19/03/2018 BBC World News America


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19/03/2018

In-depth reports on the major international and US news of the day with Katty Kay.


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LineFromTo

Welcome to our viewers on public

television here in the US,

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and also around the globe.

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Police in Austin Texas say they now

believe a serial bomber is behind

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four explosions which have killed

two people since early March.

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The latest explosion on Sunday night

appears to have been

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triggered by a tripwire,

which police say shows

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a "higher level of skill"

than the previous bombs.

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Gary ODonoghue reports from Austin.

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Latest attack was different, not

parcel bombs, but seemingly a device

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left on the sidewalk and triggered

by some kind of trip wire as two

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young men walked by custom

with this

trip wire, it changes things, it is

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more sophisticated, it is not

targeted to individuals, we are very

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concerned that with trip wires, a

child could be walking down a

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sidewalk and hit something, so it is

very important that here in Austin,

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if anyone sees anything suspicious,

you do not go near that package, you

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immediately call law enforcement so

we can get bomb techs out there to

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deal with the suspect package.

The

latest victims have significant

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injuries but are stable and

hospitals. The police say so far

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they have no suspects.

We are

clearly dealing with what we expect

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to be a serial bomber based on the

similarities between what is now the

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fourth to vice, and again as we look

at this individual and the pattern

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and what we are looking at here,

will have to determine if we see a

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specific ideology behind this.

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The bomber's

specific ideology behind this.

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The bomber's first

specific ideology behind this.

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The bomber's first victims

specific ideology behind this.

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The bomber's first victims were

specific ideology behind this.

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The bomber's first victims were

black and prominent African-American

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families, leading to suspicions it

could be a hate crime. But the

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indiscriminate nature of last

night's attack, where both victims

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were white, means that the

authorities do not know what

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motivation they are dealing with.

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For more on these bombings,

I spoke earlier with Jack Tomarchio,

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who was an official

at the department

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of homeland security.

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What does it tell us about this

investigation that there are now

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about 500 federal agents on the

scene?

Well, Right now the federal

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agents are trying to harvest

evidence. You have four separate

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explosive devices. The first three

seen to be of similar construction.

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And the last one, of course, had a

different attack mode our two. It

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was detonated by tripwire. What the

federal authorities are doing right

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now is they are trying to harvest

evidence. So, for example, is there

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any biometric evidence at the site?

When these things blow up, certainly

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the device is destroyed, at its not

destroyed in such a way that it

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doesn't exist any more. So they will

look to see if there is any

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fingerprints, are there any DNA,

possibly, on bows on -- on those

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pieces of debris. They will try to

match that up, and try to understand

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how they were constructed, was at

construct off the internet? Did this

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individual has any special

engineering skills or use any

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special tools? This will hopefully

point to an identity. The other

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thing they will look at, what was

the explosive made of, what was the

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raw material, and where did it come

from? Did it come from a hardware

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store or a chemical supply store? If

it did, they will stop Comey around

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the Austin area looking for that.

Austin police are saying that they

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are dealing with a serial bomber

here. How does that change the

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nature of their investigation?

Well,

it does a couple of things. Totally

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it's very dangerous. You have an

individual that is may be motivated

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by a political motive, may be

motivated by a personal grudge

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against the city or his neighbours.

And now they are going to look for

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an individual that is, I would say,

highly organised, fairly

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intelligent, probably very

intelligent, and is now probably

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somewhat enjoying this. A lot of

these serial bombers, serial

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killers, they consider themselves to

be a little step up, actually, than

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most of your average criminals. I

think of an individual like the you

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know bomber, a very smart guy, a

mathematics graduate from Harvard

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University who thought he was the

smartest guy in the room. They want

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to understand his motivation, not

only what he used to bill the actual

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bomb but what might have motivated

him to do this.

How will they find a

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motive, do you think?

Well, that the

tough part. They are really going to

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have to piece this evidence together

and they are going to have to

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around for individuals that may have

heard them think, maybe somebody

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knows somebody who has sprouted

something off, they have got a lot

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of work to do here, and we don't

even know if this is related to

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terrorism what overseas terrorism or

domestic terrorism or just some guy

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that has a bright, they just don't

know that right now.

Thank you,

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Jack.

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Uber is suspending driverless car

tests in the US and Canada

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after a self-driving vehicle struck

and killed a woman in Arizona.

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It's the first time a self-driving

car has been involved

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in a fatal collision,

and raises questions over

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the future of the technology.

