13/11/2017 Beyond 100 Days


13/11/2017

Katty Kay in Washington and Christian Fraser in London report on the events that are shaping the world.


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Beyond One Hundred Days.

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A huge earthquake hits

Iran and Iraq, killing

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more than 400 people.

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6000 more are injured -

the vast majority on the Iranian

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side of the border.

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The moment the tremor struck.

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It's the deadliest quake in Iran

in more than a decade.

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President Trump is wrapping

up his trip to Asia with an embrace

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with some of the world's most

controversial strongmen.

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While at home, the Senate majority

leader says its time for Roy Moore

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to quit the Alabama Senate race.

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Moore fires back that it's

McConnell who should go.

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Also on the programme...

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The UK Government makes a concession

on Brexit. Parliament is guaranteed

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a vote on the final deal before the

UK leaves the EU.

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His creative genius

gave us the Mona Lisa.

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Now a new book explores the life

of Leonardo da Vinci -

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who brought art and science together

with amazing results.

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Get in touch with us using

the hashtag Beyond One Hundred Days

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I'm Katty Kay in Washington.

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Christian Fraser's in London.

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It was 9.20pm on Sunday

when the earth

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started to shake.

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A time most people in that northern

border region of Iran and Iraq

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would have been at home,

perhaps already in bed.

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The tremor was huge -

killing more than 400 people,

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a toll that's expected to rise.

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Now they're trying to pull people

from under the rubble but the rescue

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operation is being hampered

by landslides and power cuts.

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The epicentre of the quake -

which measured 7.3 -

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was about 30 kilometres

south of Halabja.

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One of the worst hit

areas was Sarpol-e Zahab,

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as James Robbins reports.

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The moment the Earth

starts shaking violently.

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A man runs for his life

from the control room of this dam,

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as massive boulders

are hurled around outside.

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The dam wall was not breached

but elsewhere devastation.

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In Iran, the border town

of Sarpol-e Zahab was hit hardest.

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As entire walls collapsed,

many families did manage

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to flee their homes,

but others were crushed or buried.

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At a local hospital, there were many

stories of narrow escape.

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TRANSLATION:

I fell

from the balcony down.

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The earthquake was very strong.

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TRANSLATION:

The earthquake

shattered the window, which fell

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on me and it wounded my hand

and my face.

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Rescue has been made more difficult

by the mountainous terrain.

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Iranian authorities are pouring

resources in but landslides

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and power cuts are slowing both

rescue efforts and the task

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of establishing the full

extent of casualties.

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This quake was 7.3 in magnitude,

and happened in a known danger zone.

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The surface of the Earth is made

up of tectonic plates,

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and in this case the Arabian plate

has been moving roughly northwards

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against the Eurasian plate

at a rate of two centimetres,

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just under an inch a year.

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Forces build up and eventually

are very suddenly released

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with devastating effect.

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The destruction in Iran is greater

than in neighbouring Iraq,

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where a major rescue operation

is also underway.

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The BBC's correspondent is there.

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This area is one of the hardest hit

in Iraq by Sunday's earthquake.

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We are told seven people were inside

this home when it collapsed.

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Two of them were killed

and others were injured.

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Several other buildings suffered

similar damage to this one,

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but fortunately they seem to be

the exception rather than the rule,

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and most of the other homes

in the region managed to withstand

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the impact of the earthquake.

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For the survivors,

night-time is the toughest.

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In rapidly falling temperatures,

families are huddled around fires.

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Even where buildings are intact,

fear of after-shocks

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will keep people outdoors.

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James Robbins, BBC News.

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Spare a thought for the families

caught in the aftermath of the

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earthquake tonight.

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The President of the Philippines

compares himself to Hitler,

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and states publicly he would

like to slaughter three million drug

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users in his country.

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Which makes the sight

of Donald Trump sitting and smiling

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next to him quite incongruous.

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It certainly gives Rodrigo Duterte

a certain stature at home.

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The two met on the last leg

of Mr Trump's Asia trip.

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During which Mr Trump faced some

uncomfortable questions -

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about his relationship

with Vladimir Putin -

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en route to the Philippines he told

reporters that the Russian President

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had assured him he,

"Absolutely did not meddle

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in our election, he did not do

what they are saying he did.

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"Every time he sees me

he says I didn't do that.

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And I believe - I really believe -

that when he tells me

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that, he means it."

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At the same time Mr Trump criticised

several former top US

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intelligence officials -

saying they were political hacks.

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Even for Mr Trump, appearing to give

President Putin more credence

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than US agencies is a problem,

so it's little surprise

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that he was forced to quickly

qualify his comments.

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What I said, I'm surprised

there is any conflict on this.

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What I said there is I believe

he believes that amount is very

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What I said there is I believe

he believes that and it is very

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important for somebody to believe.

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I believe that he feels

that he and Russia did not

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meddle in the election.

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As to whether I believe it or not,

I'm with our agencies,

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especially as currently constituted

with their leadership.

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Confused?

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Well, it's not entirely clear

what the President believes.

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But one of the former US

intelligence chiefs who Mr Trump

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dismissed is quite clear

about what he thinks is going on.

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It demonstrates to Mr Putin that

Donald Trump can be played by

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foreign leaders, who are going to

appeal to his ego and to try to play

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upon his insecurities,

which is very, very

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worrisome from a national

security standpoint.

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For more on the President's trip

we can turn to Bill Richardson

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who formerly served as US Ambassador

to the UN and joins us today

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from Santa Fe, New Mexico.

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Do you agree with Mr Brennan when he

says he thinks Mr Trump can be

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played and foreign leaders know

that?

Yes, I agree with Director

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Brennan Amber two other directors

that are career officers, they are

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intelligence officers, not political

hacks, which is what the president

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called them. It is clear the

president sided with Vladimir Putin,

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just Putin saying I was not

involved, I did not meddle, against

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a billions of dollars we spend on

intelligence and conclusive proof

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there was Russian meddling. This is

disturbing. Cabinet level officers

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being dismissed by the president of

the United States.

For the record,

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you are a Democrat and served a

Democratic president but how unusual

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is it for an American president to

appear to give more credibility to a

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foreign adversary than his own

intelligence services?

