated complete disdain

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for the gravity of these events.

0:01:490:01:53

The midnight deadline came

and went, leaving a morning

0:01:530:01:55

with no new answers.

0:01:550:01:56

Theresa May went prepared

to Prime Minister's Questions,

0:01:560:01:58

ready to announce the biggest

diplomatic action against Russia

0:01:580:02:00

since the Cold War.

0:02:000:02:05

They have treated the use

of a military-grade nerve agent

0:02:050:02:07

in Europe with sarcasm,

contempt and defiance.

0:02:070:02:17

Mr Speaker, there is no

alternative conclusion other

0:02:190:02:22

than that the Russia State

0:02:220:02:26

was culpable for the attempted

murder of Mr Skripal

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and his daughter.

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This represents an

unlawful use of force

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by the Russian state against the UK.

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So, the UK will retaliate.

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The United Kingdom will expel

23 Russian diplomats,

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who have been identified

as undeclared intelligence officers.

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They have just one week to leave.

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This was not just an act

of attempted murder in Salisbury,

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nor just an act against the UK,

it is an affront to the prohibition

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on the use of chemical weapons

and an affront to the rules-based

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system on which we and our

international partners depend.

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So, 23 diplomats suspected of being

spies have seven days to leave,

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all high-level contact

between the UK and Russia

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is suspended, and no minister

or member of the Royal Family

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will go to the World Cup.

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And some Russian State

assets could be frozen,

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with possible new laws to crack down

on hostile states.

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In a tense Commons,

Jeremy Corbyn was not quite ready

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to accept the culpability

of the Russian State.

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Our response must be both

decisive and proportionate

0:03:330:03:35

and based on clear evidence.

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But listen to rising anger,

as Jeremy Corbyn turned some

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of his fire on the Tories.

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It is - as we have expressed

before - a matter of huge

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regret that our country's diplomatic

capacity has been stripped

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back, with cuts of 25%

in the last five years.

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It is tradition for the two

main parties to stick

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together on foreign policy.

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Not these two.

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This is not a question

of our diplomacy, of what diplomatic

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support we have around the world,

this is a question of the

0:04:100:04:12

culpability of the Russian State.

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But does this bother the Russian

strongman, but Amir Putin,

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campaigning in Crimea? Apologetic. A

spokesman claiming on Russian TV,

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written does not understand

diplomacy or the law and is full of

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liars, fully fledged liars. This is

not just a straightforward foreign

0:04:470:04:54

policy clash, but a fight with a

country that explores the norms.

0:04:540:04:58

Number 10 knows this may only be the

start.

0:04:580:05:02

That was Laura Kuennsberg

reporting there.

0:05:020:05:04

At the United Nations,

US Ambassador Nikki Haley sided

0:05:040:05:06

squarely with Britain in saying that

Russia was responsible

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for the poisoning.

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She was speaking at an emergency

meeting of the UN Security Council,

0:05:130:05:16

called at Britain's request.

0:05:160:05:17

Earlier, I spoke with the BBC's

Nick Bryant, from the UN.

0:05:170:05:20

Russia must boycott operate with the

UK's investigation and come clean

0:05:200:05:22

about its own chemical weapons

programme. Russia is a permanent

0:05:220:05:27

member of the Security Council. It

is entrusted in the United Nations

0:05:270:05:30

Charter with upholding international

peace and security. It must account

0:05:300:05:36

for its actions.

Nikki Haley

speaking there. Earlier, I spoke

0:05:360:05:44

with the BBC's Nick Bryant from then

United Nations. Very tough words,

0:05:440:05:51

tougher than her boss in the White

House, what is the reaction from

0:05:510:05:56

Russia's Ambassador?

What we heard

from Nikki Haley is the first time a

0:05:560:06:00

Trump administration official has

explicitly blamed Moscow for this

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attack. The former Secretary of

State Rex Tillerson said earlier in

0:06:030:06:07

the week it was likely Russia was in

bold. Donald Trump says he probably

0:06:070:06:11

agrees with the British binding that

had not concluded yet that Russia

0:06:110:06:15

was to blame. Nikki Haley did say

that and she said Russia's crime had

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to be met with immediate and

concrete measures from the Security

0:06:200:06:24

Council and the international

community because they did not do

0:06:240:06:26

something here, it would, Salisbury

would not be the last time we saw a

0:06:260:06:31

chemical attack and it could happen

in New York. The Russian Ambassador

0:06:310:06:36

was very angry this meeting was even

held. The British called it this

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emergency session and the Russians

tried to hold it up with procedural

0:06:400:06:44

wrangling and they've failed, the

Russian Ambassador saying it should

0:06:440:06:47

not be dragged before the Security

Council. You and made a bizarre

0:06:470:06:52

observation that we need Sherlock

Holmes to solve this case.