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For more, I spoke earlier

with Dave Lee, who's

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outside Uber headquarters.

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Dave, what are Uber saying about

this crash and the investigation?

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Well, first of all, Cooper has

expressed its condolences about what

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happened. -- Uber. This 49 year-old

woman was walking across the road

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with her bike in the early hours of

Monday morning in Arizona when the

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car struck her and she later died

from the injuries she sustained in

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that incident. Uber say they are

co-operating fully with the

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investigation into what happened.

And as part of their agreement to

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test this technology in Arizona,

they agreed to keep very detailed

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logs of how the cars act. Precisely

for reasons and incidents such as

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this one, they will be able to go

back and see exactly what may have

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happened. As you mentioned, as we

understand it, this is the first

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pedestrian to be killed by this

technology, and I think it could

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have the potential to greatly alter

the public reception of something

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that already makes people slightly

nervous, I have to say.

Dave, are

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Uber saying anything at all about

their timetable for rolling out

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these driverless cars, and what this

accident does do that?

Well, the

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timetable for driverless cars has

always been fairly foreign to the

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future. They've started testing

driverless fleets in Arizona -- far

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into the future. They were testing

them in San Francisco as well in

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2016. Up until now, they have always

had a human driver behind the wheel,

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somebody ready to take control

should anything go wrong. That was

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the case in this incident as well.

At Uber has told us that it was in

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full autonomous mode, the car's

computer was dealing with all

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aspects of the driving. This may be

a setback to the roll-out of

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driverless cars, however people who

work on this technology say, if you

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look at the bigger picture, despite

incident like this one, on the whole

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it should make driving safer.

Dave

Lee, thank you.

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Russia's presidential election

did not provide real choice,

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say international observers,

because of restrictions

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on who could run.

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Vladmir Putin easily won a fourth

term in Sunday's run-off

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with 76% of the vote,

beating seven other rivals.

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Setting a conciliatory

tone after his victory,

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Mr Putin vowed to work with other

nations in resolving

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their differences.

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The BBC's Richard Galpin has more.

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Vladimir Putin!

Vladimir Putin

emerging triumphant yet again. In

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front of his supporters in Mosquera

Lozano. -- in Moscow last night,

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allowing election -- an election

from which any serious opposition

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candidates have been excluded.

Today, the Russian media, most of

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which is controlled by the Kremlin,

also revelling in his appointment as

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president for another six years. And

yet, CCTV footage from polling

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stations posted on social media here

tells a different story. Often

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latent rigging. These women stuffing

ballot boxes -- of latent rigging.

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There are reports of hundreds of

violations during the boat.

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Officials say the violations this

time were far fewer than in the last

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election. And Mr Putin is already

concentrating again on the big

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issues of state, including the

crisis with Britain over the

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poisoning of the Skripals. He is

adamant that the Kremlin was not

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behind the attack. Kuggeleijn yellow

it is rubbish, drivel, nonsense, to

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think that Russia would do something

like that aired of the presidential

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election and the World Cup. This

respected academic told me it would

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have made no sense for the Russian

state to have been involved in the

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poisoning.

The last thing that Putin

needs right now is to have another

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problem, not even with the United

Kingdom, but with the West at large.

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My assumption has always been that

after the elections he would start

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making cautious steps in the

direction of some kind of limited

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reconciliation.

So, if not the

Kremlin itself, some here believe it

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should -- could be connected to the

murky world of powerful factions

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swirling around the president, those

determined to keep Russia I selected

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from the West. Richard Galpin, BBC

News, Moscow. -- to keep Russia

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isolated.

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For more, my colleague Katty kay

spoke earlier with Angela Stent,

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an expert in Russian politics

who teaches at

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Georgetown University.

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That was for the BBC's

Beyond 100 Days programme.

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You have written recently that

institutions in Russia have rarely

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been as insignificant as they are

today over the course of the last

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100 years. Does that mean that

Vladimir Putin is therefore much

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more powerful?

Well, he is certainly

at the moment, this is a highly

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personalised system and he appears

to be very powerful now. He has just

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won 76% of the road. Even if there

was ballot stuffing and some

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cheating, he is definitely popular.

He appears to be very popular. But

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going forward, if this is indeed his

last term, you start to get people

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manoeuvring for succession, you

start to get people questioning what

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is happening. But right now, and I

would say for the next year or two,

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he will indeed be very powerful

white I want to pick up on that,

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Angela. There is a term

limit in

Russia, he will have served 24 years

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at the end of this. Will his

priorities shift because there is a

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jostling for power?

