27/01/2016 Daily Politics


27/01/2016

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LineFromTo

Morning, folks, welcome to the Daily Politics.

:00:35.:00:38.

The Government's under fire about it's tax deal with Google.

:00:39.:00:41.

The US search engine giant has agreed to pay ?130 million in back

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tax and interest, which sounds a lot but perhaps isn't when you consider

:00:45.:00:49.

Google books several billion in British revenues every year.

:00:50.:00:54.

Italy Could be about to strike a much tougher deal even

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though Google Italy is much smaller

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You won't need a search engine to find out who'll be starring

:01:00.:01:04.

Call me Dave and Jezza face each other across the despatch

:01:05.:01:09.

Campaigners want to lower the age you can vote to 16.

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We'll be talking to one political expert who thinks it should be

:01:16.:01:20.

Why should JoCo be deprived of the vote?

:01:21.:01:28.

And have you booked your summer holiday yet?

:01:29.:01:30.

If not, how about a Brexit to Brussels?

:01:31.:01:33.

Believe it or not there's a new holiday rage for

:01:34.:01:36.

That is the kind of thing we would go on. We would be the first ones

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there. And the only ones. All that in the next hour

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and with us for the whole of the duration is the Arts

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Minister, Ed Vaizey. We have to be nice to him,

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because otherwise he'll be He is in fact the longest

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serving Arts Minister ever. And with us also, the Shadow Women's

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and Equalities Minister, We have to be nice to be her

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because otherwise it Kate's one of three Shadow Women

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and Equalities Ministers Now, since we have a Culture

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Minister with us lets talk licence fee and the over 75s,

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because the BBC is exploring plans to persuade pensioners who currently

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don't pay the licence fee Is that a good idea? It is up to the

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BBC who are now responsible for the free TV licence. I got an e-mail

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from a constituent who said they would willingly pay the licence fee.

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I have had conversations with other pensioners who said they would not.

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It is within the BBC's right now it is responsible to ask people if they

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want to make a voluntary contribution. And you would be

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comfortable with that? There is a campaign fronted by celebrities who

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want to persuade those over the age of 75 to pay. We reached an

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agreement with the BBC that they would take on the free television

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licence and if they want to ask people to make a contribution, that

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is fine. Are you worried about complaints from pensioners who feel

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they might be under pressure? No, that did not occur to me. I get a

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lot of e-mails about the BBC, people care passionately about the BBC and

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they want to have a say in it. We have had the second largest

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consultation on the BBC and this will be part of that debate. They

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care about it and many of them will be unhappy about the decision which

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is palming off welfare decision for the government and giving it to the

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BBC. It is right the BBC has wholesale responsibility for its

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financing and part of that is free TV licences for pensioners. Why

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didn't the government make that decision? We said the BBC was to

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take it on and they would be free to remove it or free to engage with

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people over the age of 75 and ask them to make a contribution. But it

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is the government that is accountable to voters. It is

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accountable to Parliament and it is also accountable to people through

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the payment of the licence fee. People have to pay it and the BBC

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has a direct relationship with the licence fee payer. Andrew quipped

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that somehow I have some say over his future, but the BBC should be

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independent of government and one of the ways that goes is by the

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financing through the licence fee rather than through general

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taxation. Which services do you think the BBC should cut to fund

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this? Minister should not tell the BBC what services to cut. But this

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decision has been foisted on the BBC. It should decide which ones it

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wants to maintain and which ones are the most effective. It moved BBC

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Three online and the justification for that was that more and more

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people are going online to view. Let's get ahead of the curve and

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have a well-established brand we moved online which is aimed at

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younger viewers and learn lessons about engaging with people online.

