17/10/2012 Daily Politics


17/10/2012

Andrew Neil and Jo Coburn present coverage of Prime Minister's Questions and the latest political news and debate. Plus, Tanni Grey-Thompson on the government's Universal Credit.


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Good morning. This is the Daily Politics. Today's top story:

:00:38.:00:40.

Unemployment is down, falling by 50,000 between June and August to

:00:41.:00:47.

just over 2.5 million. Charities claim disabled people will be worse

:00:47.:00:51.

off when the government introduces its new Universal Credit next year.

:00:51.:00:55.

We'll talk to Paralympian Tanni Grey-Thompson.

:00:55.:00:58.

David Cameron and Ed Miliband square up for the first Prime

:00:58.:01:01.

Minister's Questions for a month - we'll have all the action live from

:01:01.:01:05.

noon. And are our cinemas ripping off

:01:05.:01:08.

customers with the price of popcorn? We'll hear from George

:01:08.:01:12.

Galloway, who's leading a one-man crusade to cut the cost of a night

:01:12.:01:22.
:01:22.:01:26.

out at the flicks. What else has he got to do? Well,

:01:26.:01:30.

it is a very important role. All that to come before one o'clock.

:01:30.:01:38.

It's almost as exciting as the Great British Bake-off final!

:01:38.:01:42.

What's that? Something to do with baking cakes. Actually, it's more

:01:42.:01:46.

exciting. And with us for the duration, we're joined by the baked

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alaska and strawberry cheesecake of British politics - Jim Murphy,

:01:49.:01:51.

Labour's Shadow Defence Secretary, and Steve Webb, the Liberal

:01:51.:02:00.

Democrat work and pensions minister. Which is which, I have no idea.

:02:00.:02:03.

Welcome to you both. Let's kick off with the latest unemployment

:02:03.:02:13.
:02:13.:02:14.

figures, which showed another fall in the number of people out of work.

:02:14.:02:24.
:02:24.:02:25.

The number of people out of work now stands at just over 2.5 million.

:02:25.:02:31.

That is the count of people claiming unemployment benefit. Are

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you surprised that total employment in this country, despite the fact

:02:35.:02:40.

that the economy has barely grown at all since this coalition came to

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power, is now higher than it was in the boom year of the Labour

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government? There are some peculiarities about this recession

:02:48.:02:52.

and double-dip recession we are in. There are issues about inflation

:02:52.:02:59.

and employment, the number of people in disability benefit. Any

:02:59.:03:03.

reduction in unemployment is good news for those who have found work.

:03:03.:03:08.

But it is not so enjoyable for folk who have yet to find work to hear

:03:08.:03:14.

politicians are celebrating the cut in unemployment. My worry is that

:03:14.:03:20.

the folk who have been at work for longest are getting -- the folk who

:03:20.:03:23.

are out of work for longest are getting further away from a job.

:03:23.:03:29.

People get stuck at in benefits. We are not going back to the '80s. It

:03:29.:03:35.

was not your fault, you were not in government then. In the '80s,

:03:35.:03:43.

people got lost out of work. And they stayed on benefit, and being

:03:43.:03:47.

on benefits ended up becoming the norm in the family. I worry that

:03:47.:03:51.

behind the headlines, there is a big increase in the number of

:03:51.:03:55.

people who are long-term unemployed. When you have to 0.5 million

:03:55.:04:01.

unemployed in the Labour Force Survey, there are always bad trends

:04:01.:04:04.

within that for the long-term unemployed. The official growth

:04:04.:04:09.

figures can be revised as well. Given that there is no growth, and

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88,000 increase in full-time employment is remarkable. 170,000

:04:15.:04:19.

fewer people on out-of-work benefits, and youth unemployment

:04:19.:04:27.

down 62,000. There is a substantial number of temporary jobs. That is

:04:27.:04:34.

better than no jobs, of course. 125,000 are part-time. Of that, we

:04:34.:04:39.

don't know how many are voluntary and how many involuntary. I am not

:04:39.:04:49.
:04:49.:04:50.

here to say this is dreadful news. However, rather than celebrating it,

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understanding what is happening inside these figures is complicated.

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People who were out of work 12 months ago are not budging. There

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is a problem there for all of us. I cannot fix it in opposition, but

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these guys have to do more. Let me come to Mr Webb. I put it to you

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that the reason why the unemployment figures are better

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than they should be, given the overall state of the economy, is

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that Labour has become very cheap in this country. Real wages have

:05:20.:05:25.

not been rising. They have not kept pace with prices, and it is a

:05:25.:05:29.

bargain to employ people these days. But the price you pay for that is

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because real wages are not rising, there is a shortage of demand in

:05:33.:05:38.

the economy, and that is why it is not growing. Firms, rather than

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getting rid of people, are holding on to them through tough times

:05:42.:05:46.

because they think things will get better. If you thought we were

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going to Helen and cut with the economy, you would just sack people.

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-- If you thought we were going to hell in a handcart with the economy.

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People say, how do you square than number of people in work? These

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figures are hot off the press. Firms are keeping people because

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they believe there is a point in keeping them, because they can see

:06:11.:06:15.

things are starting to pick up. there are also keeping them because

:06:15.:06:19.

they don't need to give them pay rises. The labour market is so weak

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that they don't need to give them pay rises, even at a time when

:06:23.:06:29.

prices have been rising, and at things on which people have to

:06:29.:06:34.

spend their money, food, fuel, have been rising fast. Headlining for

:06:34.:06:40.

Asian, which includes food and fuel -- headline inflation has come down.

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It is better that we have people in jobs, yes, with modest pay rises,

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than in past recessions, when people have shed workers because

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they have no confidence in the future. We are all waiting on the

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growth figures now. We are. Let's see if it matches Steve's has this

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month. Nothing personal, but what I have heard this morning among some

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government ministers is that they are almost a uncorking the

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champagne. He when you get good news about employment month after

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month, it is good news. I thought they weren't allowed to drink

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:07:28.:07:29.

champagne in the age of austerity! Inside these figures, there are

:07:29.:07:33.

parts of the country where things are just tougher. It is true that

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the figures in the north are not great. The North and Scotland are

:07:40.:07:48.

having tough times. That needs to be addressed. Thank you Fryatt

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opening salvo. And now for number two on the list.

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Barack Obama has fought back against his Republican rival Mitt

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Romney, as the two men step up the fight to be America's next

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president. The two men appeared on live TV last night for their second

:08:00.:08:07.

of three presidential debates. Here's a flavour. The unemployment

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rate is 7.8% now. If you take into account people who dropped out of

:08:11.:08:15.

the workforce, it would be 10.7%. We have not made the progress we

:08:15.:08:20.

need to make to bring people back to work. That is why we have a five

:08:20.:08:26.

point plan to bring 12 million jobs in four years. Mitt Romney says he

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has a five point plan. He has a one point plan, and that is to make

:08:34.:08:36.

sure that folks at the top player by a different set of rules. That

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has been his philosophy in the private sector, his philosophy as

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Governor and as a presidential candidate. Jim Murphy, you were up

:08:46.:08:52.

till the wee hours? I was, to about 4 o'clock this morning. I fell

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asleep at one point, which is maybe why I look so tired. Our make-up

:08:57.:09:02.

artist has done wonders. You don't look at all tired. But then she has

:09:02.:09:12.
:09:12.:09:14.

me to practise on every day. Enough about your make-up, gentlemen. On

:09:14.:09:21.

President Obama, Heath lost last time in the present debate. Did he

:09:21.:09:26.

step up to the mark? Is the first debate, he seemed bored. He almost

:09:26.:09:29.

seemed as though it was bad- mannered of Mitt Romney to

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interrupt him, whereas we saw a different Barack Obama last night

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and early this morning. We did not see the Obama of the previous

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election, where there was a sense of him sitting on a hill with

:09:42.:09:50.

remarkable optimism. There was a sense of "if I did not do the

:09:50.:09:55.

things I did for the car industry, Ohio would be in difficulties". He

:09:55.:10:00.

swung some punches last night. He was winning points. To continue the

:10:00.:10:06.

boxing analogy, it was not a knockout. It is the third debate

:10:06.:10:10.

that has significance. This is potentially the decider. When it

:10:11.:10:14.

comes to the electoral colleges, it is conceivable that the person who

:10:14.:10:17.

wins the vote does not win the college and does not become

:10:17.:10:22.

President. The snap poll that was done by CNN did put President Obama

:10:23.:10:30.

ahead, although not by much. But on issues like jobs, taxes and

:10:30.:10:35.

healthcare, they put Mitt Romney ahead. What is your feeling about

:10:35.:10:41.

it now? What strikes me about the first debate is, you have been

:10:41.:10:44.

president for four years. You have been cloistered and treated with

:10:44.:10:49.

reverence, and suddenly, you are both candidates in a room. It took

:10:49.:10:52.

Obama time to adapt to the fact that he is President, but he is now

:10:52.:10:57.

a candidate. It was a culture shock to go out of that cocoon as

:10:57.:11:00.

President in to these debates. By the second one, he had worked it

:11:00.:11:05.

out. He had gone from his lecturing mode to being more of a visionary.

:11:05.:11:10.

But worthy debates illuminating? Do they really matter? Yes, the Poles

:11:10.:11:15.

did a job for Mitt Romney last time, so in that sense, they did. But,

:11:15.:11:19.

not wanting to be too cynical about Nick Clegg's game changing TV

:11:19.:11:24.

debate, but in the end, the Liberal Democrats did not get as many seats

:11:24.:11:30.

as they thought. An extra million people voted Liberal Democrat who

:11:30.:11:37.

had not previously. I met people on the doorstep who said, I like your

:11:37.:11:41.

guy on the telly last night. So they do make a difference. I don't

:11:42.:11:51.

like the debates. They will be a common practice now in the UK. And

:11:51.:11:56.

they will become law that the campaign is about. With Cup finals,

:11:56.:11:59.

you have the pre-match build-up, the match itself, the post-match

:11:59.:12:02.

analysis and then straight away, you are back in to a pre-match

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warm-up. At least it is what the candidates say and it is not

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mediated through third parties. could learn from last night, where

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it appeared to be genuinely independent voters who were asking

:12:16.:12:21.

real questions. It was a better format. The last one was much more

:12:21.:12:28.

stiff. They were stuck behind the podiums. I liked watching them roam

:12:28.:12:33.

around more, almost touching confrontational. It is theatre.

