19/03/2018 Beyond 100 Days


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19/03/2018

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Beyond One Hundred Days.

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A significant moment

in the Brexit negotiation.

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The UK and EU have agreed

terms for a transition,

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pending a satisfactory divorce.

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Under the terms of the deal Britain

will be allowed to sign new trade

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deals with the rest of the world

that will come into force in 2021.

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But here's the hitch -

the two sides still have a lot

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of tricky issues to figure out,

not least the Irish border question.

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Businesses need not delay investment

decisions all rushed through

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contingency plans based on guesses

about the future deal. Instead, they

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now have certainty about the terms

that will apply immediately after

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our withdrawal.

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How safe is our personal

information on Facebook?

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The company's share price falls

on news millions of profiles

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being used for political purposes.

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Also on the programme:

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Donald Trump takes aim

at Robert Mueller.

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At the moment it's just on Twitter

but is the President loosing

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patience with the Prosecutor?

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Uber suspends all tests

of its driverless cars,

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after one of them hit and killed

a woman crossing a road in Arizona.

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Get in touch with us.

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Hello and welcome -

I'm Katty Kay in Washington

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and Christian Fraser is in London.

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British business are welcoming

a moment of certainty

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in the otherwise uncertain

Brexit negotiations.

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Sterling rose today

after the UK and the EU

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agreed a deal on the terms

of the transition period.

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TRANSLATION:

What we

of the transition period.

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TRANSLATION:

What we are

of the transition period.

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TRANSLATION:

What we are presenting

of the transition period.

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TRANSLATION:

What we are presenting

to you today here with David is a

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legal text, a joint legal text,

which constitutes in my mind a

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decisive step because we were able

this morning to agree, and after all

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those days and nights of hard work,

on a large part of what will make up

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an international agreement for the

ordered withdrawal of the United

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Kingdom.

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In the colour-coded chart published

by the two sides today,

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75% of the Withdrawal

document is now in green,

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meaning "agreed in principle".

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That applies to the

financial settlement -

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the divorce payment -

and the rights of 4m citizens

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in the UK and the EU

affected by Brexit.

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Also in green,

the terms of the transition.

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It will last until Dec 2020.

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During that time London will abide

by EU rules but will lose any say

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in the decision making process.

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But the UK has got one concession.

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It will be able to sign trade deals

with other countries

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during the transition;

although they'll only come

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into effect after the transition.

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The UK won't have any say in EU

rules during the transition

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but the two sides agreed a good

faith clause, under which the UK

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will be consulted a range of issues.

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Let's cross to Brussels

and our Europe

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correspondent Damian Grammaticus.

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So lots of green, Damian,

but 25% of this document

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is in white, not agreed,

and they represent some of the most

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difficult obstacles to overcome.

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Yes, because the important thing to

remember is that this is a

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conditional agreement and you were

saying at the beginning businesses

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are welcoming certainty. There is a

big question mark at the heart of

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that, so it's not really certain.

And that is because of those white

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areas, as you say, and key to that

is the issue about Ireland and the

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border between Northern Ireland and

the Republic of Ireland, still that

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question bedevilling the

negotiations and how to avoid it.

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The agreement today says that in the

legal text there will be the EU's

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preferred or option that it has on

the table at the minute, which is

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keeping Northern Ireland part of the

UK still in the EU's Customs and

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regulatory sort of sphere, so

there's no need for a border. That

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is meant to go into the deal and the

agreement today says it will but

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that -- but that is still

politically a very difficult thing

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for the UK Government, and if that

falls apart this whole deal falls

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apart, so still that question to be

resolved.

So why should we have any

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more confidence that they can agree

issues that seem impossible to agree

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on today after the magic date of

March of next year, when we go into

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the transition period?

Well, that's

a good question. This issue of the

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Irish border has to be agreed before

March next year and it has to be

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agreed in the coming six months or

so, because it has to be in the

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withdrawal text. That's what the EU

is saying at the minute. If it isn't

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in that text, then the EU has a huge

stumbling block to get over. I think

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the positive thing to take from this

is that the overall picture from the

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UK's point of view is that one year

to go until transition, that is in

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just nine days, that is when the

countdown starts, businesses have

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been sent to the UK Government, we

need a year's notice of what will

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happen or we will start can --

triggering contingency plans, so

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that is where they need to get the

agreement saying, yes, in principle

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a transition will happen as long as

the other things can be agreed, but

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there are a lot of difficult things

the UK has already agreed to and

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most of the EU's big demands, they

UK being a payer and allowing free

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movement to continue for EU

citizens, UK has signed up to all of

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those.

Thank you.

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Let's speak now to Henry Newman,

Director at Open Europe.

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Baseball have to take a leap of

faith that there will be a political

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leap of faith -- they still say they

have to take a leap of faith. How

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much movement or they have?

I think

they have some movement. There was

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good achievement on both sides and

now, I am assuming the European

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Council signs this off, they should

have got agreement on the

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transition. That is what businesses

have been asking for. This is a

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gentleman's agreement from the heads

of government, if you like, that

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they will keep things exactly the

same for the period of roughly 21

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months until the end of 2020, as

though we were an EU member but

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without voting rights. It is

possible things will fall apart in

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the later stages of the deal but I

find that hard to imagine. This is

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now overwhelming like --

overwhelmingly likely that we will

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exit with this transition.

It was

said last week the idea that you put

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the order somewhere in the Irish Sea

was not something that was possible.

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She would never get that through

Parliament so you wonder why you

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would put in the document. Because

if she brought that back the

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government would collapse and there

would be no deal. It seems a bit of

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a moot point.

What they have done

rather cleverly is parked some of

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the most difficult issues, the

governments of the trading agreement

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and the questions of the Irish

border, until later in the

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negotiations. And that is good

practice. You don't want to do with

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the most difficult issue in the

beginning. Some of this comes down

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to the problem that the UK has

agreed to things which are

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contradictory back in December. Both

sides fudged the December text to

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make sure they could get over the

line and we've seen more of that

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today. We don't know what the answer

is Northern Ireland and Ireland and

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we will have to wait and see, so

that's a key area where there will

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need to be lots of discussion.

Henry, in any negotiation there is

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give and take. Who has taken more

and has given more?