It is

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nonexistent. I do not think it has

happened before. I have been around

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a long time and do not recall

Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Barack

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Obama, President Clinton, the two

Bushes questioning the intelligence

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community. Yes questioning them on

conclusions but not at the expense

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of a country many consider not just

a strategic competitor, but in

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occasional areas Russia is our

enemy. We have vast differences on

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Iran, Syria and vast differences on

Ukraine, or many fundamental issues,

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arms control, right now. This is not

just unusual, it has never happened.

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That is what is disturbing. You will

have spent time at the UN talking

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about North Korea and we were told

ahead of the trip north Korea was

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the priority for the president so

how do you square rich with the idea

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he wants to bring them back to the

table with this to eat over the

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weekend? He says the North Korean

leader keeps calling him old. He

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says that, I would never call him

short and fat. He says...

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How will that insulting tweet bring

North Korea back to the table?

It is

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not. North Korea, I have dealt with

them many years and been there eight

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times and personal insults, they

react negatively. They are a country

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like many Asians who want to save

face and personal relationships are

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important. I do not like the

president of the United States

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insulted and he has been insulted by

the North Koreans, though

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questioning whether saying you are

old as an insult... I am old. My

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worry is that he had a reasonably

good effort on North Korea on this

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trip. He was uniting countries

against North Korea and he has

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patched up a little bit the

relationship with South Korea and

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with Japan it is good. China did not

work. China is not willing to put

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maximum pressure on North Korea,

although they have a bit. This Tweet

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makes everything fall apart at the

end. It is like no progress has been

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made in a potential diplomatic

solution, which I think is the only

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way out on this.

OK, Ambassador,

thank you. Always good to see you.

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There has been a lot of business

done on the trip but do you think in

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the process of what is it, 12 days

on the trip, he has done anything to

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enhance America's role in Southeast

Asia?

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It was interesting, Christian, I was

getting in touch with Asia experts

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and they said at the moment we are

talking about the Tweet and the old

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and the fat and shorten fat and

Vladimir Putin but historians will

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look back at this trip to Asia, the

longest and a quarter of a sentry by

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an American president and see

something different, they will see

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it as a shift, the moment America

did not go to Asia and act as a

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world leader and it was president

she -- president Xi. It is not clear

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what America got out of this trip

and if you had to say who was the

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most important player over the 12

days, it was not Washington, it was

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Beijing and other countries in Asia

are looking to Beijing. Not so much

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looking to the United States and

that is a big shift.

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How often on this programme do we

talk about photo opportunities that

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go wrong that these big events? This

is the Asia conference in the

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Philippines. They start... They are

standing not knowing what is going

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on and then they have the crossover

handshake. I have sympathy with a

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president here, but then I look and

see what has gone wrong. A schoolboy

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error. He is standing too close to

the neighbour on the right and then

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you have to reach over. A schoolboy

error. Look at that. The grimmest

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tells you he knows it, as well. Yes,

stand in the middle -- the grimace

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tells you. And next are taller

people. You have to get tactics

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right in a crossover handshake!

The moment I saw the photograph I

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knew you would bring it up on the

programme.

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Ever since the Brexit vote,

MPs on all sides of the Commons have

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been demanding a vote

on the final agreement.

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Today the government appears to have

offered a major concession.

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The Brexit Secretary David Davis

says a vote on the deal

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will be guaranteed by

a new piece of legislation.

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Labour has called it a climbdown.

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Leila Nathoo joins us

now from Westminster.

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I suppose it comes down to what

constitutes a meaningful vote and

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piece of legislation.

There has been

much debate over the term meaningful

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and the opposition, Labour, calling

for a meaningful vote for sometime

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but the government had always

promised there would be some

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Parliamentary say on the final

Brexit deal, there would be a moment

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after the deal was agreed between

the UK and Brussels where Parliament

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can have its say. That vote would

always be a kind of seal of approval

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or rejection and if it was rejected,

it was not clear what would happen

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because there was no facility the

government said to sense the UK

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Government back to the negotiating

table. Now, the government have

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offered another vote over and above

the initial vote in principle, to

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say there is going to be a piece of

legislation that can be scrutinised,

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including all the terms of the deal,

so EU citizens' right, the financial

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settlement, the transitional period,

that Parliaments, the Commons and

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the Lords, can scrutinise but not

answer still on what would happen if

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Parliament rejected the deal. They

would be no opportunity to really

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send back Theresa May, David Davis

to the negotiating table in Brussels

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and so the risk is anyone voting

against the deal at that time would

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affect of the vote for no deal.

Can I ask the question a lot of

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viewers would ask that is in the

end, does this vote mean there is a

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chance the result of the Brexit

referendum could be reversed?

It

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does not sound like it. No. The

government has been cleared it is

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not a vehicle, mechanism to try to

stop Brexit. What it is is an

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overture to Conservative

backbenchers, who are uneasy about

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certain parts of Brexit, about the

process. There is a piece of

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legislation going through Parliament

now which MPs are using to try to

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tinker with the process of Brexit,

with the government approach. This

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offer of more legislation down the

line, the final say over the

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agreement is a gesture, to get the

potential rebels on side, who had

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been demanding there would be a

separate piece of legislation, among

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other things. I do not think this is

opening the door to Brexit not

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happening and it certainly does not

look like the end of the story in

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terms of Parliamentary arguments

over how Brexit take shape.

Thank

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you. Tensions in the Cabinet 's

surface this weekend with a letter.

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It was leaked from within number 10

urged the Prime Minister

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to remain faithful to

the referendum vote.

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The letter published this weekend

called on Mrs May to act

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with pragmatism without diluting

the ambition of the UK to be

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a "fully independent self-governing

country by the time of the next

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election".

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The letter goes on...

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"We are profoundly worried that

in some parts of government

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the current preparations are not

proceeding with anything

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like sufficient energy.

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We have heard it argued by some

that we cannot start preparations

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on the basis of no deal -

a not too subtle dig

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at the Chancellor Phillip Hammond.

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And it finishes...

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We all want you to push your agenda

forward with confidence.

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It's now reported that 40 MPs

from Theresa May's own party

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are ready to sign a letter of no

confidence in her leadership.

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Only 48 would be needed

to trigger a vote.

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And so earlier today,

I talked to Graham Brady -

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chairman of the powerful 1922

Committee of Tory backbenchers -

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whose job it would be to deliver

that letter of no confidence

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were it written.