Well, his

priorities should shift to economic

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reform, strengthening the economy

and making sure that people's

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standard of living doesn't fall and

the people around him don't start

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grumbling more. But it's not clear

that he really will do anything. The

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other possibility is a more

assertive foreign policy. If you go

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back to the pre-election speech he

made a couple of weeks ago, it had?

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Part to it. One was economic reform

and the other was showing of nuclear

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weapons and basically telling the

US, we can invade any think any

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weapons that you have, and don't

mess with us. You didn't listen to

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us beforehand so listen to us now.

I

wonder if history and his worldview

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ensures that he really does like the

way that things are drifting at the

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moment, going back to a Cold War,

and an era, really, where Russia and

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the Soviet bloc was all powerful. As

if you think back to where he was as

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an FSB agent, everything was

collapsing, there was chaos. There

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might have been more democracy, but

there wasn't a strong economy.

So,

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his goal has been to get the outside

world to Russia as if it were the

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subject union, a great superpower,

powerful, people should respect and

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fear it -- as if it were the Sobhi

at union. He is well on his way to

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achieving that, despite an economy

that is not reduction in well,

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crumbling infrastructure, the

demographics, he has been able to

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project Russian power.

In that

context to what extent does

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interfere and in elections around

the world, in the West in

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particular, and the spy story in the

UK, costed you part of blood

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Prutton's legacy?

It certainly will

be part his legacy, double

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constitute blood Armia Prutton's

legacy. There are a number of

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European and American groups that

look favourably upon Putin, this

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will be part of his legacy.

Deploying these tactics, poisoning,

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and very tough tactics which were

deployed in Sobhi at times too but

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with greater intensity now.

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That was Angela Stent,

speaking earlier to my colleagues

0:14:410:14:43

Katty Kay and Christian Fraser.

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You're watching BBC

World News America.

0:14:450:14:46

Still to come on tonight's

programme: Having their day

0:14:460:14:48

in court, but not in jail.

0:14:480:14:50

How opioid addicts are getting

a new chance at this courtroom

0:14:500:14:52

in Upstate New York.

0:14:520:15:02

Surgeons in London have restored

the sight of two patients

0:15:020:15:04

with one of the most common

forms of blindness.

0:15:040:15:07

The team at Moorfields Eye Hospital

inserted human embryonic stem cells

0:15:070:15:09

in the back of the patients' eyes

to treat age-related degeneration.

0:15:090:15:12

Fergus Walsh reports.

0:15:120:15:20

Before his pioneering

stem-cell treatment,

0:15:200:15:22

Douglas Waters was completely blind

in his right eye.

0:15:220:15:24

Now he can see.

0:15:240:15:34

Everyone wanted to go

outside when the...

0:15:350:15:37

Rain finally stopped.

0:15:370:15:38

That's perfect.

0:15:380:15:39

So, this is an amazing

improvement, Mr Waters.

0:15:390:15:41

I just couldn't believe it.

0:15:410:15:42

And each morning, I picked things

out in the bedroom to look

0:15:420:15:45

at, out of the garden.

0:15:450:15:46

I'd do this.

0:15:460:15:47

And it's unbelievable.

0:15:470:15:48

I'm really chuffed,

I suppose you could say!

0:15:480:15:50

And so is his surgeon.

0:15:500:15:52

Two patients with age-related

macular degeneration had

0:15:520:15:55

the sight-restoring treatment

at Moorfields Eye

0:15:550:15:56

Hospital, in London.

0:15:560:16:01

We are able to show

that we could take someone that

0:16:010:16:03

could not read at all,

that could not see the book

0:16:030:16:10

that they were supposed to be

reading from, and taken them

0:16:100:16:12

to reading around 60-80 words

per minute with their

0:16:120:16:14

normal reading glasses.

0:16:150:16:16

For us, this is a

fantastic breakthrough.

0:16:160:16:17

And it could help other

patients with age-related

0:16:170:16:19

macular degeneration,

who can lose all

0:16:190:16:22

their central vision.

0:16:220:16:23

So what causes AMD?

0:16:230:16:25

Well, if we open the eye,

the macular is at the back.

0:16:250:16:28

It's the part of the retina

responsible for central vision.

0:16:280:16:32

Now, if we pull out a section,

here are the light-sensitive cells,

0:16:320:16:35

the rods and cones.