Probably the UK

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has moved further but the EU has

also moved. That's sensible because

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it is something primarily the UK was

asking for. We could spend a lot of

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capital trying to design bespoke

transition periods or we could focus

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the capital of working at the future

agreement, so I think it was quite

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sensible for the UK to broadly

accept the EU terms for the

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transition.

Good to see you. Thank

you for coming in.

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Facebook's share price fell sharply

today as the company came

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under scrutiny for failing

to protect information on millions

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of American voters that may have

been used to influence

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the 2016 election.

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A joint report by the New York Times

and the Observer newspapers found

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that 50 million Facebook profiles

were accessed, without

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users' knowledge, to help

Donald Trump's campaign.

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The data was used by the UK

firm Cambridge Analytica

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to gain information about voters

so they could be influenced

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to support the Trump campaign.

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Alexander Nix, the chief executive

of Cambridge Analytica,

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told BBC Newsnight the allegations

were completely untrue.

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A lot of the allegations that have

been put to Cambridge are entirely

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unfounded and unfair. We weren't

involved with Brexit. We've been

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crystal clear about this. At every

single opportunity. And at last we

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are beginning to see in the media

reporting that reflects this. Only

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yesterday Aaron Banks came out with

a statement for the first time

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clarifying we had absolutely no

involvement. The Guardian, who's

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been propagating a lot of this

misinformation or fake news, printed

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that, and two days ago another

statement saying we weren't

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involved.

Do you think The Guardian

is in the business of fake news?

I

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think that there has been some...

Some fairly slipshod journalism in

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regards to our involvement in some

of these things, where we presented

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unequivocally the fact of the matter

to these newspapers and they've

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chosen to paint their own picture,

which is now proving to be false.

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Plenty in the weekend newspapers

about this. Cambridge analytical

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boasted had 4000-5000 datapoints on

Americans who were voting but they

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did tell Facebook reportedly that

they deleted the information they

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had harvested. Did they delete that

information and have they been

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forthcoming and honest in these

Parliamentary inquiries about the

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information they hold? That's speak

to the chair of the Parliamentary

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committee in the UK, who is looking

into this. You put out a statement

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last night saying you want Mark

Zuckerberg to come back to really

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give evidence on what happened. Are

you concerned that Facebook doesn't

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have control of what third parties

are doing with its information?

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That's right, because they gave us

assurances that they could track

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what people were doing with their

data, that if somebody was breaching

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their rules they would get that data

back and take action against the

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company that was doing that. And

here we have a case with Cambridge

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analytical who knew there was an

issue two years ago with data they

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had taken and that Facebook had

asked them to destroy. They did

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nothing to check they had and they

only suspended them when it was

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about to hit the newspapers.

Facebook has been quite aggressive

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about this story. First they are

saying there wasn't a breach because

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these user profiles were taken for

academic purposes. Then they

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threatened to sue The Observer, they

banned them from having a Facebook

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account. Do you think the Facebook

response is in any way, and we have

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not hard from Mark Zuckerberg

himself, is their response in any

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way adequate? -- heard from Mark

Zuckerberg.

No. It just shows you

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they can take down accounts really

quickly when they have the grounds

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to do it so they are punishing the

whistle-blower for bringing very

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important information into the

public domain. They knew what was

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going on and they didn't act on it.

They can call it what they want but

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as far as members of the public are

concerned, an academic at Cambridge

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University managed to access data of

50 million Facebook users and

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themselves act to a commercial

entity for them to use in their

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campaigns. I think that is a data

breach and I think many will be

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concerned about actually how much

data Facebook has on them and that

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Facebook cannot keep it safe.

What

about the chief executive? Keeper

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Parliament last month his company

had never obtained or used Facebook

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data. Now we know they did and they

did not delete face -- they did not

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delete the data they told Facebook

they had.

Exactly. We asked him

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whether he had acquired data

directly and he said they hadn't.

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And that's why we want him to come

back and explain to Parliament his

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answers, because I don't think his

answers are in any way consistent

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with what we now know and therefore

if Parliament and the committee

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believe we have been misled, we will

report back to the Committee on

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Standards here in Parliament.

It is

not entirely clear what you or US

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investigators can do about Facebook

or Mark Zuckerberg but billions of

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our viewers around the world have

Facebook accounts. What would you

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say to those viewers?

I think they

should speak up and let Facebook

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know how angry they are. I think

it's terrible that Mark Zuckerberg

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or an equally senior person in the

company is not prepared to answer

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questions to discuss these concerns.

Ultimately this is about data

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Facebook others on its users and how

it sells that data to advertisers

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and whether it can keep it safe.

This is fundamental to the way

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Facebook work some people have a

right to know if their data is being

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used properly. There is a bigger

concern is well about the way in

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which consumer data gathered through

surveys on consumer issues is being

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used in political campaigns, when

nobody really gave their consent for

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that to take place. But in terms of

what we can do, we can hold

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inquiries to take people to account

but we have also been debating in

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the House of Commons today whether

the government could change the law

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to give the Information Commissioner

even more powers for tech companies

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not to disclose data to a request

for in that nation to make sure data

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laws are properly being adhered to.

-- request for information. On the

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whole we have to take it on trust

that the big tech companies are

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abiding by the data protection laws

that exist in our country and other

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countries and I think we need the

right to go behind the curtain and

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see for ourselves that is the case.

I can understand why that shouldn't

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be Parliament but an independent

investigator could do that.

Thank

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you. I didn't understand until this

morning the fact that American to

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have their data held on harvested

might have stronger legal grounds

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here in the UK because the

information was stored in the UK, so

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there are Americans now making

representations over here, and

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apparently, according to the America

I saw this morning, he said the

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safeguards here in the UK are much

stronger than the United States, so

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they are more confident in the

system here in the UK. I think the

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question will be a commercial one.

There has been so much bad publicity

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surrounding the story on Facebook

and so much pressure on Facebook's

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executives to come forward and

explain how they have this

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information and did nothing about

it, because we saw the share price

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falling by something like 7%. If all

of those people with accounts start

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speaking up about this and

protesting, I would suspect you

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would see Facebook moving a bit more

quickly. Do you know how much Mark

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Zuckerberg loss today in one-day?