:12:33.:12:38.

Nick Clegg proved at the last debate that he could make himself a

:12:38.:12:42.

player. He was not just the third party guy in the corner. And

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because he did well without notes, he became a player. Ed Miliband

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spoke without notes at the conference speech for an hour, so

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that will benefit him. I think we can learn from last night's debate

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in the UK, with real people asking tough questions, with a Moderator

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interrupting when possible. Gerry Ford could not have done it

:13:04.:13:11.

last night. He could not walk and talk at the same time. I have not

:13:11.:13:16.

mastered that yet. The universal credit is the

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government's flagship Welfare Reform Policy. It has already got

:13:20.:13:24.

its critics. Today the former Paralympian Tanni Grey-Thompson

:13:24.:13:28.

joined them, claiming in a report that up to half a million disabled

:13:28.:13:34.

people and their families could be left worse off.

:13:34.:13:38.

He from October, next year, some of the biggest benefits including

:13:38.:13:41.

income support, income based jobseeker's allowance, housing

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benefit and child tax credits will be combined into one universal

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credit. The scheme, which the government says is the biggest

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welfare reform for 60 years, is the brainchild of Work and Pensions

:13:53.:13:57.

Secretary Iain Duncan Smith and is intended to make work pay by

:13:57.:14:00.

insuring that benefits are reduced at a consistent rate as earnings go

:14:00.:14:06.

up. But Barras Tanni Grey-Thompson has today published a report backed

:14:06.:14:10.

by several charities, concluding that the group likely to be most

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affected his disabled people. It claims that over time, 100,000

:14:14.:14:20.

families with disabled children stand to lose up to �28 a week, and

:14:20.:14:24.

116,000 disabled people who work will be at risk of losing �40 a

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week. It also says that many disabled people plan to cut back on

:14:28.:14:32.

heating and food bills because of the changes. But the government

:14:32.:14:36.

said the report is highly selective and could result in irresponsible

:14:36.:14:39.

scaremongering. The Department for Work and Pensions insisted that

:14:39.:14:43.

there will be no cash losers under the universal credit, and said many

:14:43.:14:46.

disabled adults and children would Yvette get more support than at

:14:46.:14:50.

present. Here is the welfare minister, defending the reforms.

:14:50.:15:00.
:15:00.:15:01.

We are introducing Universal Credit, which has a much simplified system,

:15:01.:15:07.

which people will be able to understand. Lots of disabled people

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will actually benefit, because we are focusing our money particularly

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on the most severely disabled. There will be transitional

:15:16.:15:20.

protection for people so there are no cash loses, it is misleading to

:15:20.:15:25.

suggest there will be. If someone changes their circumstances, that

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is the same as the current position, but there will be cash protection

:15:29.:15:33.

in the sense that there is transitional protection. I am

:15:33.:15:38.

concerned the scaremongering and there is going round, because it

:15:38.:15:42.

will make disabled people unnecessarily frightened.

:15:42.:15:47.

We are joined by the Paralympian Tanni Grey-Thompson. The government

:15:47.:15:53.

has promised that the Universal Credit, which wraps up a number of

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benefits that are paid at the moment, will be fairer, Burma,

:15:58.:16:03.

simpler and there will be less fraud and error. They say no one

:16:03.:16:08.

will lose out. What do you say? And a report says that up to 450,000

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disabled people will be worse off. Disabled children, disabled people

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in work, and also severely disabled people who live on their own and

:16:18.:16:22.

don't have any hope. It is a very challenging time, but it could

:16:23.:16:27.

actually pressure the cost elsewhere, on to local authorities,

:16:27.:16:32.

and could actually cost us more in the long run. Could you explain how

:16:32.:16:39.

in your view these hundred and 50,000 that will lose out, why will

:16:39.:16:44.

they lose out? Are people could be losing anywhere between 28 and �50

:16:44.:16:50.

a week. For someone who has a disabled child, the cost of

:16:50.:16:52.

childcare is incredibly expensive, it makes it difficult for them to

:16:52.:16:56.

go into work. For someone who is severely disabled who lives on

:16:56.:17:00.

their own, he uses the money for someone to care for them, they

:17:00.:17:05.

could lose that. Why would they lose it, though? As I understand it,

:17:05.:17:12.

the credit was meant to wrap up the existing payments. Why will they

:17:12.:17:18.

lose the money? They will visit in the changeover, because the severe

:17:18.:17:21.

disability premium is disappearing. The government says that it pays

:17:21.:17:25.

for the extra cost of disabled people, that doesn't cover the

:17:25.:17:29.

additional extra costs of being disabled and living on your own.

:17:29.:17:35.

Steve Webb, was it the intention of the welfare reforms to make 150,000

:17:35.:17:41.

disabled people worse off? No, and they will not. First of all,

:17:41.:17:46.

disabled -- Universal Credit is not about cuts, it is about extra. It

:17:46.:17:52.

is putting more money... A all chancellors like to spend less

:17:52.:17:56.

rather than more! But in the context of spending less, defined

:17:56.:18:02.

over 2 billion extra to help people in low wages, including people in

:18:02.:18:07.

work, all of us want to see disabled people able to work and

:18:07.:18:12.

able to do so, this means you will keep more of what you earn. But it

:18:12.:18:15.

is true for everybody? In is particularly relevant for disabled

:18:15.:18:22.

people. If you are doing a part- time job, or you're in out of work,

:18:22.:18:28.

the system is much better. response we have had from 3500

:18:28.:18:33.

disabled people doesn't match up with that. They're saying the money

:18:33.:18:37.

they currently get, the dads think they will get it within the new

:18:37.:18:42.

system. There are lots of things in Universal Credit which are good,

:18:42.:18:45.

but the reporters four recommendation to a round children,

:18:45.:18:50.

child care, and we think we can help the government moved to where

:18:50.:18:57.

they want to be. Your report says that half a million disabled people

:18:57.:19:03.

will be worse off. But your own department, in its impact

:19:03.:19:08.

assessment, said that around 800,000 disabled households would

:19:08.:19:16.

be worse off. That was in November 2011. One question is, if you put a

:19:16.:19:19.

whole thing in tomorrow, what would it look like? The money spent on

:19:19.:19:23.

disabled people is the same overall, roughly 800,000 disabled people

:19:23.:19:27.

will gain. Do people who would get less are protected, so the cash

:19:27.:19:34.

amount they get is protected, and that is the point. Of course Tanni

:19:34.:19:37.

Grey-Thompson is right to raise awareness of these issues, but our

:19:37.:19:44.

worry is people read the headline, disabled people lose cash. Your

:19:44.:19:47.

money is protected, all of this is coming in over the years, it is

:19:47.:19:55.

gradual. Let me get this clear. Are you saying that if you are disabled,

:19:55.:20:00.

whatever the disability, if it qualifies for some form of welfare

:20:00.:20:05.

payment, when this credit comes in, we will not be worse off? The that

:20:05.:20:10.

is what I'm saying. The Universal Credit replaces it the other system

:20:10.:20:15.

of credits. The cash amount will be protected, this is being done over

:20:15.:20:22.

a series of years. He is live on air, he has said it! That is great

:20:22.:20:26.

if you're currently on the benefit. It is not there for a new claimant,

:20:26.:20:29.

people can have the same level of impairment on different levels of

:20:29.:20:37.

support. Doesn't that always happen in a transition? I just... What do

:20:37.:20:44.

you say it to the claim that your report looks at various things, and

:20:44.:20:48.

you may well have found problems with his Universal Credit, I am

:20:48.:20:52.

sure the government will have to read it carefully, but there seems

:20:52.:20:55.

to be an element of scaremongering. You talk about disabled people

:20:55.:21:00.

having to cut back on food, 80% said they would cut the amount on

:21:00.:21:05.

heating. People will be contemplating suicide. Children's

:21:05.:21:10.

futures will be redeemed. Have you gone too far? Are that is what

:21:10.:21:16.

people have said to us. We're at parents saying they would consider

:21:16.:21:21.

putting their disabled child in two residential care because of the

:21:21.:21:26.

debt they would slip into. I think it is important that been raised

:21:26.:21:30.

this with disabled people, so they know the changes are coming. I also

:21:30.:21:33.

think it is important that we did this research. It is not me sitting

:21:33.:21:37.

in my office thinking about disabled people, we need to have

:21:37.:21:44.

facts to go back to the government. Jim Mate, I wanted to hear the

:21:44.:21:50.

report coming out and the government's response, but just a

:21:50.:21:54.

clarification, his Labour in favour of Universal Credit? We think it is

:21:54.:21:58.

a good idea, we were looking at it in government. But importantly, it

:21:58.:22:03.

is how you then design it. Politicians of all parties have got

:22:03.:22:06.

to talk and carry this argument Caerphilly, because people watching

:22:06.:22:12.

today would genuinely be worried. I think Tanni Grey-Thompson has done

:22:12.:22:15.

a great job at highlighting some real concerns, I think the

:22:15.:22:20.

government has got to listen to disabled people themselves, from

:22:20.:22:27.

their perspective. Because there is a genuine worry. The government has

:22:27.:22:32.

now got to respond. But I assume you have a gut to get together, the

:22:32.:22:39.

two if you, and compare notes. think people sometimes imagine that

:22:39.:22:43.

policies are disabled people are made in some sort of ivory tower.