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The claim that there are 40

colleagues ready to call

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for a no confidence vote,

wasn't, as far as I could tell,

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supported by any source

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that was quoted, so I would treat it

with considerable caution,

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but in terms of the process,

if we were ever to reach a point

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where 15% of the parliamentary

Conservative Party, currently 48

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Members of Parliament,

wrote to me asking for a confidence

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vote to be held, it would be

incumbent upon me to arrange such

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a vote as soon as could be

reasonably managed.

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The other letter that was in

the newspapers this weekend

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was from Boris Johnson

and Michael Gove, which we are led

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to believe was then trying to direct

the Prime Minister towards a hard

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Brexit, or that was the way

it was interpreted.

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Could it also be seen another way,

that they felt it necessary to write

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a letter asking her to lead?

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I would say in that regard

there is nothing unusual in Cabinet

0:17:250:17:27

ministers sending memos to the Prime

Minister.

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This is part of the normal flow

of business within government.

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What should not happen is for such

a confidential memo to be put

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in the public domain.

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I do not think that was done

by the Prime Minister,

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I do not think it was done

by the Foreign Secretary

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or Mr Gove, either.

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So I think clearly somebody has

leaked a piece of private

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correspondence in order

to create mischief.

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But if she was leading

and in leading had chosen a cabinet

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that was cohesive are not divided

over the aims of Brexit,

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then first of all Boris Johnson

and Michael Gove would not have seen

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reason to send the letter

and secondly it wouldn't be leaked

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by someone within number 10,

presumably trying to undermine them.

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Ultimately the Prime Minister leads

the government and she set that

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clear vision of an outward looking,

free trading Britain that engages

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closely with our European friends.

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When you look at this cabinet, two

resignations in little over a week.

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Damien Green, the Deputy Prime

Minister, still under investigation,

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and Boris Johnson under pressure

for his comments about

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Nazanin Zaghair-Ratcliffe.

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There are lots of people who say,

why doesn't the Prime Minister

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lead from the front,

clear out the cabinet

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and have a new start?

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I would like to have a quiet couple

of weeks in British politics.

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It would make a welcome

change at the moment.

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There have been a lot of things that

have happened over recent weeks,

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many of them completely unexpected,

things which are not

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within the power of this

Prime Minister or any

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Prime Minister to control.

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It would be a bad time in my view,

when you have had some necessary

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changes that have been forced

by events, it would be a bad time

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to just plunge into still greater,

more far reaching changes.

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Would you agree it is good always

to have a Foreign Secretary

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who reads his briefs?

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Of course, but Boris Johnson

is somebody who is immensely able,

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who has a great personality,

projects to lots of people

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and I'm sure has projected

to a lot of people around

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the world, as well.

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I don't think he would say that

episode was the finest moment.

0:19:450:19:54

Christian, I told you I was in

England visiting family and I read

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the papers and came away confused

about the status of Boris Johnson

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because last week we spoke about the

mess up he made about Iran and he

0:20:020:20:08

has apologised, if he said anything

that put in jeopardy the British

0:20:080:20:12

prisoner in Iran. And yet, he is

issuing what seems to be an

0:20:120:20:17

ultimatum to the Prime Minister. Are

the fortunes of the Foreign

0:20:170:20:22

Secretary up or down?

I think they are down today because

0:20:220:20:25

he has been forced into an apology

of sorts in the Commons.

0:20:250:20:34

How does he think he has the power

to issue ultimatums to the Prime

0:20:340:20:37

Minister? Probably he and Michael

Gove, since they campaigned hard for

0:20:370:20:40

Brexit, it is incumbent on them to

make the argument for the Brexit

0:20:400:20:44

side and if it goes downhill it

reflects badly on them and

0:20:440:20:50

presumably their future in Cabinet

are linked to that and there are

0:20:500:20:54

people who feel the Prime Minister

has not grasped the nettle and is

0:20:540:20:58

trying to keep all sides in the

Cabinet together and at the expense

0:20:580:21:02

of the negotiations so that might be

the reason they wrote the letter

0:21:020:21:05

that the fact it was leaked from

number 10, presumably by somebody

0:21:050:21:09

who wanted to undermine them proves

how divisive it is the divisions

0:21:090:21:14

that are within Canada.

Almost -- within the Cabinet.

0:21:140:21:20

Global carbon dioxide emissions

are projected to rise

0:21:200:21:23

for the first time in four years.

0:21:230:21:26

Scientists at a United Nations

climate conference in Germany say

0:21:260:21:28

the main cause of the expected

growth has been greater use of coal

0:21:280:21:31

in China as its economy expanded.

0:21:310:21:33

They're warning that levels of CO2

need to be reduced before 2020

0:21:330:21:36

if we are to limit dangerous global

warming this century.

0:21:360:21:38

Here's our science

editor David Shukman.

0:21:380:21:43

For more than a week now,

the people of Delhi have

0:21:430:21:46

been suffering in air

that has become toxic.

0:21:460:21:48

Smog created by countless

engines burning fossil

0:21:480:21:49

fuels, including coal.

0:21:490:21:53

Coal is one of the biggest sources

of pollution worldwide.

0:21:530:21:55

Power stations such as this one

in Poland belch out gases

0:21:550:22:01

including carbon dioxide,

and despite promises to clean up,

0:22:010:22:03

emissions are actually increasing.

0:22:030:22:07

For countries in the path

of devastating hurricanes,

0:22:070:22:10

like the ones that struck

the Caribbean earlier this year,

0:22:100:22:12

this is depressing.

0:22:120:22:17

Because global warming may bring

more extreme weather.

0:22:170:22:21

And it seems to them that little

is being done to stop it.

0:22:210:22:24

This is very worrying for us.

0:22:240:22:26

I would hate to say that it

sounds a death knell,

0:22:260:22:29

but it translates into that,

given this summer we have had such

0:22:290:22:32

an active hurricane season.

0:22:320:22:33

We know what Irma and Maria

did to the region.

0:22:330:22:36

This new research finds that more

and more carbon dioxide

0:22:360:22:39

is being released from power

stations, factories and different

0:22:390:22:41

forms of transport.

0:22:410:22:43

And this matters because the gas

traps heat in the atmosphere.

0:22:430:22:48

This graph shows how emissions

of carbon dioxide have risen over

0:22:480:22:50

almost three decades.

0:22:500:22:53

In the last few years,

they have been levelling off,

0:22:530:22:56

which was seen as a positive sign.

0:22:560:22:58

But this year, there has suddenly

been an increase of 2%.

