14/02/2014 Daily Politics


14/02/2014

Andrew Neil with the latest political news and debate, including reaction to the Wythenshawe by-election and a look at viral campaign videos.


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Transcript


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Afternoon folks, welcome to the Daily Politics. Labour win

:00:37.:00:41.

Wythenshawe with an increased share of the vote. UKIP push the Tories

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into third, and the Liberal Democrats lose their deposit. We'll

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discuss the by-election fallout. David Cameron repeats his message

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that money is no object in the relief effort as yet another

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Atlantic storm hits the UK. Plans for a law to allow MPs to be sacked

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by local voters are rained off. The Lib Dems are livid. As is the

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Conservative Zac Goldsmith. We'll talk to him live.

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And could viral videos swing the outcome of the next general

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election? We will take a look at the latest effort from the Labour Party.

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All that in the next hour, and with me for the duration editor of

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Prospect Magazine Brownen Maddox, and the political editor of the

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Economist, James Astill. Welcome to you both. Let's start with the

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Wythenshawe by-election, won last night by the Labour candidate

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Michael Kane. This was entirely inspected -- expected. Speaking in

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the last hour, Ed Miliband claimed it showed Labour were listening to

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the electorate. It was a very, very good result for the Labour Party. We

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added to the share of the vote, we gained support and I'm delighted by

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the result we have. What you saw was the governing parties, the

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Conservatives and Liberal Democrats, in total retreat. This is a

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constituency where, even in 1997, the Conservative Party were polling

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about 20% of the vote, so they should be deeply concerned. There is

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a reason for this, that they have been telling people that everything

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is fixed, that the economy is fine, the cost of living crisis is there,

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and the people of Wythenshawe and Sale East no differently. --, they

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no differently. Earlier this morning David Cameron was asked whether he

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was worried that his party had been pushed into third by UKIP. This

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by-election, the result was never in doubt. It's a relatively safe Labour

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seat and I congratulate the winner and welcome him to Parliament. In

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terms of coming third, that is disappointing. By-elections are a

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time when people know they're not changing the government. They often

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use them to send a message to politicians to make a protest. I

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always believe in listening to the messages, and I want to win back

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people to my party, and that's what I'm fighting to do at the next

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general election. Our Adam spent the night at the Wythenshaw count, and

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joins us now. You lucky man. It is the morning after the night before.

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How does it look today? Looking a bit windy and wet, at the moment.

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Thank you, Andrew, for making me to stay up till 3am from a result that

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we predicted three weeks ago when the by-election was called. Labour

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with is really strong showing an increasing the majority -- a really

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strong showing. UKIP making it to second place, all eyes were on UKIP,

:03:45.:03:48.

and they did pretty well, increasing their share quite a lot, but not one

:03:49.:03:52.

of the stronger showings they've had in a by-election. They've had quite

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a few others in the north where they've done better. The

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Conservative Party shoved into third place, a bad night for them. Not as

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bad as it was for the Liberal Democrats, losing their deposit with

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less than 5% of the vote which cost them some money. Somebody much

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happier is Michael Kane. Have you had much sleep? A few hours, but not

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much. Were looking at the election through the prism of UKIP. Was that

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an issue or a distraction? When the election started the Westminster

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story was it was about UKIP, but they didn't break through at all. If

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I was David Cameron I'd be more worried about UKIP, if I was Nick

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Clegg I'd be more worried about them. The results shows that the

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Labour Party increased its majority Ed Miliband's message is getting

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through, so we were delighted. Did you even need to go out and

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campaign? This is rock solid territory for the Labour Party. We

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had deep relationships here. Paul Goggins was respected, dedicated,

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immensely popular. We knocked on doors every week, and we will go

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back out again to knock on the doors. We have deep-seated roots in

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this constituency, and I think people recognise that, and they

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recognise the issues we campaigned on, hospital pressures, the cost of

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living crisis and the on her council cuts. I know one of the accident and

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emergency unit down the road -- the unfair Council cuts. Where is this

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crisis that Labour keep going on about? The evidence is that this

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Tory led government, propped up by the liberal -- Liberal Democrats,

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they closed the accident and emergency at Trafford, of the road,

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then they closed the walk-in centre in the town centre, and overnight we

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had 1000 ambulances queueing up this winter with people waiting to get

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into the hospital. We have had over 700 people waiting on trolleys for

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over four hours. This is going back to the dark days. We have had 80

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operations cancelled. We cannot allow this to happen any more.

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Talking to UKIP they would say there have been dark days in the

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campaign. They say Labour activists daubed graffiti on the UKIP shop in

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Sale and abused their activists. I think they are diverted away from a

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very poor result. We run an extraordinarily professional

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campaign with lots of volunteers, knocking on doors, listening to

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issues. They produced absolutely no evidence of that, and if they did,

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we would investigate and take action but there has been no evidence of

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that whatsoever. Congratulations again, and you have to wait a week,

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because they are all on holiday. Just finishing up on UKIP, I was in

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the office there earlier and they are still quite bullish. A few years

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ago, they say, they were nowhere in the seat but they have increased

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their vote by a lot, so they think that's a positive thing ahead of

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European elections in May. Sounds like the people of Wythenshawe have

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a new Paul Goggins on their hand from the way he spoke there. -- on

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their hands. We've been joined now by the Conservative MP Brooks

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Newmark and UKIP's head of policy Tim Aker. We did ask the Lib Dems

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for an interview, but no one was available. I wonder why. Let's come

:07:08.:07:16.

to the Conservatives. By-elections are here today, gone tomorrow, only

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a 28% turnout, it is derisory, but the Labour Party has consistently

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been strong in by-elections. It is their 13th win since 2010. It has to

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mean something. Yes, it does. Historically, anybody in

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government, it's very difficult when you are in government, particularly

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when you have to make tough decisions, that means you have to

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bring down the deficit, and it has an impact on peoples lives. But the

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good news is, the government has been creating jobs, reducing the

:07:49.:07:52.

deficit and increasing growth which means, for example, 1.6 million jobs

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today extra, which means 1.6 million extra who are secure. So why did

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your share of the vote dropped by 11% in Wythenshawe? There are a

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whole host of factors, as you heard from the new Labour MP. When it

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comes to by-elections, people, for whatever region -- reason, they want

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to give the incumbent government are kicking. We are no different than in

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the past when the Labour Party were in government, they got a kicking as

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well. One of the reasons you did not win the last general election was

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because your performance in the North was lacklustre, particularly

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in the cities. This suggests that the Conservative brand in the North

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of England is still dying. We actually gained a number of seats in

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the North, in the north-west, and the north-east. Maybe in the rural