According to that share for? More

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than you or I will ever have in our

lives! $5 billion! Talking, by the

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way, of big Internet companies who

have not had a good day, one of

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Uber's vehicles, self driving

vehicles, has hit and killed a woman

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in Arizona. The car was an

autonomous mode with an operator

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behind the wheel when the woman was

struck. Uber has not confirmed the

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vehicle within autonomous mode but

it does say it is suspending self

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driving car tests in all cities. I

think people will pay a lot of

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attention to this, don't you?

I

think so. We chatted about this

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earlier and you said you think the

technology is already there but I

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suppose the point is that you have

an incident there will be a public

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inquiry and people will have less

confidence in it. And when I sort of

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reflect on whether I would be happy

to get into one of these cars, how

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long would it take you as a driver

to actually let go of the wheel to

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put your faith in the car and trust

in the system? I think that's the

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problem a lot of people will have,

particularly when they see a story

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like this.

Look at those pictures.

That is just brutal. The poor woman

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on her bicycle who was knocked over

by this driverless car. People I

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speak to in the tech world say that

technology is there, you are right,

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and ultimately these cars will be

safer than those driven by people

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because robots don't drink and they

are. Texting and driving and they

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don't get distracted, they don't

speed, they know what they are

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doing, but the human appetite for

trusting driverless cars is still

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something like 5-10 years off, and

it would take me something a very

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long time -- it would take somebody

like me a very long time to trust a

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driverless car. That sets that

public confidence.

But we don't know

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who was to blame there. It just

takes me back to that incident

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involving a driver being killed and

it became clear after the

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investigation he had ignored six

audible warnings and seven visual

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warnings on his dashboard.

I think

he was watching Harry Potter, wasn't

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he?

That's it. You hear the story

but not the follow-up.

OK, American

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politics.

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On Saturday, Donald Trump said there

was no collusion and no crime and

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the probe should not have been

trusted. This is the first time Mr

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Trump mentioned him by name, and

then again today came a total

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witchhunt.

For the most part there

has been a deafening silence from

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the Republican Party protest at the

President's attacks on the

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investigation but a couple of

Republican leaders were prompted to

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speak out on TV this weekend.

If you

look at the jurisdiction, first and

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foremost, what did Russia do to this

country in 2016? That is supremely

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important and it has nothing to do

with collusion. So to suggest that

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mullah should shut down and all he

is looking at is collusion, if you

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have an innocent client, act like

it.

Are you worried that the

0:19:180:19:24

president is ordering the fire of

him? It looks like that from his

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tweets.

That would be the beginning

and end of his presidency because...

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We are joined by Ron Christie from

New York, who used to working the

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Bush administration. -- Ron Christie

in New York. What would the steps be

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word Donald Trump to decide to act

on what his tweet seemed to be

0:19:460:19:51

suggesting he would like to do and

shut down the Russia probe?

0:19:510:20:06

It would be very simple, actually.

He would be within his legal

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authority to fire him if he thought

it the appropriate action to do so.

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But all that does, as we've seen, is

bring very bad press and attention

0:20:160:20:21

to the president, so while it is

within his legal rights to do so, we

0:20:210:20:25

have heard so many people talk about

a constitutional crisis, I think the

0:20:250:20:30

president would have more people

against him in his own party than he

0:20:300:20:33

would be -- than would be

supportive.

We played a couple there

0:20:330:20:38

but so far, the Republican Party has

been pretty forgiving of Donald

0:20:380:20:41

Trump. Do you think this would be

the straw that would break the

0:20:410:20:47

Repubblica... On getting lost in

that one! With this be a bridge too

0:20:470:20:50

far?

It would be a bridge too far.

What little audience I have on

0:20:500:20:58

Twitter, I've taken to Twitter

myself this weekend and have said

0:20:580:21:01

the president is not acting

presidential. It's an honour for him

0:21:010:21:05

to hold that office and he demeaned

by some of his tweets and outlandish

0:21:050:21:09

comments that he makes. Let the

special counsel do its work. If your

0:21:090:21:14

client is innocent and they have

nothing to find, then let the

0:21:140:21:18

investigation go. And you heard one

of the current members of Congress

0:21:180:21:22

say, stop acting guilty, Mr

President.

Aside from the fact that

0:21:220:21:27

there would be all these

repercussions if he sacked Mueller,

0:21:270:21:32

the important point, and that what

his lawyers keep saying to him, is

0:21:320:21:35

the obstruction of a non-crime is a

crime, and that is the real danger.

0:21:350:21:41

It's good to see you, Christian.

Obstruction of justice here with

0:21:410:21:46

United States is a very simple crime

to prove. What you're looking at

0:21:460:21:49

here is, has an individual taken

steps to a legal proceeding? To

0:21:490:21:54

impede an investigation? And one

could certainly make the argument

0:21:540:21:59

that, yes, the president is well

within his legal power to dismiss

0:21:590:22:02

the special counsel but it does

bring into question, is that

0:22:020:22:07

obstructing an investigation? That

is certainly not a road he wants to

0:22:070:22:10

go down. It's a bridge too far. The

question remains, what does Mr Trump

0:22:100:22:15

thing and will he act on it?

I know

you've got your into the ground.

0:22:150:22:20

What is going on? He's got rid of

Gary Coen, among others. He has an

0:22:200:22:29

ambiguous relationship with his

chief of staff. These are the people

0:22:290:22:31

who rent him in. The shackles off

now and is this real Trump we're

0:22:310:22:36

starting to see? -- these are the

people who rein him in.

I can tell

0:22:360:22:44

you the times I've been in the White

House, I wouldn't call it disarray

0:22:440:22:47

but it's certainly been very

chaotic. The president likes chaos

0:22:470:22:51

and pitting his staff against each

other, and what you've seen, the

0:22:510:22:55

so-called adult supervision the

president has, those figures are

0:22:550:22:59

largely gone. He likes these folks

being at each other's throats and

0:22:590:23:02

running around because that's how

he's always operated. The question

0:23:020:23:07

is, it might be good for the

president but is it good for our

0:23:070:23:09

country? And of course it is not.

I'm not sure it is for us either

0:23:090:23:16

because it's exhausting. He has

often a real spin because there is

0:23:160:23:18

so much news!