:22:43.:22:49.

Disabled people scrips are in and out of that department constantly.

:22:49.:22:53.

-- disabled people's groups. Come back and see us after you have had

:22:53.:23:03.
:23:03.:23:03.

the dialogue! Now, for the big news this week. The German Chancellor

:23:04.:23:10.

Angela Merkel, Greece's favourite politician, she is a bit hacked off

:23:10.:23:15.

with our dear Prime Minister. According to the magazine Der

:23:15.:23:21.

Spiegel, she likens David Cameron and our glorious country to be

:23:21.:23:27.

grumpy Muppets. The ones who are constantly grumbling from the

:23:27.:23:33.

sidelines! Angela Merkel is apparently fed up with David

:23:33.:23:37.

Cameron's approach to Europe, the air macro is a surprise! How can we

:23:37.:23:45.

help? We have just the thing. We have a Daily Politics mug, build,

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of course, with freshly brewed it English Breakfast tea. If you want

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to get your hands on one of these, all you need to do it is when our

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:24:08.:24:17.

Guess The Year competition. Can you More than 2000 stations will be

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closed. The most dramatic effect is When are you taking up residence in

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Number 10? I don't know, much too To be in with a chance of winning a

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Daily Politics mug, send your It is coming up to midday, let's

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take a look at Big Ben. That can only mean one thing. Prime

:26:00.:26:09.

Minister's Questions is on its way. Nick Robinson is here. I watched

:26:09.:26:13.

your love-in with Alex Salmond! I was in the Middle East. People

:26:13.:26:21.

talked of nothing else. I always thought of you and I ASBOs Muppets!

:26:21.:26:27.

Which is which? But older! I have two words to you, Andrew Mitchell.

:26:28.:26:33.

Interesting choice for Ed Miliband. I would be amazed if there wasn't a

:26:33.:26:37.

reference to him, but I would be surprised if you do it head-on. The

:26:37.:26:41.

danger for an opposition leader, in a story that is causing a huge

:26:41.:26:46.

embarrassment to the government, the act of using it up front can

:26:46.:26:51.

rally the whole of the government benches to support the guide. So

:26:51.:26:55.

why would be saying, I probably won't some good jokes, make it look

:26:55.:26:59.

awkward, but if you do it head-on, the danger is that Cameron has to

:26:59.:27:03.

back him, at the back benches have to back him, in a sense it makes it

:27:03.:27:07.

harder. Curiously, sometimes when you are faced with an open goal, it

:27:07.:27:12.

is more to the got to know where to put the ball! But it is not just

:27:12.:27:19.

Labour, even a former Tory whip was having a go. My Right Honourable

:27:19.:27:27.

Friend, who I might say is sorely missed as Chief Whip,... Could he

:27:27.:27:31.

give an assurance to my constituentss in its field that

:27:31.:27:35.

services will not be damaged by these changes, and bought to the

:27:35.:27:41.

point, that stations like Lichfield Trent Valley, badly in need of

:27:41.:27:44.

improvement for disabled access, one might find that any new works

:27:45.:27:52.

are delayed as a consequence? we see no delays in investment, I'm

:27:52.:27:55.

always grateful to my honourable friend, who is always trying to be

:27:56.:28:00.

helpful. There have been various reports

:28:01.:28:05.

that there is a larger number of cabinet ministers are unhappy that

:28:05.:28:08.

Andrew Mitchell is still on the front bench, still in his job as

:28:08.:28:16.

chief whip. Can you corroborate that? There is certainly a number

:28:16.:28:20.

of Cabinet ministers who were amazed he was not fired, and pick

:28:20.:28:24.

anybody else and had done the same thing would have been out. There

:28:24.:28:27.

are others who were not urging the Prime Minister to fire him, but

:28:27.:28:32.

cannot see how he gets away from this story and cannot see how the

:28:32.:28:36.

conversation goes when he has to halt in the Tory MP and say, you

:28:37.:28:45.

have to behave well in public, you know! My sense is that the Prime

:28:45.:28:52.

Minister has decided he will not give his party's opponents are

:28:52.:28:59.

scalp now. The interesting question is whether, in a few months' time,

:28:59.:29:01.

whether the Prime Minister might start to think again about whether

:29:01.:29:07.

there is not an important shift he needs to make. But this was the one

:29:07.:29:12.

reshuffle - he has only had one reshuffle - this was the one man to

:29:12.:29:21.

take them through to the next election. It would be obvious, but

:29:21.:29:27.

what government stranding his do it after a quiet time, Boxing Day... I

:29:27.:29:31.

am not saying that I know anything, but I get the sense that they will

:29:31.:29:35.

not let Mitchell go now, but they know he is not necessarily

:29:35.:29:41.

guaranteed to be in his job till the next election. He hasn't got

:29:41.:29:46.

that much support in the back benches, or even the front benches,

:29:46.:29:52.

but some Tories are furious for the Police Federation, they believe it

:29:52.:29:58.

is the Police Federation that has kept it going. In the Times

:29:58.:30:02.

yesterday, a Labour MP, a fascinating article, siding with

:30:02.:30:08.

Andrew Mitchell! If you talk to politicians up either side, they

:30:08.:30:12.

will tell you that the Police Federation is about the fiercest,

:30:12.:30:18.

most scary Union, although it isn't officially a union, you will ever

:30:18.:30:28.
:30:28.:30:29.

face. The Home Secretary's, they had sought to ritually humiliate

:30:29.:30:33.

them at their conferences. They often sat them in front of a slogan

:30:33.:30:39.

implying that they are in favour of slashing the police. At these guys

:30:40.:30:47.

fight tough in -- for their members. There is no doubt in my mind that

:30:47.:30:50.

the federation think that the public will be bored, may not even

:30:50.:30:56.

be sympathetic to stories about pay and regulation, but if you talk

:30:56.:31:02.

about plebs, the public are on your side. So it has cut through!

:31:03.:31:07.

does. The Police Federation are still locked in a battle about

:31:07.:31:12.

their own pensions, their own pay and conditions. Some conditions

:31:12.:31:17.

that an independent report suggested were pretty generous.

:31:17.:31:25.

we should look to Mr Miliband, and see if he goes for truncal. Why not

:31:25.:31:35.
:31:35.:31:48.

find another subject about the We pay tribute to the following.

:31:48.:31:51.

Sergeant Jonathan coops of the Royal Electrical and Mechanical

:31:51.:31:55.

Engineers. Captain James Townley of the Royal Engineers and captain

:31:55.:32:00.

Carl manly of the Royal Marines. Once again, we are reminded of the

:32:00.:32:04.

immense danger our armed forces operate in top hold our safety and

:32:04.:32:07.

security. Their families and the whole country should be proud of

:32:07.:32:11.

their heroic service, and we will always remember them. I am sure the

:32:11.:32:16.

house will also join me in paying tribute to PC Fiona Bone and PC

:32:16.:32:20.

Nicola Hughes, who were killed, brutally murdered in the line of

:32:20.:32:24.

duty on 18th September. The whole country has been shocked and

:32:24.:32:28.

saddened by the loss of these two young dedicated officers. Our

:32:28.:32:32.

thoughts are with their families and colleagues at what must be a

:32:32.:32:37.

very difficult time. I also know the House will join me in sending

:32:38.:32:42.

our condolences to the family of Malcolm Wicks, who sadly passed

:32:42.:32:46.

away on 29th September. All sides of this House will remember him as

:32:46.:32:50.

a real gentleman, a man of integrity and compassion who put

:32:50.:32:54.

his constituents first and work to cross party lines and was a decent

:32:55.:32:59.

man. He served the house with great distinction for 20 years and will

:32:59.:33:05.

be missed by all who knew him. We must also pay tribute to another of

:33:05.:33:08.

Parliament's great characters. It is hard not to believe that he is

:33:08.:33:12.

not sitting in front of me, Sir Stuart Bell. He was hugely popular

:33:12.:33:16.

across the house and was honoured for his services to Parliament. We

:33:16.:33:21.

will remember him as a passionate and dedicated member of the house,

:33:21.:33:23.

whose kind us again transcended the political divide. We send our

:33:24.:33:29.

sympathies to his wife and family. This morning, I had meetings with

:33:29.:33:33.

ministerial colleagues and others, and I shall have further such

:33:33.:33:39.

meetings later today. Come ISAs it all honourable and right honourable

:33:39.:33:42.

members with the Prime Minister's tribute to the members of the armed

:33:42.:33:45.

forces and police who have died in the service of our country and to

:33:45.:33:53.

their families. We in this house and the people of Middlesbrough and

:33:54.:33:57.

Croydon North will miss Sir Stuart Bell and Malcolm Wicks. Last week,

:33:57.:34:03.

the Prime Minister promised that work would always pay, but this

:34:03.:34:06.

morning, Baroness Tanni Grey- Thompson and the Children's Society

:34:06.:34:08.

have revealed that his current plans for universal credit next

:34:08.:34:14.

year will mean that up to 116,000 disabled people in work could lose

:34:14.:34:23.

as much as �14 a week. Doesn't it say everything about how this

:34:23.:34:30.

divisive Prime Minister always stands up for the wrong people,

:34:30.:34:36.

while at the same time handing huge tax cuts to 800,000 people, nearly

:34:36.:34:41.

over �1 million a year? He will penalise some of the bravest

:34:41.:34:47.

strivers in the country. honourable gentleman raises an

:34:47.:34:52.

extremely serious issue. The money that is going into disability

:34:52.:34:55.

benefit will not go down under universal credit, it will go up.

:34:55.:35:03.