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seats, but you did not win a seat in the northern city. And in the

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suburbs as well. It's like asking why Labour parties don't win the

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rural areas, they just generally don't. It is about the general

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trajectory of what is going on. As you pointed out, in this

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by-election, we didn't do well. I totally acknowledge that. It would

:09:10.:09:13.

be hard to argue any other way. Whether it matters in the long term

:09:14.:09:18.

it's harder to say. UKIP, you came from nowhere, you got 18% of the

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vote. It's OK. Not life changing. It's a solid result. It is a tough

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seat. You were 9000 votes behind the winner. He won't exactly breathing

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down their necks. Our vote went up five fold. We are seeing a trend

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that we are the opposition in the north. It's a waste of time voting

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for the Conservative Party and the Liberals in the north, because as

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the results show, not just the by-election, but rather, South

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Shields, we are challenging Labour. Can you reply to that? From this

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by-election, and other straws in the wind, the Tory and Liberal Democrat

:10:01.:10:05.

vote is collapsing in the north and UKIP is the beneficiary will stop

:10:06.:10:13.

they have become the Liberal Democrat repository. It's for people

:10:14.:10:16.

who are not sure. That's what we see in the north and the south. What the

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Liberal Democrats are finding out is there is a cost of being in

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government and being responsible. The price that is that their vote in

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particular, compared to ours, is dropping enormously, and UKIP has

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been the beneficiary. , general election, I think things will be

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different. -- come a general election. You have taken a leaf out

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of the Liberal Democrat book, changing your colour depending on

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the seat. We saw the emergence of red, promising to protect welfare

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benefits. You are now the kind of red UKIP up in the northern

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constituencies, and the Thatcherite party in the South. All of these

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labels mean very little. We would prioritise that spending here. Where

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we lead on the response was about putting our people first. I don't

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remember you talking about protecting people's welfare benefits

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in the Eastleigh by-election. We proposed the bedroom tax, that's a

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benefit cut. They have become more like the Liberal Democrats. They say

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one thing nationally. We heard Nigel Farage a few weeks ago saying he

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would cut benefits and the NHS, but in this particular by-election, they

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changed their tune completely. We will take no lessons from a

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party... They are the Liberal Democrats now. We will not take

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lessons from a party that has made at lifetime out of doing one thing

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and saying another. You can have too much of a good thing, and it's great

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fun watching the Conservatives and UKIP going together. What did you

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make of the by-election? I'm enjoying this, but there are two

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questions. Whether UKIP can take votes of labour, and it is plausible

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they might in the north, but I then think this shows that. -- I don't

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think this election shows that. But it makes a good point about where

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the Conservatives in the North are at the moment. The thing about UKIP

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in the North is whether people will vote differently in a general

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election. The next issue is going to have detailed polling. Prospect

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magazine will have details of whether UKIP supporters who voted

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Conservative last time will vote for them again when given a choice

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between that and Ed Miliband. The polling does say yes, a lot of them

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will. That tends to support David Cameron's view but there's still a

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big question hanging out there. Nonetheless, this by-election was

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not South Shields, it was ultimately a bit of support for UKIP, and it

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suggest that the notions that the mainstream parties will suffer

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somewhat equally because of the rise of UKIP, but that might not be

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correct. I think the Conservatives will be able to say that they will

:13:15.:13:22.

get the UKIP vote away from Ed Miliband, even if it works against

:13:23.:13:26.

them in northern seat. I suppose it doesn't matter in the European

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elections. But what does? I think we will do well. I think we have to

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make sure that we get more than 20 MPs. The formula is different, and

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it is by region, and in some regions we do well and in other regions we

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are working on it. It's encouraging for the north-west. It's early days.

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We had a big peak in the run-up to the last European elections, so we

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will see. One polling survey company has some 30%, and the Conservatives

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well behind. We will talk more about this later in the programme, but

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thank you to all of at the moment. -- all of you. Now it's time for our

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daily quiz. And while turnout was down to a rather depressing 28% in

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the Wythenshaw by-election, there's been another contest at Westminster

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this week which has been anything but apathetic. In fact, so desperate

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were MPs to win the Westminster cat of the year contest there were even

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accusations of vote rigging. The well of democracy has truly been

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poisoned. Anyway the winner's been chosen, but which cat has taken the

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prize? Is it a) Bosun? B) Parsnip? C) Kevin? Or d) Scaredy-Cat? At the

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end of the show, Bronwen and James will give us the correct answer. It

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seemed like such a good idea, and a pretty popular one. If your MP has

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been up to no good, you have the power to recall them and force a

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by-election. A form of MP recall was in all three party's manifesto. And

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it made it into the Coalition Agreement. But now it looks like the

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idea has been dropped all together and it's left coalition relations on

:15:15.:15:19.

thin ice. It all started so well for the two-man luge at the head of the

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Government, as both parties agreed it was time to clean up politics

:15:24.:15:27.

after the expenses scandal. And promised to pass legislation to

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equalise constituency boundaries, reduce the number of MPs and

:15:31.:15:33.

introduce the power of recall. The idea was that 10% of the electorate

:15:34.:15:37.

could sign a petition calling for a by-election when their MP was guilty

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of serious wrongdoing. The coalition agreement even stated they would

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bring forward early legislation. But a draft bill in 2011 was frozen out

:15:52.:15:54.

after some complained about the additional requirement that a

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committee of MPs would first have to decide if wrongdoing had taken

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place. Now we learn that the power of recall won't be in the next, and

:16:01.:16:04.

final, Queen's Speech by the time things have thawed out in May or

:16:05.:16:08.

June. It must have been squeezed out by all that other legislation they

:16:09.:16:11.

are going bring forward over the next year.

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It's left one or two Lib Dems, including party president Tim

:16:19.:16:23.

Farron, rather unhappy. He said last night the decision to drop the

:16:24.:16:26.

policy showed the Conservatives didn't trust the electorate. Let's

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get more on this now from our political correspondent Carole

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Walker. Tim Farren said the Prime Minister

:16:37.:17:10.

had blocked the idea, and I think you're about to speak to Zac

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Goldsmith, a Conservative MP who will disagree strongly given what

:17:14.:17:21.

his Twitter feed. -- said today. It's is a sense that before the

:17:22.:17:26.

general election the parties want to get on with issues that really are a

:17:27.:17:31.

voter's priorities. Although there was a massive public outcry after

:17:32.:17:37.

the MP expenses scandal, this is not something that voters are clamouring

:17:38.:17:41.

for at the moment. There is also a big disagreement about exactly how

:17:42.:17:47.

the principles of this should work. MPs will tell you that the principle

:17:48.:17:51.

is a good one, that voters should have more power to get rid of MPs

:17:52.:17:55.

who misbehave, but when it comes to exactly how that should be

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triggered, there's a lot of dispute. Something you should not have first

:17:59.:18:05.

in the findings by this Parliamentary standing -- standards

:18:06.:18:08.

committee. Others think that the bar has been set too high, and

:18:09.:18:12.

constitutional reform committees in the Common criticised the proposals

:18:13.:18:15.

and said they should be dropped because, in practice, it would never

:18:16.:18:21.

happen, so voter expectations would be raised and realistically. In the

:18:22.:18:25.

mix of all that, the idea is not going to make the Queens speech, it

:18:26.:18:29.

won't be put into law this side of January -- of a general election,

:18:30.:18:31.

and there's a good deal of scrapping about who is to blame. With us now

:18:32.:18:40.

is the Conservative MP who's been pushing for a new right of recall,

:18:41.:18:44.