0:22:580:23:02

So what is happening and who is to

blame around the world?

0:23:020:23:06

In America, emissions of carbon

dioxide have fallen slightly

0:23:060:23:09

and that is despite President Trump

wanting to leave

0:23:090:23:11

the Paris agreement.

0:23:110:23:13

In Europe,

0:23:130:23:14

they are on course

to be down as well.

0:23:140:23:17

But in China they are up,

as the economy picks up

0:23:170:23:19

and more coal is burned.

0:23:190:23:22

Climate scientists say it is vital

that less coal is used

0:23:220:23:24

if we are to have any chance

of heading off the worst

0:23:240:23:27

of global warming.

0:23:270:23:29

But President Trump is promoting

the coal industry and he wants

0:23:290:23:34

America to help other countries

to use it.

0:23:340:23:36

There are countries that have said

that coal is going to be

0:23:360:23:42

part of our energy mix

for the foreseeable future, many

0:23:420:23:45

in Asia and some in Africa as well.

0:23:450:23:46

And they have been clear that

because coal is going to be part

0:23:460:23:50

of their energy mix in the future,

they want support for

0:23:500:23:52

cleaner coal technology.

0:23:520:23:55

There is now a battle over a fuel

that many economies rely on.

0:23:550:23:58

There are plans to make

coal cleaner, to use it

0:23:580:24:00

without releasing carbon dioxide.

0:24:000:24:05

But this is not much of a reality

so far and, in the meantime,

0:24:050:24:09

there are warnings that emissions

need to fall rapidly,

0:24:090:24:11

not rise, as they are now.

0:24:110:24:21

Donald Trump only sent a fledgling

group to the climate conference in

0:24:220:24:27

Germany, smaller than they would

normally send, but there has been

0:24:270:24:31

representation from the White House

about clean coal, a cleaner fossil

0:24:310:24:34

fuel that they say must be part of

the global warming solution. But it

0:24:340:24:41

was interrupted. We have pictures of

protesters who went to the

0:24:410:24:46

presentation. I understand it was

quite noisy. Let's have a look.

Oil,

0:24:460:24:56

34, natural gas, 35.

SINGING. I was

told noisy, not tuneful.

0:24:560:25:12

That is quite a protest. And quite

coordinated. You think nothing is

0:25:120:25:18

going to happen and suddenly the

room stands up. There are people who

0:25:180:25:22

are mayors, people from states

represented, but the White House in

0:25:220:25:27

particular sent a smaller group and

looks -- look at what happened when

0:25:270:25:35

they did try to make a presentation.

A roomful of protesters. They will

0:25:350:25:41

have to vet the invitations.

0:25:410:25:45

This is Beyond 100

Days from the BBC.

0:25:450:25:49

Coming up for viewers on the BBC

News Channel and BBC World News -

0:25:490:25:52

the warning from European business

leaders to the British Prime

0:25:520:25:54

Minister - what they say is at stake

if progress isn't made on reaching

0:25:540:25:58

a deal, and fast.

0:25:580:25:59

And what does the Last Supper

tell us about Davinci?

0:25:590:26:01

We speak to the author who's just

written about the life

0:26:010:26:05

of Leonardo.

0:26:050:26:06

That's still to come.

0:26:060:26:07

That's still to come.

0:26:070:26:10

It is being cold across the UK with

frost around and mountain snow. A

0:26:100:26:17

nice picture from the Highlands.

Tomorrow, a little milder will stop

0:26:170:26:22

not a lot. Some of us will have a

cold start to the day but overall,

0:26:220:26:27

what will happen is cold air sitting

on top of us will be pushed away and

0:26:270:26:35

milder and Atlantic air will come

in. There is a lot of cloud,

0:26:350:26:39

outbreaks of rain across the North.

In the south this coming night,

0:26:390:26:44

relatively dry and temperatures

dipping down to single figures. In

0:26:440:26:52

Scotland in the morning, we are

expecting sunshine and this is where

0:26:520:26:56

the best of the weather will be on

Tuesday, certainly from the lowlands

0:26:560:27:00

northwards. Colder in the Glens. The

central part of the UK, where we

0:27:000:27:09

have a weather front, cloud and the

light outbreaks of rain, around 10

0:27:090:27:13

degrees. In the south, perhaps

brightness first thing but overall,

0:27:130:27:18

it will be a pretty grey day across

England, Wales and to an extent

0:27:180:27:25

Northern Ireland. The weather front

across the UK during Tuesday. A fair

0:27:250:27:31

bit of cloud, apart from Scotland

and maybe the far north of England.

0:27:310:27:35

I expect Newcastle will have

sunshine. Temperatures a little bit

0:27:350:27:39

higher than the last few days when

they have been into single figures

0:27:390:27:44

across the country. Tuesday night,

we are in for a foggy night.

0:27:440:27:50

Potentially. The early hours of

Wednesday could be murky with

0:27:500:27:54

reduced visibility almost anywhere

across the UK. Particularly across

0:27:540:27:59

the southern half of the country. Mr

and Fogg could be a problem for

0:27:590:28:05

early-morning commuters on Wednesday

and fog might linger.

0:28:050:28:13

We are holding on to temperatures of

12-13d. On Thursday, rain in western

0:28:180:28:26

areas and in the south, temperatures

getting up to 13 degrees.

0:28:260:28:29

This is Beyond One Hundred Days,

with me, Katty Kay in Washington.

0:30:080:30:11

Christian Fraser's in London.

0:30:110:30:17

Our top stories:

0:30:170:30:19

More than 400 people are dead

and thousands injured

0:30:190:30:21

after a powerful earthquake strikes

near the border

0:30:210:30:23

between Iran and Iraq.

0:30:230:30:33

Coming up in the next half hour:

Roy Moore should quit

0:30:330:30:36

the Alabama Senate race -

that's the call of Senate Majority

0:30:360:30:38

leader Mitch McConnell after

allegations of sexual misconduct.

0:30:380:30:48

The Church of England says kids

should be able to wear what they

0:30:490:30:52

want without judgment.

0:30:520:30:54

Let us know your thoughts

by using the hashtag

0:30:540:30:56

Beyond One Hundred Days.

0:30:560:31:06

As time passes with no

concrete progress in

0:31:090:31:11

the Brexit negotiations -

yet, business leaders appear to be

0:31:110:31:13

getting more and more nervous.

