15/03/2018 Beyond 100 Days


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15/03/2018

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You're watching

Beyond 100 Days on PBS.

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Donald Trump slaps sanctions

on Russia and offers a rare

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criticism of Moscow,

after a conversation

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with Theresa May.

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On both the poisoning

of Sergei Skripal and Russian

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meddling in the US election,

the White House is pushed to take

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a tougher line on Putin.

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As tests continues at Skripal's

house in Salisbury -

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Britain, France, Germany and the US

issue a rare joint

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statement condemning

the Kremlin for the attack.

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Meanwhile Russia denies it made

the nerve agent used in that attack

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and promises to retaliate

against both Britain and America.

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In Miami a pedestrian bridge has

collapsed. We are getting reports of

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multiple fatalities. We'll bring you

the latest.

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Also on the programme.

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New reports in Washington that

Special Counsel Bob Mueller has

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subpoenaed Donald Trump's business

records.

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The President has said that

would be a red line.

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Long dark winters and summers

bathed in continual light

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might drive some mad,

but the people of Finland are in

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fact the happiest in the world.

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Get in touch with us using

the hashtag Beyond-One-Hundred-Days.

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Hello and welcome -

I'm Katty Kay in Washington

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and Christian Fraser is in London.

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The West today came together

in an unusual, coordinated criticism

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of Russia's aggressive behaviour.

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There was a joint statement

from Britain's allies

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and new sanctions from Washington.

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After a string of what are

being called malicious

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actions from Moscow,

it sounds like Western

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allies have had enough.

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Even Donald Trump, normally loathe

to criticise President Putin,

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has been pushed to drop

the ambiguity, blaming Moscow

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for the events in Salisbury.

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In response to Russia's

interference in the US election,

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his own Treasury Department added

more sanctions

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against Russians today.

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And yet there is still the very real

question of how much tougher

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the West is really prepared to be

against the Kremlin.

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Here's James Landale.

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This was Theresa May's

first visit to Salisbury

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since the nerve agent attack.

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A chance to be briefed by the police

and public health experts,

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but a chance to meet and reassure

members of the public,

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whose lives have been so disrupted.

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The spirit of those that live

here has been fantastic.

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She visited the scene of the attack

on the former Russian intelligence

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officer and his daughter

11 days ago.

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The restaurant where they ate

and a park bench, under a tent,

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where they were found.

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The Prime Minister thanked some

of the police officers who first

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responded to the call.

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Thank you, what you did

is what the police do

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day in and day out.

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You go to a routine call,

you don't know what you find.

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Then at the local hospital

she met and thanked

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Detective Sergeant Nick Bailey,

who is still recovering

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from exposure to the nerve agent.

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Russia, she said, was guilty

of a brazen and despicable attack.

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She expelled 23 of its diplomats,

but is ready to do more.

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There are other things

we're looking at.

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If we face further provocation from

Russia there are other measures we

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can deploy.

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What is important in

the international arena and we have

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taken this into Nato,

the United Nations and we will be

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taking it into the European Union,

allies are standing alongside us.

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That came in a joint statement

from the leaders of Britain,

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France, Germany and the US,

blaming Russia for what they called

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an assault on UK sovereignty.

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I spoke with the Prime Minister

and we are in deep discussions,

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very sad situation and it looks

like the Russians are behind it.

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Something that should never,

ever happen and we are taking it

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very seriously, as I think

are many others.

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The joint statement is significant

because it shows the Foreign Office

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and Downing Street are convincing

Britain's allies that the Salisbury

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attack is different,

it represents an escalation

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of Russia's hostile behaviour.

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And as such, those allies are ready

to crank up the pressure on Moscow.

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That diplomacy continued today

in Brussels, where British security

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officials briefed Nato allies.

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The head of the alliance said Russia

had clearly breached

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international agreements.

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It is important to express

strong, political support

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to the United Kingdom,

sending a clear message that

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the United Kingdom is not alone.

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We stand together with them.

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In Moscow, President Putin

discussed the Salisbury

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case with his ministers,

who denied Russia and the Soviet

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Union had ever run a Novichok nerve

agent programme and promised

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to respond soon to the expulsion

of its diplomats.

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The Porton Down military

research laboratory,

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which identified the nerve agent,

is to get an extra £48

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million in funding.

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Ministers confirmed it would provide

a sample to the chemical watchdog.

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Ministers, whose diplomacy is not

extending to Russia.

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If you are a nation and another

nation has launched a nerve agent

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attack on your people,

you have every right to tell Russia

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to shut up and go away.

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Meanwhile, this afternoon

near Salisbury, the investigation

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continued with the Army recovering

a car from the village near the home

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of Detective Sergeant Nick Bailey.

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We'll get more on this story in a

minute.

We are getting breaking news

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from Miami, where a pedestrian

bridge at Florida International

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University has collapsed. There are

reports that several people have

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been killed in the accident.

These

are live pictures from Miami. At

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least three vehicles, we understand,

are underneath the bridge and a

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number of injured people have been

treated. The bridge, which was only

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opened on Saturday, connected the

university to a student housing

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area. The Miami Herald is reporting

that those firemen you can see their

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around the bridge have been working

through a hole, so they are getting

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some access to the vehicles

underneath, and we've seen pictures

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in the last few minutes of

paramedics also treating people on

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the road close to the bridge.

Police

are telling people to stay away from

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the area now, of course. Does remind

our viewers it's about 3pm on the

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east coast in Miami. There would

have been a lot of people travelling

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on the highway and that bridge has

just been opened for a few days.

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We'll have more on this story as we

get it. Let's return to the story,

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straight to Moscow, because our

colleague Lucy Hawking is is there.

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We're still awaiting a response from

the Russian authorities. It will

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come, it will be no surprise. What

are we expecting?

It's snowing on us

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here in Moscow and we really should,

I suppose, use a metaphor and an

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analogy because relations between

Britain and Russia are really in the

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deep freeze, the worst they've been

for the past 30 years and Christian

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Kimura right, it we're expecting

that response from the Kremlin some

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time soon -- Christian, you are

right. We've had some indications as

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to what it could be. Sergei Lavrov

suggesting some British diplomatic

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staff will be expelled from Russia,

possibly. They said that when this

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response comes it will be different

from how they we heard from the

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British, they will behave like

gentlemen and will let the British

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here through official channels

before the public here. We can show

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some pictures of Vladimir Putin,

he's been taking this into

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consideration today, meeting with

his Security Council and the line we

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had from this meeting is that great

concern was expressed about the

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destructive and provocative stance

taken by Britain. The other thing

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that has constantly been stressed

here is they are still wanting and

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waiting for evidence to be produced

by the British, to back up these

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allegations.