Zac Goldsmith. Welcome to the Daily Politics.

:18:45.:19:44.

If you are a maverick, George Galloway, myself, Caroline Lucas,

:19:45.:19:53.

you haven't got a hope. It was totally anti-democratic. It was not

:19:54.:19:56.

a small step towards a recall, it was a step backwards in terms of

:19:57.:20:01.

democratic evolution. It was an appalling piece of legislation and I

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am thrilled it was dropped. I'm less thrilled that the principle is

:20:05.:20:07.

dropped. Recall was the only promise we made in the heat of the expenses

:20:08.:20:10.

scandal, running up to the last election. The only reform proposal

:20:11.:20:15.

that might have empowered voters. Everything else was nonsense. This

:20:16.:20:19.

would enable voters to hold their MPs to account in safe seats, and

:20:20.:20:21.

people knew it, and they looked forward to it. Could David Cameron

:20:22.:20:27.

have rescued it? I think he could have, and I think he's behaved

:20:28.:20:32.

appallingly. I have seen clips all date from David Cameron about what

:20:33.:20:34.

it meant before the last election, and it's been dropped. It didn't

:20:35.:20:40.

mean anything to him before. Nick Clegg and Tim Farren have been

:20:41.:20:43.

disingenuous. They had three and a half years to deliver it. After the

:20:44.:20:46.

criticism of the first draft bill, they haven't changed it. It was

:20:47.:20:49.

never going to get through Parliament. I would have voted

:20:50.:20:52.

against it and this is one of my big issues, I couldn't have supported

:20:53.:20:56.

the bill. He had an opportunity to come back with something proper but

:20:57.:21:00.

he chose not to. He kept talking about kangaroo courts. The only

:21:01.:21:03.

caught in a recall system is the constituency, so not a nice word to

:21:04.:21:11.

use. He effectively said that he is worried that genuine recall would

:21:12.:21:14.

make MPs vulnerable. He wrote to me this morning to make the point.

:21:15.:21:18.

Recall would make MPs vulnerable, which is why he has not supported

:21:19.:21:22.

it. He has instead supported the complete and utter nonsense Billy

:21:23.:21:25.

put forward. If we were to have five seconds silence, would we not hear

:21:26.:21:34.

an audible sigh of relief from your party's own backbenchers that that

:21:35.:21:40.

isn't going ahead? I don't buy into that. I pressed my own recall bill

:21:41.:21:44.

to vote. It was a vote in which only backbenchers could take part and it

:21:45.:21:49.

won with a thumping majority. Only 17 MPs voted against. The majority

:21:50.:21:54.

who backed it were MPs. That was genuine recall. Parliament is up for

:21:55.:21:57.

reform, the difficulty is that Cameron and Nick Clegg are not. It

:21:58.:22:01.

remains to see if Ed Miliband is. If he would have put this forward in

:22:02.:22:05.

opposition, he could have won. He could take the agenda and show that

:22:06.:22:09.

he believes in democracy and the electorate. He has an amazing

:22:10.:22:14.

opportunity and I hope he takes it. You would encourage Ed Miliband to

:22:15.:22:17.

take the batter? It must be delivered because it's the only way

:22:18.:22:20.

to have a meaningful change that will shake up Parliament, genuinely

:22:21.:22:25.

empowered voters and ensure that Parliament does its job of holding

:22:26.:22:28.

them to account and make sure MPs are kept on their toes. You don't

:22:29.:22:35.

think the mood has changed after the demonstration of the defection of

:22:36.:22:42.

your MPs? I don't think it mattered at all. I'm lucky I get on with my

:22:43.:22:45.

association but if they had chosen to deselect me last month, I would

:22:46.:22:54.

have been happy to go to the voters to try my luck in a general

:22:55.:22:58.

election. Recall is democracy full for this no other way to describe

:22:59.:23:02.

it. All arguments against recall effectively our arguments against

:23:03.:23:07.

democracy itself. It is extraordinary, really. Despite the

:23:08.:23:13.

noise as we make, the party today believe they can get away with

:23:14.:23:17.

breaking promises on this scale. It's extraordinary. You have had an

:23:18.:23:22.

interesting conversation on twitter with Tim Farron, from the Lib Dems,

:23:23.:23:28.

who is broadly on the same space as you on this issue? Any chance you

:23:29.:23:32.

could get together to put the show back on the road? Yes, I will work

:23:33.:23:39.

with anyone. I think he agrees with me and supported my bill. I know he

:23:40.:23:43.

supports general recall, but his entire body language suggests he

:23:44.:23:49.

will always put his party first. I don't think we can move forward and

:23:50.:23:52.

that is willing to hold his party to account in the way I am. Otherwise

:23:53.:23:57.

we won't make any progress at all. I sympathise with this noble

:23:58.:24:03.

endeavour. It was promised by party leaders but it's tough to argue MPs

:24:04.:24:06.

are not becoming increasingly accountable for their constituencies

:24:07.:24:13.

and the deselection is the Tories have seen recently, perhaps the

:24:14.:24:17.

promise of reform with the unions, it promises more of the same in the

:24:18.:24:21.

Labour Party. There's no doubt, that rather fundamental change is making

:24:22.:24:28.

Government tougher to run. We have seen that in enormous rebellions the

:24:29.:24:33.

party is carried out in recent times. Voters still want to see

:24:34.:24:37.

efficient smooth running Government so there is a balance there. We are

:24:38.:24:44.

edging towards a slightly more accountable system. It's still the

:24:45.:24:48.

case and it would be the case under Nick Clegg's reforms, as an MP could

:24:49.:24:54.

go on holiday for five years and you could be deselected but you would

:24:55.:25:00.

still be the MP. I could either BNP or going on holiday that two years,

:25:01.:25:05.

there's nothing in the structures today or anything Nick Clegg

:25:06.:25:10.

proposed in his bill to prevent me from doing that. I could be the

:25:11.:25:14.

worst MP and as long as I'm not in jail for 12 months, I'm fine full is

:25:15.:25:18.

nothing voters could do about it. It matters less than a marginal seat.