0:31:130:31:15

The tensions in Theresa May's

government are intensifying this

0:31:150:31:17

week ahead of a vital vote

on the Brexit Bill, and after two

0:31:170:31:20

of her cabinet ministers -

Boris Johnson and Michael Gove -

0:31:200:31:23

sent her a forthright letter

demanding that she shape up a bit

0:31:230:31:26

when it somes to Brexit.

0:31:260:31:27

They've called for a transitional

deal that preserves the status quo,

0:31:270:31:30

after Britain leaves the EU

in March 2019.

0:31:300:31:32

I am joined in the studio

by Miriam Gonzalez, a lawyer

0:31:320:31:34

and former EU trade negotiator.

0:31:340:31:39

The major complaint from business

leaders is that they want more

0:31:390:31:43

certainty and clarity in the next

few weeks, but the point is this

0:31:430:31:50

still got to go to a vote in the EU

Parliament, 27 countries have to

0:31:500:31:55

agree, there has to be agreement in

the UK Parliament. Should you not

0:31:550:31:58

just robbed prepare for the worst

and hope for the best?

Preparing for

0:31:580:32:04

the worst is always a good thing. In

terms of hoping for the best, the

0:32:040:32:10

businesspeople want the government

to do something which is more than

0:32:100:32:13

just hoping and it does its real

technical negotiating homework. They

0:32:130:32:20

are asking for two things, one of

them is certainty and clarity. The

0:32:200:32:25

other thing they are asking for is

more energy, more progress. Very

0:32:250:32:31

little has happened in one year, and

they just want to see more

0:32:310:32:36

indication from the government of

what it is exactly they will be

0:32:360:32:39

asking for.

I say the worst-case

scenario. That be how remained

0:32:390:32:46

sealed. Brexiteers might say, if we

walk and there is no deal, that is

0:32:460:32:51

the best scenario. Listen to Sir

James Dyson, who was speaking to the

0:32:510:32:56

BBC this weekend. He says going to

the WTO rules and walking away from

0:32:560:33:01

Europe might be a good thing.

80% is

percent of our growth are stewards

0:33:010:33:06

outside the EU. But we have already

fallen off a cliff as company

0:33:060:33:11

because we already pay a tariff into

Europe. Yet we are one of the

0:33:110:33:18

fastest-growing companies in Europe.

One of the fastest-growing

0:33:180:33:22

manufacturing companies in Europe

outside the EU, the single market,

0:33:220:33:29

the customs union, trading under WTO

rules.

That is very much a minority

0:33:290:33:33

view and not the view of most of

businesspeople who are represented

0:33:330:33:38

at the meeting with the Prime

Minister today. It makes the news

0:33:380:33:45

when he says something like that! I

do not think this is a matter of

0:33:450:33:50

confidence. Royals will be very

different and so were tariffs. It is

0:33:500:33:55

very easy to calculate company by

company what the difference between

0:33:550:34:00

operating within the single market

and the customs union is an

0:34:000:34:03

operating not only outside that but

operating with WTO only rules.

0:34:030:34:08

Everyone can calculate that and that

is why many businesses are anxious.

0:34:080:34:12

The level of anxiety has risen a lot

over the last few weeks. That is

0:34:120:34:20

taking into account the biggest

issue we still have on the table,

0:34:200:34:24

which is the transition period.

There is a lot of misunderstanding

0:34:240:34:28

as to what the transition period is.

Businesses calling for a standstill.

0:34:280:34:35

But the government has put on the

table is not a standstill. It is the

0:34:350:34:41

wind down process that is within

Article 50 which is very different

0:34:410:34:48

to a standstill. Business needs to

understand is a bag gap.

We keep

0:34:480:34:55

hearing Europe has moved on from the

whole Brexit process, they are not

0:34:550:34:58

thinking about Britain any more. To

what extent is that not the case for

0:34:580:35:04

European businesses? The genuinely

concerned at the moment?

European

0:35:040:35:09

businesses and politicians would all

hope to have an agreement with the

0:35:090:35:12

UK. They did want any of this! This

has happened to them, and they are

0:35:120:35:18

simply reacting to what has happened

in the UK. There is will to try to

0:35:180:35:23

get to an agreement, but the ball is

in the UK Government's court. We

0:35:230:35:31

just need to know what the UK

Government once.

So what are the

0:35:310:35:36

chances of turning this from what

some business leaders are calling a

0:35:360:35:39

lose lose into a win-win for both

sides?

The very first thing we need

0:35:390:35:44

is to understand exactly what the

plan is, what the trade framework is

0:35:440:35:50

that the government wants to put on

the table for negotiations, and that

0:35:500:35:53

is the very first step. We still do

not know. More than one year after

0:35:530:35:59

the Brexit referendum, we still do

not know exactly what type of

0:35:590:36:03

agreement the UK Government once.

Once they put that on the table,

0:36:030:36:07

negotiations can start, and I am

sure it would be with goodwill.

0:36:070:36:10

Everybody has to lose if we do not

have an agreement.

Thank you very

0:36:100:36:15

much for coming, do come back and

talk to us more. There will be

0:36:150:36:19

plenty to talk about! Here is

something I do not understand.

0:36:190:36:22

Businesses say they want clarity but

in this instance, even if they get

0:36:220:36:35

clarity from London and the British

side, the then still have to go

0:36:350:36:37

through the whole European side

where you've got 27 countries

0:36:370:36:39

involved, and that could still be

changed, potentially.

That was the

0:36:390:36:42

experience of the Canadians. They

negotiated for many years to get

0:36:420:36:44

this deal. It is not the sort of

deal the UK has now within the

0:36:440:36:47

single market and Customs union, but

when that went to the vote of the 27

0:36:470:36:53

countries, I think Belgium voted

against it, the smallest part of the

0:36:530:36:56

European Union. You have to face

facts are that, when this goes

0:36:560:37:01

through the process in October if

they get there and as soon as

0:37:010:37:04

October, there may be some countries

who do not like the deal, and there

0:37:040:37:09

will certainly be dissenting voices

within the European Parliament, and

0:37:090:37:11

both have to agree to it.

Let's not

look other news now. Boris Johnson

0:37:110:37:23

has said the MPs that Nazanin

Zaghari-Ratcliffe had been training

0:37:230:37:27

journalists but now the government

admits she was visiting family and

0:37:270:37:32

has called on Iraq to release on

humanitarian grounds.