The overall amount of money will go from one point �35 billion last

:35:03.:35:08.

year to �1.45 billion in 2015. Under the plans, both recipients

:35:08.:35:11.

will lose out unless their circumstances change. All current

:35:11.:35:19.

recipients are protected by the scheme. This is a choice we have

:35:19.:35:23.

made that future recipients, we will increase the amount we give to

:35:23.:35:29.

the most severely disabled children. And there will be a new low amount

:35:29.:35:34.

for less disabled people. We are increasing the overall amount of

:35:34.:35:38.

money, focusing on the most disabled. That is the right

:35:38.:35:45.

approach. May I congratulate the Government on the early

:35:45.:35:51.

introduction of the adjudicator bill? Farmers in the Third World

:35:51.:35:55.

and developing country producers desperately need protection from

:35:55.:35:58.

what have been described by the Competition Commission as bully-boy

:35:58.:36:05.

tactics of the supermarket buyers. In view of that, could I ask how

:36:05.:36:09.

quickly it will be before the government introduces this

:36:09.:36:14.

important measure? We are making progress with introducing this

:36:14.:36:21.

measure. It is an important measure. It is important to stand up for

:36:21.:36:26.

farmers so that they get a fair deal from supermarkets. On occasion,

:36:26.:36:30.

there have been unfair practices, things like retrospective discounts

:36:30.:36:39.

that have sometimes been proposed. Mr Ed Miliband. I joined the Prime

:36:39.:36:42.

Minister in paying tribute to the six servicemen that have died since

:36:42.:36:48.

the House last met. Lance Corporal Dwayne groom of first Battalion

:36:48.:36:52.

Grenadier Guards, sergeant Gareth Thursby and Private Thomas role of

:36:52.:36:56.

third Battalion the Yorkshire Regiment, Sergeant Jonathan coops

:36:56.:37:00.

of the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, Captain James

:37:00.:37:04.

Townley of the Court of Royal Engineers and captain Carl manly of

:37:04.:37:09.

the Royal Marines. They all died heroically serving our country.

:37:09.:37:13.

They showed bravery and sacrifice, and our condolences go to their

:37:13.:37:17.

family and friends. I also joined him in pay tribute to PCs Fiona

:37:18.:37:23.

Bone and Nicola Hughes. They remind us of the dangerous work our police

:37:23.:37:28.

officers do day in, day out in the line of duty. Fair bet is a great

:37:28.:37:32.

loss due Greater Manchester Police have -- their death is a loss to

:37:32.:37:36.

Greater Manchester Police, their communities and their families. I

:37:36.:37:39.

also thanked the Prime Minister for his generous comments about the two

:37:39.:37:42.

Labour colleagues we have lost since we last met. Stuart Bell was

:37:42.:37:46.

the son of a miner and a long- standing member of this house. He

:37:46.:37:50.

was passionate about European issues and served with distinction

:37:50.:37:55.

as a Church Commissioner. His death was sudden, his illness diagnosed

:37:55.:37:58.

just days before he died. The condolences of this side of the

:37:59.:38:04.

house and the whole house go to his family. And on Malcolm Wicks, he

:38:04.:38:09.

was one of the deepest thinkers in this house. He was a brilliant

:38:09.:38:12.

minister. I know from my time as the Energy Secretary what a

:38:12.:38:17.

brilliant minister he was. He also faced his illness with the utmost

:38:17.:38:22.

bravery. He knew what was going to happen to him, but carried on

:38:22.:38:26.

writing, thinking, talking and engaging with the work of this

:38:26.:38:30.

house. My last conversation with him was before our party conference,

:38:30.:38:34.

where he talked passionately about politics as he always did. Our

:38:34.:38:39.

condolences go to his family. The unemployment figures today are

:38:39.:38:43.

welcome, particularly for youth unemployment. I am sure we all

:38:43.:38:46.

agree that there are too many people still looking for work, and

:38:46.:38:50.

the number of people out of work for a long period over a year

:38:50.:38:56.

remain stubbornly high. Can the Prime Minister tell us why he

:38:56.:38:59.

believes the fall in unemployment is not yet been matched by the

:38:59.:39:02.

figure for long-term unemployment? I thank the right honourable

:39:02.:39:05.

gentleman for his generous remarks about those who have fallen, those

:39:06.:39:11.

brave police officers and the colleagues we have lost. In terms

:39:11.:39:18.

of the unemployment figures, this is a good piece of news that should

:39:18.:39:24.

be welcomed. A number of different things are happening. Employment is

:39:24.:39:28.

up by 212,000 this quarter. Unemployment is down by 50,000. The

:39:28.:39:34.

claimant count has fallen by 4000. Since the election, that means

:39:34.:39:41.

there are some 170,000 fewer people on out-of-work benefits. These

:39:41.:39:45.

figures show that there are more women in work than at any time in

:39:45.:39:50.

our history. The overall level of employment is now above where it

:39:51.:39:55.

was before the crash in 2008. We still have huge economic challenges

:39:55.:40:00.

to meet. We are in a global race. We need to make a set of reforms in

:40:00.:40:06.

our country to education, welfare and the private sector, but this is

:40:06.:40:10.

positive news. Unemployment is still too high, partly because of

:40:10.:40:14.

the increase in unemployment that took place at the time of the crash.

:40:14.:40:18.

But we need to do more to deal with long-term unemployment, and that is

:40:18.:40:22.

why the work programme has helped thousands of people already. We are

:40:22.:40:27.

prepared to spend up to �14,000 on one individual long-term unemployed

:40:27.:40:32.

person to get them back into work. We do have the measures in place to

:40:32.:40:37.

tackle this scourge. withstanding that, youth

:40:37.:40:40.

unemployment, long-term unemployment and long-term youth

:40:40.:40:44.

unemployment are all higher than when he came to office. On the

:40:44.:40:48.

particular issue about long-term youth unemployment, he cut

:40:48.:40:51.

attributed to the craft are happened four years ago, because it

:40:51.:40:59.

has been rising over the last 18 months. It remains a big concern.

:40:59.:41:02.

The number of people out of work for more than a year is continuing

:41:02.:41:06.

to rise. Does he agree that the longer young people remain out of

:41:06.:41:11.

work, the greater the damage not just now, but to their long-term

:41:11.:41:14.

prospects and the greater the damage to our economy? Of course he

:41:14.:41:19.

is right. The longer people are out of work, the worse for them and the

:41:19.:41:22.

economy. That is why we have the youth contract and the work

:41:22.:41:26.

programme, the biggest back-to-work programme since the war. He

:41:26.:41:30.

mentions the problem of long-term unemployment. In the last two years

:41:30.:41:34.

of the last Labour government, long-term unemployment almost

:41:34.:41:38.

doubled, so we should hear about that before we get a lecture. In

:41:38.:41:43.

terms of helping young people, under this Government, 900,000

:41:43.:41:48.

people have started apprenticeships. We are backing apprenticeship

:41:48.:41:51.

schemes and are reforming the school and welfare system so that

:41:51.:41:56.

it pays for people to get jobs. We face enormous economic challenges.

:41:56.:42:00.

We have to rebalance our economy. The state sector was to be, the

:42:00.:42:05.

private sector was too small. Since the election, 1 million new private

:42:05.:42:11.

sector jobs have happened, which makes up for the loss of jobs in

:42:11.:42:15.

the state sector. We have a huge amount more to do - reform welfare,

:42:15.:42:19.

reform schools, boost the private sector and Britain can be a winner

:42:19.:42:23.

in the global race. On long-term unemployment, there are more people

:42:23.:42:27.

out of work for longer than at any time for two decades. That is

:42:27.:42:31.

happening on his watch. Let me turn to one group who are losing their

:42:31.:42:37.

jobs as a result of government policy. A year ago, he told me a

:42:37.:42:41.

"there is no reason for there to be fewer frontline police officers".

:42:41.:42:44.

Can he tell the House how many frontline police officers have lost

:42:44.:42:50.

their jobs since the election? percentage of officers on frontline

:42:50.:43:00.

duties has gone up. Frankly, who weather won the last election was

:43:00.:43:06.

going to have to reduce police budgets. They were committed to

:43:06.:43:10.

reducing police budgets. We have had to reduce police budgets. We

:43:10.:43:14.

have increased the percentage because we have cut paperwork and

:43:14.:43:19.

taken difficult decisions about pay and allowances. It is remarkable

:43:19.:43:22.

that while the percentage of officers on the frontline is up,

:43:22.:43:30.

crime is down. I really hope, just for once, we would get a straight

:43:30.:43:39.

answer. All the Prime Minister needs to do, they were like this -

:43:39.:43:43.

all the Prime Minister needs to do is take a leaf out of the Police

:43:43.:43:51.

Minister's book. On Monday, he told the House the truth. He said there

:43:51.:44:00.

are 6778 fewer frontline police officers than when he came to power.

:44:00.:44:05.

I don't think he is going to help. Maybe the part-time Chancellor is

:44:05.:44:09.

taking over the Home Office. Another promise broken. They are

:44:09.:44:19.
:44:19.:44:21.

not just breaking their promise, it is their conduct as well. This is

:44:21.:44:28.

what the mayor of London said. order. It will just take longer to

:44:28.:44:31.

get in a backbenchers who wish to participate, as opposed to shouting

:44:31.:44:35.

and screaming in a juvenile fashion, because I will have to extend the

:44:35.:44:39.

session. The drop the -- the leader of the opposition will be heard,

:44:39.:44:43.

and the Prime Minister will be heard. This is what the mayor of

:44:43.:44:47.

London, his new best mate, said last year at the Conservative Party

:44:47.:44:52.

conference. "I reckon we need to make it clear that if people swear

:44:52.:44:59.

at the police, they must expect to be arrested". He says from a

:44:59.:45:03.

sedentary position that he did not say that. Maybe he will tell us

:45:03.:45:09.

what he actually did say. According to the official police report, "a

:45:09.:45:15.

man claiming to be the chief whip called the police plebs and told

:45:15.:45:20.

them they should know their place, and used other abusive language".