Can the

0:06:520:07:00

UN Security Council do anything

given that Russia has a beta and it

0:07:000:07:03

can block any concrete action?

Nikki

Haley said that because she knows

0:07:030:07:10

that Russia will veto any move to

take concrete measures that she was

0:07:100:07:14

proposing. And the bishops -- the

British in calling this meeting had

0:07:140:07:22

ambitions. They wanted to provide a

forum, the biggest politics stage in

0:07:220:07:27

the world, that horseshoe table at

the Security Council, so that the

0:07:270:07:30

international community could show

solidarity and condemn Russia's

0:07:300:07:35

actions. For the most part, that

happened today at the United Nations

0:07:350:07:39

in New York.

What does the UN

Secretary General say himself about

0:07:390:07:43

the poisoning?

He said it is

unacceptable. The use of chemical

0:07:430:07:49

weapons is a violation of

international law. What Antonio

0:07:490:07:54

Gutierrez stop short of doing was

pointing the finger of blame at

0:07:540:07:57

Russia and he said it was not his

job to assign blame. But clearly,

0:07:570:08:02

most members on the Security Council

this afternoon was -- were prepared

0:08:020:08:06

to do that, pointing the finger of

blame at Moscow.

From the United

0:08:060:08:11

Nations, thank you.

0:08:110:08:12

Here in the US, students

across the country took part

0:08:120:08:15

in a National School Walkout,

to mark one month since

0:08:150:08:17

the Florida School shooting.

0:08:170:08:21

The event lasted 17 minutes -

one minute for each life lost,

0:08:210:08:24

when a gunman opened fire

on students and teachers.

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The walkout comes ahead

of a major march on Washington

0:08:280:08:30

later this month.

0:08:300:08:31

Our North America editor,

Jon Sopel, reports.

0:08:310:08:36

The last time we saw children

pouring out of school,

0:08:360:08:39

it was with their hands up in terror

after the Florida shooting.

0:08:390:08:49

Today, they came out across America

- but this time, with their fists

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clenched, demanding

change on gun control.

0:08:530:08:57

In Washington, at ten o'clock

on a bracing cold morning,

0:08:570:09:05

with their backs turned

on the White House,

0:09:050:09:11

fell silent for 17 minutes,

0:09:110:09:12

one minute for each of the people

0:09:120:09:14

who died at the Marjorie

Stoneman Douglas school

0:09:140:09:16

in Florida last month.

0:09:160:09:17

There's no doubting extraordinary

success these young people have had

0:09:170:09:19

in changing the whole terms

of debate on the subject

0:09:190:09:22

of gun control.

0:09:220:09:23

Their problem is that the man

who lives on the other side of that

0:09:230:09:26

fence seems to have got cold feet.

0:09:260:09:32

When Donald Trump met youngsters

from the Florida School

0:09:320:09:36

at the White House, he seemed

to offer his support for tougher gun

0:09:360:09:39

control measures like raising to 21

the age at which you can

0:09:390:09:42

buy a rifle.

0:09:420:09:44

And he later chided lawmakers

for being frightened

0:09:440:09:46

of the National Rifle Association.

0:09:460:09:47

Some of you people are

petrified of the NRA.

0:09:470:09:51

You can't be petrified.

0:09:510:09:55

But he's now backed off those

proposals and so the end people

0:09:550:09:58

are intensifying their campaign.

0:09:580:09:59

We want them to pass common-sense

gun reforms and ban assault rifles.

0:09:590:10:02

We don't want to be

scared in school.

0:10:020:10:04

We are tired of being scared.

0:10:040:10:08

We want actual change.

0:10:080:10:13

We want it with this actual protest.