:25:19.:25:22.

You would be booted out at the next election. If you are in an old

:25:23.:25:26.

Labour mining town where people never vote Conservative or a

:25:27.:25:32.

rock-solid Tory seat, that's the choice people would have. You want a

:25:33.:25:38.

system to protect an MP from harassment, from people who don't

:25:39.:25:45.

like the views. I completely support the democratic principles you've

:25:46.:25:47.

said, but it proves not as simple as that when people started. People

:25:48.:25:54.

argued about the system. You mean the process of it? The process how

:25:55.:25:59.

to do about the party would have a lot of influence on it and so on. I

:26:00.:26:04.

welcome the rebellions. The increasing independence shown by MPs

:26:05.:26:08.

right across the budget spectrum. He said he needs a mechanism. In the

:26:09.:26:14.

end, the people themselves, not a committee of MPs, not the party of

:26:15.:26:17.

whips, but the people themselves can take action. I would agree with that

:26:18.:26:20.

but they have won at least every five years. But it on a flawed

:26:21.:26:25.

mechanism if you're in a safe seat. Even in a marginal seat. What would

:26:26.:26:32.

additional voters have to do, vote for the Lib Dems? They might

:26:33.:26:35.

disagree with anything they stand for, they might vote Labour... They

:26:36.:26:40.

could be deselected. But, until the election, I would still be the MP.

:26:41.:26:45.

You grab two or three years without any representation at all. It's a

:26:46.:26:50.

flaw in the system. MPs need to be kept on their toes throughout the

:26:51.:26:53.

five years and no, when they make promises, they will be held to those

:26:54.:26:58.

promises. You might find MPs make less extravagant promises because

:26:59.:27:02.

they're more likely to keep them. I think it would improve the

:27:03.:27:04.

relationship between people and those in power. People are pulling

:27:05.:27:11.

away from politics. And the political establishment. And all the

:27:12.:27:14.

data backs that up. Something big is needed, and I think this could be

:27:15.:27:19.

it. There is one example in the world where recall exists, plenty of

:27:20.:27:29.

times but not one success story. Let me ask you a final question. What

:27:30.:27:33.

the Conservatives going to put in the next manifesto on this? If we

:27:34.:27:38.

walk away from this side of the election and have the gall to

:27:39.:27:41.

introduce into our next manifesto, frankly, it makes a mockery of the

:27:42.:27:46.

whole idea of a manifesto. People are going to struggle to believe

:27:47.:27:52.

anything I say. It's open to the black me to point that out. If you

:27:53.:27:57.

put it on, we say, why should we believe you? No one can blame the

:27:58.:28:01.

coalition. Both parties promised it. We could push this through, and that

:28:02.:28:08.

could easily be demonstrated if he were to take the lead on this

:28:09.:28:11.

because it would get support in parliament. No doubt about that. We

:28:12.:28:14.

shall see if he takes up the challenge. Thank you. Who wouldn't

:28:15.:28:22.

want to live in a nice affordable House, with local parks, well

:28:23.:28:25.

financed local amenities, and well thought out public spaces? Ah, if

:28:26.:28:28.

only local authorities could deliver such an idyllic dream. The Garden

:28:29.:28:31.

City movement however has always said it could deliver that, and a

:28:32.:28:35.

number of Garden Cities exist and thrive to this day across the globe.

:28:36.:28:38.

Two and half years ago the Coalition said it wanted to build more in

:28:39.:28:42.

England. And then has said very little since. You can see a pattern

:28:43.:28:48.

in this programme. Giles has been looking at why. There has been an

:28:49.:28:55.

upsurge in focus on the garden city of Letchworth recently. At least the

:28:56.:28:58.

concept behind it. The founder of the Garden City movement at the

:28:59.:29:03.

knees Howard. Why? Because the Victorian mixer planning social

:29:04.:29:05.

interaction, housing and infrastructure might be a solution,

:29:06.:29:11.

albeit updated for the 21st-century. To me, garden city is about creating

:29:12.:29:21.

a balance community and thinkable to do for their enjoyment. Ethical

:29:22.:29:26.

brands of a planned development for the committed and that the Garden

:29:27.:29:29.

City. Whether it was a hundred years ago or not. I know what your

:29:30.:29:34.

thinking. These houses look expensive and they are. Nobody in

:29:35.:29:38.

bad urban housing could just move here now. But the Garden City

:29:39.:29:42.

concept was always rooted in being affordable, even turning a profit

:29:43.:29:46.

but those who lived and invested in it. One of the main reasons we are

:29:47.:29:52.

interested in Garden City is at an ideas precise because of the idea

:29:53.:29:54.

they can behave themselves. You're talking about bits of land who are

:29:55.:30:00.

currently very low value, once you build a town have enormous value and

:30:01.:30:03.

if you can capture that uplift and recycle it into the town to pay for

:30:04.:30:06.

the infrastructure and the facilities, the schools, new towns

:30:07.:30:14.

doing Canon have pay for themselves. At the knees Howard came up with the

:30:15.:30:17.

idea of a garden city and he didn't just think about how people lived

:30:18.:30:20.

and where they lived but where they would work, how they will spend

:30:21.:30:25.

their leisure time and also, more importantly, how they could afford

:30:26.:30:29.

to live here. Letchworth was the first. Welwyn Garden City followed

:30:30.:30:32.

and there are many places around the country that would say they had at

:30:33.:30:36.

least a bit of a Garden City concept within them. But given the fact that

:30:37.:30:41.

most parties, quite like the Garden City idea, and the coalition

:30:42.:30:44.

committing to building more of them, in 2011, why has it all gone quiet?

:30:45.:30:52.

Well look at what happens if you want to build anything in a a leafy

:30:53.:30:55.

rural environment. Now imagine a building a whole town. It's not the

:30:56.:30:59.

when. It's the where that might be the hiccup and then see the ripple

:31:00.:31:03.

you find who will be against. Recently the Telegraph said it had

:31:04.:31:06.

learned of plans for Yalding in Kent and Gerrard's Cross in

:31:07.:31:12.