We've been hearing on

the programme over the last couple

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of days that the actions Theresa May

has so far announced won't

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necessarily worry the Kremlin.

What's your sense of whether people

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in the Russian government are

feeling the heat over this one?

It's

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a great question and I think that

one of the interesting things,

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listening to the state television

today, is that there are some

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analysts here who thought that

Theresa May would have gone further,

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that these sanctions aren't as

strong as they could have been, and

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maybe she's got others up her

sleeve, particularly into if we get

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into a tit-for-tat situation and

she's still holding on for some

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measures. If you speak to people on

the streets, there is a massive

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sense of indignation here. They

believe Russia has been falsely

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accused of something and people have

all sorts of interesting allegations

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to toss Britain's way. For instance,

they say that this is Britain

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wanting to interfere in Russia's

build-up to the World Cup, wanting

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to interfere in the elections which

are taking place in a few days'

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time, wanting to belittle Russia and

make Britain look great game, at a

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time when they feel Britain looks on

its knees because of Brexit. Just a

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few hours ago, state television said

this was about Britain's centuries

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old imperial rivalry with brusher

>> weather-macro: Russia. They gave

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ten examples, in 1917 King George V

refused to receive the far's family

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in London, that's the kind of

rhetoric we are seeing on state

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television this evening -- King

George V refused to receive the

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tsar's family in London.

Let's look

at the joint statement from Nato

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allies. It says...

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How are Putin's

supporters responding?

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Natalia Narochnitskaya

is the former Vice Chair of

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the International Affairs Committee

in the Russian State Duma

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and is currently campaigning

across the country for President

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Putin.

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He's up for re-election. Thanks very

much for joining the programme. Is

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it plausible for the Russian

government at this stage after the

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Brits have investigated what has

happened and this nerve agent to say

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really we had nothing to do with

this?

Well, I believe, I don't know

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whether my participation has any

sense, because I remember the

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episodes in the British House of

Commons when Jeremy Corbyn was

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silenced when he was asking

legitimate questions, but of course

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I will try, since I come here to the

studio. As far as I understand, as I

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know, there's still nobody has seen

real proof of that was Russia behind

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and it would take someone insane, I

mean in Russia's authorities circle,

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to organise such an event just

before the election. The legitimate

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question, the first question we

always ask ourselves when we

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investigate, when we face similar

cases, who is profiting? Is Russia

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profiting from this? I think it

would be insane to... As we proved,

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our Foreign Minister has said they

were asking just give us the

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material.

What the British Prime

Minister is saying is there is no

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plausible alternative explanation

and you have now Germany, France,

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the United Kingdom and the United

States all saying that the Kremlin

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is responsible for this and has

behaved in a way that is outrageous.

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Well, that's not cricket, because

the allies are just supporting, they

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don't know anything about the case.

You know, my only relative, the

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brother of my father, perished in

Stalin's concentration camp and what

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I saw in the British House of

Commons reminds me of how the trial

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in the Soviet Union of Stalin's time

went, when the prosecutor general

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was accusing crime is absolutely

unbelievable scale and all the rest

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were competing in loyalty, you know,

pronouncing ardent speeches. There's

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only one person to ask for the

proof.

This is quite extraordinary,

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that you are about to have election

on Sunday where there is no

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opposition and the opposition isn't

allowed to stand and you are picking

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holes in British democracy where

people are having a legitimate

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debate.

We have a position, we have

eight candidates and for instance

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the latest several rounds of debates

on TV, people even slapped each

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other and were accusing Putin and

the current authorities of all sorts

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of... Etc, etc. You call opposition

only someone in the street, you

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know, that means that for instance

your Labour Party is not opposition,

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etc, so opposition in some marginals

only. We have opposition, we have

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eight candidates, and I'm sure they

will gain some votes. For instance,

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the Communist Party, candidates, who

is not a member of the party, will

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get 10%, I'm sure. Another will get

not less than 6% and all the rest,

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two or three.

I'm sorry, we have to

leave it there. But thank you very

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much for coming into the studio. We

are out of time.

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As we mentioned, the US has slapped

sanctions on 19 Russian

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individuals and five groups,

including Moscow's intelligence

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services, for meddling in the US

presidential election.

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For more we can cross

now to the BBC's North

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America Editor, Jon Sopel.

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It's extraordinary, listening to the

indignant is from Moscow. Quite

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strong feelings there. There were

people who were concerned that maybe

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President Trump wouldn't put his

name to this condemnation. What

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we've seen today is him standing.

Behind the Prime Minister.

Well, it

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looks as though Theresa May has

managed to pull something off that

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all the US intelligence services

have singular Lee failed to do. And

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that's to bring the President onside

into believing that the Russians

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were responsible for something that

was not good and I think it was very

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striking, when I saw the statement

classmate issued by Sarah Sanders,

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the press secretary to the

president, condemning the Russian

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activity, accepting that Russia was

likely responsible, accepting that

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it was the right thing to do to

expel those diplomats and perhaps

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taking further action, then this

morning Donald Trump doing something

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rather Trump, which was to sign a

joint letter with the leaders of the

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UK, France and Germany, in

condemnation of what Russia was

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doing and saying was offending the

norms of international behaviour and

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destabilising, and he's also

repeated that in terms in his

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meeting with the Taoiseach. These

are things we haven't seen from the

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president before.

Stay with us,

because I want to get your reaction

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to another story that's breaking

here about Russia will stop

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The New York Times is reporting

that the special counsel Bob Mueller

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has subpoenaed Mr Trump's financial

records to do with any Russian

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business activities.

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It's the first time

the investigation has subpoenaed

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Trump's business records.

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Here's the White House press

secretary a few moments ago.

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as we've maintained all along and as

the president has said numerous

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times, there was no collusion

between the campaign and Russia for

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specific questions regarding the

Trump Organisation, I'd refuse you

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to them.

How significant is this

news breaking in the New York Times?

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It is significant for tit reasons.

It shows the Bob Mueller

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investigation is going on, it's not

coming to a close, it's not pack up

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and go home and a couple of weeks'

time. This is going on. The second

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reason it is significant is that

Donald Trump gave an interview to

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the New York Times last summer in

which he said, look, if you start

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coming after my family's finances,

that would be crossing a red line.