0:10:130:10:16

This is a curtain-raiser

to a mass demonstration

0:10:160:10:18

in Washington in ten days' time.

0:10:180:10:20

They are a long way from getting

what they want, but the power

0:10:200:10:23

of youth protest has got them

further than anyone could have

0:10:230:10:26

imagined and they're not

in any mood to surrender.

0:10:260:10:29

Never again! Never again!

0:10:290:10:32

In other news...

0:10:320:10:34

Donald Trump has tipped a cable news

commentator to be his top adviser.

0:10:340:10:41

Larry Kudlow has been a fixture on

US TV for more than a decade. He

0:10:410:10:46

also served in the Reagan

administration. He replaces Gary

0:10:460:10:49

Cohen who stepped down last week in

protest against the steel and

0:10:490:10:55

aluminium tariffs.

After six months of coalition talks,

0:10:550:10:58

Angela Merkel has been sworn in for

it though term as German Chancellor

0:10:580:11:02

leading a coalition of Conservatives

and Social Democrats.

0:11:020:11:07

In Italy, 23,000 people had been

evacuated from a town on the East

0:11:070:11:10

coast after an unexploded World War

II bomb was found. Officials say 225

0:11:100:11:16

kilograms bomb was British made and

there was panic when it was

0:11:160:11:22

accidentally activated during the

construction of a drain. The device

0:11:220:11:24

was removed and dropped into the

sea.

0:11:240:11:26

From June, Google says the

cryptocurrency Bit coin will be

0:11:260:11:31

banned from being advertised on its

platforms. BBC understands Google

0:11:310:11:35

decided to act because it felt there

was a lack of consumer protection

0:11:350:11:40

for highly speculative and complex

trades.

0:11:400:11:43

Democrat Conor Lamb has claimed

victory in a Congressional race

0:11:430:11:45

in Western Pennsylvania that's

virtually a dead heat.

0:11:450:11:52

The strong showing by the former

Marine in a district Donald Trump

0:11:520:11:55

won by nearly 20 points has both

parties re-thinking their approach

0:11:550:11:58

to the November midterms.

0:11:580:12:00

Josh Kraushaar is the political

editor for the National Journal,

0:12:000:12:03

and he joins me now.

0:12:030:12:08

You know about the special

elections. The seat was in the heart

0:12:080:12:11

of Trump country, why could

Republicans not convincingly hold

0:12:110:12:15

onto it?

Number one, the Democratic

base is so energised in the country

0:12:150:12:20

even in very Republican districts.

You have an energised Liberal base

0:12:200:12:24

so angry at President Trump they are

willing to show what to every

0:12:240:12:28

election from dog-catcher to a big

congressional race. Conor Lamb ran

0:12:280:12:33

as a very centrist candidate,

winning over a lot of Republican and

0:12:330:12:37

independent voters who worry about

going too far to the left, but his

0:12:370:12:42

message was reassuring on a lot of

key issues.

But only in January,

0:12:420:12:46

Republicans were feeling good about

their tax cuts, hoping they could

0:12:460:12:49

sell it in an area like this, what's

changed between then and now?

Trump

0:12:490:12:55

and his daily controversies which

drive the new cycle and distract

0:12:550:12:58

Republicans from talking about what

they want. Namely, the state of the

0:12:580:13:03

economy. One reason why this race is

so significant is it is taking place

0:13:030:13:06

in the middle of an economic boom

when people in this district say

0:13:060:13:10

they are very happy about the state

of the economy, but a Republican

0:13:100:13:15

seat Trump won by 20 points was won

by a Democrat even during the good

0:13:150:13:21

economy.

So what does this mean if

you are a vulnerable Republican in a

0:13:210:13:26

seat, got ahead of November's

midterm elections?

There are over

0:13:260:13:30

100 house seats more competitive

than this Pennsylvania congressional

0:13:300:13:34

district.

This map is going to be

huge in November. Democrats only

0:13:340:13:39

need to win 24 house seats to take

back the majority and only need to

0:13:390:13:43

win maybe half, a third of the races

in play. The odds of Democrats

0:13:430:13:47

taking back the house have never

looked greater after this election.

0:13:470:13:51

Democrats to face hurdles of their

own. Not least, the Senate.