Buckinghamshire. No one welcomes new development. I know it's not

:31:13.:31:15.

perceived as the best thing, but I think everyone is recognising

:31:16.:31:18.

something has to be done so I think you answered the light with who was

:31:19.:31:25.

going to take that big decision. In November last year, Lord Wolfson

:31:26.:31:27.

offered a quarter million pound prize for anyone who could come up

:31:28.:31:31.

with a blue skies Garden City design that was visionary, economically

:31:32.:31:34.

viable and sparklingly popular. The Government however has hardly

:31:35.:31:37.

bubbled over on the topic. It is disappointing. We have been calling

:31:38.:31:40.

on the Government to publish its plans for Garden City is the two

:31:41.:31:47.

years. We certainly hope the prize will prompt the Government into

:31:48.:31:51.

action. For some, the exciting prospects of Garden cities as one

:31:52.:31:54.

part of a housing solution seem obvious but unless it's grasped

:31:55.:31:57.

we're all just going round and round in circles. Giles Dilnot reporting.

:31:58.:32:04.

And we've been joined by Miles Gibson, director of the Wolfson

:32:05.:32:08.

Economics Prize. We know what garden cities. Why do need competition?

:32:09.:32:12.

Because plenty of people, although they understand the concept of the

:32:13.:32:16.

Garden City, album worried about how you could implement one. We have

:32:17.:32:21.

done it before and we think we can do it again. As your board

:32:22.:32:26.

indicated, painted people think that the concept of garden cities in

:32:27.:32:31.

something, and I'm including the politicians the day, but what the is

:32:32.:32:35.

asking how would you do it quit at how can you persuade people that

:32:36.:32:39.

there's a future for them in a nice place to live? How can you offer

:32:40.:32:42.

them something better than what have so far. Let's come back the

:32:43.:32:48.

practical edges of this. Let me ask you this. We've had Welwyn Garden

:32:49.:32:55.

City, the most famous one, because the names on the title. That was a

:32:56.:32:59.

while ago. Before the Second World War, continued afterwards. If we

:33:00.:33:03.

were to start today, in what way do you think would garden cities

:33:04.:33:07.

different from the ones we have done it in the past? And how would you

:33:08.:33:11.

stop them ending up as just another Newtown? Actually, that's a question

:33:12.:33:16.

we are asking for thought we were offering ?250,000 for the answer to

:33:17.:33:22.

that question. There could be a university. There's money to be made

:33:23.:33:28.

here. What might be different? We are asking people about, what's

:33:29.:33:31.

different about the way we live today compared to Welwyn Garden

:33:32.:33:36.

City? We are a car dominated society for example full that can be push

:33:37.:33:40.

the clock back on that? What about technology? What can broadband and

:33:41.:33:45.

Wi-Fi do for us. Cycle lanes, great places to bring up your children,

:33:46.:33:49.

with parks, gardens, allotments, flood plains, things that we need in

:33:50.:33:53.

the new cities which you might not have had in cities prewar and

:33:54.:33:59.

post-war. Is there any sign in your view that the current Government is

:34:00.:34:03.

prepared to commit on this? You have to look at other politicians have

:34:04.:34:06.

actually said, so I think Eric Pickles come out recently and said

:34:07.:34:10.

the coalition was paid to build a few garden cities. Nick Clegg said

:34:11.:34:14.

in a speech he is interested in the concept, as well, and Ed Miliband at

:34:15.:34:18.

who's interested in new generation of new towns, and asked Sir Michael

:34:19.:34:21.

Lyons to think about how that might come about. We are hoping the body

:34:22.:34:26.

of entries we get to our prize will give people a bit of material to do

:34:27.:34:32.

the thinking necessary. Can you point to Labour not in power, but

:34:33.:34:36.

can you point to any ground work being done by the coalition on this?

:34:37.:34:41.

You'd have to ask them, I think. But you are the specialist full subdue

:34:42.:34:45.

follow these things. Day in day out. I they talk vaguely about it. It

:34:46.:34:51.

sounds nice. We have a housing problem in this country. I'm not

:34:52.:34:55.

aware that any area has been designated, the groundwork has been

:34:56.:34:58.

done, any plans being drawn up. Are you? You would have two ask them

:34:59.:35:04.

that but my job is to dangle a ?250,000 check-in for the people who

:35:05.:35:07.

can give is the best ideas how we should do it. What Lord Wolfson has

:35:08.:35:13.

been clear about, he thinks the politicians will follow the debate

:35:14.:35:17.

rather than lead it. They need answers. They need technical answers

:35:18.:35:20.

as to how to actually do this and then they will come forward with

:35:21.:35:25.

proposals. You will have to wait because it's inconceivable that the

:35:26.:35:27.

Conservatives in particular are going to go down this road this side

:35:28.:35:31.

of the election. The harsh truth is that the biggest need for these

:35:32.:35:36.

garden cities is in the south-east of England. That's where the housing

:35:37.:35:40.

shortage is greatest for the bats where people want to live. And the

:35:41.:35:44.

Conservatives are not going to open this whole can of worms in

:35:45.:35:48.

constituencies that they either want to hold onto or hope to win a couple

:35:49.:35:54.

from the Lib Dems. Too bad the whole thread of the people in leafy

:35:55.:35:58.

villages, and by the way, where going to have a Garden City over the

:35:59.:36:04.

hill. That might be the perception, at the national level, but if you

:36:05.:36:07.

look at what's going on in local authorities in the south-east, there

:36:08.:36:10.

are some local authorities capable of delivering quite large

:36:11.:36:13.

settlements, for example, if you look at Charlot District Council,

:36:14.:36:17.

they're proposing a extension to this stuff. North Huntington, big

:36:18.:36:21.

settlement of over 5000 homes going in there. I was talking to the

:36:22.:36:24.

developer about that recently come and they had just four objections to

:36:25.:36:29.

that proposition, so it can be done. It can be done. That is not a garden

:36:30.:36:38.

city though. A garden city 's 50,000 new homes and we've not built any

:36:39.:36:46.

since the 1960s. The government at the time of the 40s and 50s, like in

:36:47.:36:50.

Stevenage, said to the local objectors, thank you, but stuff you,

:36:51.:36:56.

it's happening anyway. It's hard to think our government today could not

:36:57.:36:59.

adopt a broadly similar tack. I know that this is my playful at ?250,000,

:37:00.:37:07.

but please. Three entries already this morning. But that is why, given

:37:08.:37:12.

that demand is hottest in the south-east, it won't happen under a

:37:13.:37:15.