Thank you for joining us. This is

0:23:180:23:23

interesting - the idea of the

president being unshackled. Because

0:23:230:23:27

he is also facing the weight of the

Mueller investigation. His business

0:23:270:23:32

has been subpoenaed for business

documents. And I wonder where -- I

0:23:320:23:36

wonder whether the two aren't

related. He feels he can do things

0:23:360:23:39

the way he wants to do. He fired

people and the markets didn't crash.

0:23:390:23:44

He lodged a trade war and the

markets didn't crash. He had Korean

0:23:440:23:51

trade talks and everything was fine.

And he's saying, hey, I could fire

0:23:510:23:56

Bob Mueller and everything will be

fine.

Yes, maybe. He's got a year

0:23:560:24:01

into the job and thinks he can do it

his own way. Maybe he doesn't

0:24:010:24:05

believe the accounts of those

closest to him. Anyway, we will

0:24:050:24:12

watch this with interest.

Anyway,

over to my favourite story of the

0:24:120:24:15

day. Andy Murray getting woken up by

the comedian Michael McIntyre. The

0:24:150:24:22

rude awakening was in aid of Sports

Relief. Let's have a look at the

0:24:220:24:28

tennis star getting prank.

0:24:280:24:32

Andy!

0:24:400:24:42

Welcome!

0:24:420:24:43

Holy BLEEP!

0:24:430:24:46

..To the Sport Relief

midnight game-show.

0:24:460:24:56

BLEEP morning, and the!

From your favourite TV show, please

0:24:570:25:04

tell us who is this person?

That's,

erm... That's Daddy Pig.

That's it!

0:25:040:25:23

Brilliant! He gets a high five!

He

walks in on an unsuspecting member

0:25:230:25:33

of the public in that show. And

plays a game show. I love the

0:25:330:25:38

cameramen in the tennis gear, Bjorn

Lomborg style! This is Beyond 100

0:25:380:25:44

Days.

Coming up, as President Trump

0:25:440:25:49

unveils his strategy to tackle the

US opioid crisis, we pay a visit to

0:25:490:25:53

the country's first opioid court,

getting users into treatment within

0:25:530:25:57

hours rather than weeks of their

arrest.

0:25:570:26:00

Plus the Facebook data scandal and

why one author claims it's as much

0:26:000:26:04

our fault as it is theirs. All to

come.

0:26:040:26:07

Good evening. It is the Equinox and

after a weekend of heavy snowfall,

0:26:150:26:21

no signs of spring out there. --

sums lines -- some signs of spring.

0:26:210:26:29

Temperatures are on the rise for the

rest of this week as the wind goes

0:26:290:26:32

from an easterly direction to a more

westerly one. Still north-easterly

0:26:320:26:37

wind across the country and that's

going to fade. More cloud across

0:26:370:26:40

England and Wales overnight and that

means the temperatures will be up

0:26:400:26:43

and down a bit. Clearer skies in

Scotland and Northern Ireland and

0:26:430:26:47

temperatures will drop the furthest

here. Glasgow down to -6 and some

0:26:470:26:52

places -7 or minus eight. Occasional

cloud breaks with a frost across

0:26:520:26:58

England and Wales. But signs of

change and that's because high

0:26:580:27:01

pressure to the north of us is

drifting southwards, and that will

0:27:010:27:06

allow wind coming off the Atlantic.

Not for England and Wales to begin

0:27:060:27:11

with. A brisk wind coming in for the

north-east. But temperatures up on

0:27:110:27:15

what we have seen. -- from the

north-east. The odd spot of light

0:27:150:27:20

rain and sleet but most staying dry.

Cloud increases into the north-west

0:27:200:27:26

later but temperatures way up on

what we've seen recently. Back up to

0:27:260:27:31

nine or ten in one or two spots.

High pressure continues to drift

0:27:310:27:36

down towards the south-west, the

Atlantic air will gradually flood

0:27:360:27:40

in. That process starts in earnest

on Wednesday. A brighter day over

0:27:400:27:47

England and Wales but westerly winds

for Ireland and Northern Ireland.

0:27:470:27:51

Occasional rain and drizzle further

west, the odd shower further north,

0:27:510:27:56

but temperatures climbing.

Aberdeenshire, 11 or 12. And a few

0:27:560:28:00

spots in England and Wales getting

closer to double figures. That

0:28:000:28:03

continues into Thursday. At the same

time, the Atlantic weather front

0:28:030:28:09

will be gathering towards the West

so the cloud thickening up and some

0:28:090:28:16

rain into the West of Northern

Ireland. A dry day on Thursday,

0:28:160:28:20

increasing cloud with the best of

the breaks in Eastern counties. It

0:28:200:28:24

could hit 13 degrees in parts of

Aberdeenshire on Thursday. 12 or 13.

0:28:240:28:29

Also possible across parts of the

south-east, spring will be with us.

0:28:290:28:32

This is Beyond One Hundred Days,

with me Katty Kay in Washington.

0:30:140:30:17

Christian Fraser's in London.

0:30:170:30:18

Our top stories:

0:30:180:30:19

A big step on the road to Brexit,

as agreement is reached

0:30:190:30:22

on the UK's transition period,

but there are still issues to be

0:30:220:30:25

resolved, notably the Irish border.

0:30:250:30:26

Facebook's share price

has fallen sharply on news

0:30:260:30:29

of millions of profiles were used

for political purposes.

0:30:290:30:33

Coming up in the next half hour...

0:30:330:30:34

President Trump has continued his

Twitter attack on special

0:30:340:30:38

counsel Robert Mueller,

calling the ongoing investigation

0:30:380:30:40

into Russia's interference

in the 2016 election a "witch hunt."

0:30:400:30:43

Uber suspends all tests

of its driverless cars,

0:30:430:30:45

after one of them hit and killed

a woman crossing a road in Arizona.

0:30:450:30:52

Let us know your thoughts

by using the hashtag...

0:30:520:30:56

'Beyond-One-Hundred-Days'.

0:30:560:30:59

International chemical weapons

experts have arrived in Salisbury

0:31:010:31:06

to examine the nerve agent used

to poison the former Russian spy

0:31:060:31:09

Sergei Skripal and his daughter.

0:31:090:31:14

The team from the Organisation

for the Prohibition

0:31:140:31:16

of Chemical Weapons will also visit

the military research base

0:31:160:31:18

at Porton Down in Wiltshire.