:45:20.:45:26.

Can the Prime Minister tell us, did the chief whip use those words?

:45:26.:45:31.

What the Chief Whip did and said were wrong. I am clear about that.

:45:31.:45:36.

That is why it is important that the Chief Whip apologised. That

:45:36.:45:41.

apology has been accepted. order. I said a moment ago that the

:45:41.:45:45.

leader of the opposition must and would be heard. The same goes for

:45:45.:45:52.

the prime minister. What the Chief Whip did and said were wrong. That

:45:52.:45:56.

is why it is important that he apologised. That apology has been

:45:56.:46:01.

accepted by the officer concerned and by the head of the Metropolitan

:46:01.:46:04.

Police. That is why this Government will get on with the big issues

:46:05.:46:14.
:46:15.:46:18.

about helping Britain compete and No straight answers on the Chief

:46:18.:46:24.

Whip! It is a real issue, abusing a police officer. Just because a

:46:24.:46:28.

police officer has better manners than the Chief Whip, he doesn't

:46:28.:46:35.

mean he should keep his job. If a York in a city-centre abused a

:46:35.:46:38.

police officer, ranting and raving, the chances are they would be

:46:38.:46:44.

arrested and placed in the back of a police van. And rightly so. The

:46:44.:46:48.

Prime Minister would be the first in the queue to say it was right.

:46:48.:46:53.

But whereas it is a night in the cell but then, it is a night at the

:46:53.:46:57.

Carlton Club for the Chief Whip. Isn't that the clearest case there

:46:57.:47:04.

could be a total double standards? This apology has been accepted by

:47:04.:47:07.

the police officer, accepted by the head of the Metropolitan Police, it

:47:07.:47:10.

is clearly not going to be accepted by the leader of the opposition,

:47:10.:47:14.

because he doesn't want to talk about what we need to do in this

:47:14.:47:20.

country to get out deficit down, because he has got no plans. He

:47:20.:47:25.

doesn't want to talk about building on our record on unemployment, but

:47:26.:47:29.

he is input -- approach to welfare caps. He wants to discuss these

:47:29.:47:36.

issues because he has nothing serious to say about the country.

:47:37.:47:40.

Here is the most extraordinary thing. They say that I practise

:47:40.:47:45.

class war, and they go around calling people plebs! Can you

:47:45.:47:49.

believe that? It is good to see the Cabinet in their place come are

:47:49.:47:52.

supporting him in public, but in the newspapers, what are they

:47:52.:47:57.

saying in private? His position is untenable, in other words, he is

:47:57.:48:02.

toast. That is the reality. He is the truth about this government.

:48:02.:48:06.

What everybody else loses their jobs, the Chief Whip keeps his. If

:48:06.:48:10.

you are a millionaire, you get a tax cut. If you are everybody else,

:48:10.:48:20.
:48:20.:48:26.

Order! Order! I am very worried about your health! You're shouting

:48:26.:48:35.

in a bizarre manner, calm yourself, They are totally out of touch with

:48:35.:48:42.

this government, one rule for everybody else. Now we know, he

:48:42.:48:47.

wrote those questions yesterday, before unemployment fell. He

:48:47.:48:52.

obviously wasn't listening earlier, so let me remind him. Employment is

:48:52.:48:57.

up 212,000, that is a success. Unemployment, down a 50,000 of this

:48:57.:49:03.

quarter. The claimant count down, that is a success. He comes to this

:49:04.:49:06.

house, he has written out his clever political questions, he

:49:06.:49:16.
:49:16.:49:19.

doesn't care what is really Or the! -- order! Mystic Lynn

:49:19.:49:29.
:49:29.:49:29.

Over two weeks ago, April Jones was abducted when playing with her

:49:29.:49:38.

friends in my constituency, a well behaved, quiet town to stop well

:49:38.:49:41.

Mike honourable friend at the Prime Minister Trinny in paying tribute

:49:41.:49:47.

to the amazing way in which the people in the town have come

:49:47.:49:54.

together and committed to the ongoing search for April. I will

:49:54.:49:56.

certainly join my honourable friend in doing that, I think the whole

:49:56.:50:00.

country has not only been shocked by these appalling events, but also

:50:00.:50:05.

the whole country, frankly, has been lifted and incredibly

:50:05.:50:09.

impressed by the response of this community and everything everybody

:50:09.:50:13.

has done to help the police, helped the emergency services. We have

:50:13.:50:18.

seen a whole community come together, not just in grief, but in

:50:18.:50:26.

action, to help this family. At the energy summit last year, he prized

:50:26.:50:29.

faithfully he would take action to help people reduce their energy

:50:29.:50:36.

bills. Can he tell the House and the country how that is going?

:50:36.:50:40.

have encouraged people to switch, one of the best ways to get your

:50:40.:50:43.

energy bills down. And I can announce that will be legislating

:50:43.:50:48.

so that energy companies have to give the lowest tariff to their

:50:48.:50:56.

companies -- customers. Something Labour didn't do in 13 years.

:50:56.:51:03.

Closed question, Dr Julian Lewis. know that my honourable friend will

:51:03.:51:06.

be delighted to know that the answer is yes, we are committed to

:51:06.:51:09.

retaining an independent nuclear deterrent based on the Trident

:51:09.:51:15.

missile system, that is why we have continued with the programme to

:51:15.:51:24.

replace the vanguard scheme of. That is indeed an excellent answer.

:51:24.:51:32.

Given that apart time nuclear deterrent would be dangerously

:51:32.:51:38.

destabilising, with the Prime Minister confirm -- would be Prime

:51:38.:51:43.

Minister confirm that the British Trident successor submarines must

:51:43.:51:49.

and will operate on the basis of continuous at sea deterrence?

:51:49.:51:53.

think he is absolutely right to raise this issue. One of the key

:51:53.:51:57.

elements are the credibility of our deterrent has been the fact it is

:51:57.:52:01.

continuously at sea. It is something the Royal Navy take

:52:01.:52:04.

immense pride in, being able to deliver that without a break for so

:52:04.:52:09.

many years. Having met some of the crews, it is incredibly impressive

:52:09.:52:14.

what they do. I pay tribute to them up for the service they provide. It

:52:14.:52:20.

is a key part of our deterrent. a parliamentary answer to my friend

:52:20.:52:25.

from Wrexham yesterday, the government said, "we remain very

:52:25.:52:31.

concerned by continuing reports of Rwandan support for the M23 rebels,

:52:31.:52:38.

who are killing, maiming and creeping in east Congo." so why did

:52:38.:52:42.

the chief whip authorised the payments of �60 million of British

:52:42.:52:48.

taxpayers' money to Rwanda as his parting shot on his very last day

:52:48.:52:54.

as international development secretary? I would like to wish the

:52:54.:52:59.

honourable gentleman habit that date for yesterday. -- happy

:52:59.:53:05.

birthday. I'm sorry I wasn't invited! It is a very important

:53:05.:53:12.

Haydn that he raises. -- important Haydn. Ryan Day is a continuing

:53:12.:53:18.

success story, a culture that has gone up from genocide and disaster

:53:18.:53:22.

to being a role model in lifting people out of poverty in Africa. --

:53:22.:53:28.

Rwandan. I am proud that we have continued to invest in that success,

:53:28.:53:31.

but we should be proud and firm with the Rwandan regime that we do

:53:31.:53:35.

not accept that they should be supporting it militias in the Congo

:53:35.:53:40.

or elsewhere. I have raised this issue personally with the President,

:53:40.:53:45.

but I believe that investing in Rwanda's success as at an African

:53:45.:53:49.

country showing you can break the cycle of poverty, is something we

:53:49.:53:57.

are right to do. A today, the unemployment figures show a

:53:57.:54:01.

reduction of 62,000 in the number of 16 to 24 year-old out-of-work

:54:01.:54:05.

for the three months to August, and employment is now at the highest

:54:05.:54:11.

level since records began in 1971. I'm sure the Prime Minister will

:54:11.:54:15.

want to commend the economic policies of this government to the

:54:15.:54:17.

whole house, rather than more borrowing and spending from

:54:18.:54:26.

opposite. Mark Bent makes an important point, what we need is an

:54:26.:54:31.

important rebalancing of the economy -- my honourable friend.

:54:31.:54:35.

That has more than made up for the job losses in the public sector.

:54:35.:54:39.

But there is more we need to do to tackle youth unemployment, long

:54:39.:54:45.

term unemployment, but these figures should be welcomed.

:54:45.:54:52.

constituent of mine loftiest left - - lost his leg in Afghanistan then

:54:52.:54:55.

lost his disability allowance. The Prime Minister promised to look

:54:55.:55:00.

after ex-servicemen and women. What has happened? I have insisted on a

:55:00.:55:03.

special car out for limbless ex- servicemen, they will be separately

:55:03.:55:08.

looked after through the Ministry of Defence. This house agrees that

:55:08.:55:13.

it did mean to politics when negative campaigning, designed to

:55:13.:55:19.

scare vulnerable people, is used. A campaign to save our hospital were

:55:19.:55:21.

now hospital is not closing is possibly the worst example of that

:55:21.:55:26.

I have ever seen. But my honourable friend grieve me that Labour's

:55:26.:55:35.

Campaign in Corby is a disgrace? -- was my honourable friend agree with

:55:35.:55:40.

me? He is entirely right. A Labour MP after a Labour MP is trooping up

:55:40.:55:44.

to Corby and claiming that hospital isn't safe, and they know it is

:55:44.:55:48.

simply not true. The local newspaper is now backing up the

:55:48.:55:51.

fact that this hospital is being invested in by this government

:55:51.:55:56.

because unlike the party opposite, you are going to stay there for a

:55:56.:56:04.

very long time! And the reason... Do reason you are going to stay

:56:04.:56:10.

there... The reason you are going to stay there is the reason this

:56:10.:56:14.

country is in a mess because of the borrowing, spending and debt did

:56:14.:56:24.
:56:24.:56:28.

you delivered. So get yourself comfortable. Why will the Prime

:56:28.:56:37.