The

0:13:510:13:57

Senate is much tougher because the

big battle grounds for the Senate

0:13:570:14:00

are in very Republican states like

North Dakota, West Virginia, the

0:14:000:14:04

most Trump friendly states on the

map. It is not like Pennsylvania, it

0:14:040:14:12

is more in suburban battle grounds

where Donald Trump has lost

0:14:120:14:15

significant ground. What made this

so significant, this isn't Trump

0:14:150:14:18

country and Democrats still want to

raise enemy lines.

What lessons will

0:14:180:14:22

Democrats learn from it, that they

can track right and do well with the

0:14:220:14:28

right candidate or do anything and

win regardless?

The former is a much

0:14:280:14:32

more important lesson and if

Democrats can nominate moderate

0:14:320:14:35

candidates, not necessarily Liberal

on guns and economically Liberal,

0:14:350:14:40

Conor Lamb did not support the $50

minimum wage for example, if they

0:14:400:14:45

appeal to the business friendly

centrists who do not care for Donald

0:14:450:14:48

Trump and his presidency, that is

the ticket to winning a lot of key

0:14:480:14:52

suburban districts.

Thank you so

much for joining us.

Thanks.

0:14:520:14:56

You're watching BBC

World News America.

0:14:560:14:58

Still to come on

tonight's programme:

0:14:580:14:59

Finding the Stephen

Hawking of tomorrow.

0:14:590:15:02

We visit a science fair in the UK,

to hear from students how

0:15:020:15:05

the physicist influenced them.

0:15:050:15:15

30 years ago, the crew of the Maiden

became the first all-female team

0:15:150:15:18

in a round-the-world yacht race.

0:15:180:15:22

Now a new Maiden project is aimed

at promoting girls' education.

0:15:220:15:26

Here's John Maguire.

0:15:260:15:30

Almost 30 years since she was first

converted into a yacht ready to race

0:15:300:15:33

around the world's oceans,

Maiden is back.

0:15:330:15:36

She's in the same boatshed

as her first refit and with

0:15:360:15:39

the same man in charge.

0:15:390:15:40

We didn't know what we were letting

ourselves in for until we blasted

0:15:400:15:46

all the paint and it fell off

the boat inside and out, and then

0:15:460:15:51

we could actually judge

what it was and there

0:15:510:15:53

was a lot more.

0:15:530:15:55

Once you get into it,

you find other jobs.

0:15:550:16:02

In 1990, Tracy Edwards and her team

sailed around the globe -

0:16:020:16:05

and into the record books -

as the first all-female crew

0:16:050:16:09

in the Whitbread race.

0:16:090:16:10

Last year, Maiden was rescued

from the Seychelles and brought back

0:16:100:16:13

to her spiritual home.

0:16:130:16:18

She made a sorry, but

very welcome, sight.

0:16:180:16:19

A bit emotional, really.

0:16:190:16:22

I haven't seen the boat since 1990,

when the race finished.

0:16:220:16:25

Right.

0:16:250:16:26

And then all of a sudden,

last summer, she reappeared again.

0:16:260:16:28

Duncan also worked back on the yacht

in the '80s and has a very

0:16:280:16:32

personal link with her.

0:16:320:16:37

One of the girls from the first

crew never actually did

0:16:370:16:44

the round-the-world trip because I

separated her from the rest

0:16:440:16:47

of them and married her.

0:16:470:16:48

She was the first

of the two doctors.

0:16:480:16:51

Maiden has been restored to embark

later this year on another

0:16:510:16:54

round-the-world adventure,

this time taking three years

0:16:540:16:55

as the crew promotes

education for girls.

0:16:550:17:05

With so much being refurbished

or replaced, when she returns

0:17:080:17:10

to the water in the summer,

it will feel like her maiden

0:17:100:17:17

voyage but, in many ways,

her mission will be the same -

0:17:170:17:20

to once again promote challenge,

adventure and opportunity

0:17:200:17:22

for women and for girls.

0:17:220:17:27

Tributes have been pouring

in for Stephen Hawking,

0:17:270:17:29

who re-shaped the way we see

the universe, and brought

0:17:290:17:35

theoretical physics to the masses.

0:17:350:17:36

The scientist died peacefully

at his home in Cambridge,

0:17:360:17:38

England, early on Wednesday.