0:31:180:31:20

It comes as police say

the investigation will take months

0:31:200:31:24

and EU foreign ministers

meeting in Brussels

0:31:240:31:27

have expressed today "unqualified

solidarity" with Britain.

0:31:270:31:29

Here's our Diplomatic

Correspondent James Landale.

0:31:290:31:39

Though the focus of the

investigation today shifted ten

0:31:420:31:45

miles of Salisbury.

0:31:450:31:55

to the village of

Durrington.

0:32:010:32:02

Here, officers examined and then

removed a car that was used to pick

0:32:020:32:06

up Yulia Skripal from the airport

the day before she and her father,

0:32:060:32:09

Sergei, were attacked

with nerve agent.

0:32:090:32:10

Nearby, at the military research

complex of Porton Down,

0:32:100:32:13

inspectors from the global chemical

weapons watchdog the OPCW were due

0:32:130:32:15

to start analysing the nerve agent

that British experts believe came

0:32:150:32:18

from Russia, a process that

officials say could take some weeks.

0:32:180:32:20

In Brussels, the Foreign Secretary

was talking to Nato and European

0:32:200:32:23

allies, trying to maintain

the diplomatic pressure on Russia -

0:32:230:32:25

looking not just for

statements of support,

0:32:250:32:27

but tangible, joined-up action.

0:32:270:32:28

There are things we can

and must do together,

0:32:280:32:30

tackling disinformation from Russia,

and the UK has been helping to fund

0:32:300:32:33

that at an EU level.

0:32:330:32:34

Tackling cyber together.

0:32:340:32:35

Sharing intelligence

about what Russia is up to.

0:32:350:32:37

And for now, at least, allies

standing shoulder to shoulder.

0:32:370:32:39

All 29 Nato allies stand united.

0:32:400:32:41

We stand in solidarity

with the United Kingdom.

0:32:410:32:43

And the UK is not alone.

0:32:430:32:53

Earlier, EU foreign ministers

gathered to discuss the attack

0:32:530:32:55

and issued a joint statement

expressing unqualified

0:32:550:32:57

solidarity with the UK,

saying they took its assessment that

0:32:570:33:00

Russia was to blame

extremely seriously.

0:33:000:33:01

What is absolutely clear is that

solidarity with the United Kingdom

0:33:010:33:04

and our extreme concern

about what has happened,

0:33:040:33:06

that is really unacceptable.

0:33:060:33:10

But in Moscow,

the defiance continued.

0:33:100:33:11

As President Putin began his fourth

term of office, his spokesman said

0:33:110:33:14

the UK must prove Russia's role

in the poisoning of Mr

0:33:140:33:17

Skripal or apologise.

0:33:170:33:18

As for Russia's diplomats in London,

well, some of these officials

0:33:180:33:21

and their families will be heading

home tomorrow - 23 in all,

0:33:210:33:23

with a similar number of British

diplomats leaving Moscow shortly.

0:33:230:33:26

Tomorrow, the National Security

Council will meet to decide

0:33:260:33:28

Britain's next steps

and there is a live debate

0:33:280:33:34

within government -

should they retaliate and escalate,

0:33:340:33:38

or simply do nothing?

0:33:380:33:41

Should they kick more Russian

diplomats out of the Embassy

0:33:410:33:44

here or should they find new ways

of penalising Russia?

0:33:440:33:46

The question is, what

further diplomatic price

0:33:460:33:48

is the Government prepared to pay?

0:33:480:33:49

James Langdale, BBC News.

0:33:490:33:59

Global reaction to Vladimir Putin's

re-election tells you a lot

0:33:590:34:01

about the state of the world today.

0:34:010:34:03

The President's victory in this

weekend's poll prompted effusive

0:34:030:34:05

praise from among others China,

Venezuela and Cuba and a rather

0:34:050:34:08

frosty response from the West.

0:34:080:34:13

Election monitoring groups pointed

to a lack of real choice

0:34:130:34:16

in the election in which Mr Putin

won three quarters of the vote.

0:34:160:34:19

The main opposition

leader, Alexei Navalny,

0:34:190:34:20

was barred from standing.

0:34:200:34:21

There have also been accounts of

ballot stuffing and forced voting.

0:34:210:34:27

For more we are joined

now by Angela Stent,

0:34:270:34:29

an expert in Russian politics

who teaches at

0:34:290:34:31

Georgetown University.

0:34:310:34:36

I want to get to the real election

of President Putin in a second but

0:34:360:34:41

first the spy story in the UK and

the latest developments. It doesn't

0:34:410:34:45

look like the Russian government has

any intention of giving anything on

0:34:450:34:50

this one.

Of course not, they never

do, they didn't do it with Alexander

0:34:500:34:56

Litvinenko and they won't now.

That's how they respond to these

0:34:560:34:59

things, with denial, which makes it

more difficult to hold people to

0:34:590:35:04

account.

You have written recently

that institutions in Russia have

0:35:040:35:08

rarely been as insignificant as they

are today over the course of the

0:35:080:35:12

last 100 years. Does that mean

Vladimir Putin is therefore much

0:35:120:35:17

more powerful?

Certainly at the

moment. He appears to be very

0:35:170:35:21

powerful now. He has just won 76% of

the vote and even if there was some

0:35:210:35:29

cheating he's definitely popular.

But I think going forward we will

0:35:290:35:33

have to see whether this is indeed

his last term, you start to get

0:35:330:35:38

people manoeuvring for succession,

you start to get people questioning

0:35:380:35:41

what's happening but right now and I

would say that the next year or two

0:35:410:35:46

he will be very powerful.

I want to

pick up on that because their risk

0:35:460:35:52

term limit in Russia, and by the end

of this he will have served 24

0:35:520:35:56

years. Will his priority shift

because of that jostling for power?

0:35:560:36:02

His priority should shift to

economic reform, to strengthening

0:36:020:36:06

the economy, and to make sure

people's standard of living don't

0:36:060:36:11

fall and people around him don't

start grumbling more. It's not clear

0:36:110:36:15

who really will do anything. The

other possibility is more assertive

0:36:150:36:20

foreign policy. Going back to the

pre-election speech he made, it had

0:36:200:36:25

two parts to it, one was economic

reform and the other was showing off

0:36:250:36:30

nuclear weapons and basically

telling the United States, we can

0:36:300:36:34

evade any weapons you have and don't

mess with us.