Minister... Over here! Why will the Prime Minister not publish all the

:56:37.:56:40.

texts come e-mails and other forms of correspondence between himself

:56:40.:56:46.

and his office and Rebekah Brooks and Andy Coulson and News

:56:47.:56:50.

International? So that we can judge whether they are relevant. Is it

:56:50.:56:55.

because they are too salacious and embarrassing for the Prime

:56:55.:57:00.

Minister? I wouldn't smile. When the truth comes out, the Prime

:57:00.:57:04.

Minister will not be smiling. Or is it because there is one rule for

:57:04.:57:08.

the Prime Minister and another for the rest of us? Before answering

:57:08.:57:12.

this question I would like everyone to recall that the member macro

:57:12.:57:16.

stood up in this house and read out a whole lot of the Leveson

:57:16.:57:20.

information that was under embargo, he wasn't meant to read it out.

:57:20.:57:28.

Much of which turned out to be untrue, and he has never apologised.

:57:28.:57:38.
:57:38.:57:52.

Until he apologises, I am not going I hope that house will have the

:57:52.:58:00.

self-restraint and courtesy to hear Employment levels in Wales have

:58:00.:58:05.

increased by 40,000 in the last quarter, not least because of the

:58:05.:58:09.

contribution... Will the Prime Minister are welcome me in

:58:09.:58:15.

welcoming the extension that has created 8000 new businesses?

:58:15.:58:19.

will certainly during my honourable friend. The new enterprise

:58:19.:58:22.

allowance gives people who have become unemployed at the chance to

:58:22.:58:26.

set up their own business, their own enterprise. Under the current

:58:26.:58:29.

rules, they have to wait three months before being able to access

:58:29.:58:33.

that programme, but under our plans, they will be able to get that from

:58:33.:58:38.

day one of becoming unemployed. I was to see new businesses starting

:58:38.:58:42.

up in our country, to build on the record of last year, when more

:58:42.:58:45.

businesses were established in Britain that at any year in our

:58:45.:58:51.

history. When in opposition, at the Prime Minister said, "all too often,

:58:51.:58:57.

when questions are put to ministers, the answer is met as a not me,

:58:57.:59:05.

governor, shrug of the shoulders. *" SOCA and the promise to tell us

:59:05.:59:09.

which one of his ministers will take responsibility of the West

:59:09.:59:14.

Coast Main Line? De Transport Secretary can do this house and

:59:14.:59:18.

made a full statement and gave a full apology -- came to this house.

:59:18.:59:22.

Can we ever remember a minister from the party opposite about

:59:22.:59:32.
:59:32.:59:32.

apologising for anything? Returning to the Trident issue, has the Prime

:59:32.:59:37.

Minister looked at the severe cost pressures facing defence at the

:59:37.:59:44.

very moment Trident replacement has to be paid for? Frigate, airplanes,

:59:44.:59:49.

unmanned aircraft, army vehicles, all need paying for at much the

:59:49.:59:54.

same time. This has to come out of the defence budget. Will the Prime

:59:54.:00:02.

Minister keep an open mind on how exactly to replace our nuclear

:00:02.:00:06.

deterrent? The list of things that he goes through it are all

:00:06.:00:10.

programmes that are fully funded and properly going to be invested

:00:10.:00:14.

in because this government has sorted out, as he knows, the

:00:14.:00:20.

defence budget. What I would say to him about the deterrent is I don't

:00:20.:00:24.

believe that we would save money by adopting some alternative nuclear

:00:24.:00:29.

deterrent posture. If you are going to have a deterrent, it makes sense

:00:29.:00:33.

to have something that is credible and believable, otherwise there is

:00:33.:00:41.

no point having one at all. There are record levels of support for

:00:41.:00:48.

the British Union. In a recent poll, the Prime Minister will no that

:00:48.:00:51.

only 7% of the population of Northern Ireland want a united

:00:51.:00:59.

Ireland, that only rises to 32% in 20 years' time. But the Prime

:00:59.:01:08.

Minister agreed that the agreement he signed up to this week, to

:01:08.:01:11.

ensure there is a single, decisive question asked of the Scottish and

:01:12.:01:18.

British Union, that it is now up to him and his house to unite in a

:01:18.:01:28.
:01:28.:01:35.

campaign to maintain sustained I am delighted to answer in the

:01:35.:01:39.

most positive way I can. I am pleased we have reached an

:01:39.:01:44.

agreement with the Scottish government, a single, simple

:01:44.:01:48.

question on the referendum, so we can put beyond doubt the future of

:01:48.:01:54.

the UK. I hope everyone will vote to keep the UK together. I know

:01:54.:01:59.

this will have cross-party support. I have always wanted to share a

:01:59.:02:09.
:02:09.:02:13.

platform with Ian Paisley. Maybe I will get my chance! Recently a lap-

:02:13.:02:17.

dancing club has been granted a licence. It doesn't matter if it is

:02:17.:02:24.

a Wembley sized incinerator or a lap-dancing club in a beautiful

:02:24.:02:29.

market town, there is no weight in planning the law. With the Prime

:02:29.:02:32.

Minister agree that it is time there was a planning law so that

:02:32.:02:36.

when a catastrophic applications come Fordwich blight the

:02:36.:02:41.

environment people living, which distresses people to a great degree,

:02:41.:02:46.

their voices should be heard. speaks for many people about the

:02:46.:02:51.

frustration the planning system can sometimes deliver. We have changed

:02:51.:02:56.

the licensing laws to give the planners greater power to alter or

:02:56.:03:01.

licences, and that can apply to the sort of the premises she refers to.

:03:01.:03:05.

The second thing is, and our plans be broken right made their plans

:03:05.:03:09.

which give greater control to residents about the shape of their

:03:09.:03:13.

community. I would encourage her to take up the issue with the

:03:13.:03:23.
:03:23.:03:26.

department. Could I thank the prodigious that there tributes? On

:03:26.:03:31.

the theme of policing, as the house has heard, there are nearly 7000

:03:31.:03:37.

from one police which have now disappeared from our system. -- a

:03:37.:03:44.

frontline police. Will the Prime Minister give me a straightforward

:03:44.:03:48.

answer, in what is my last question in this house, and give a

:03:48.:03:54.

commitment there will be no more cuts whatever happens to policing

:03:54.:03:59.

it? And nobody wants to prejudge the wisdom of the Greater

:03:59.:04:02.

Manchester electric, but I wish to honourable gentleman well if he is

:04:02.:04:09.

successful. The point I would make is the point the police force would

:04:09.:04:18.

make to him, "the effectiveness of policing can only be measured by

:04:18.:04:25.

the reduction in crime." Crime is down 12% in Greater Manchester.

:04:25.:04:27.

They rise difficult decisions, and the Labour Party was committed to

:04:27.:04:33.

even greater cuts than we have it delivered. Turkey is, can we crack

:04:33.:04:40.

down on the paperwork? -- the key is. Can we cut crime? The answer is

:04:40.:04:50.
:04:50.:04:56.

I join the Prime Minister in paying tribute to Mr Wicks. Isn't one way

:04:56.:05:00.

we can honour his memory to continue to improve our national

:05:00.:05:03.

health service so that more people beat cancer and don't have their

:05:03.:05:07.

lives tragically cut short? honourable friend speaks for the

:05:07.:05:11.

whole house in what he says about Malcolm Wicks. I understand he

:05:11.:05:15.

often used to drive Malcolm home to Croydon after the vote, and Malcolm

:05:15.:05:19.

refer to your car as the cab. And the fare was apparently a bottle of

:05:19.:05:23.

wine at Christmas. We will make sure the Inland Revenue lay-off

:05:23.:05:28.

that, but it is a good arrangement. He is right. One of the greatest

:05:28.:05:31.

things we can do to remember Malcolm is ensured the continued

:05:32.:05:35.

success of the cancer drugs fund, which has helped thousands, and

:05:35.:05:41.

make sure people get urgent treatments as well as urging drugs.

:05:41.:05:44.

The Secretary of State of Education said this weekend that if there

:05:44.:05:47.

were a referendum on Britain's continued membership of the EU, he

:05:47.:05:51.

would vote to leave. A third of the Cabinet to agree with him. How

:05:51.:05:58.

would the Prime Minister vote? don't want an in-out referendum,

:05:58.:06:02.

because I am not happy with us leaving the European Union. But I

:06:02.:06:06.

am not happy with the status quo either. I think the majority of the

:06:06.:06:10.

country wants a new settlement with Europe, and that settlement being

:06:10.:06:15.

put to fresh consent. That will get a ringing endorsement from the

:06:15.:06:23.

British people. Does my right honourable friend

:06:24.:06:29.

agree that there was no structural deficit at the top of the boom, as

:06:29.:06:34.

claimed by the Shadow Chancellor? My right honourable friend makes an

:06:34.:06:38.

important point, which is that in the IMF report out this week, it

:06:38.:06:42.

shows that the structural deficit in 2007 at the height of the boom

:06:43.:06:50.

was 5% of our GDP, or �73 billion. The shadow Chancellor said there

:06:50.:06:54.

was no structural deficit. This demonstrates how little they have

:06:54.:06:59.

learnt. We have talked about our plans for the British economy, how

:06:59.:07:04.

we will help it compete and succeed. Their plans are to go on a giant

:07:04.:07:08.

march with their trade union paymasters. That is how the leader

:07:08.:07:12.

of the opposition will be spending his weekend, the most lucrative

:07:12.:07:22.
:07:22.:07:34.