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All of which leaves open the

question has the Bob Mueller

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investigation with the supreme

crossed one of those red line that

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Donald Trump set, so potentially

dangerous moment for the

0:17:220:17:24

investigation. We had Sarah Sanders

say I refer you to the Trump

0:17:240:17:28

organisation. Let me tell you what

they have said in the last few

0:17:280:17:31

moments. Since July 2017 we've

advised the public that the Trump

0:17:310:17:36

organisation is fully cooperative

with all investigations, including

0:17:360:17:38

the Special Counsel, and is

responding to their requests. This

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is old news and our assistance in

cooperation with the various

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investigations remain the same

today. I suppose my only question I

0:17:470:17:51

would throw in, if they'd been

cooperating so fully with the Bob

0:17:510:17:55

Mueller organisation, why would

there have been a need for a

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subpoena?

Yeah, I've been asking

that question as well. What do Mr

0:17:590:18:07

Trump supporters make of this news?

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Kayleigh McEnany is

the spokesperson for

0:18:100:18:12

the Republican National Committee.

0:18:120:18:15

I want to get the reaction to the

news in the New York Times that Bob

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Mueller has subpoenaed the Trump

Organisation for the business

0:18:200:18:24

records. How significant is it?

Not

very significant. The Trump

0:18:240:18:28

organisation has been cooperating

and will co-operate further and Bob

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Mueller has subpoenaed these

documents. They've already been

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given 20,000 documents from the

Trump organisation, from the White

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House, from the campaign. They've

got 37 witnesses. The Trump

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Administration, campaign and

organisation of been fully

0:18:440:18:46

cooperating. There are hundreds of

thousands of pages of documents that

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they found no collusion. There will

be no collusion that is found and we

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hope...

If Bob Mueller is

investigating President Trump's

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business dealings and looking at

those and he finds something there,

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the president has said this would be

crossing a red line. What does that

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actually mean in terms of the

investigation? Could he fire Bob

0:19:060:19:11

Mueller over this?

I think President

Trump trusts Mr Muller to stay

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within his jurisdiction and that was

what he was indicating, that it

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should not be a free rein to look

into anyone with the name Trump.

0:19:200:19:24

Everything the Trump organisation

has done has been aboveboard and

0:19:240:19:27

that's what Bob Mueller will find,

he'll not find any evidence of

0:19:270:19:31

collusion, any bad financial

transactions here, so they will

0:19:310:19:34

co-operate as they indicated. There

will be nothing found and all

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President Trump wants is for this to

wrap up quickly and fairly.

We've

0:19:370:19:41

had an announcement today, we have a

new national economic adviser Larry

0:19:410:19:46

Kudlow, who is coming to the

building, Rex Tillerson on his way

0:19:460:19:49

out of course, he'll be gone in a

few weeks' time and the rumours are

0:19:490:19:53

starting to circulate about who else

might go, HR McMaster, the National

0:19:530:19:57

Security adviser. It looks pretty

chaotic from over here.

It's not

0:19:570:20:02

chaotic at all. Here's what Trump

supporters look at and Americans

0:20:020:20:05

generally are the results coming out

of the Administration and their

0:20:050:20:09

staff changes, yes, there is a lot

of power century in our mainstream

0:20:090:20:12

media, but look at the results, the

economy, the fact North Korea is

0:20:120:20:19

willing to temporarily stop their

missile testing and pursues a

0:20:190:20:21

meeting with the president. That's

what Trump supporters and Americans

0:20:210:20:24

are looking at. The staff changes

are in a footnote to a bigger story.

0:20:240:20:31

It does give an impression there

have been more people leaving this

0:20:310:20:34

Administration in the first year

that -- that -- than is customary

0:20:340:20:41

and it's understandable as reports

of chaos because so many people are

0:20:410:20:45

coming and going.

President Trump is

a very high standard and if someone

0:20:450:20:49

isn't meeting that standard,

President Trump...

Does everyone

0:20:490:20:54

else in the White House meeting

standard at the moment?

I think at

0:20:540:20:57

the moment, yes, if someone loses

the confidence and they will know.

0:20:570:21:02

President Trump did push back

reports that other people would be

0:21:020:21:08

leaving. Mr McMaster stays for now.

We'll see if it changes by next

0:21:080:21:14

week. We'll get you back in if it

does because it changes a lot.

0:21:140:21:24

The appointment of Larry Kudlow is

interesting, he's somebody who is a

0:21:240:21:30

conservatives television commentator

and here's what he did last night,

0:21:300:21:33

Christian, when he was on television

himself. He spoke very unusual this

0:21:330:21:37

about how he was called and asked to

be in the Trump Administration. His

0:21:370:21:43

answer was the president called me,

told him he'd seen him on television

0:21:430:21:47

and said that he was very handsome.

Opec smack there is hope for us all.

0:21:470:21:52

You should be sending in your

resume. You look handsome on TV.

Do

0:21:520:21:57

you think he'd read it?

I think it

would have to be a picture of you on

0:21:570:22:04

television.

Lycos is all real, my

bad clips.

There a valid point to be

0:22:040:22:08

made that the president needs to

have around him any president needs

0:22:080:22:13

to have around them a team with

which they are comfortable and we've

0:22:130:22:15

seen the changes in the State

Department. He was clearly not

0:22:150:22:18

comfortable with Rex Tillerson. He

was clearly not comfortable either

0:22:180:22:21

with Gary Cohen, so having a new

person running the economic side of

0:22:210:22:26

things makes an awful lot of sense

in terms of how you're going to

0:22:260:22:29

operate the White House. If you can

get the team with him that he's

0:22:290:22:32

comfortable with we may see less of

this churn in the White House.

And

0:22:320:22:36

yet five months ago this was the

most remarkable group of people he'd

0:22:360:22:39

ever brought together in the Cabinet

and if you read the papers, and I

0:22:390:22:42

know some of it is speculation, the

atmosphere, both within the Cabinet

0:22:420:22:47

and within the White House in

general, I mean people don't have

0:22:470:22:51

any confidence they're going to be

there next week.

No, he was elected

0:22:510:22:55

because he didn't have experience of

running politics and political

0:22:550:22:58

organisations. Well, part of that

leads to a certain amount of players

0:22:580:23:02

in the stuffing I guess, so that's

perhaps to be expected from what is

0:23:020:23:06

voters wanted from him -- a certain

amount of chaos in the stuffing.

0:23:060:23:17

I want to share some spectacular

pictures coming to us from Finland.