But I wonder if

0:36:340:36:42

history and his worldview ensures

that he really does like the way

0:36:420:36:45

things are drifting at the moment,

going back to a Cold War and nearer

0:36:450:36:52

really where Russia and the Soviet

bloc was all powerful. If you think

0:36:520:36:56

back to where he was as an FSB

agent, there was chaos. There was

0:36:560:37:02

not a strong economy although there

was more democracy.

His goal has

0:37:020:37:06

been to get the outside world to

treat Russia as if it were the

0:37:060:37:10

Soviet Union, a great superpower,

people should respect and fear it,

0:37:100:37:16

and is on his way to achieving that

despite an economy that is not

0:37:160:37:21

functioning that well, despite

crumbling infrastructure and bad

0:37:210:37:25

demographics. He has been able to

project Russian power into its

0:37:250:37:30

neighbourhood and beyond.

So to what

extent does interfering in elections

0:37:300:37:34

around the world, in the west in

particular, and the spy story in the

0:37:340:37:40

UK constitute part of Vladimir

Putin's C?

It will be part of his

0:37:400:37:45

legacy because it is exacerbating

the polarisation that exists in the

0:37:450:37:49

west, making people question their

own societies. This will be part of

0:37:490:37:56

his legacy, then deploying these

tactics, poisoning, and these tough

0:37:560:38:01

tactics which were deployed in the

Soviet times too, but with greater

0:38:010:38:06

intensity now.

Thank you for coming

in. Angela Merkel has been in Poland

0:38:060:38:15

today.

0:38:150:38:25

and top of her agenda

0:38:320:38:33

was North Stream two -

the gas pipeline that would ship

0:38:330:38:36

Russian gas to Germany.

0:38:360:38:37

Mrs Merkel's government has given

it the green light -

0:38:370:38:39

but Poland is urging Western

sanctions be imposed on it.

0:38:390:38:41

It's not the only topic that the two

countries fail to see eye to eye on.

0:38:410:38:45

Berlin is less than impressed with

Warsaw's sweeping judicial reforms.

0:38:450:38:48

Poland's Minister of Investment

0:38:480:38:49

and Economic Development

and is in London

0:38:490:38:50

today to talk trade.

0:38:500:38:51

We spoke to him a little earlier

and I asked him for Poland's

0:38:510:38:55

response to the alleged Russian

poisoning of a former

0:38:550:38:57

Russian Spy here in the UK

and whether he believed the EU

0:38:570:39:00

was ready to take strong action?

0:39:000:39:02

The United Kingdom can count on

Polish support and I think not only

0:39:020:39:05

the Government but especially

European Society and the media

0:39:050:39:08

should say very clearly what do they

think about actions like that

0:39:080:39:13

because that was not only be action

against the former spy but it was

0:39:130:39:19

also the action against his family

up against common citizens who

0:39:190:39:27

unfortunately suffered from that.

I

know that Poland is supporting --

0:39:270:39:32

has supported in the past British

sanctions on Russia, and Angela

0:39:320:39:37

Merkel is in Warsaw today talking

about the gas pipeline that will

0:39:370:39:40

bring gas from Russia into Europe. I

know this is something you seek as a

0:39:400:39:46

potential for sanctions, if Russia

were to continue misbehaving.

For us

0:39:460:39:52

it's important the dialogue between

Poland and Germany continues, and at

0:39:520:39:56

a very high level. At the level of

our Prime ministers. But you're

0:39:560:40:04

right, north stream two is something

we do not accept at all in Poland

0:40:040:40:11

and we do not concede that

commercial economic undertaking.

0:40:110:40:19

That is an investment which could

monopolise the transfer of gas from

0:40:190:40:24

Russia to Europe. We think that it

could make not only Poland but

0:40:240:40:32

especially Ukraine in a very, very

comfortable situation.

I wanted to

0:40:320:40:44

ask, the German government

spokesperson ahead of Angela

0:40:440:40:45

Merkel's visit today said European

Democrats must stand together

0:40:450:40:50

against Trump and Putin. Is that how

you see it from Poland's point of

0:40:500:40:59

view?

The United States are very

close ally of Poland. You know,

0:40:590:41:05

these days. We received strong

support from Nato especially on our

0:41:050:41:12

eastern border, and that was

extremely important for us that we

0:41:120:41:18

have got now the Nato troops led by

American soldiers of Poland. We have

0:41:180:41:24

very good relations in the area of

defence cooperation and now we want

0:41:240:41:32

to foster our economic relations

with the United States. So I think

0:41:320:41:38

that comparison of Trump and Putin

is not really relevant.

I must ask

0:41:380:41:45

you finally about the relationship

between Britain and Poland, 1

0:41:450:41:49

million Polish people live in the

UK, you must be encouraged by the

0:41:490:41:52

agreement signed in Brussels today

that will assure their rights post

0:41:520:41:57

Brexit.

It is very good news for

both Polish citizens in the UK but

0:41:570:42:01

also British citizens.

Do you think

Brexit deal can be done?

Yes, I'm

0:42:010:42:10

much more optimistic after the end

of the last year, when the

0:42:100:42:14

compromise was made and also by

today's agreement, so I'm much more

0:42:140:42:20

optimistic than I was a year ago.

A

significant moment. Minister, thank

0:42:200:42:28

you for coming.

My pleasure.

0:42:280:42:30

Today President Trump rolled

out his long awaited plan to tackle

0:42:300:42:33

the nation's growing opioid crises.

0:42:330:42:34

Drug overdoses have become leading

cause of death for Americans

0:42:340:42:37

under the age of 50,

a problem fuelled by

0:42:370:42:39

a spike in opioids.

0:42:390:42:40

The President said that drug

companies must be held accountable

0:42:400:42:42

and added there would be stiffer

penalties for high

0:42:420:42:44

intensity drug traffickers.

0:42:440:42:49

We can have all of the blue riband

committees we want but if we don't

0:42:490:42:53

get tough on the drug dealers, we

are wasting our time, just remember

0:42:530:42:59

that, we are wasting our time. That

toughness includes the death

0:42:590:43:03

penalty.