That overrun a bit. There were a couple of perfunctory exchanges on

:07:34.:07:37.

unemployment, a hugely important issue, but it was not the one they

:07:37.:07:41.

all wanted to pop about. That was Andrew Mitchell. It did not take

:07:41.:07:49.

long for the leader of the opposition to get onto that. They

:07:49.:07:53.

were looking at the government attitude to the police and police

:07:53.:07:56.

numbers. Andrew Mitchell, the Chief Whip, was sitting on the front

:07:56.:08:03.

bench. He may have responded from a sedentary position. We are still

:08:03.:08:10.

trying to check that out. Let's hear from what the voters thought.

:08:10.:08:15.

The viewers all talked about Andrew Mitchell. Tony in West Berkshire

:08:15.:08:18.

said the remark caught our attention, but the dishonesty is

:08:18.:08:21.

the point. The minister may have apologised and the officer may have

:08:21.:08:25.

accepted it, but there is still the matter of who is lying. Jack says

:08:25.:08:29.

Ed Miliband has a point. The Chief Whip has failed to confirm what he

:08:29.:08:33.

said and should be sacked. Fill in Doncaster says Andrew Mitchell

:08:33.:08:37.

behave badly, but this is a mountain out of a molehill. Colin

:08:37.:08:41.

says Sean Ed Miliband realises that the more he goes on about the Chief

:08:41.:08:44.

Whip's behaviour, the more difficult it is the David Cameron

:08:44.:08:48.

to get rid of him. Antoni says Ed Miliband is trying to milk a mouse

:08:48.:08:53.

by pursuing the Chief Whip. Can you do that? I have never heard that

:08:53.:09:03.
:09:03.:09:07.

expression. Put the image away. What do you make of it all?

:09:07.:09:11.

well, you said before that sometimes when the goal is open, it

:09:11.:09:15.

is hard to score. I don't think he slotted it in the net. On the other

:09:15.:09:19.

hand, Ed Miliband will know that this has resonance as a story. It

:09:19.:09:24.

is easy to understand. The viewers' e-mails reflect that. They think he

:09:24.:09:28.

either said plebs, or he didn't. Someone was accusing someone of

:09:29.:09:34.

lying. So it in one sense, he can't help but win on that. But, and this

:09:34.:09:37.

is an important but in the psychology of Westminster, if you

:09:37.:09:40.

put the ball in the back of the net on Prime Minister's Questions,

:09:41.:09:46.

those faces behind the Prime Minister Goh glum. They were

:09:46.:09:49.

cheering by the end, not because they support Andrew Mitchell, not

:09:49.:09:55.

because they think David Cameron should keep him in the Cabinet, a

:09:55.:10:00.

but because there was a little slip of the tongue by Ed Miliband, where

:10:00.:10:04.

he talked about everyone losing their jobs when Andrew Mitchell

:10:04.:10:08.

keeps his. He allowed the Prime Minister to say hold on, you

:10:08.:10:14.

weren't listening. Unemployment has gone down. It was a little thing,

:10:14.:10:17.

but it means that as David Cameron goes back to his office and is

:10:17.:10:22.

surrounded by people talking about the Mitchell thing, they will feel

:10:22.:10:26.

better than they thought they would feel before they went in.

:10:26.:10:29.

Murphy, this has been a running sore for the Conservatives. It

:10:29.:10:34.

angers a lot of Tory backbenchers and Cabinet ministers. At the

:10:34.:10:39.

Conservative conference, Cabinet ministers were openly critical of

:10:39.:10:42.

Andrew Mitchell, which does not happen often. I wonder where the

:10:42.:10:49.

story goes from here? Politics is so unpredictable. It is one of the

:10:49.:10:53.

rare beauties of politics. Your viewers might not since this, but

:10:53.:10:59.

in Parliament, the Chief Whip has to be seen and not heard. He is not

:10:59.:11:05.

a news story. That's right. It is a small thing, but an important thing

:11:05.:11:08.

for the theatre of Parliament. When Ed Miliband was talking about it,

:11:08.:11:14.

the minimum the Chief Whip was doing was shaking his head. He is

:11:14.:11:18.

voluntarily putting himself back into it by virtue in responding

:11:18.:11:24.

that way. How does it work out? If David Cameron sacks him, it is a

:11:24.:11:28.

week sacking. So I suspect he will try to cling on to him. But this is

:11:28.:11:33.

not just about who lied, the Chief Whip or the police. They can't both

:11:33.:11:40.

be telling the truth. It also gets into real communities, living rooms

:11:40.:11:45.

and pubs across the country. It is one of those things people

:11:45.:11:49.

genuinely talk about spontaneously. The longer he is there, the more

:11:49.:11:53.

that conversation will continue, none of which is good for the

:11:53.:11:58.

Conservative Party. I am not paid to give the Tory party advice.

:11:58.:12:06.

Would you like to be? No. For does your own side pay you to give

:12:07.:12:16.
:12:17.:12:17.

advice? No one listens! But I would have dispatched him weeks ago. The

:12:17.:12:20.

Prime Minister standing up for the wrong people. You stand up for

:12:20.:12:26.

someone who went to the same posh schools as you. Are they makes?

:12:26.:12:30.

public perceive it that way. They have a similar background. That is

:12:30.:12:34.

toxic for the Conservative Party, which has been trying to change its

:12:34.:12:41.

image. There is this thought of, did Andrew Mitchell shout out a

:12:41.:12:46.

comment? You might think of course he did, because Ed Miliband reacted.

:12:46.:12:50.

Famously, Tony Blair wants reacted to a heckle in Prime Minister's

:12:50.:12:53.

Questions which was not made. He was taunting William Hague about

:12:53.:12:57.

which countries supported Tory policy on Europe, paused as

:12:57.:13:02.

suddenly went, Norway? No one had anyone in the chamber Saynor way.

:13:02.:13:06.

We went back over the tape, and nobody did. I am not saying Ed

:13:06.:13:11.

Miliband made it up. There may have been a heckle, but now we are all

:13:11.:13:21.
:13:21.:13:23.

asking about it. I was racking my brains while watching that. Maybe

:13:23.:13:27.

you have heard people talking about Andrew Mitchell. I have only had

:13:27.:13:31.

three or four e-mails about it. People have just moved on. He

:13:31.:13:37.

should not have done it. He was stupid to do it. But in terms of

:13:37.:13:44.

real people contacting me, which they do about all sorts of stuff...

:13:44.:13:51.

Are you saying our viewers are not real people? It is one of those

:13:51.:13:54.

things that emanates from Westminster that people talk about.

:13:54.:13:58.

Maybe that is because it is an accessible story about a prominent

:13:58.:14:02.

person swearing at a police officer. I don't know what it is about this

:14:02.:14:09.

story. Despite your constituents, it has taken off. I do get the

:14:09.:14:14.

impression that Mr Mitchell lives to fight another day... Last week,

:14:14.:14:18.

it was the Telegraph editorial. People were saying, we are not

:14:18.:14:23.

going to have the Daily Telegraph sacked on ministers. Now they will

:14:23.:14:28.

not have Ed Miliband sack their ministers. The line now is not just

:14:28.:14:33.

that somebody like. The line now from Mr Mitchell and the government

:14:33.:14:39.

is, they misunderstood. Nobody is lying, they just misunderstood.

:14:40.:14:43.

last thing they want to do is get into a detailed conversation about

:14:43.:14:47.

who said what, possibly because if he had really lost it, he might not

:14:47.:14:52.

have a clue what he said. It is possible that he can't remember

:14:52.:15:01.

what he said. I am like that out of the newsroom quite often.

:15:01.:15:07.

Politicians often fight the last war. David Cameron is interested in

:15:07.:15:11.

Tony Blair's memoirs. They reflect the former Prime Minister saying, I

:15:11.:15:16.

should not have led Peter Mandelson go when I did. I did it because the

:15:16.:15:22.

press hounded me. I think David Cameron has thought, I am not going

:15:22.:15:25.

to make that mistake. He may well be making a different mistake,

:15:25.:15:29.

which is that he may be holding on to someone who is toxic for the

:15:29.:15:35.

Tory brand. There we leave it. Dwayne Fields was brought up in

:15:35.:15:40.

Hackney, east London. One night, he got into a fight. A Gunn was pulled

:15:40.:15:45.

on him. It was fired twice, but he was not hit. This made him take a

:15:45.:15:48.

different turn in life. He became the first black British man and the

:15:48.:15:51.

second black man in the world to reach the North Pole. Now he has

:15:51.:15:55.

his sights set on the South Pole. He wants to help inner-city

:15:55.:15:59.

teenagers to make them realise that they can do something, too. For him,

:15:59.:16:02.

getting them out into the countryside is the key, which he

:16:02.:16:12.
:16:12.:16:14.

argues means more funding for youth groups. Here is his soapbox.

:16:14.:16:19.

This is something you hardly see, a young black man enjoying the

:16:19.:16:24.

countryside. When I am out here training, I hardly ever see any

:16:24.:16:27.

young people enjoying the countryside, let alone black people.

:16:28.:16:32.

I am not tried to say everyone should go to the North Pole. I want

:16:32.:16:35.

to encourage them that their choices in life are not limited to

:16:35.:16:40.

being a rapper, Sports personality or a footballer. I want to get them

:16:40.:16:43.

out into the countryside as a way of opening up their world. They

:16:43.:16:47.

think it is not for them, but that is because they don't see it. I was

:16:47.:16:51.

born in Jamaica and loved it. I would run around in the forest all

:16:51.:16:56.

day. No one would see me for hours. When I came to London, I had a

:16:56.:17:00.

small concrete backyard to run around in. It was crowded. School

:17:00.:17:04.

was not much better. It was painful and tedious. We did camping trips,

:17:04.:17:09.

but that was about it. We hardly ever saw a different way of life,

:17:09.:17:14.

or even new one existed. I lived in a difficult part of London. The day

:17:14.:17:18.