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Did you support that initial decision and agreement as Ed Vaizey

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calls it between the BBC and the government for the BBC to fund the

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over 75 is? It is important to recognise the BBC is a public

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service broadcaster and we have to make sure it is on a sustainable,

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financial footing and that is a government responsibility. We all

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rely on the BBC is independent, impartial and informative. As far as

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this initiative for the over 75s is concerned, it might be quite

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bureaucratic to implement and the gains might be marginal, but this is

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my concern about the transferring of the funding onto the BBC and they

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have to find money somewhere, if this starts to exclude marginalise

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pensioners. Many of them find the television a lifeline, they cannot

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get out of the House, they need the BBC and we need to be careful about

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the impact of these changes. A campaign by celebrities to persuade

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pensioners, do you think that would be seen by somebody is bullying? I

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hope it would not be seen as bullying and I hope nobody would be

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offended when I say that some pensioners could be confused, they

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might not get the message clearly, they might not understand it is

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voluntary, they do not have to make a contribution. I am concerned and I

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understand why the BBC are looking at every single possibility to raise

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money, but this could impact on vulnerable people.

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What about other pensioner benefits? In the run-up to the election Labour

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said they would be reviewing pension benefits that were given right

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across the board. Should it be looked at again? If I am on this, we

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were not very great about pensioner lifestyles, we were miserable

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leading up to the election. People in their 60s and 70s are living a

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very different life. Should they still get those benefits? It is

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important we should review the way benefits are structured for older

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people, how we should support people who carry on working in their 60s

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and 70s, to gain from their employment, and to make sure they

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get income for retirement. We have to make sure that those who are

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finding it most difficult to save for retirement are properly

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protected. I am in favour of a full review. We are four and half years

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away from an election, let's use that time to get it right.

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Now, it's coming up to the end of January and the spectre

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of the looming tax return is weighing heavily upon many of us.

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Working out tax is such a tiresome affair.

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It's happy days, however, for Google, who have come to a deal

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with Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs to pay ?130 million

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Let's talk to our political correspondent Vicky Young

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The Chancellor began by hailing this deal is a major success, but now it

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looks like they are on the back foot. If Jeremy Corbyn tries to

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tackle the Prime Minister on this he will be desperate to get David

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Cameron to repeat that phrase, is it a major success? Do they believe it

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is? Labour are trying to pin this on ministers. They are saying there

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should be no such thing as mates' rates for big companies. Labour are

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asking all sorts of questions about what meetings the government and

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Google had. The bottom line is we do not know much about the deal. It is

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HMRC that deals with all of this and it is by its nature very secret, so

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it is hard to establish what rate they might be paying and how they

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came to this deal. The politicians might shout about it on both sides

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of the House, but isn't it the case that this is a done deal? HMRC has

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done a deal with Google and they have signed a clause and it cannot

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be changed unless they find that Google has broken the law. 130

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million, job done. That is right, and we heard from Boris Johnson who

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said that although it is not much money, they have done nothing wrong

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and it is the law that needs to change. George Osborne will say he

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has brought in a new tax on diverted profits and is trying to tackle all

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of this. What would look bad would be if Italy and France got more

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money out of Google, that with then make the HMRC here look pretty bad.

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But it is the corporation tax, the system that the UK has and the

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Treasury Select Committee has said it will look into all of that and

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the chairman is saying the UK tax laws are to old. The Chancellor said

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it was a success, and Boris Johnson said it was derisory. Who is right?

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HMRC conducted a tax audit with Google dating back to 2005. What is

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right is the Chancellor has introduced the diverted profits tax

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which means going forward Google will pay tax on profits are

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generated in the UK in a proper way. The diverted profits tax is

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something other countries have started to copy. The point about

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France and Italy is well made in that there is not a developed

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country that is not wrestling with these digital companies that have a

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global presence. The UK has taken the lead in the OECD saying we have

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to sort this out. But is not right that under this deal, up until now,

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Google will not pay the diverted profits tax? It has just come in.

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The future? So any profits that have been diverted are not covered by

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this deal? Going forward it will pay it and under this audit by HMRC we

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have seen ten years back tax being paid. Is it all back tax or is it

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interest? Are there penalties? This is a confidential agreement in the

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sense that companies reach agreement with HMRC about the right level of

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tax they should pay and they reach it on the basis of commercial

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reasons. If it included penalties, the amount of tax would go up

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hugely? You can argue the granular point. But HMRC has gone through a

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very... I am arguing it. Everyone will have a view on what Google

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should pay fairly. What I should say is the process is right. It should

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not be for ministers to say what a company should pay. It is HMRC

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conducting an audit, going through the books and reaching an agreement.