Tory government. It could only happen under a Labour government. It

:37:16.:37:19.

is politically impossible this side of the election. What is easier is

:37:20.:37:27.

due dribbling five or 10,000 town -- five or ?10,000 house clutches, you

:37:28.:37:33.

cannot have a garden bed. Although I am sure your prize will get the most

:37:34.:37:36.

wonderful vision and the dream of the little figures walking through

:37:37.:37:43.

the models. It's always the same little figure. That person has made

:37:44.:37:47.

a fortune. The parents pushing the body and all that. One of the things

:37:48.:37:54.

were asking, one of the Di mentions of the question is, how do you make

:37:55.:37:58.

a garden city popular -- the dimensional. People will say it

:37:59.:38:03.

cannot be done. There is no point in you asking. I don't believe that. We

:38:04.:38:06.

have to be optimistic. We have to think that people can be persuaded

:38:07.:38:10.

that development of high quality that brings new infrastructure and

:38:11.:38:13.

services with it is a good thing for them and their communities. Didn't

:38:14.:38:19.

Gordon Brown talk at one stage about those for new towns? What happened

:38:20.:38:28.

to that? One of those was Bicester. All the 5000? They are tiny. I'm not

:38:29.:38:36.

going to save that was a good initiative or not. I think we will

:38:37.:38:41.

get more propositions of that kind of size from entrance to the

:38:42.:38:43.

competition, but we need to be ambitious about this. The figures

:38:44.:38:47.

that James was using earlier are more what we are looking for. A

:38:48.:38:52.

city, the clue is in the title, you want something that will end up as a

:38:53.:38:55.

city even if it doesn't start as one. Haven't you got a problem of

:38:56.:39:03.

perception here? When people hear the words garden city, they think

:39:04.:39:07.

that is nice, but what they fear is they will end up with a new town,

:39:08.:39:12.

and that is not so nice, and with some honourable exceptions, they

:39:13.:39:16.

aren't so nice. You need to speak to some people who live in the new

:39:17.:39:21.

towns. Milton Keynes is a nice place. That is the honourable

:39:22.:39:26.

exception. But people living near it before it was billed might have a

:39:27.:39:31.

different view. -- before it was built. I am sure the residents of

:39:32.:39:37.

Milton Keynes would not be that happy. I will guarantee you that the

:39:38.:39:42.

value of those houses has gone up not down. I'm sure of that, but

:39:43.:39:46.

that's true everywhere in the south-east. In the end, to get this

:39:47.:39:50.

done, to be brutally honest about it, do you not need French style

:39:51.:39:57.

planning laws? Otherwise the central government says you will do it. Or

:39:58.:40:04.

even Chinese style? That is how we did the new towns. But we should

:40:05.:40:10.

remember that Letchworth was not built in that way. They were built

:40:11.:40:14.

with private money and they are successful places. Places that

:40:15.:40:18.

people want to live. They have high value. If we did it before, we can

:40:19.:40:23.

do it again. Thank you very much. An interesting concept, and good luck

:40:24.:40:27.

with the essays. I'll be writing mine tonight. In just over three

:40:28.:40:32.

months, 400 million people across Europe will be able to cast their

:40:33.:40:35.

vote in fresh elections to the European Parliament. How many

:40:36.:40:39.

actually will? Property a third. So what's at stake? Adam's been to

:40:40.:40:43.

Brussels to find out. -- probably a third.

:40:44.:40:50.

The perfect addition to the Brussels skyline, a 70 metre tall platform

:40:51.:40:56.

that goes round and round in circles. It's a great place to get

:40:57.:41:03.

an overview of Europe's big year. The first big event affects one of

:41:04.:41:07.

the building over there, the European Parliament, because those

:41:08.:41:11.

elections to it in May show that the way the wind is blowing, it could be

:41:12.:41:17.

in for a historic realignment. Polling across Europe suggest that

:41:18.:41:21.

far left, far right and extreme Eurosceptic parties could be on the

:41:22.:41:28.

up. Do they organise themselves into an efficient legislative machine

:41:29.:41:31.

that will achieve what they want to try and undo bits of legislation,

:41:32.:41:37.

try to roll back the political frontiers of Europe? Or will they

:41:38.:41:42.

simply become a blocking my obstructive group that sit on their

:41:43.:41:45.

hands and try to stop things from happening? But the excitement

:41:46.:41:50.

doesn't end there. Then a new president of the European Commission

:41:51.:41:54.

needs to be is elected. You will miss all this by the end of the

:41:55.:42:00.

year. We are still working. He is still working until November but

:42:01.:42:02.

then a replacement needs to be found, and frankly, it is a

:42:03.:42:08.

merry-go-round. For the first time ever, the seven pan-European

:42:09.:42:11.

political groups in the Parliament have picked their own candidates for

:42:12.:42:15.

the job because the Lisbon Treaty says the appointment should reflect

:42:16.:42:18.

the results of the European elections. But the final choice will

:42:19.:42:21.

be made by the national leaders at a summit, and they do not want their

:42:22.:42:25.

hands tied, so there's a good chance they will take no notice. But their

:42:26.:42:29.

decision then goes back to parliament, where it has to be

:42:30.:42:32.

approved by a majority, who might kick up a fuss. Then the leaders and

:42:33.:42:35.

the new president select a commissioner from each member state,

:42:36.:42:39.

and the Parliament can veto all of those. Confused? Well, so are they.

:42:40.:42:44.

No one is quite sure how the back and forth will actually work. Please

:42:45.:42:49.

remain seated, the ride is not over yet. Because the President of the

:42:50.:43:00.

Council, Herman van rhomboid -- Rompuy. He has not been -- he will

:43:01.:43:08.

leave at the end of the year. Cathy Ashton, the foreign policy supremo

:43:09.:43:11.

is out of the door as well. It really is enough to make your head

:43:12.:43:14.

spin. But fear not, here is the really, really easy version. By the

:43:15.:43:21.

end of the year it will have set in motion the way Europe moves from

:43:22.:43:28.

here over the next five years. It is not so much what happens during the

:43:29.:43:31.

year, but what is in place by the end of the year, that is what will

:43:32.:43:36.

set off Europe on a course which could be very different from that

:43:37.:43:37.

which we see at the moment. Adam Fleming reporting. The turnout

:43:38.:43:50.

was 28% in this by-election in the north-west yesterday. The European

:43:51.:43:56.

elections in this country, you could probably put a number three in front

:43:57.:44:01.

of it, but not a number four. This by-election saw a very low turnout

:44:02.:44:06.

and there will be a low turnout in the parliamentary elections, and

:44:07.:44:10.

what we are all looking for is how well UKIP does, how badly the

:44:11.:44:14.

Conservatives do, and how that feeds into the general election next year.

:44:15.:44:23.

Do you think UKIP, is there an amateur bit about them, that they're

:44:24.:44:26.

not very good at managing expectations? It is a political

:44:27.:44:31.

skill and they have had Nigel Farage and other leading UKIP people on the

:44:32.:44:35.

programme saying that they will come first, which, of course, they might

:44:36.:44:42.

not. An interesting problem is that Labour will run 32% in a poll, and

:44:43.:44:48.