0:37:320:37:49

Today marks two years

since the terrorist attacks

0:37:490:37:51

by Islamist militants in Paris,

in which 130 people

0:37:510:37:53

lost their lives.

0:37:530:37:54

The French President Emmanuel Macron

heard tributes at each site.

0:37:540:37:56

His visit took him to Bataclan

nightclub, where 89 people

0:37:560:37:59

were killed when gunmen stormed

a rock concert just after the Eagles

0:37:590:38:01

of Death Metal had begun performing.

0:38:020:38:03

The band returned to Paris to take

part in today's commemoration.

0:38:030:38:06

The solution for Catalonia may be

something for other than

0:38:060:38:08

independence. The Spanish Prime

Minister has been campaigning. He

0:38:080:38:09

says regional elections next month

will help end what he called the

0:38:090:38:12

havoc. Bob Geldof says he is handing

back the freedom of the city in

0:38:120:38:16

Dublin because the same honour was

given to Aung San Suu Kyi. The Irish

0:38:160:38:22

musician and humanitarian activist

described the treatment of the

0:38:220:38:26

revenger Muslims matter ethnic

cleansing.

0:38:260:38:38

The Majority Leader of the US

Senate Mitch McConnell has become

0:38:380:38:40

the latest to say it is time

for Roy Moore to step

0:38:400:38:43

aside as a candidate

for an Alabama Senate seat.

0:38:430:38:49

It comes after allegations

in the Washington Post that Moore

0:38:490:38:51

initiated sexual contact with a 14

year old when he was in his 30s.

0:38:510:38:55

Today another woman is coming

forward to say she was assaulted

0:38:550:38:57

by Moore as a minor.

0:38:570:38:58

But the firebrand judge denies

the allegations and is threatening

0:38:580:39:02

to sue the Washington Post.

0:39:030:39:04

With us now is the BBC's

North America Editor Jon Sopel.

0:39:040:39:08

This is some fairly obscure or

special election in Alabama but it

0:39:080:39:11

is suddenly getting an awful lot of

attention because sex?

It is about

0:39:110:39:17

sex and the battle between the

establishment Republican party, who

0:39:170:39:21

do not like Roy Moore one little

bit, and firebrands who are keen and

0:39:210:39:26

pushing Roy Moore to be the standard

bearer for a new type of

0:39:260:39:31

republicanism in Washington. We had

Mitch McConnell coming out today,

0:39:310:39:36

saying he should step aside. Till

now people have been saying, if it

0:39:360:39:43

is the women's allegations proved

correct, who will prove or disprove

0:39:430:39:47

it? Why would you disbelieve the

women? And you have had Roy Moore

0:39:470:39:54

firing back, the person who should

step aside is Mitch McConnell! He

0:39:540:39:59

has failed Conservatives and must be

replaced.

Beyond Earth row, this

0:39:590:40:06

also says something about the leaves

of paedophilia on Alabama because

0:40:060:40:12

Republican leaders have been saying

even if he did do this, I would

0:40:120:40:17

still vote for him because he's not

Democrat.

People commit

0:40:170:40:20

transgressions and they may be

apologetic. The abuse of a

0:40:200:40:28

14-year-old, I wonder what they

think it was the own daughter who

0:40:280:40:33

was the subject of such attention?

Maybe they would take a rather

0:40:330:40:36

different view on it. But it shows

just how polarised politics are you

0:40:360:40:43

would say, there was a bit of an

indiscretion with a 14-year-old, but

0:40:430:40:47

more important we get a Republican

in the Senate than we do someone who

0:40:470:40:51

may have an unsavoury past.

The big

stick that the Roy Moorside is

0:40:510:40:57

wielding, he has been elected to

various offices within Alabama, this

0:40:570:41:01

is just come out now?

They are

trying to play that. But what is

0:41:010:41:08

fascinating as well as the various

scenarios that have been sketched

0:41:080:41:11

out for what might unfold next,

which is fascinating. You could have

0:41:110:41:17

a writing candidate, you could agree

that Republican eggs would be a

0:41:170:41:22

better person, the you write their

name on the ballot, and a senator

0:41:220:41:26

wins a seat by that way. The other

way suggested is that the Senate, he

0:41:260:41:32

gets appointed, wins the election,

goes to the Senate, the modern

0:41:320:41:37

inquiry, say, not the person, start

again, and the process goes back to

0:41:370:41:42

zero. The more intriguing one, the

Machiavellian mind, is that the seat

0:41:420:41:47

is available because Jeff Sessions,

the Attorney General who Donald

0:41:470:41:51

Trump has described as we can not

good at doing his job, goes back to

0:41:510:41:54

being the senator for Alabama and

hey, presto! You have both

0:41:540:42:03

created... Solve the problem of Roy

Moore and got rid of the guy you do

0:42:030:42:06

not like as Attorney General! It is

the house of cards on steroids

0:42:060:42:10

option!

Never heard that before! And

that is why we have the programme!

0:42:100:42:16

That is quite a scenario, that is

brilliant.

You heard it here first!

0:42:160:42:24

Exactly. I was going to ask you

whether Roy Moore was the best

0:42:240:42:29

option, but clearly not!

I think it

would be tricky. Who else has

0:42:290:42:35

recognition? You would have to be

pushed to find another Republican.

0:42:350:42:39

Roy Moore is still ten points ahead,

and that is in a poll taken since

0:42:390:42:45

these allegations surfaced. 40% of

Alabama Christian evangelicals say

0:42:450:42:49

they were still vote for him despite

these allegations. We do do have

0:42:490:42:54

some religious figures coming out

and saying, this business of 40

0:42:540:42:58

years ago, total red herring, what

did we learn from the Catholic abuse

0:42:580:43:02

crisis? It it's a very long time for

the victims of harassment and abuse

0:43:020:43:06

to come forward. They seem to be

saying, give these women the benefit

0:43:060:43:10

of the doubt. Good news, we will go

down to Alabama to cover this

0:43:100:43:14

election, so that should be a fun

programme.

0:43:140:43:17

This is Beyond One Hundred Days.

0:43:180:43:21

Still to come:

0:43:210:43:24

The biographer who gives new details

on da Vinci and his works.

0:43:240:43:35

From "Four Weddings and a Funeral",

to "Love Actually" and "Bridget

0:43:350:43:38

Jones's Diary" he's played

many leading roles.