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When you reach an agreement, there may be issues to do with interest

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and penalties and there will be calculations about if this came to

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court and the expense and time involved. All sorts of issues. I

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understand that. Would it be a major success if it turns out that France

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and Italy, where Google is much smaller, a quarter of what it is

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here, ended up getting a lot more money out of them? I will not

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speculate on what France and Italy will get. People are talking as if

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the Italians have secured a fantastic settlement. No, they have

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not, but they are quite far down the road. We have an agreement with

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Google to pay taxes, we have a diverted profits tax that people are

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copying and we have taken the lead in international forums saying we

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need changes in the international tax laws to cope with companies who

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are able to move quite freely around the globe. In 2014, Google's

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revenues out of the UK were almost ?5 billion. This is separate from

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the deal. It paid 30 million in corporation tax. 5 billion in

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revenues, 30 million in corporation tax. Is that a success? Those of you

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watching the news will have seen HMRC explaining some of the

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calculations made effectively to criticise the settlement and not

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based on an accurate understanding of tax laws. The National tax law is

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even more complicated. I am confident HMRC went through a very

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thorough investigation. It is an independent process. I am not sure

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that it is fair that a company makes revenues of almost 5 billion in

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Britain pays only 30 million in tax. We want companies to pay their fair

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share of tax. The Chancellor was criticised in some international

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forums where they said he was messing with international tax

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treaties, but he went ahead with it because he thinks it is the right

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thing to do and that is being copied by other countries around the world.

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Google will pay its fair share of tax going forward and we are in the

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lead in international forums. Out of 5 billion, the Exchequer got

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30 million. Is that fair? Google's European tax -- headquarters are in

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Ireland with a low level of corporation tax. In Australia,

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Google's Asian headquarters is in Singapore. We are getting into lots

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of detail. I am not privy to it all. But we know that Google... Let me

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ask you. Has this agreement with HM RC, as it established that Google

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now has a permanent establishment in Britain? That is a very technical

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point. That was presumably part of the debate about whether Google is

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paying its fair share of tax. Does it doesn't it... You can ask the HM

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RC on what basis... You visited the headquarters. We have a picture.

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This is the new headquarters, because their existing one isn't big

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enough. This is the proposed headquarters in King's 5000 people.

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The one they have at the moment is split between two sites. -- proposed

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headquarters in King's Cross. Is it not incredible but anybody planning

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to build a bigger headquarters cannot for tax purposes have a

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permanent establishment? I went to visit what is known as the Google

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campus because I was supporting an organisation which supports... Did

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it look permanent? Was it a pop-up headquarters? An organisation called

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creative England which does a lot of work supporting our fantastically

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successful creative industries around the UK. You are asking me a

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technical point. It doesn't look that technical. It looks like a

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massive headquarters. HM RC have conducted an extensive audit. There

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is a new tax regime, which was controversial with some companies

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and in some international forums, but the Chancellor went ahead

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because he recognises that the company -- public want to see

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companies like this paying their tax. The fact is that, since 2005,

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Google has been following the principles of how you measure

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taxable profits that it agreed with the last Labour government. So, if

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Google isn't paying enough tax, it is as much Labour's fault. As I

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understand, the first questions were asked in 2000 and Margaret Hodge,

:18:10.:18:13.

the Labour chair of the Public Accounts Committee in the last

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Parliament, really took up the mantle. She isn't in government. The

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principles that Google followed in paying tax worth agreed by the last

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Labour government. You made the wrong agreement. A lot of time has

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passed since 2009 and, while I welcome steps to toughen up and

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agreed internationally a more robust tax regime, we have to recognise

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that circumstances and learning and understanding of Google's

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operations, it was quite a new company in 2000. Did you make a

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mistake? I have no idea whether that tax regime was appropriate at the

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time. I think we can all agree it is not appropriate now. It was a tax

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regime agreed by the last Labour government which allowed Facebook, a

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multi-billion dollar corporation, to pay corporation tax of ?4000 in

:19:10.:19:16.