0:23:170:23:20

They are the Northern Lights

of course, and Christian,

0:23:200:23:22

I want you take a good look them.

0:23:220:23:24

How do they make you feel?

0:23:240:23:25

Humbled perhaps?

0:23:250:23:30

Maybe there's a happy-go-lucky and

feeling when you look at the aurora

0:23:300:23:35

borealis.

I just feel rather green!

Do you? Apparently you can see it

0:23:350:23:42

from England tonight, from

Gloucestershire. We'll have to find

0:23:420:23:45

out tomorrow if the people of

Gloucestershire are happy tomorrow.

0:23:450:23:47

Maybe there's something in it. Shall

we get back to Finland? You were

0:23:470:23:53

meant to say you feel very happy.

That's the reason we are showing

0:23:530:23:57

these pictures, not because they are

beautiful but because they come from

0:23:570:24:01

the happiest country on earth.

0:24:010:24:08

Apart from economic factors, life

expectancy and freedom of choice -

0:24:080:24:11

the countries were also ranked based

on the happiness of

0:24:110:24:13

immigrants in the country.

0:24:130:24:14

Scandinavia is well

represented in the top five.

0:24:140:24:18

Apart from other European countries,

Canada, New Zealand and Australia

0:24:180:24:21

round out the top ten.

0:24:210:24:26

As for the US and the UK -

18th and 19th respectively.

0:24:300:24:37

I don't understand, I'm always

hearing people in Scandinavian

0:24:370:24:41

countries, don't they have high

suicide rates?

That was always the

0:24:410:24:45

feeling about Finland, because of

the dark nights, the long, dark

0:24:450:24:48

nights and the Vari-Lite Summers,

that they had a higher than average

0:24:480:24:52

suicide rate. -- very light source.

America's subjective well-being is

0:24:520:24:59

being systematically undermined by

three interrelated epidemic

0:24:590:25:04

diseases. Notable obesity, substance

abuse, especially opioid addiction,

0:25:040:25:09

and depression, and that's why they

think America is slipping down the

0:25:090:25:13

table. Also notable that when we

talk about income and society of the

0:25:130:25:17

way society interacts, Venezuela has

dropped 20 places to 102 on the

0:25:170:25:24

list.

They didn't have our studio,

which of course is the happiest

0:25:240:25:28

place on the planet, right?

And

Burnley, as well, seventh in the

0:25:280:25:33

league and doing well! Anyway...

This is.

0:25:330:25:37

This is Beyond 100

Days from the BBC.

0:25:370:25:39

Coming up for viewers on the BBC

News Channel and BBC World News -

0:25:390:25:43

a sombre anniversary in Syria -

seven years since the outbreak

0:25:430:25:45

of civil war, what's

the world doing about it?

0:25:450:25:48

And the changing face

of National Geographic -

0:25:480:25:50

why its editor wants to talk to us

about its racist past.

0:25:500:25:52

That's still to come.

0:25:520:25:53

Welcome to how the weather is going

to pan out in the British Isles. In

0:26:180:26:22

the short term we are looking to the

Atlantic, to see low-pressure

0:26:220:26:26

driving frontal systems towards the

British Isles. If you spend the day

0:26:260:26:29

in northern and eastern parts it's

been one of those, it's been wet,

0:26:290:26:33

cold, pretty miserable affairs, snow

across the high ground of Scotland.

0:26:330:26:37

We're watching another feature

running into the south-western

0:26:370:26:39

quarter of the British Isles, so as

we start the new day on Friday not a

0:26:390:26:44

particularly cold start the day but

it will be for some of you are

0:26:440:26:47

really quite wet one. This front

towards the north and east of

0:26:470:26:50

Scotland producing quite a bit of

rain and significant snowfall across

0:26:500:26:56

the high and then Northern Ireland

down through the North West of

0:26:560:26:59

England towards north-eastern Wales,

the Midlands, on towards the

0:26:590:27:01

south-east, really quite heavy rain

in its own right there. The snowfall

0:27:010:27:05

totals really mounting up across the

higher ground of Scotland here. It

0:27:050:27:08

really will be a high ground

feature, I think. Similar prospect

0:27:080:27:12

perhaps across the highest ground at

the top end of the Pennines. Don't

0:27:120:27:16

discount this more southerly

feature. It looks rather more patchy

0:27:160:27:18

but even so I think there will be

the moderate burst of rain. Further

0:27:180:27:23

south than that is where you get

sunshine but some pretty sharp

0:27:230:27:30

showers as well. As you sleep into

the start of the weekend marked

0:27:300:27:33

transformation. We start importing

some really cold air. There will be

0:27:330:27:36

a widespread frost on Saturday.

Thanks to the importation of some

0:27:360:27:40

really cold air and that big area of

high pressure over Scandinavia

0:27:400:27:43

throwing the cold air towards the

British Isles, no signs of mild air

0:27:430:27:46

we are all in this similar boat. And

on that noticeable very keen

0:27:460:27:53

easterly wind there will be plenty

of snow showers running into the

0:27:530:27:56

Wash and through towards the

Midlands, into East Anglia, into the

0:27:560:28:00

eastern side of Pennines and eastern

Scotland and you add in the strength

0:28:000:28:03

of the wind, my word it will feel

bitterly cold full stop considering

0:28:030:28:06

that some of you had around 13-14 on

Friday, it will be a shock to the

0:28:060:28:12

system. We start Sunday, there could

well be more widespread snowfall

0:28:120:28:16

rather than showers. The northern

boundary of that is difficult to pin

0:28:160:28:20

down at the moment. Further north

than that yes, there will still be

0:28:200:28:23

wintry showers to be had. Simply

because it is going to be that cold.

0:28:230:28:28

Take care, goodbye.

0:28:280:28:33

This is Beyond 100 Days, with me,

Katty Kay in Washington.

0:30:100:30:12

Christian Fraser's in London.

0:30:120:30:13

Our top stories:

0:30:130:30:15

As tests continue at the home

of the poisoned former

0:30:150:30:18

Russia spy Sergei Skripal,

Britain, France, Germany and the US

0:30:180:30:20

issue a rare joint statement

condemning the Kremlin

0:30:200:30:22

for the attack.

0:30:220:30:25

Russia denies it made the nerve

agent used in that attack

0:30:250:30:28

and promises to retaliate

against Britain for expelling

0:30:280:30:30

23 Russian diplomats.

0:30:300:30:32

More on that shortly.