0:43:030:43:10

Well it is not just first responders

and treatment centres

0:43:100:43:14

which are being taxed

by the opioid crisis,

0:43:140:43:16

the nation's criminal

0:43:160:43:17

justice system is also

struggling to keep up.

0:43:170:43:19

In Buffalo, New York they are trying

an innovative approach

0:43:190:43:21

which could prove a model

for the rest of the nation.

0:43:210:43:24

The BBC's Nada Tawfik has gone

to see the country's first

0:43:240:43:26

opioid court in action.

0:43:260:43:31

This unremarkable courtroom in New

York might be America's best new

0:43:310:43:34

defence against its deadliest drug

crisis. The goal here in the nation

0:43:340:43:41

's first opioid court is basic yet

ambitious, to keep people alive.

0:43:410:43:47

When offenders who appear in court

are addicts, the judge immediately

0:43:470:43:51

puts their case on hold.

I'm going

to release you today but I need you

0:43:510:43:56

to report here tomorrow so we can go

over everything about your

0:43:560:43:59

treatment.

No longer viewed as

criminals, they are given help and

0:43:590:44:06

have a chance to get their sentence

reduced.

We are not going to make

0:44:060:44:14

the same mistake as we did in the

1990s because we have the research

0:44:140:44:18

and data to show you cannot lock up

an addiction is the second they walk

0:44:180:44:22

out of jail they will have the same

need for that substance.

0:44:220:44:30

Participants are given treatment

within hours. They agreed to drug

0:44:300:44:34

tests, a curfew and daily court

appearances. The judge knows often

0:44:340:44:39

this court can be the only support

system some people have, so having

0:44:390:44:42

them checked in daily and trying to

form a personal bond is a way to

0:44:420:44:48

keep them on track. Carly has been

clean for two months since starting

0:44:480:44:53

the programme. She was arrested for

drug possession and says she has

0:44:530:44:58

used prescription pills and heroin

for over a decade. In one week alone

0:44:580:45:07

she was arrived -- revived three

times after overdoses.

You are a dog

0:45:070:45:15

to drug dealers, you don't have any

self-worth at all so when somebody

0:45:150:45:21

looks at you and actually cares

about what you are going through in

0:45:210:45:24

your life, what your problems are,

how we can help, it reminds you that

0:45:240:45:30

deep inside there is a person that

needs and deserves love.

Carly is

0:45:300:45:33

trying to develop a plan for the day

she no longer has to check in with

0:45:330:45:37

the courts. She hopes to have a

career in criminal justice, just

0:45:370:45:42

like judge Hannah, himself a

recovering addict.

The only

0:45:420:45:49

difference between me and

individuals you saw today is time.

0:45:490:45:51

Once they have spent enough time is

clean as I have, they can accomplish

0:45:510:45:58

anything in life.

In Buffalo they

already think it is a success, the

0:45:580:46:04

number of overdose deaths has

significantly increased and that has

0:46:040:46:06

other cities taking notice.

This is such a huge problem in the

0:46:060:46:13

United States, but that proposition

of giving the death penalty to some

0:46:130:46:17

drug traffickers will be

controversial.

0:46:170:46:18

This is Beyond One Hundred Days.

0:46:180:46:22

Still to come - the actress

Cynthia Nixon announces her

0:46:220:46:25

candidacy for governor of New York.

0:46:250:46:29

Recognise her?

0:46:290:46:33

The TV presenter, Ant McPartlin,

says he will seek further treatment

0:46:330:46:36

after he was arrested

on suspicion of drink-driving.

0:46:360:46:38

He was detained yesterday afternoon

following a collision involving

0:46:380:46:41

three cars in south west London.

0:46:410:46:44

ITV says his Saturday night

programme broadcast with his partner

0:46:440:46:46

Declan Donnelly will not be

broadcast this weekend.

0:46:460:46:52

Mr McPartlin spent time in rehab

last year and will take time off

0:46:520:46:55

for the foreseeable future according

to his publicist.

0:46:550:46:57

Lizo Mzimba has more.

0:46:570:47:06

Moments after the Mini

he was driving was involved

0:47:060:47:08

in a collision with two cars,

Ant McPartlin at the

0:47:080:47:11

scene of the crash.

0:47:110:47:15

When police arrived,

he was taken away under arrest,

0:47:150:47:17

after failing a breath test.

0:47:170:47:25

A number of people were treated

for minor injuries and a child

0:47:250:47:28

passenger taken to hospital

for a precautionary checkup.

0:47:280:47:29

The evening before,

Ant McPartlin had presented ITV's

0:47:290:47:31

Saturday Night Takeaway.

0:47:310:47:33

He returned to TV last year,

after going into rehab

0:47:330:47:36

visitation to treat addiction

to alcohol and painkillers.

0:47:360:47:42

This afternoon,

the broadcaster said...

0:47:420:47:46

From Britain's Got Talent

through to I'm A Celebrity,

0:47:590:48:01

so much of ITV's output is built

on Ant McPartlin, as well as his

0:48:010:48:05

co-host, Declan Donnelly.

0:48:050:48:11

They will be trying to work out

what all this will mean

0:48:110:48:15

for the long-term future of one

of its biggest stars.

0:48:150:48:17

Police say inquiries

into the collision are continuing.

0:48:170:48:24

ITV said they hoped the presenter

will get the help he needs, police

0:48:240:48:28

say inquiries are continuing.

0:48:280:48:34

Here is a strange, alarming story.

0:48:460:48:47

Police in Austin, Texas,

are warning of a new bomb

0:48:470:48:50

threat after the city

0:48:500:48:51

was hit by a fourth explosion

in just one month.

0:48:510:48:53

Two people were injured

by a device that may have been

0:48:530:48:56

triggered by a trip wire.

0:48:560:48:57

The previous bombs were stuffed

inside packages and left

0:48:570:48:59

on residents' doorsteps.

0:48:590:49:00

Authorities have little

understanding of who could be

0:49:000:49:02

setting off these devices and why.

0:49:020:49:04

Police gave this

update earlier today.