2011. It is derisory. Nobody could defend that. What is really

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important, having obviously set up the tax regime that haven't

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understood at the time the way in which some of these international

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online, really without much in the way of material, I think perhaps

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none of us, accountants, tax people, the Treasury, governments, perhaps

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didn't understand, and perhaps the companies themselves didn't fully,

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how they would knit to the tax regimes. What I think is important

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now is that there is credibility in the tax system. As a taxpayer, my

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constituents feel that this is really pretty insulting. We pay our

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taxes. Our small businesses pay taxes. Ballet companies pay taxes.

:19:57.:20:00.

They look at this and they think it is a deal for the rich. -- family

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companies. What would you do differently? We need to be sharper

:20:08.:20:15.

about getting the right deals. HM RC uses its top experts... Perhaps it

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needs to invest more in its expertise. We have lost substantial

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numbers of experts in HMS seed and we don't have any transparency. --

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HM RC. The government is hotly defending the privacy of Google's

:20:31.:20:34.

tax affairs, but it has to be balanced with public belief. You

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allowed a double Irish and a Dutch sandwich. Can you still do that? I

:20:41.:20:45.

think we got rid of the double Irish. I don't know if we have the

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Dutch sandwich. I was taught the other day that the human brain can

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accommodate 4.7 billion books but I can't accommodate whether we have

:20:55.:20:57.

the double Dutch sandwich. I think we have raised hundreds billion

:20:58.:21:05.

pounds in tax, backdated tax, thanks to the experts in HMRC.

:21:06.:21:08.

The so-called bedroom tax has been declared discriminatory by Court

:21:09.:21:10.

of Appeal judges, following a legal challenge by a domestic violence

:21:11.:21:13.

victim and the family of a disabled teenager.

:21:14.:21:15.

They had argued that the spare room subsidy,

:21:16.:21:17.

which reduces housing benefit for social housing tenants

:21:18.:21:18.

with a "spare" bedroom, is discriminatory.

:21:19.:21:21.

The Government says it's to appeal against the decision.

:21:22.:21:28.

Do you back the government decision to appeal this? As a member of the

:21:29.:21:35.

government, I obviously backed the government decision. I haven't seen

:21:36.:21:39.

the judgment so I don't know on what basis it was made and how it was

:21:40.:21:43.

found to be discriminatory, but clearly Iain Duncan Smith and his

:21:44.:21:46.

team and the government as a whole doesn't agree with this judgment. It

:21:47.:21:52.

is within its rights to appeal. Why? We are talking about two but

:21:53.:21:56.

vulnerable -- two small but vulnerable groups, disabled children

:21:57.:22:02.

who need an overnight room to state and victims of domestic violence who

:22:03.:22:05.

need a safe sanctuary. We are talking about thousands in the

:22:06.:22:10.

former, 300 in the latter. Could they not be an exception? There are

:22:11.:22:17.

a range of exceptions... But not for these people. There are exceptions

:22:18.:22:23.

for vulnerable children... There is not an exemption for disabled

:22:24.:22:28.

children who need an overnight carer. You are saying it is still

:22:29.:22:34.

fair to make them pay. I haven't seen the details of the judgment and

:22:35.:22:37.

I don't know on what basis this was taken to court or on what basis the

:22:38.:22:41.