I was shot at twice over nothing made me want to do something

:17:18.:17:25.

different. That is why I decided to go to the North Pole. I want

:17:25.:17:29.

teenagers to realise that they can do something, too, and getting out

:17:29.:17:32.

into the countryside is a great way to show that the world has more to

:17:32.:17:37.

offer them. I love the countryside, because you are out of the city,

:17:37.:17:42.

away from the noise. It opens a new up to a different way of living. In

:17:42.:17:46.

the countryside, you see big houses. People have time to say hello and

:17:46.:17:52.

smile at you. Here, you can relax, focus, think about decisions you

:17:52.:17:56.

want to make. It gives you something to do, keeps you away

:17:56.:17:59.

from trouble, away from your peers and the pressures that come with it.

:17:59.:18:03.

You can't survive on your own in the wilderness. It helps you learn

:18:03.:18:08.

to rely on other people. You are not just thinking about yourself or

:18:08.:18:12.

your own needs. The only way to encourage more young people into

:18:12.:18:18.

the countryside is to increase the funding to youth groups like army

:18:18.:18:21.

cadets, Sea cadets, Scouts. Increasing funding rather than

:18:21.:18:25.

cutting is the way forward. Unless we start giving more opportunity

:18:25.:18:29.

and choice to young teenagers, their worlds will remain narrow,

:18:29.:18:39.
:18:39.:18:40.

and they are more likely to choose Looks lovely out there in the

:18:40.:18:44.

countryside! Or what made you think of trekking to the north pole of

:18:44.:18:49.

you had had that terrible incident? In surely, it wasn't about trekking

:18:49.:18:53.

to the North Pole, it was about doing something different to what I

:18:53.:18:59.

would normally do. -- initially. It came up through Ben Fogle and James

:18:59.:19:02.

Cracknell, I heard them on BBC Breakfast say they wanted to go to

:19:02.:19:08.

the South Pole. I thought, that is as different from my normal life as

:19:08.:19:18.
:19:18.:19:19.

I could get. They directed due to the North Pole instead! What do

:19:19.:19:25.

your friends say? You described eloquently, the contrast with city

:19:25.:19:33.

life, do your friends to feel the same way? It is strange, initially

:19:33.:19:36.

it was really difficult for them to come to terms with why I wanted to

:19:36.:19:40.

go. As soon as they realised that I had a passion borders, they started

:19:40.:19:45.

to follow, because passion is contagious. So they started to

:19:45.:19:49.

follow my lead, or one of two of them came out into the countryside

:19:49.:19:54.

and enjoyed it would meet. In general, they are City folk. But

:19:54.:19:59.

they did comment and say, they understand why a lot -- I love the

:19:59.:20:04.

countryside. Do you think more money should be given to help kids

:20:04.:20:10.

living in urban areas, in cities, to go to the countryside? They do

:20:10.:20:16.

city farms to give kids a taste of the countryside. I think funding

:20:17.:20:21.

needs to be put into it. When you are in the countryside it is

:20:21.:20:25.

totally different to the lifestyle that you live in the city. You have

:20:26.:20:30.

space to think, you have silent for a change. Not many people get to

:20:30.:20:36.

experience what silence feels like. You are alone, you have time to

:20:36.:20:40.

think about issues come up problems, challenges you might face and

:20:40.:20:46.

possible solutions. Do some of your friends think it might be boring? I

:20:46.:20:52.

often hear this idea that when you have kids, the AD up thank you for

:20:52.:20:57.

living in the countryside. It is not seen as a cool thing to do

:20:57.:21:01.

until people experience it. That is just belief. When you bring a group

:21:01.:21:04.

of young people into the countryside, they see the benefits,

:21:04.:21:09.

I have seen it with my own eyes. I have spoken tickets, their reaction

:21:09.:21:15.

is, there is nothing out there. It is just the sticks. The fact is, we

:21:15.:21:20.

knew what out there, you enjoy it, they enjoy it, they want to go back.

:21:20.:21:26.

Do you think people will say that this is not the most critical think

:21:26.:21:30.

-- think we should be spending money on? A I disagree. To prepare

:21:30.:21:35.

young people are adult life, it is about getting them out into the

:21:35.:21:38.

wilderness, giving them a small challenges, allowing them to

:21:38.:21:42.

overcome challenges as a group and a small community, and then bring

:21:42.:21:48.

them back to the city. It line to up to face other challengers.

:21:48.:21:53.

do you think? This idea that enthusiasm is contagious is great,

:21:53.:21:59.

hopefully people who are watching get that sense today. Would you put

:21:59.:22:03.

money into it? We can chat afterwards and see how we could do

:22:03.:22:10.

that. One of the wider point is the way in which a lot of children get

:22:10.:22:14.

an experience of the countryside would be three uniformed

:22:15.:22:21.

organisations, the guides, the Scouts, a lot of that still happens,

:22:21.:22:26.

but a reduction in the involvement, I remember I was about nine or 10,

:22:26.:22:32.

but I can still remember it, lighting a fire. That is my only

:22:32.:22:41.

experience. Is there a problem in psychology, the children are

:22:41.:22:45.

cosseted, letting them roam freely... We I have seen it all

:22:45.:22:49.

work, I live in a south Gloucestershire village commit is

:22:49.:22:54.

quiet at night, the primary school there is twinned with the a school

:22:54.:23:01.

in inner-city Bristol. Tickets from the inner city school came out and

:23:01.:23:06.

really enjoyed the experience. It - - the kids. It just needed a bit of

:23:06.:23:14.

initiative. Maybe you should talk about these opportunities! Not to

:23:14.:23:23.

be done in the home! You can see the stars at night.

:23:23.:23:33.
:23:33.:23:35.

Have you got your popcorn? We have! We are talking cinemas. Someone

:23:35.:23:39.

picks these things are too expensive and wants to take action

:23:39.:23:49.
:23:49.:23:56.

to stop but who is the man who He is taking on the US Senate.

:23:56.:24:06.

not now, nor have I ever been, and oil trader. He has taken on Big

:24:06.:24:12.

Brother. But now George Galloway is turning his sights on a cinema near

:24:12.:24:20.

you and their prices. Fighting for your fizzy pop, at dishing out flak

:24:20.:24:26.

for your savoury snack. His weapon? An early day motion in Parliament.

:24:26.:24:33.

An adventure guaranteed to tap your height and purse-strings. George

:24:33.:24:38.

Galloway, taking on cinemas in his new blockbuster. This time, it is

:24:38.:24:48.
:24:48.:24:49.

We had joined now by George Galloway. He has embarked on a

:24:49.:24:53.

crusade to cut the cost of a night out at the cinema. I heard you say

:24:53.:24:59.

you have never had popcorn. What got you into this? I had to buy it

:24:59.:25:07.

for my kids, and it is a 1,000% mark-up. I went to watch the

:25:07.:25:17.

terrific new, very Scottish movie, Braved a. It is a wonderful, feisty

:25:17.:25:25.

film. But you cannot drag your kids crying, I want popcorn, it is a

:25:25.:25:32.

1,000% mark up, you have to buy it. Then I started looking at ice cream,

:25:32.:25:35.

Coca-Cola, it is absolute profiteering. They throw you out if

:25:35.:25:41.

you bring your own. In Westfield, which is where I went, you would

:25:41.:25:48.

get banned from the whole of that brought. Not just London. My friend

:25:48.:25:52.

in New York brought his dude in come the end up getting arrested,

:25:52.:26:02.

because he tried to bring it in -- brought his food in it. What is the

:26:02.:26:06.

price of a big bucket of popcorn? How much would you pay for that?

:26:06.:26:14.

Depends if you get one of these meal deals! You don't know this!

:26:14.:26:22.

You don't know the price of milk! You would get it for about �8.50

:26:22.:26:32.
:26:32.:26:32.

Foster I'm vegetarian, I don't get a hard dog! -- hot dog. I think it

:26:32.:26:42.
:26:42.:26:45.

is �4.99. No, it is �4.40. However, in the Odeon, according to the

:26:45.:26:53.

watchdog, it is a five per M25 pence. Oh I am now the country's

:26:53.:27:02.

expert on these matters! It looks awful to me. But kids love it.

:27:02.:27:10.

can make at home! The kids were saying, dad, dad! But I didn't want

:27:10.:27:20.
:27:20.:27:23.

to pay that price. But what is to be done? I think the OFT, or which

:27:23.:27:28.

macro, somebody... We need some kind of public pressure. A people

:27:29.:27:32.

may not realise they are being ripped off. They are in such a

:27:32.:27:40.

hurry to get into the cinema that they soon forget. Why not have, for

:27:40.:27:47.

example, private enterprise outside the cinema, a selling popcorn? You

:27:47.:27:52.

will not get banned or jailed for bringing it in. Why should they be

:27:52.:27:57.

allowed, effectively, because they are licensed premises, they are

:27:58.:28:01.

effectively private clubs, they can exclude you or banlieue, had you

:28:02.:28:11.
:28:12.:28:15.

taken from the premises. -- have So you tabled an early-day motion?

:28:15.:28:22.

Yes, Sir Peter Bottomley... This is the 4th interview I have done on

:28:22.:28:31.

this! I salute your indefatigability. I well remember

:28:31.:28:36.

that the next time I go to the Cinema! We haven't got time to pick

:28:36.:28:41.

the winner for Guess The Year, but we will do it tomorrow. The answer

:28:41.:28:47.

Andrew Neil and Jo Coburn discuss all the latest political news, interviews and debate, including coverage of Prime Minister's Questions and Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson on the government's Universal Credit.

The Guess the Year competition closes during the live broadcast of this programme.


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