0:30:320:30:33

Also coming up in

the next half hour:

0:30:330:30:35

We'll get the latest from Florida

where a new pedestrian

0:30:350:30:38

bridge has collapsed,

reportedly killing

0:30:380:30:39

a number of people.

0:30:390:30:40

These are live pictures

from the scene in Miami.

0:30:400:30:44

It's an industry worth

£28 billion to the UK economy -

0:30:440:30:47

but what impact will Brexit have

on British fashion?

0:30:470:30:50

We'll talk to leading

designer Maria Grachvogel.

0:30:500:30:54

Let us know your thoughts

by using the hashtag #Beyond100Days.

0:30:540:31:01

Let's return to our

breaking news this hour.

0:31:070:31:09

A pedestrian bridge at

Florida's International University

0:31:090:31:11

in Miami has collapsed,

killing several people.

0:31:110:31:15

These are live pictures from Miami -

at least three vehicles were trapped

0:31:150:31:20

underneath and a number of injured

people have been treated.

0:31:200:31:24

Luis Fajado from BBC

Monitoring is in Miami.

0:31:240:31:31

What more can you tell us?

There has

been this major accident, a 900

0:31:310:31:41

tonne bridge has collapsed on a

major Miami Avenue in the early

0:31:410:31:49

afternoon with heavy traffic,

several cars have been trapped

0:31:490:31:54

inside the structure. Florida

highway police have told local media

0:31:540:31:58

there have been confirmed fatalities

and they also say a number of people

0:31:580:32:06

are being treated in hospital. This

bridge had only been set up this

0:32:060:32:11

weekend, it was considered a safety

hazard for university students

0:32:110:32:16

moving from the main campus to their

residences across the Avenue and now

0:32:160:32:22

they are facing this major accident.

Thank you for bringing us the latest

0:32:220:32:28

from Miami.

0:32:280:32:30

It's only three days until Russians

go to the polls and today

0:32:300:32:33

the country's conflicts

with the West are centre stage.

0:32:330:32:35

Moscow has called Britain's

expulsion of 23 Russian diplomats

0:32:350:32:37

over the poisoning of a former spy

in southern England irresponsible.

0:32:370:32:41

While here in the US,

the government has slapped sanctions

0:32:410:32:44

on 19 Russians for interfering

in the US election.

0:32:440:32:48

Here to discuss all of these

developments is Thomas Pickering,

0:32:480:32:51

former US Ambassador to both Russia

and the UN.

0:32:510:32:58

Thank you for coming in. Earlier on

we were speaking to somebody who was

0:32:580:33:05

a strong supporter of President

Putin, who expressed outrage at the

0:33:050:33:12

suggestion that Russia was involved

in the poisoning of this former spy

0:33:120:33:15

and said they wanted proof before

they would contemplate this. Is that

0:33:150:33:21

what you would expect?

I would, they

are very defensive about these kind

0:33:210:33:27

of things, but using novichok, that

Russian nerve agent, and the

0:33:270:33:39

tell-tale that has left, is

something interesting because they

0:33:390:33:42

have seemingly left a trace and you

wonder why, and my sense is that

0:33:420:33:48

when Putin was asked a year ago, was

there something unforgivable, he

0:33:480:33:54

said the trail, and while this is

not clear, there is an interesting

0:33:540:34:00

tie-up here between these two people

that have been poisoned, the

0:34:000:34:05

Alexander Litvinenko case, both of

which the Russians would have a

0:34:050:34:11

reason to feel represented the

trailers, the tradition among

0:34:110:34:16

released spies is that they work

beyond farm. I'm not sure what is

0:34:160:34:23

going on but Putin could be sending

a message to his folks are aware of

0:34:230:34:29

the fact they are targets for

western intelligence and wanting to

0:34:290:34:33

tighten the reins.

If we were to go

down the line of Jeremy Corbyn and

0:34:330:34:41

not point the finger directly at the

state and hypothesise that maybe

0:34:410:34:46

there was a Black Ops operation in

Russia, is that possible? We think

0:34:460:34:52

President Putin is our strong man

and no one can touch but how much

0:34:520:34:58

power do these groups around him

have?

We saw some things like that

0:34:580:35:05

in the middle of the Boris Yeltsin

period where things were more at

0:35:050:35:09

tumultuous and out of work. Putin

knows this business, he has been

0:35:090:35:15

around for a long time and the last

thing he would want is some kind of

0:35:150:35:21

black operation put him in a

difficult position. The

0:35:210:35:27

juxtaposition with the election is

something but nobody has ever had

0:35:270:35:31

the view that Putin would lose this

election. His popularity is up, the

0:35:310:35:37

notion he controls the vote count is

not far from reality so it may be a

0:35:370:35:43

late night if it is close but it is

hard to believe it will not be a

0:35:430:35:50

landslide for him.

Do you think

there is anything different about

0:35:500:35:56

this occasion to the Alexander

Litvinenko murder that would make

0:35:560:35:59

you think there will be a tough

retaliation?

That unrolled slowly,

0:35:590:36:09

and it took a longer time to come to

a conclusion. Polonium 2010 was a

0:36:090:36:16

harder element to find so that may

have done it but this is the second

0:36:160:36:22

time, maybe more if there are truths

to some of the other cases that have

0:36:220:36:27

popped up but not been fully

explored, so why think the notion

0:36:270:36:32

that how much further can it go on,

the British Prime Minister is under

0:36:320:36:38

pressure for all kinds of things so

it is a good time to be tough.

Thank

0:36:380:36:43

you for coming in.

0:36:430:36:46

Seven years after the civil war

in Syria broke out today

0:36:460:36:48

the bloodshed continues.

0:36:480:36:49

Thousands of people are fleeing

the rebel held enclave

0:36:490:36:52

of Eastern Ghouta as government

forces step up their

0:36:520:36:54

bombardment of the suburb.

0:36:540:36:55

One doctor has told the BBC

that the streets and hospitals

0:36:550:36:57

are full of injured people.

0:36:570:36:59

And there are not enough medical

staff or supplies to help them all.

0:36:590:37:02

As our Middle East editor

Jeremy Bowen reports,

0:37:020:37:04

after years of resistance,

it looks like the Damascus

0:37:040:37:06

suburb is about to fall.

0:37:060:37:08

Thousands of people are fleeing

parts of Eastern Ghouta,

0:37:080:37:11

going into an uncertain future that

looks better now than

0:37:110:37:15

the deadly present.