Court of Appeal made its judgment. I am used to reading judgments in

:22:42.:22:48.

areas I am responsible for the. There may be issues in the judgment

:22:49.:22:52.

to do with process, in terms of how it was introduced, which the

:22:53.:22:55.

government may have to look at. The government has made a firm statement

:22:56.:22:59.

early on that it doesn't agree with this judgment and it wants to appeal

:23:00.:23:03.

and it clearly thinks it has grounds. How do you think it looks

:23:04.:23:06.

to the public when the government said it wants to protect the most

:23:07.:23:10.

vulnerable and people would judge that these two groups are among the

:23:11.:23:14.

most vulnerable, and yet they cannot be exempted from this paying off a

:23:15.:23:20.

spare room subsidy or a bedroom tax, whatever you want to pay it, because

:23:21.:23:24.

the government thinks it has to fit in to its broad range of welfare

:23:25.:23:29.

plans? What the government is doing, which I think has overwhelming

:23:30.:23:34.

support, is to reform welfare. That is in terms of capping the amount of

:23:35.:23:38.

benefits which people get, and I think there was support for the

:23:39.:23:43.

spare room subsidy... But these groups... There something like

:23:44.:23:48.

400,000 homes which under occupied. We want to have a system, and people

:23:49.:23:53.

have looked at under occupancy for many years, we ought a system which

:23:54.:23:56.

encourages people who are under occupied their house to look for

:23:57.:24:04.

other accommodation. I can't comment on the specific details of the case.

:24:05.:24:08.

I haven't seen the judgment. I assume the government are appealing

:24:09.:24:10.

because they think they are right to appeal.

:24:11.:24:11.

Now, the Justice Secretary, Michael Gove, told the House

:24:12.:24:14.

of Commons yesterday that, contrary to reports,

:24:15.:24:15.

he has not become, quote, "a sandal-wearing,

:24:16.:24:17.

I'm glad he felt the need to clear that up.

:24:18.:24:28.

He was responding to a question from Conservative backbencher

:24:29.:24:30.

Phillip Davies, a man who, I think it is fair to say,

:24:31.:24:34.

is not known for wearing sandals nor munching muesli.

:24:35.:24:39.

But, here at the Daily Politics, it got us thinking.

:24:40.:24:42.

We don't care if you've swapped your shiny brogues for

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Or if you've ditched the full English for a healthier alternative.

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Or, indeed, if you've swapped your fully caffeinated

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We believe that it's not what you drink, it's

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Yes, what better way to sip your organic dandelion tea

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But whether you're vegan or not you'll have to enter our Guess

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the Year competition to get your hands on one.

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We'll remind you how to enter in just a minute but,

:25:15.:25:16.

first, do you know when this happened?

:25:17.:25:23.

So far, 11 MPs, both Labour and Tory, have stood down or been

:25:24.:25:27.

forced out because of the expenses saga.

:25:28.:25:29.

# Is falling down on all that I've ever known...#

:25:30.:25:37.

# I don't know what's right and what's real anymore

:25:38.:25:43.

# And I don't know how I'm meant to feel any more...#

:25:44.:25:52.

# When there's no one left to fight

:25:53.:25:54.

# Boys like him don't shine so bright

:25:55.:25:55.

# He's out on the town tryin' to find trouble...#

:25:56.:26:01.

Indigenous British, the people who have been here...

:26:02.:26:04.

# When life is a bitter pill to swallow

:26:05.:26:15.

# You gotta hold on to what you believe...#

:26:16.:26:22.

# We gotta fight fight fight fight fight for this love

:26:23.:26:43.

# We gotta fight fight fight fight fight for this love...#

:26:44.:26:48.

To be in with a chance of winning a Daily Politics mug,

:26:49.:26:51.

send your answer to our special quiz email address, [email protected]

:26:52.:26:55.

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:26:56.:26:58.

and conditions on our website, bbc.co.uk/dailypolitics.

:26:59.:27:05.

Just take a look at Big Ben, and that can

:27:06.:27:09.

Yes, Prime Minister's Questions is on its way.

:27:10.:27:14.

What is likely to dominate the front bench exchanges? I think there is a

:27:15.:27:27.

nice big parcel of a gift which George Osborne tied up with a big

:27:28.:27:33.

fat ribbon at the end of Davos, especially for John McDonnell and

:27:34.:27:36.