0:49:040:49:07

We are clearly dealing with what we

expect to be a serial bomber at this

0:49:070:49:12

point based on the similarities

between now what is the fourth

0:49:120:49:16

device and again as we look at this

individual and the pattern, and what

0:49:160:49:20

we are looking at here, we will have

to determine whether we see a

0:49:200:49:24

specific ideology behind this or

something that will lead us to make

0:49:240:49:28

that decision along with our federal

partners.

Two people died in the

0:49:280:49:34

previous attacks.

0:49:340:49:36

For the latest we can speak

to our correspondent Gary O'Donoghue

0:49:360:49:38

who joins us from Austin.

0:49:380:49:40

What more do the police know about

this?

They don't know a great deal

0:49:400:49:45

and I think that was pretty clear

from what they said this morning.

0:49:450:49:49

They don't have a suspect, they are

following up a few final leads but

0:49:490:49:54

they haven't lighted on any person

or more importantly perhaps any

0:49:540:49:59

motive. There was speculation after

the first three bombings that seemed

0:49:590:50:04

to target black people and someone

from an Hispanic background as well,

0:50:040:50:11

but last night's attack here was

indiscriminate. It actually affected

0:50:110:50:18

two young white men but it was a

trip wire so it could have affected

0:50:180:50:21

anyone including children as the

police pointed out this morning.

0:50:210:50:26

They sound pretty baffled. They are

offering not just money for advice

0:50:260:50:31

and information about who might be

doing this, $115,000, but they are

0:50:310:50:36

also trying to reach out to the

bomber himself or themselves to say,

0:50:360:50:42

look, we can listen to you and take

on board what you want to say. But

0:50:420:50:47

they don't know if this is a hate

crime or domestic terrorism case or

0:50:470:50:53

any of the other possibilities.

Thank you, Gary

0:50:530:50:58

any of the other possibilities.

Thank you, Gary.

0:50:580:51:02

What's the last thing

you did on the internet?

0:51:020:51:04

Did it involve handing over

great dollops of private

0:51:040:51:06

information about yourself?

0:51:060:51:07

It is something most of us do

everyday, as we 'share',

0:51:070:51:10

'post', 'like', 'tweet'.

0:51:100:51:12

But how much time do we spend

thinking about where all that

0:51:120:51:14

information ends up?

0:51:140:51:15

The allegations surrounding the use

of personal Facebook data

0:51:150:51:17

by Cambridge Analytica offers

another reminder of how much we've

0:51:170:51:20

all been willing to hand over.

0:51:200:51:21

So should we be concerned?

0:51:210:51:22

We're joined in the studio now

by Julia Hobsbawm author

0:51:220:51:25

of 'Fully Connected: Social Health

in an Age of Overload'.

0:51:250:51:33

We talk about this a lot on this

programme, about how we are deluged

0:51:330:51:38

by social media and things on the

internet, so we are really to blame,

0:51:380:51:42

aren't we?

We are, yes. I like the

Freudian slip of overlord, it is

0:51:420:51:52

actually overload. But we have

reached the point where we feel out

0:51:520:51:56

of control and yet we have given the

control away. Research has shown

0:51:560:52:02

that less than one in 1000 people

ever read the small print. How many

0:52:020:52:07

times have you clicked, yes yes yes,

sign me up. It's a great story, a

0:52:070:52:16

fantastic piece of investigative

reporting, but I think there is

0:52:160:52:20

another story behind it which is

that we, the public, that down --

0:52:200:52:29

download apps, we know they give

data away. It is a well stated

0:52:290:52:37

precondition very often so my point

about this story is of course we

0:52:370:52:40

should be up in arms about not

knowing that Facebook has lost

0:52:400:52:45

control of its data but data loss of

control is everywhere. That's why

0:52:450:52:55

the GDPR is coming in in Europe.

We

will talk about that in a second but

0:52:550:53:00

I want to talk about a tweet from

Ian, says funny how everyone is in

0:53:000:53:07

uproar about data issues but people

use chrome, android, nobody ever

0:53:070:53:15

complains about those companies so

they have been harvesting

0:53:150:53:18

information for years.

They do,

there is an enormous tech lash, it

0:53:180:53:25

is just that Facebook is getting it

in the neck now. The truth is we are

0:53:250:53:29

all waking up to something we have

slightly brought upon ourselves

0:53:290:53:33

which is for free social media for

the last ten years, we have given

0:53:330:53:37

away our privacy and our data. That

is now being harvested, terrible

0:53:370:53:45

word to use really, it is being

harvested and sold. We have a choice

0:53:450:53:52

in society, what are we going to do

about that and I believe we have to

0:53:520:53:57

take our social health, our

behaviours around how we connect as

0:53:570:54:02

seriously as we take our physical

and mental health.

I totally agree,

0:54:020:54:07

I thought Christian was doing one of

his terrible puns with overlord!

0:54:070:54:17

This hasn't been around for long, so

we as a species have to get smarter

0:54:170:54:22

about the way we use the internet

and social media. What will it take

0:54:220:54:26

to trigger the learning process and

the revolution where we say that is

0:54:260:54:31

enough?

You are completely right it

is down to the human and not the

0:54:310:54:34

machine. A bit like you see people

in the gym and they are reading but

0:54:340:54:41

not really engaging, we have got to

engage with what we are doing online

0:54:410:54:46

and on the internet. Our data goes

somewhere. Unless we obsessively set

0:54:460:54:51

high privacy settings, and even if

we do, there is a back door. Back in

0:54:510:54:58

1999 and very prominent net person

said there is zero privacy, get over

0:54:580:55:06

it. So the choice is do you want to

be online, in which case why because

0:55:060:55:12

really about 20% of our time is now

lost, and if you do, what are you

0:55:120:55:18

sharing and why. So we have to take

responsibility.

Yulia, we have to

0:55:180:55:23

leave it there. Very quickly before

we go, here is a blast from the

0:55:230:55:31

past.

0:55:310:55:34

The actress

Cynthia Nixon has announced her

0:55:340:55:36

candidacy for governor of New York.

0:55:360:55:38

Ms Nixon - who's most

famous for playing

0:55:380:55:40

the character of Miranda in Sex

and the City - will challenge Andrew

0:55:400:55:43

Cuomo for the Democratic nomination.

0:55:430:55:47

Who else do we know who did this?

Was he a success?

0:55:470:56:00