0:16:350:16:37

AMD is triggered when a crucial

layer of support cells -

0:16:370:16:39

seen here in green -

die.

0:16:390:16:43

As a result, patients gradually

lose the ability to read

0:16:430:16:49

or to recognise faces.

0:16:490:16:56

Douglas, who's 86, says

the stem-cell therapy has given him

0:16:560:16:59

renewed independence.

0:16:590:17:01

Fergus Walsh, BBC News.

0:17:010:17:05

President Trump flew

to New Hampshire on Monday to roll

0:17:180:17:20

out his plan to address

the nation's opioid crisis.

0:17:200:17:22

He's calling for increased law

enforcement, improved public

0:17:220:17:25

awareness, and that wall

with Mexico to stop the drugs

0:17:250:17:27

from entering the US.

0:17:270:17:28

Mr Trump also wants

the stiffest of penalties

0:17:280:17:30

for major drug traffickers.

0:17:300:17:35

We can have all the blue ribbon

committee is we don't get tough on

0:17:350:17:41

the drug dealers, where wasting our

time. But remember that, where

0:17:410:17:45

wasting our time. And that toughness

includes the death penalty.

0:17:450:17:49

CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

0:17:490:17:55

Well, if tougher penalties are one

side of this debate,

0:17:550:17:57

the other is giving treatment

to those addicted to opiods.

0:17:570:18:00

And in the city of Buffalo,

New York, the country's first opioid

0:18:000:18:03

court is providing what could be

a model for the rest of America,

0:18:030:18:06

as Nada Tawfik reports.

0:18:060:18:12

All rise.

Thank you, please be

seated.

This unremarkable court room

0:18:120:18:18

in upstate New York might just be

America's best defence against this

0:18:180:18:22

badly drug crisis. The goal here in

the nation's first open your court

0:18:220:18:27

is basic yet ambitious, to keep

people alive. When offenders who

0:18:270:18:32

appear in court are addicts, the

judge immediately put their case on

0:18:320:18:36

hold.

I'm going to release due today

and I need you to report here

0:18:360:18:40

tomorrow so we can go over

everything about drug treatment.

No

0:18:400:18:43

longer viewed as criminals, they are

given help and a chance to have

0:18:430:18:48

their charges dropped or reduced.

I

think we've made a tremendous

0:18:480:18:52

mistake in the 60s, 70s, 80s and

90s, which is locking people up. It

0:18:520:18:56

didn't work. And we're not going to

make that same mistake now, we have

0:18:560:19:00

the Mussa Chamaune to show that you

cannot lock up an addiction, the

0:19:000:19:06

second that they walk out of jail

they are going to go back to the

0:19:060:19:09

substance.

Participants are given

treatment within hours. They agreed

0:19:090:19:15

to drug test, a curfew, and daily

court appearances. The judge knows

0:19:150:19:21

that often this court can be the

only support system that some people

0:19:210:19:25

have. Having them check in daily and

trying to form a personal bond is a

0:19:250:19:29

way of keeping them on track.

Are

these good?

Carly has been clean for

0:19:290:19:35

two months since starting the

programme. She was arrested for drug

0:19:350:19:40

and session and says she has used

prescription pills and heroin for

0:19:400:19:42

over a decade. In one weekend alone,

she was revived three times after

0:19:420:19:48

overdosing. Finally she feels like

herself against a pillar when you

0:19:480:19:52

are in jail or on the streets, you

are number

to correctional officers,

0:19:520:19:56

you are a dog to drug dealers, you

really don't have any value or

0:19:560:20:01

self-worth, you don't have any sense

of self at all. Like when somebody

0:20:010:20:04

looks at you and actually cares

about what are going through in your

0:20:040:20:08

life, what your problems are, how

can we help you, it reminds you that

0:20:080:20:12

deep inside there is a person, you

know, that needs and deserves love.

0:20:120:20:16

Carly is trying to develop a plan

for the day when she no longer has

0:20:160:20:19

to check in with the court. She

hopes to have a career in criminal

0:20:190:20:23

justice, just like Judge Hannah,

himself a recovering addict.

The

0:20:230:20:28

only difference between me and the

individuals you saw today is one

0:20:280:20:31

thing, time. Once they have us

long-time clean as I have, they can

0:20:310:20:37

accomplish anything like.

Whilst it

is too early to draw firm

0:20:370:20:41

conclusions, in Buffalo they already

think it is a success. The number of

0:20:410:20:45

deaths has significantly decreased

come and that has other cities

0:20:450:20:48

taking notice.