Jeremy Corbyn today, this deal with Google, which he tried to claim as a

:27:37.:27:42.

victory. It was an HM RC deal. By George Osborne claiming a victory,

:27:43.:27:46.

he put himself in the story and then, over the coming days, as

:27:47.:27:50.

politicians in all parties and the public looked more closely at the

:27:51.:27:55.

scale of the deal, ?5 billion in revenues and ?130 million in back

:27:56.:27:59.

taxes, there is a question about the smell tax and I think it is

:28:00.:28:02.

inevitable Labour will raise it. They think they are onto something

:28:03.:28:06.

and they will push it and push it began as a campaign. I understand

:28:07.:28:12.

later that a letter will go to the government calling on the National

:28:13.:28:16.

Audit Office to investigate. Europe is increasingly moving up the

:28:17.:28:19.

agenda. What do you hear on the latest that the government hoped for

:28:20.:28:23.

the timetable to get it in by the end of June but might not? The 23rd

:28:24.:28:28.

of June is the date to pencil into your diaries for people who are sad

:28:29.:28:34.

enough! It would be wise to have an eraser ready to take it out. The

:28:35.:28:38.

stumbling block, as we have known for some time in these negotiations,

:28:39.:28:42.

is the question of getting an agreement which looks anything like

:28:43.:28:46.

the Prime Minister's promised to ban benefits for EU workers in the UK

:28:47.:28:50.

for four years. In the other parts of the renegotiation, there is a way

:28:51.:28:54.

through, no final agreements. Officials this week are frantically

:28:55.:28:59.

going backwards and forwards between Brussels and London trying to find a

:29:00.:29:03.

way through on welfare. If that can be done, and there is a belief in

:29:04.:29:07.

government that it can indeed be done, because nobody wants to talk

:29:08.:29:11.

about this around the EU for any longer than necessary. They have

:29:12.:29:16.

bigger fish to fry. There is no guarantee will that, if you keep

:29:17.:29:20.

going on and on, that you end up with a bit agreement. The government

:29:21.:29:24.

is hopeful, it is possible, but they have been very careful in the last

:29:25.:29:29.

seven days to row back from what is the beginning of the year was

:29:30.:29:32.

probably public overconfidence, things like the Chancellor saying it

:29:33.:29:37.

was falling into place. They will still need to get it through

:29:38.:29:41.

Parliament. If Labour was to vote against it in June, and the Scottish

:29:42.:29:47.

Nationalists don't want the end of June, and the number of Eurosceptics

:29:48.:29:50.

peeled off, because they believe that the longer they wait for the

:29:51.:29:53.

referendum the better their chance of winning, they might not get it

:29:54.:29:59.

through for June. This sounds like all of us obsessing about ridiculous

:30:00.:30:03.

process but it matters enormously. There is a lot of chatter about this

:30:04.:30:07.

in the corridors of the House of Commons. If Labour could be

:30:08.:30:11.

persuaded or see it in their interests to give the government

:30:12.:30:15.

maximum embarrassment on this, to go alongside the Scottish Nationalists,

:30:16.:30:19.

and there is concern in Northern Ireland and Wales also about this

:30:20.:30:23.

timetable, because of the elections, if they could be persuaded it would

:30:24.:30:28.

be fun and larks to embarrass the government on the timetable, they

:30:29.:30:31.

could do it. Will Labour vote for the end of June as a referendum

:30:32.:30:37.

date? The longer we are in an uncertain situation, the worst that

:30:38.:30:41.

is for the UK economy, so I don't think it is about fun and games. I

:30:42.:30:45.

think it is about what is in the interests of the country. That is

:30:46.:30:49.

what we will have to discuss. I want to see what the deal is. But you

:30:50.:30:55.

would have a preference for sooner? I think a protracted campaign is bad

:30:56.:31:01.

for the UK and the business. That is the view among the majority of the

:31:02.:31:05.

PLP. I think Alan Johnson would be very unhappy about the delay. There

:31:06.:31:08.

are people nibbling around the edges of this. We have got the ballot

:31:09.:31:15.

paper. This is what we will get to vote, whatever the date is. I have

:31:16.:31:25.

got one for Ed Vaizey. Fill it in. But the deal hasn't come back! This

:31:26.:31:32.

is like a secret ballot, dear Ron The Daily Politics. We won't tell a

:31:33.:31:39.

soul. -- here on The Daily Politics. What have you voted? You are not

:31:40.:31:47.

going to wait for the deal to come back. You have both voted to remain.