0:43:380:43:39

But in his latest film,

Hugh Grant has been cast

0:43:390:43:42

as a self-obsessed, washed up actor.

0:43:420:43:43

How did he feel about

being offered the role

0:43:430:43:45

of the villain in Paddington 2 -

and the prospect of being

0:43:450:43:48

overshadowed by a much loved bear?

0:43:480:43:52

What is so special about that bear?

0:43:520:43:54

He's a wonderful

character, isn't he?

0:43:540:43:56

Well, it's funny, number one,

and it's moving, number two.

0:43:560:43:58

And it manages not to be

schmaltzy, which is,

0:43:580:44:00

I think, really difficult.

0:44:000:44:03

Especially when the whole philosophy

of the film is "be nice to everyone,

0:44:030:44:06

be tolerant," you know.

0:44:060:44:07

It would be really easy to go yucky.

0:44:070:44:12

Just putting you on hold.

0:44:120:44:14

Whoa!

0:44:140:44:16

But I don't want to.

0:44:160:44:17

It's only a haircut, Nelson.

0:44:180:44:19

There's nothing to be afraid of.

0:44:190:44:22

Come in, take a seat.

0:44:220:44:25

We'll go somewhere else.

0:44:250:44:29

And an actor playing an actor -

did you enjoy that?

0:44:290:44:32

Yes, well, I loved that.

0:44:330:44:36

I was able to dip into the dim,

distant past of my career,

0:44:360:44:39

when I did do theatre

0:44:390:44:40

and met characters not entirely

unlike Phoenix Buchanan,

0:44:400:44:42

the guy I play in this film.

0:44:420:44:47

He was a big West End star,

and became such a narcissist

0:44:470:44:50

that he couldn't bear

working with anyone else.

0:44:500:45:00

He's Phoenix Buchanan.

0:45:280:45:29

Dad's celebrity client.

0:45:290:45:30

I suppose you know who I am?

0:45:300:45:32

Oh, yes.

0:45:320:45:33

You're a very famous actor.

0:45:330:45:34

VIP, celebrity...

0:45:340:45:35

Or used to be.

0:45:350:45:36

Now you do dog food commercials.

0:45:360:45:37

This will be me, in ten years' time.

0:45:370:45:39

You think it will?

0:45:390:45:40

What about the dog food adverts?

0:45:400:45:42

That is his big gig, at the moment.

0:45:420:45:44

Yeah.

0:45:440:45:45

Hugh, really, dog food adverts?

0:45:450:45:46

Well, you never know,

you never know.

0:45:460:45:48

I started with adverts.

0:45:480:45:49

My career in the '80s was writing

and acting in radio commercials,

0:45:490:45:52

including dog food.

0:45:520:45:53

Actually, no - we did spoof dog food

- for Red Stripe lager.

0:45:530:45:56

The Church of England is saying that

people should be able to dress

0:45:560:45:58

however they like.

0:45:580:45:59

Dressing up is not just a favourite

activity for the reception class

0:45:590:46:02

at this London church primary

school, it's also part

0:46:020:46:04

of the curriculum designed

to encourage individuality

0:46:040:46:06

and discourage bullying.

0:46:060:46:12

The Church of England has

updated its advice for its 4700

0:46:120:46:15

schools to protect children who may

be considering transition

0:46:150:46:17

from one gender to another.

0:46:170:46:24

Being an individual is very

important and respecting everybody's

0:46:240:46:26

right to be an individual is very

important to us.

0:46:260:46:30

So if children aren't themselves

then they cannot be free

0:46:300:46:32

to learn and that's key.

0:46:320:46:37

The new guidelines say children

should be allowed to try many cloaks

0:46:370:46:40

of identity without being labelled

and that a child may choose

0:46:400:46:43

the tutu, princess's tiara,

or a fireman's helmet

0:46:430:46:45

without expectation or comment.

0:46:450:46:53

Today's guidance is designed

to prevent bullying in schools

0:46:530:46:59

like this but, on the issue of human

sexuality, there is deep division

0:46:590:47:04

within the Church of England

and some Evangelical Christians see

0:47:040:47:07

today's announcement as an attempt

to erode the authority

0:47:070:47:09

of the Bible and embrace

an ever-changing culture.

0:47:090:47:13

What people expect the Church

of England to do is to set forth

0:47:130:47:16

the framework for living as set out

in the Bible.

0:47:160:47:25

That we're all made wonderfully

in the image of God,

0:47:250:47:27

male and female, and the Church

of England today seems

0:47:270:47:29

to have failed in its duty

to say that to the nation.

0:47:290:47:32

But the Archbishop of Canterbury,

who expressed his support

0:47:320:47:34

for the new guidance in writing

and on social media,

0:47:340:47:37

rejects this criticism,

saying no child should be diminished

0:47:370:47:41

by being reduced to

a stereotype or a problem.

0:47:410:47:50

Steve Jobs, Albert Einstein

and Benjamin Franklin -

0:47:520:47:54

they are a few of the towering

figures that author

0:47:540:47:58

Walter Isaacson has captured

in his acclaimed biographies.

0:47:580:48:00

Now he has set his sights

on Leonardo da Vinci.

0:48:000:48:07

Using Leonardo's notebooks

and drawings he shows how

0:48:070:48:10

the intersection of art and science

led to a new world of innovation.

0:48:100:48:13

For more on this creative genius

and the works which have been

0:48:130:48:17

enjoyed by millions, Mr

Isaacson joins us now from New York.

0:48:170:48:23

I knew of course that da Vinci had

such a broad reach but I did not

0:48:230:48:29

realise how broad until I picked up

your book, astronomy, astrology,

0:48:290:48:35

music, military, it was almost as if

the paintings is an afterthought for

0:48:350:48:38

him.

He wants to learn about

everything. He sees the patterns of

0:48:380:48:46

nature. When he turned that

unnerving master of becoming 30

0:48:460:48:52

years old, he writes a job

application to the Duke of Malang,

0:48:520:48:55

and it is 11 paragraphs long. The

first ten paragraphs all about

0:48:550:49:00

engineering, I can build great

buildings and make weapons of war

0:49:000:49:04

and divert rivers. Only in the 11th

paragraph does he say you can paint

0:49:040:49:08

as well as anyone. I think it

enjoyed trying to do everything, and

0:49:080:49:12

that is what made him the

Renaissance man.