0:20:480:20:55

The US midterm elections are months

away, but we already know

0:20:550:20:59

that there will be more than twice

as many female candidates running

0:20:590:21:02

for Congress compared to 2016.

0:21:020:21:03

This comes nearly a century

after women fought and won

0:21:030:21:05

the right to vote.

0:21:060:21:10

Author Elaine Weiss' new book,

The Woman's Hour, explores

0:21:100:21:11

the struggle behind the ratification

of the 19th Amendment,

0:21:110:21:13

guaranteeing that right.

0:21:130:21:14

She joined me earlier.

0:21:140:21:20

Elaine, you handed this manuscript

in the very day before the 2016

0:21:200:21:24

election, and even though Hillary

Clinton didn't win, is an jaw book

0:21:240:21:27

store very timely?

I think it is. It

has -- isn't your book very timely.

0:21:270:21:34

It is the story of how our democracy

is improved and expanded and it is a

0:21:340:21:39

story about women making a

difference in the political spear.

0:21:390:21:41

They were not handed the vote, they

had to demand it and they had to

0:21:410:21:46

fight for it. So, in this time, a

sort of brought political time here

0:21:460:21:53

in America, I think it really speaks

volumes about what sort of fight for

0:21:530:22:02

rights we have a historical legacy

of fighting for. We need to be doing

0:22:020:22:08

that again now.

What I find so

interesting about your book is the

0:22:080:22:12

way you reveal it was actually women

who were against women getting the

0:22:120:22:17

vote. How intense was that

confrontation?

It was very intense.

0:22:170:22:21

Because the right to vote was never

just a political issue. It became a

0:22:210:22:28

cultural issue, a social issue, for

some people even a moral issue,

0:22:280:22:32

about what women's role sites should

be. And so the anti-suffragists, the

0:22:320:22:37

women and is suffragists, thought

that women being able to vote,

0:22:370:22:43

entering into the political sphere,

would destroy the family. They would

0:22:430:22:47

tear off their aprons and run out

and want to go to work and do also

0:22:470:22:51

the things that were not considered

proper. And so there's great passion

0:22:510:22:56

on both sides, because it's almost

like what we call the cultural wars

0:22:560:23:02

now, it's much more complicated than

just a political decision.

0:23:020:23:04

Fascinating. You detail in the book

how the battle for women to get the

0:23:040:23:09

vote came all the way down to one

young male lawmaker in the state of

0:23:090:23:14

Tennessee. How did his mother

influence his pivotal vote?

Well,

0:23:140:23:19

his mother, Mrs Harry Burn, he's 24

years old, the youngest legislator

0:23:190:23:23

in Tennessee, in his freshman term

-- this is Harry Burn. His mother is

0:23:230:23:29

a very well read woman, she lives on

a small farmhouse, but she urges,

0:23:290:23:34

she writes a letter to him and says,

I want you to stand up and support

0:23:340:23:39

women. It is only right, it is only

justice. He has that letter in his

0:23:390:23:45

pocket and he changes his vote.

He

does the right thing! In Britain,

0:23:450:23:49

the women who fought for the folk

are household names -- who fought

0:23:490:23:54

for the vote are household names

like Emmeline Pankhurst. Why is that

0:23:540:23:58

not the case in the United States

with these women?

Fadli to say, it

0:23:580:24:02

is not. We know some of the pioneers

-- sadly to say. It is usually about

0:24:020:24:07

as wide as our knowledge extends.

What I wanted to do in this book is

0:24:070:24:11

to talk about the second and third

generation suffragists who brought

0:24:110:24:16

the ball over the finish line and

won the vote for American women. It

0:24:160:24:22

took seven decades here, seven

decades of ceaseless work, and these

0:24:220:24:25

are the women who finally carried it

through. And I hope they will become

0:24:250:24:29

household names. And to put some

monuments up to them to honour them

0:24:290:24:36

in other ways, as we approach the

centennial of American women getting

0:24:360:24:41

the vote in 2020.

Elaine, thank you

so much for joining us.

My pleasure.

0:24:410:24:45

A long fight for women's equality.

0:24:450:24:49

Remember, you can find more

on all the days news at our website.

0:24:490:24:55

Plus, to see what we're working

on at any time, make sure to check

0:24:550:24:58

out our Facebook page.

0:24:580:24:59

I'm Laura Trevellyan.

0:24:590:25:00

Thank you for watching

World News America.

0:25:000:25:04