0:17:380:17:46

His work on black holes

and relativity made him a household

0:17:460:17:48

name, as he overcame

his physical challenges.

0:17:480:17:50

Our science editor,

David Shukman, looks back

0:17:500:17:52

on his extraordinary life.

0:17:520:17:53

There is nothing like the Eureka

moment of discovering

0:17:530:17:57

something that no-one knew before.

0:17:570:18:00

Stephen Hawking had a gift

for inspiration, a powerful spirit

0:18:000:18:03

overcoming an ailing body to allow

a mind to roam the cosmos.

0:18:030:18:06

Earning him a place as the most

famous scientist in the world.

0:18:060:18:09

It has been a glorious time to be

alive and researching and doing

0:18:090:18:12

theoretical physics.

0:18:120:18:17

Who else could draw

crowds like this?

0:18:170:18:20

The man who gazed at the stars

became one himself.

0:18:200:18:25

His story poignant and uplifting,

his career involved concept

0:18:250:18:35

so alien and complicated that for

most, it was a struggle to keep up.

0:18:390:18:42

But he explored the strangest

of features of the universe,

0:18:420:18:44

black holes, drawing together

the science of the largest things

0:18:440:18:49

in space with the science

of the very small - part

0:18:490:18:54

of a quest to come up with a single

theory for the universe.

0:18:540:18:57

He made these incredibly original

insights that set up the modern

0:18:570:18:59

theory of black holes.

0:18:590:19:01

And made great

contributions to cosmology.

0:19:010:19:03

And so

he was a huge figure.

0:19:030:19:06

I was devastated, really upset.

0:19:060:19:16

I only met him a couple of times,

but he had a real impact on my life.

0:19:170:19:21

It is the passing of a great

scientist who will be truly missed.

0:19:210:19:30

As a student, his intelligence

stood out but, at that

0:19:300:19:32

moment, he was given

0:19:320:19:33

a warning that motor neurone disease

would cut his life short.

0:19:330:19:36

When I was diagnosed at 21,

I was told it would kill me

0:19:360:19:39

in two, three years.

0:19:390:19:40

Somehow, he kept going.

0:19:400:19:42

In a high-tech wheelchair

and with a synthesised voice.

0:19:420:19:44

Communicating first by touch,

then by twitching a single

0:19:440:19:48

muscle in his cheek -

a daunting burden for anyone.

0:19:480:19:50

His children saw him as an example.

0:19:500:19:55

People who live in really extreme

circumstances seem to find something

0:19:550:19:59

very inspirational in his example

of perseverance and his ability

0:19:590:20:04

to rise above his suffering

and still want to communicate

0:20:040:20:06

at a higher level.

0:20:060:20:11

Life was never straightforward -

his first marriage ending

0:20:110:20:13

in divorce, as did a second to one

of his nurses.

0:20:130:20:16

Claims that he had been physically

abused, the case dropped

0:20:160:20:19

because of lack of evidence.

0:20:190:20:24

His book sold at least ten million

copies and everyone wanted

0:20:240:20:29

to meet him - from the Pope

in the Vatican, to the Queen.

0:20:290:20:32

To President Obama,

who awarded him a medal of honour.

0:20:320:20:35

His fame reached beyond

the world of science.

0:20:350:20:39

Your theory of a doughnut-shaped

universe is intriguing.

0:20:390:20:43

Even appearing in The Simpsons.

0:20:430:20:48

I didn't say that.

0:20:480:20:54

Yes, I did.

0:20:540:20:56

In an episode of Star Trek, he had

the chance to tease Isaac Newton.

0:20:560:21:00

Not the apple story again!

0:21:000:21:03

Astounding to think the Lord created

this in just seven days.

0:21:030:21:06

Incorrect.

0:21:060:21:07

It took 13.8 million years.

0:21:070:21:11

Let's not get robbed down in all

that again!

0:21:110:21:16

More recently, he was happy to play

along for Comic Relief.

0:21:160:21:20

He saw himself as an ambassador

for science and in this interview,

0:21:200:21:23

told me of his hopes

for the Large Hadron Collider.

0:21:230:21:25

He had a sense of adventure.

0:21:250:21:26

I am very excited.