UKIP on 26, a good second, so the Tories on 23. If they had not been

:44:49.:44:51.

telling everybody they would come first, and they come second, it will

:44:52.:44:58.

seem they've not done well. That's why this OK result for them in

:44:59.:45:03.

Wythenshawe is not such a bad thing. Just two, sort of, slow their energy

:45:04.:45:09.

little bit. A big fallout, if the Tories and Lib Dems do badly. Which

:45:10.:45:16.

is widely expected. In the European elections? Yes, the fallout for them

:45:17.:45:21.

afterwards? Yes, they will have to be arguing even more strongly that

:45:22.:45:24.

the European elections, like a by-election, not ready any guide to

:45:25.:45:30.

a general election. But people are expecting UKIP to do well. And, if

:45:31.:45:35.

you like, parallel parties right across the continent coming up with

:45:36.:45:39.

an anti-Europe message expecting them to do well, as well. It is

:45:40.:45:44.

interesting, even though I'm not expect the turnout to be very high.

:45:45.:45:47.

We could end up with a different European Parliament. And real reason

:45:48.:45:53.

to pay attention to it. And that's the story on the European

:45:54.:45:57.

elections. UKIP is just a part of it because you will see that phenomenon

:45:58.:46:01.

and much further to the right in France, with the National front, the

:46:02.:46:04.

Freedom parties in Finland and Holland, even Sweden looks like it

:46:05.:46:10.

may have one or two MEPs from the hard right. Who knows what Greece

:46:11.:46:15.

and Italy are going to send us? The European Parliament could have a

:46:16.:46:22.

block of 35-40% of MEPs outside, to the right of the mainstream. And, at

:46:23.:46:29.

a time, moreover, when the parliament is claiming more powers

:46:30.:46:32.

and more of a say in the way the commission runs itself. So it is

:46:33.:46:37.

concerning, no doubt so it will be worth watching the election results.

:46:38.:46:44.

The boating. I wouldn't go that far. -- the voting. Of course, I always

:46:45.:46:50.

vote. Now, as we know, the next General Election is going to be on

:46:51.:46:54.

seventh May 2015. And that means the campaigning and electioneering is

:46:55.:46:57.

already taking place. How do we know that? Well, the parties are turning

:46:58.:47:01.

to youTube, Facebook and Twitter to try and create a viral internet

:47:02.:47:03.

buzz. Take a look at this. Make yourself heard. Don't wait for

:47:04.:48:03.

a general election, don't wait for a referendum, don't let anyone put

:48:04.:48:08.

jobs at risk and don't let anyone throw our recovery away. Let's keep

:48:09.:48:14.

Britain prosperous Thomas safe and strong. Vote Liberal Democrat.

:48:15.:48:27.

That was an example from each party but how they're trying to use social

:48:28.:48:32.

media to get their message across. And we're joined now by the

:48:33.:48:35.

political editor of BuzzFeed, Jim Waterson. It's at the cutting edge

:48:36.:48:39.

of social media. Welcome. Let's take the Labour won, because of the most

:48:40.:48:43.

recent one, and it's clearly the most sophisticated as well. What did

:48:44.:48:49.

you make of it? I thought was brilliant, the first time any

:48:50.:48:52.

British poetical parties accident something to communicate outside of

:48:53.:48:57.

someone of Westminster on this scale. It won't have cost much to

:48:58.:49:02.

do. A few hours with staff they've got, nothing to distribute and it

:49:03.:49:06.

reached 400,000 people, people who are normally look at political

:49:07.:49:11.

videos. Is it good or bad but it looks like the Conservatives can

:49:12.:49:17.

afford less good graphics and the Daily Politics? It was pretty awful.

:49:18.:49:21.

I think some people would agree with that as well, but I think they will

:49:22.:49:25.

come back with something better. The main thing they got to do is have a

:49:26.:49:28.

bit of humour. It's hard for politicians to drop their guard and

:49:29.:49:32.

show self-deprecation. And awareness. That was lying about Ed

:49:33.:49:36.

Balls being controlled by Ed Miliband and predictions going

:49:37.:49:40.

wrong, and that's an interest of 10,000 people, it's not going to

:49:41.:49:46.

spread far. The Labour won, it got almost 440,000 hits. It's a lot for

:49:47.:49:52.

a political video. -- belabour one. When I see things that go viral,

:49:53.:49:59.

quite often, they are not made to go viral. But they do go viral because

:50:00.:50:04.

people just like them. -- the Labour one. Can people make them go viral?

:50:05.:50:10.

Just try to be funny, drop your guard. The Labour won and funny,

:50:11.:50:15.

it's serious. It's poignant, in fact. There's pictures of George

:50:16.:50:19.

Osborne eating a pasty, looking very unhappy with that. The reaction was,

:50:20.:50:25.

people are finding it funny. Here is the big question. In this country,

:50:26.:50:36.

we've never had the video political advertising and like the USA and

:50:37.:50:41.

other countries. We don't allow the parties to advertise on TV. They get

:50:42.:50:46.

free space instead, whereas, in America in particular, campaigns can

:50:47.:50:49.

be dominated by television advertising. Will this, the fact the

:50:50.:50:55.

parties can go round the existing broadcasters, and go direct to the

:50:56.:50:59.

public, get round the broadcasting rules, is this the beginning of

:51:00.:51:04.

American-style advertising in British politics? I wouldn't go that

:51:05.:51:07.

far but we will see a lot of paid adverts in the 20 15th election.

:51:08.:51:13.

There's nothing to stop the Tories or Labour or the Lib Dems going and

:51:14.:51:18.

buying all the adverts on you Tube. A new voter, they sit down to watch

:51:19.:51:23.

something and they will see an advert which is what you have just

:51:24.:51:26.

shown there for them is nothing to stop that happening. They could be

:51:27.:51:31.

in bed in newspapers and magazines, couldn't they? They would pay for

:51:32.:51:36.

them. They could pay for print ads in some respects now. But a video is

:51:37.:51:42.

much more powerful. The trick is, the reason it goes viral is because

:51:43.:51:46.

your friends are recommending it. Your friend on Facebook is saying

:51:47.:51:49.

it's great. It's not like somebody chucking a leaflet through your

:51:50.:51:56.

door. What do you make of this? Very watchable. It doesn't have that you

:51:57.:52:01.

must see this, I must pass it on, quality. 400,000 in a short time, it

:52:02.:52:12.

is very watchable, but this really isn't American political

:52:13.:52:17.

advertising. That's not so far away. I would suggest it's early days. The

:52:18.:52:23.

techniques could take is that way, but the tone of it is actually

:52:24.:52:28.

rather marvellously British. It's funny. They will hire the people who

:52:29.:52:33.

can do this sort of thing. I would suggest it's quite a short jump from

:52:34.:52:36.

doing this sort of thing, once you get the in-house expertise, to say,

:52:37.:52:41.

let's try some negative advertising. Let's try what works in America.