Then he did also

0:49:120:49:18

merge the two. I loved the story in

the book about the process he went

0:49:180:49:22

through to produce perhaps the most

famous painting ever painted and the

0:49:220:49:25

most famous smile ever painted, that

of the Mona Lisa.

When I looked at

0:49:250:49:33

his notebooks, I realised he is

curious about everything and wants

0:49:330:49:36

to know every muscle that touches

the lips and which nerves control

0:49:360:49:41

those muscles. He dissects the human

eye to show that when you look at

0:49:410:49:45

something directly, you see the

black-and-white detail, but on the

0:49:450:49:49

edges of your retina, you see

colours and shadows. He is able to

0:49:490:49:52

make that smile of the no Mona Lisa

interactive. If you stare at the

0:49:520:49:57

tiniest black-and-white details on

the corner of her lips, they are

0:49:570:50:02

straight, but the shadows and

colours go up, and over 16 years he

0:50:020:50:07

is doing the tiniest of brush

strokes so that it becomes an

0:50:070:50:11

emotional painting that interacts

with us. That is why you have to

0:50:110:50:15

love both his science and his

anatomy and his optics as well as

0:50:150:50:20

his eye to see why he was so

creative and innovative.

Are you

0:50:200:50:25

saying that, when he dissected

faces, he was actually looking at

0:50:250:50:29

how the muscles were working? Is

that the secret as to why this

0:50:290:50:36

painting flirts with us?

It is one

of the many secrets. Also the way

0:50:360:50:41

the optics work. But there are 16

pages in this notebook where he

0:50:410:50:45

dissects every muscle of the face

and how it works. He even discovers

0:50:450:50:50

things you a night could discover if

we were more observant, like all

0:50:500:50:55

bottom lip is a muscle which is why

you out on your own, but your top

0:50:550:50:59

lip is not an independent muscle, it

so you cannot pout out, don't try

0:50:590:51:07

this now, you will look silly on

television, but it is why Leonardo

0:51:070:51:12

loved every aspect of science and

anatomy.

We were just looking at

0:51:120:51:17

pictures of a man which is on the

back of the book, but you also had a

0:51:170:51:21

chance to come over here to Windsor

to look at the Royal collection and

0:51:210:51:24

the drawings and the Royal

collection. How did you get there

0:51:240:51:28

and what did you find when you

looked at the drawings?

Windsor

0:51:280:51:33

Castle has the greatest collection

of the notebook pages from Leonardo

0:51:330:51:37

on anatomy, the foetus in the womb,

for example, that beautiful drawing.

0:51:370:51:42

They showed how he made most

distinction between art and science.

0:51:420:51:48

I was very lucky to meet some of the

people involved in the duration,

0:51:480:51:55

Martin Clayton is a great expert on

Leonardo, so I was able to see some

0:51:550:52:01

of his drawings, and in other places

study other notebook drawings. But

0:52:010:52:05

England is very lucky. It probably

has the greatest collection of

0:52:050:52:12

Leonardo's drawings and the virgin

of the locks in the National

0:52:120:52:15

Gallery.

You are writing a book

that, if Leonardo da Vinci had been

0:52:150:52:22

alive today, he probably would have

been diagnosed with a DD! We would

0:52:220:52:28

not be able to comprehend or contain

his creativity.

Leonardo was always

0:52:280:52:35

very distracted. He was obsessively

focused at times. He had depression

0:52:350:52:43

and anxiety, but also very elated at

times. When people ask me, did he

0:52:430:52:47

have a DD or OCD? I say, you are not

supposed to pull down the diagnostic

0:52:470:52:55

manual and think, how would we have

treated him or what regiment would

0:52:550:52:59

we have put on? Maybe we would have

done that but I doubt we would have

0:52:590:53:03

had the Mona Lisa if so. It was good

he was able to deal with his angels

0:53:030:53:09

and dragons without his life.

Clearly he would still be

0:53:090:53:13

appreciated. I think Sotheby's has a

painting of his going on sale today

0:53:130:53:19

that is expected to fetch even more

than you can afford!

The's give

0:53:190:53:23

credit to Christies. It will

probably go for 115 million dollars.

0:53:230:53:36

It is the last Leonardo in private

hands. In Salvador Monday, you see

0:53:360:53:42

this beautiful crystal orb and you

see the imagination use it him

0:53:420:53:47

getting the crystal right but not

distort Jesus' robes because he's

0:53:470:53:53

showing the miraculous quality of

Jesus' stewardess of this world. And

0:53:530:53:58

the hand being very sharp because

Leonardo knows that the sharpness

0:53:580:54:02

makes it look like the hand is

coming out to you. This is why he's

0:54:020:54:06

so creative and why we learn from

him.

Love it! Brilliant. It is

0:54:060:54:10

always good to talk to you, thank

you very much indeed for coming on

0:54:100:54:15

the programme. Fabulous! They were

enormously tolerant of da Vinci, you

0:54:150:54:20

was gay, left-handed, born out of

wedlock and still manage to an

0:54:200:54:24

engineering job. Amazing. An amazing

that today he is just as appreciated

0:54:240:54:30

and valuable as he was back then. We

will try the experiment, which is

0:54:300:54:35

worthy of Leonardo da Vinci. It is a

time space experiment and it is to

0:54:350:54:41

with whether you can blow out a

candle on your birthday cake or the

0:54:410:54:47

way from London. You blow, and we

will see what happens! Go on. Blow

0:54:470:54:52

to my right, I have been told. You

didn't even have two! It went out!

0:54:520:55:01

Happy birthday, Christian. I will

eat a bit and you will tell me how

0:55:010:55:04

delicious it is! 25, never been

kissed today. I did get a chocolate

0:55:040:55:11

cake like that from the team this

morning to have my copy. And I have

0:55:110:55:16

had very nice messages from our view

was. I hope you enjoy the cake! We

0:55:160:55:26

have to admit the Christian is still

ridiculously young, talented, not

0:55:260:55:34

quite da Vinci -esque, but if we

give him a few more years, he will

0:55:340:55:37

be up there selling something for

$100 billion at Christie 's, not

0:55:370:55:43

Sotheby's. Kristian, my friend,

happy birthday, it is so much fun

0:55:430:55:46

working with you. And stay young! Do

you is this tomorrow? Yours, and we

0:55:460:55:54

will celebrate it tomorrow! I want a

really big cake!

0:55:540:56:01