0:37:150:37:17

These are the people

who have spent weeks hiding

0:37:170:37:19

in basements from the shelling.

0:37:190:37:22

Eastern Ghouta is a big area

and this isn't happening everywhere.

0:37:220:37:28

Many tens of thousands

are still besieged.

0:37:330:37:38

This was filmed by Omar, a cameraman

who gives his material to the BBC.

0:37:380:37:44

The attack happened

outside his building.

0:37:440:37:47

A small boy was caught up in it.

0:37:470:37:51

He is deaf, so he hadn't heard

warnings to take cover.

0:37:510:37:55

Omar, the cameraman,

worried the boy would bleed to death

0:37:550:37:58

and told us the eight minutes it

took for the ambulance to arrive

0:37:580:38:01

were the worst he had

endured since the battle

0:38:010:38:04

for Eastern Ghouta had began.

0:38:040:38:08

Omar carried him to the ambulance

where he was squeezed in

0:38:080:38:11

next to the bodies of the dead.

0:38:110:38:14

Omar has seen a lot of death.

0:38:140:38:17

He said the boy was a soul

he wanted to save.

0:38:170:38:21

We have been following this doctor,

a paediatrician in an underground

0:38:210:38:26

hospital, who spends every day

with the wounded and the dying.

0:38:260:38:31

In that place, they are all fighting

fear, where regime soldiers

0:38:310:38:35

are advancing into the Eastern

Ghouta.

0:38:350:38:38

The doctor sent a message.

0:38:380:38:45

TRANSLATION:

It is the worst it

has been for many days,

0:38:450:38:47

the shelling is brutal,

bombs, rockets,

0:38:470:38:49

all kinds of weapons.

0:38:490:38:51

This may be my last message.

0:38:510:38:53

The injured are everywhere,

the operating theatres

0:38:530:38:55

are full of wounded people.

0:38:550:38:58

We don't have enough

doctors to help them

0:38:580:39:00

and our own homes are being shelved.

0:39:000:39:03

A small amount of aid is being

brought into Eastern Ghouta.

0:39:030:39:07

All the talk of a humanitarian

ceasefire is being ignored.

0:39:070:39:15

This war started seven years ago.

0:39:150:39:17

Its horror goes on.

0:39:170:39:20

Jeremy Bowen, BBC News.

0:39:200:39:24

When the violence in Syria first

broke out seven years ago,

0:39:240:39:28

journalist Rania Abouzeid

was on the ground, and for years

0:39:280:39:30

continued her reporting

despite being banned

0:39:300:39:33

from entering the country.

0:39:330:39:36

She's written a new book

about her experiences

0:39:360:39:37

called No Turning Back.

0:39:370:39:39

She joined us a short time ago.

0:39:390:39:43

You've told the story of the Syrian

civil war through portraits

0:39:430:39:49

of people you met over the years,

four of them, and I wanted

0:39:490:39:55

you to start by telling us a little

about the girl you met six for seven

0:39:550:39:59

years ago, what's happened

to her life in the last few years?

0:39:590:40:02

I wanted to explain war

through the eyes of a child and show

0:40:020:40:06

the impact it had on a regular

family, so you see Ruha absorbing

0:40:060:40:09

what's happening around her,

trying to understand it,

0:40:090:40:13

and some of the challenges

she faces as a child

0:40:130:40:16

living in tumultuous times,

like the small things for a little

0:40:160:40:24

girl, not being able to go out

into the courtyard because she fears

0:40:240:40:28

snipers, not being able

to play on the streets.

0:40:280:40:32

She says we used to play

on the streets then

0:40:320:40:34

we feared we would be shot,

this is a nine-year-old girl who has

0:40:340:40:39

these concerns so it gives

you an idea how it impacts everyone

0:40:390:40:43

and how even a nine-year-old can

absorb everything happening

0:40:430:40:45

around her and she's trying

to understand it in her own ways.

0:40:450:40:48

One of the political things we have

seen in Syria over the course

0:40:480:40:51

of this war has been the growth

of radicalisation,

0:40:510:40:54

of Islamic extremists.

0:40:540:40:55

It wasn't necessarily

there at the beginning

0:40:550:40:58

of the protest but it has emerged

in the country.

0:40:580:41:03

You tell the story of Muhammad,

who became radicalised - how?

0:41:030:41:08

I tell the story of three Al-Qaeda

members in this book and that's

0:41:080:41:11

to illustrate the Islamisation

of the uprising and all three

0:41:110:41:13

characters were radicalised

at different times

0:41:130:41:15

and in different ways.

0:41:150:41:18

Muhammad was radicalised

because his family suffered

0:41:180:41:21

from the older Assad's crackdown

against an earlier Islamist

0:41:210:41:27

insurrection in the 1980s and that,

to use Muhammad's words,

0:41:270:41:34

planted hatred in his heart,

which he carried with him

0:41:340:41:37

until he saw a chance in 2011

to take revenge against the regime

0:41:370:41:43

and his vehicle for revenge

was Islamic radicalism.

0:41:430:41:50

The characters you follow

through your book and their life

0:41:500:41:54

stories that you bring to us

are important because I worry that

0:41:540:42:01

after seven years of the pictures

and horror we see on our screens,

0:42:010:42:10

the world has become inured

to what is happening in Syria.

0:42:100:42:12

Do you worry that the international

community has switched off?

0:42:120:42:15

That's why I chose to follow

a number of characters and do so not

0:42:150:42:18

just for a minute where you see them

after a battle but to follow them

0:42:180:42:22

over years so you can get

the context of their experience

0:42:220:42:26

and in following them

you will understand something

0:42:260:42:31

about what happened in Syria

on a political level,

0:42:310:42:33

a military level, on a social level.

0:42:330:42:36

That's why I structured it the way

it is, because it is complex

0:42:360:42:39

and difficult to understand

and there is an alphabet soup

0:42:390:42:43

of rebel groups that keeps changing

but in my experience of covering

0:42:430:42:47

a place like the Middle East,

if you focus on people and tell

0:42:470:42:54

the story through people,

you can untangle those ideologies

0:42:540:42:56

and the complicated nature

of the story.

0:42:560:42:57

It becomes easier to understand.

0:42:570:43:00

Briefly, have you been

back to Syria?

0:43:000:43:05

I haven't been back since late

2016, just because

0:43:050:43:07

it's so difficult to get into.

0:43:070:43:08

It's near impossible

to get into Syria now.

0:43:080:43:13

Which is why there is

so little coverage of it.