:52:42.:52:49.

Sure, I'm sure it will change politics in the media for ever.

:52:50.:52:56.

Colossal election shaping way, but what we have since over it's hard to

:52:57.:52:59.

get excited about. I struggled to find that Labour advert in any way

:53:00.:53:07.

amusing or ground-breaking. It seems me perfectly straightforward and I'm

:53:08.:53:10.

sure it will appeal to people who are basically minded to vote Labour

:53:11.:53:14.

anyway. That's why they approve this message. It is not entertaining. We

:53:15.:53:20.

run it for people who are no interest in politics, Labour ought

:53:21.:53:24.

Tory, tweeting, I don't like either party but it was funny for some it

:53:25.:53:28.

was influencing them against the parties. What was funny about it? I

:53:29.:53:34.

don't know, ask them for sub at 400,000 people liked it. I don't

:53:35.:53:38.

think it's funny but it's well made and slick by the standards of the

:53:39.:53:44.

Tories won. It was slightly funny. It could've been better. It was

:53:45.:53:48.

hitting on ahead of a hammer funny, not subtle funny. That hit me on the

:53:49.:53:53.

head with a hammer funny. Are the parties hiring the expertise

:53:54.:54:04.

now to do this sort of thing? Yes, Labour have an in House person

:54:05.:54:07.

separate from the main campaign team doing this sort of thing, and using

:54:08.:54:12.

this to raise money. If you got this sent to you by the Labour Party

:54:13.:54:16.

mailing list, you would get things sane would like to donate ?5? That's

:54:17.:54:21.

the way Barack Obama raced his money. -- raised his money. At the

:54:22.:54:29.

moment, the law does not allow you to place a party political advert in

:54:30.:54:34.

the middle of the break of Coronation Street. If I watch

:54:35.:54:39.

Coronation Street on ITV player, can I place the ad in the middle of

:54:40.:54:43.

that? There's absolutely nothing to stop you buying it and putting VAT

:54:44.:54:48.

advert in that slot, if you're watching it on any online catch-up

:54:49.:54:53.

service. There you go. This will change British politics.

:54:54.:54:56.

Fascinating, thank you free much. The politicians had to dig their

:54:57.:54:59.

wellies from the back of the cupboard this week as they set out

:55:00.:55:03.

to tour parts of the England and Wales hit by flooding and storms.

:55:04.:55:06.

And the political response to the weather was the main event at

:55:07.:55:09.

Westminster. Here's David with a round-up in just 60 seconds.

:55:10.:55:18.

It was raining politicians this week as they got their feet wet to show

:55:19.:55:24.

that those affected by the wild weather haven't been left high and

:55:25.:55:28.

dry. But there were some good news as David Cameron declared he'd

:55:29.:55:31.

splash the cash to help people affected with the flooding. Money is

:55:32.:55:37.

no object in this relief effort. But not so good and slightly confusing,

:55:38.:55:41.

ministers said that would be no blank cheque to deal with the

:55:42.:55:45.

fallout. Meanwhile, smoking in cars with children side may become an

:55:46.:55:49.

offence, even though Nick Clegg originally had his doubts about it.

:55:50.:55:54.

Relief for London's commuters as a threatened Tube strike was called

:55:55.:55:58.

off but Bob Crow and Boris Johnson both declared victory. And

:55:59.:56:04.

cross-party unity as George Osborne, Ed Balls and Danny Alexander all

:56:05.:56:08.

ruled out sharing the pound with an independent Scotland. SNP 's were

:56:09.:56:13.

less happy at what they described as a latest bout of bullying from the

:56:14.:56:17.

Westminster playground. Scotland Yard has confirmed that a

:56:18.:56:30.

48-year-old journalist has been interviewed under caution by

:56:31.:56:34.

detectives from operation building, the investigation into illegal

:56:35.:56:40.

interception of voice mail messages at Mirror group newspapers. The

:56:41.:56:44.

journalist in question is a former Daily Mirror editor, peers Morgan.

:56:45.:56:49.

More on that, no doubt, in the news coming up. The politics of the flood

:56:50.:56:58.

so far, politicians were slow off the ground, they usually are, they

:56:59.:57:03.

are rushing to catch up. The stakes are bigger for Mr Cameron than

:57:04.:57:06.

anybody else. So far, I would suggest terrible for the people, but

:57:07.:57:13.

not a seminal political event? Not yet, but clearly if David Cameron

:57:14.:57:17.

didn't manage to show some basic competence in this, it could stick

:57:18.:57:21.

for the rest of his parliament, so he has to show they were slow but

:57:22.:57:27.

were hoping the water would go away. Not bad so far. The floods are

:57:28.:57:36.

happening in a lot of Lib Dem and Tory areas weather will be a

:57:37.:57:40.

conflict and contest, so I'm watching whether there has been more

:57:41.:57:43.

rows within the Tories than between the Tories and Lib Dems. New Orleans

:57:44.:57:47.

on a different scale from this. It is one of the defining moments of

:57:48.:57:50.

the Bush administration, but so far, this doesn't look like a defining

:57:51.:57:55.

moment for Mr Cameron. No, I would take a punt and say it isn't going

:57:56.:57:59.

to be either full support could've gone very badly wrong. As it did for

:58:00.:58:08.

Mr Bush. I got to interrupt you. Never mind Piers Morgan. There's

:58:09.:58:13.

just time before we go to find out the answer to our quiz. The question

:58:14.:58:16.

was which cat won the Westminster Cat of the Year competition this

:58:17.:58:19.

week following allegations of vote-rigging? Was it: a) Bosun. B)

:58:20.:58:22.

Parsnip. C) Kevin. Or d) Scaredy-Cat. We have 15 seconds. Who

:58:23.:58:26.

can tell me the answer. Kevin would have my vote. Actually, you are

:58:27.:58:33.

right. It was Kevin. Owned by Bill Esterson, Labour MP for Sefton

:58:34.:58:37.

Central. That is it for today. Thanks to Bronwen, James and all my

:58:38.:58:41.

guests. I'll be back on BBC One on Sunday with the Sunday Politics.

:58:42.:58:46.

I'll be joined by the RMT union leader Bob Crow. Westminster is on a

:58:47.:58:53.

break all next week. We're not back for ten days. Bye bye.

:58:54.:58:56.

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