0:21:260:21:29

I have been wheelchair-bound

for almost four decades

0:21:290:21:31

and the chance to float

free in zero G will be wonderful.

0:21:310:21:35

Even braving a zero-gravity flight.

0:21:350:21:39

No surprise his death

prompted tributes.

0:21:390:21:42

Tim Berners-Lee tweeted...

0:21:420:21:44

Nasa said...

0:21:500:21:51

If you reverse time and the universe

is getting smaller...

0:22:000:22:04

Eddie Redmayne played him

in the film The Theory

0:22:040:22:14

of Everything and today

said, 'We have lost

0:22:140:22:16

a truly beautiful mind.'

0:22:160:22:17

A scientist who delved

into the realm of black holes

0:22:170:22:20

offered an incredibly engaging story

that achieved something remarkable,

0:22:200:22:22

it touched a global audience.

0:22:220:22:28

Professor Hawking was clearly

an inspiration to scientists

0:22:280:22:30

the world over and, in particular,

to young people.

0:22:300:22:33

And the UK is actually in the middle

of British Science Week,

0:22:330:22:36

and thousands of kids and young

adults have been attending a Science

0:22:360:22:39

fair at the National Exhibition

Centre, in Birmingham.

0:22:390:22:42

Some of them have been talking

to Jon Kay about Stephen Hawking.

0:22:420:22:45

Stephen Hawking would

have loved this.

0:22:450:22:46

20,000 young British scientists

experimenting together.

0:22:460:22:49

Do it again!

0:22:490:22:50

Do it again!

0:22:500:22:58

He told young people

to be curious and, today,

0:22:580:23:02

as they studied trajectories...

0:23:020:23:04

and force, many were thinking

of their scientific superhero.

0:23:040:23:06

How would you describe him?

0:23:060:23:08

Genius, pioneer, brilliant,

inspirational, motivationally

0:23:080:23:09

engaging, phenomenal.

0:23:090:23:13

I read A Brief History Of Time.

0:23:130:23:15

I thought it was very interesting.

0:23:150:23:17

Did you read all of it?

0:23:170:23:18

I did actually read all of it.

0:23:180:23:22

And it got me into black holes,

and I went on to a series

0:23:220:23:25

of lectures about them.

0:23:250:23:29

So, yeah, it fuelled a lot for me.

0:23:290:23:30

On display at the Big

Bang Fair, inventions

0:23:300:23:32

from the scientists of tomorrow.

0:23:320:23:34

These A-level physicists from

North Wales regard Professor Hawking

0:23:340:23:36

as a modern-day genius.

0:23:360:23:38

He's the intellectual follower

of Einstein and Newton.

0:23:380:23:43

These amazing, amazing figures

that we read about in physics books,

0:23:430:23:46

he was getting to that level.

0:23:460:23:49

He was incredible.

0:23:490:23:51

His legacy will live on.

0:23:510:23:52

Forever.

0:23:520:23:55

Inside an inflatable black hole,

teenagers studied Hawking's

0:23:550:23:58

space and time theories

while taking selfies.

0:23:580:24:03

It's a lot in one

lifetime for anyone.

0:24:030:24:06

I think he's encouraged

science as a field as well.

0:24:060:24:08

I think more people are more

invested in science

0:24:080:24:10

nowadays because of him.

0:24:100:24:18

At 15, this boy has invented an app

which could help people

0:24:180:24:21

escape a tower block fire

using virtual reality.

0:24:210:24:23

He admires Hawking's

personal courage.

0:24:230:24:25

He was only one man who did such

great things and I was really

0:24:250:24:28

inspired by that, because usually,

you see people follow the same paths

0:24:280:24:31

and try and do the same things.

0:24:310:24:34

But Stephen Hawking was really

unique, in the sense that he wanted

0:24:340:24:37

to do things differently

and he wanted to contribute things

0:24:370:24:40

in a different sense.

0:24:400:24:41

And I was really inspired by that.

0:24:410:24:42

Perhaps the next Stephen Hawking

was in this room today.

0:24:420:24:45

Jon Kay, BBC News, Birmingham.

0:24:450:24:52

How Stephen Hawking is inspiring the

next generation.

0:24:520:24:58

I'm Laura Trevelyan.

0:24:580:24:59

Thank you for watching

World News America.

0:24:590:25:03