0:43:130:43:17

The book is no turning back.

0:43:170:43:19

Thank you for coming in.

0:43:190:43:24

Keeping the world interesting in

what is going on is a real battle.

0:43:240:43:30

It reminded me of a tweet I saw a

month ago from Unicef who sent out a

0:43:300:43:36

blank tweet, no words will do

justice to the children killed,

0:43:360:43:42

their mothers, fathers and loved

ones, pointing out that all these

0:43:420:43:47

pictures are not working because the

international community is not doing

0:43:470:43:55

enough.

And you met some of the

Syrian refugees who came out, those

0:43:550:43:59

people had tough lives, then once

you met on the border with Greece.

0:43:590:44:05

It's two years ago this week, and it

is those personal stories that stick

0:44:050:44:10

with you, the pictures and videos

pale compared to the people I listen

0:44:100:44:17

to on the border. This family had a

farm outside Damascus that they sold

0:44:170:44:23

because they wanted a wooden boat

from Turkey to Greece because the

0:44:230:44:28

rubber ones were sinking, but before

they got to Greece, they chose --

0:44:280:44:34

the border was closed, so they

couldn't go forwards or backwards,

0:44:340:44:40

and that night I went home and had a

warm shower. It rained and rained

0:44:400:44:46

and it was really miserable.

And

they had nothing left because they

0:44:460:44:52

had sold it all.

0:44:520:44:54

Stella McCartney, Vivenne Westwood,

Alexander McQueen -

0:44:540:44:56

some of the biggest names in global

fashion are British and in the last

0:44:560:44:59

ten year the size of the business

in the UK has taken off

0:44:590:45:02

as never before.

0:45:020:45:03

At the last count, fashion

was worth more than to

0:45:030:45:05

£28 billion to the UK economy.

0:45:060:45:07

And fashion is as about

as international a business

0:45:070:45:09

as you can get, so what difference

will Brexit make?

0:45:090:45:12

On the day that the Creative

Industries Federation

0:45:120:45:13

hosts a major conference,

and as part of our own Business

0:45:130:45:16

of Brexit series, we've been talking

to the leading UK fashion designer

0:45:160:45:19

Maria Grachvogel.

0:45:190:45:26

Almost a year to go until Brexit,

does your industry think it has

0:45:260:45:32

enough information about what will

happen?

Absolutely not. On a human

0:45:320:45:39

level, there is concern among

designers and manufacturers in the

0:45:390:45:45

UK, to see exactly what that will

mean. I think we have a huge design

0:45:450:45:52

skill here in the UK and our skills

are some of the best but we are in

0:45:520:45:58

some ways, we have relied on a

certain pool of immigration for the

0:45:580:46:05

people that do the work, the

machinists, we aren't training those

0:46:050:46:09

in the UK, we don't have those

skills and the risk concern as to

0:46:090:46:13

what happens next for the industry.

When I lived in Italy, it was a huge

0:46:130:46:22

frustration to designers who had

made a brand that sold around the

0:46:220:46:26

world that some of their skills were

disappearing because they were

0:46:260:46:30

bringing in people from abroad to

keep down the cost. When Brexiteer

0:46:300:46:35

is saved those are the sort of

people we need to start retraining,

0:46:350:46:40

building up a British brand?

That's

all well and good but it's whether

0:46:400:46:47

they want to. Students come in to my

work for placements and we offer a

0:46:470:46:55

good technical placement because I

believe in making clothes, I can

0:46:550:47:00

make something from beginning to end

that not many people are interested

0:47:000:47:05

in learning to be a machinist.

People are interested in being a

0:47:050:47:12

designer and that is different, we

in the UK have to say it is gorgeous

0:47:120:47:17

to be a pattern cutter or a

machinist and have that pride as

0:47:170:47:25

opposed to purely in design.

Beyond

the idea of labour and raw materials

0:47:250:47:29

which use a lot of imported

materials, fashion is very global.

0:47:290:47:35

Christian wear something that is

fabulous, we try and copy it, but

0:47:350:47:41

that idea of a globalised creative

spirit, how does that get affected,

0:47:410:47:47

or does it, when Britain leaves the

EU?

It's not so much to design side

0:47:470:47:55

of things although there are

questions about, right now I could

0:47:550:47:59

go and potentially have a job in the

design house in Paris, how easy

0:47:590:48:05

would that be after Brexit remains

to be seen. Somebody at my level may

0:48:050:48:11

not have the issues, the issues are

further down the food chain.

What do

0:48:110:48:17

you need to hear next week when the

European governments get together?

0:48:170:48:23

Harass any materials?

That's super

important because we're bringing

0:48:230:48:29

things in from the EU all the time

and what that looks like in terms of

0:48:290:48:34

the finished price of goods because

we have an amazing design industry

0:48:340:48:39

and we need to support it.

0:48:390:48:40

This is Beyond 100 Days.

0:48:400:48:41

Still to come:

0:48:410:48:51

The changing face of

National Geographic -

0:48:520:48:57

What these pictures tell us about

its past and its future.

0:48:570:49:01

The police investigation

into the Grenfell Tower blaze has

0:49:010:49:03

revealed a fire door has failed

a fire test.

0:49:030:49:05

Experts said it was supposed

to resist fire for 30 minutes,

0:49:050:49:08

but lasted for only 15.

0:49:080:49:09

Tom Symonds reports.

0:49:090:49:10

Could what happened

here be the result of

0:49:100:49:12

corporate manslaughter?

0:49:120:49:14

That is what the police

are investigating.

0:49:140:49:15

Highly technical work,

including the test of a door

0:49:150:49:17

from a Grenfell flat.

0:49:170:49:18

One that was undamaged in the fire.

0:49:180:49:20

In this standard test,

heat is applied to one side

0:49:200:49:23

and the door must

hold for 30 minutes.

0:49:230:49:26

Here, there's some smoke, but this

door easily passes the test.

0:49:260:49:29

The sample from Grenfell

lasted 15 minutes.

0:49:290:49:33

The police informed the government,

which has consulted its own experts.

0:49:330:49:37

The response:

0:49:370:49:39

There is no change

to fire safety advice

0:49:390:49:41

that the public should follow.

0:49:410:49:44

I, nevertheless, fully appreciate

that this news will be

0:49:440:49:48

troubling for many people,

not least all those affected

0:49:480:49:51

by the Grenfell tragedy.

0:49:510:49:54

That is why, based on expert advice,

we have begun the process

0:49:540:49:57

of conducting further tests

and we will continue to consult

0:49:570:50:01

with the expert panel

to identify the implications

0:50:010:50:04

of these further tests.

0:50:040:50:06

This picture is from

before the fire.

0:50:060:50:08

Flats appear to have

had a variety of doors,

0:50:080:50:11

but they were fairly new.

0:50:110:50:13

The doors were replaced in 2012,

not as part as the major

0:50:130:50:16

refurbishment of Grenfell Tower.

0:50:160:50:19

After that work there

was a safety inspection.

0:50:190:50:22

The investigators will want to know

were the doors properly assessed?

0:50:220:50:27

For the survivors, understanding why

it happened is vital.

0:50:270:50:30

It's very important for Grenfell

survivors and the bereaved families

0:50:300:50:35

to feel that we can honour

the memory of those who have died.

0:50:350:50:38

One way we can bring justice

is to make sure that regulations

0:50:380:50:43

and progressive policies ensure that

people feel safe in their homes

0:50:430:50:46

once again and that means

tightening the regulations.

0:50:460:50:49

But those questions will come later.

0:50:500:50:52

For now, this is still the scene

of a criminal investigation.

0:50:520:50:55

Tom Symonds, BBC News,

at Grenfell Tower.

0:50:550:51:01

You're watching Beyond 100 Days.

0:51:020:51:04

It's famous for its glossy pages

of photos and stories

0:51:040:51:07

from around the world,

but National Geographic Magazine

0:51:070:51:09

is taking a moment

to re-think its past.

0:51:090:51:12

The publication has said

its previous coverage was racist

0:51:120:51:17

by showing different groups

as exotic or savage

0:51:170:51:19

and reproducing a racial hierarchy.

0:51:190:51:23

Now the latest issue

of the 130-year-old publication

0:51:230:51:26

is confronting its troubled history

by being entirely dedicated

0:51:260:51:29

to the issue of race.

0:51:290:51:31

With us now to discuss it

all is National Geographic's

0:51:310:51:34

editor in chief, Susan Goldberg.

0:51:340:51:41

What made you decide to look not

just at the issue of race, it is the

0:51:410:51:48

50th anniversary of the

assassination of Martin Luther King,

0:51:480:51:52

but National Geographic's role in

that?

I thought if we were going to

0:51:520:51:58

speak credibly about race, we should

look at her own history because I

0:51:580:52:04

have heard that the pages of our

magazine was the first place that

0:52:040:52:08

readers were exposed to community is

different to them.

So you look back

0:52:080:52:14

and what did you find?

Until the

time of the civil rights movement in

0:52:140:52:22

the US, we didn't capture people of

colour living in the US, did not

0:52:220:52:28

acknowledge their roles beyond being

labourers or domestics, then when we

0:52:280:52:33

went overseas we portrayed people as

exotic.

You gave an example of a

0:52:330:52:40

1962 addition for your team went to

South Africa, just a little while

0:52:400:52:46

after the massacre in Sharpeville,

how did National Geographic cover

0:52:460:52:51

that story?

There were really not

voices of black South Africans and

0:52:510:52:58

the story did not even mention the

Sharpeville shootings, which

0:52:580:53:03

horrified the world. What was

encouraging is that in 1977 when we

0:53:030:53:10

went by, that story talks about the

opposition leaders, we have pictures

0:53:100:53:15

of Winnie Mandela and we are talking

about apartheid and capturing the

0:53:150:53:20

problems, so you can see how much

the coverage changed after the civil

0:53:200:53:25

rights movement.

Do you think in the

way that you represented cultures

0:53:250:53:32

abroad you didn't so much teach

people in the US because you didn't

0:53:320:53:37

talk about black culture, did you in

some ways through the photographs

0:53:370:53:42

reinforce the prejudice?

We asked

our historian to help us undertake

0:53:420:53:50

this and he is an expert here, he

said he thought our coverage

0:53:500:53:56

reinforced a colonial view of the

world. You have National Geographic,

0:53:560:54:02

founded in 1888 at the height of

colonialism and for a long time that

0:54:020:54:08

was the view that was reinforced.

There is much of our history we are

0:54:080:54:13

proud of, how we brought people into

the broader world, but we didn't do

0:54:130:54:19

everything right.

How conscious are

you now of this issue of unintended

0:54:190:54:24

pious?

We tried to make sure we are

covering a diverse world with a

0:54:240:54:32

diverse group of photographers and

writers, so people go into

0:54:320:54:37

situations where they will not fall

into easy cliches, so we are more

0:54:370:54:45

able to provide context and

perspective. We are also giving

0:54:450:54:48

people in their communities cameras

so they can document their own

0:54:480:54:52

lives, which we would never have

done 15 years ago.

Thank you for

0:54:520:54:58

coming in, it's a great bit of

research.

0:54:580:55:00

Do you like fish and chips?

0:55:000:55:04

Yes, of course.

0:55:040:55:07

I used to make fish and chips -

in another life.

0:55:070:55:09

It was my Saturday job.

0:55:090:55:10

But here's the thing,

all the fish we sold on a Saturday

0:55:100:55:13

afternoon was haddock and cod.

0:55:130:55:15

But now we are being

encouraged to eat other fish.

0:55:150:55:17

Brexit fish.

0:55:170:55:18

Fish from our own local waters,

partly to help the British

0:55:180:55:21

fishing industry but largely

because it is much more sustainable.

0:55:210:55:24

You are seriously going to call them

Brexit feis? I'm going to give you

0:55:240:55:32

the numbers.

0:55:320:55:33

Britain exports 75% of the fish

it catches and imports

0:55:330:55:35

70% of its consumption.

0:55:350:55:36

That's because the Brits don't

like the fish from their own waters.

0:55:360:55:43

Take that one, Christian! We don't

like our own feis.

You will know why

0:55:430:55:50

in the second.

0:55:500:55:52

So let me show you the top three

fish the Marine Conservation Society

0:55:520:55:58

wants us to start eating.

0:55:580:55:59

No real painting. Any man who fished

as a boy used to catch these. When I

0:55:590:56:08

caught one of these, I would stick

it in the frying pan and it tasted

0:56:080:56:13

pretty good but if you put that in

the deep fat fryer and have it with

0:56:130:56:18

fish and chips, it will be to bone

and skin me.

I wouldn't buy it even

0:56:180:56:23

from you.

This is hate, rather more

good looking. And herrings, we do

0:56:230:56:32