:31:48.:31:55.

That is because my unswerving confidence in the Prime Minister and

:31:56.:31:57.

the fantastic deal he will bring back. David Cameron always wanted to

:31:58.:32:04.

maintain public opinion but there was a chance he might change his

:32:05.:32:08.

mind at the last minute. Can we believe that given that, day after

:32:09.:32:12.

day, he is sending more and more, close to saying... He can't wait to

:32:13.:32:19.

come out and start campaigning to stay in. He just wants to get on

:32:20.:32:25.

with it. He will take a very personal, forward, leading role in

:32:26.:32:31.

the campaign. While the other side is under continued question about

:32:32.:32:33.

how they would have as their leader, if indeed there is one leader, I

:32:34.:32:40.

think it is clear that the leader of the end campaign will be the Prime

:32:41.:32:44.

Minister. This is why there is that, what sounds like process but is

:32:45.:32:48.

rather important, but this spat about the timing.

:32:49.:32:51.

Let's see if Europe comes up. It is right our whole country should

:32:52.:33:07.

stand together to remember the darkest hour of our country. Last

:33:08.:33:14.

year, I said we would build a national memorial in London to show

:33:15.:33:18.

the importance Britain places on sharing the memory of the Holocaust.

:33:19.:33:24.

This will be built in Victoria Tower Gardens and will stand beside

:33:25.:33:26.

Parliament as a permanent statement of our values and will be somewhere

:33:27.:33:30.

for children to visit for generations to come. I am grateful

:33:31.:33:35.

to all those who have made this possible. This morning I had

:33:36.:33:40.

meetings with ministerial colleagues and others and in addition to my

:33:41.:33:43.

duties in this house I shall have further such meetings later today. I

:33:44.:33:51.

echo the Prime Minister's sentiments regarding Holocaust Memorial Day. We

:33:52.:33:55.

must never forget. The North Sea or an industry on which many people in

:33:56.:34:02.

my constituency are dependent for their livelihoods is facing very

:34:03.:34:05.

serious challenges at the current time. The government has taken steps

:34:06.:34:12.

to address the situation, but more is required if the industry is to

:34:13.:34:19.

survive and thrive. Will my right honourable friend assuming that he

:34:20.:34:22.

recognises the seriousness of the situation and he will do all he can

:34:23.:34:26.

to get the industry through these very difficult times? My honourable

:34:27.:34:33.

friend is right to raise this, I recognise the seriousness of the

:34:34.:34:37.

situation. The oil price decline is the longest in 20 years and this

:34:38.:34:41.

causes difficulties for the North Sea and we can see the effects in

:34:42.:34:47.

the east of England, in Scotland, particularly Aberdeen. I am

:34:48.:34:50.

determined we build a bridge to the future for all those involved in the

:34:51.:34:59.

North Sea. We will help the world-class sector export expertise.

:35:00.:35:03.

We announced 1.3 billion of support last year and we are implementing a

:35:04.:35:07.

review and I will be going to Aberdeen tomorrow where we will be

:35:08.:35:11.

saying more about what we can do to help this vital industry at this

:35:12.:35:17.

vital time. Jeremy Corbyn. Thank you, Mr Speaker. On behalf of the

:35:18.:35:23.

opposition, could I welcome the remarks the Prime Minister has just

:35:24.:35:28.

made about Holocaust Memorial Day. It is the 71st anniversary of the

:35:29.:35:34.

liberation of Auschwitz and we have to remember the deepest, darkest

:35:35.:35:38.

days of inhumanity that happened then and genocides that have

:35:39.:35:42.

happened since and educate another generation to avoid those for all

:35:43.:35:46.

time in the future. I thank the Prime Minister for what he said.

:35:47.:35:51.

Independent experts have suggested that Google is paying an effective

:35:52.:35:57.

tax rate on its UK profits of around 3%. Does the Prime Minister dispute

:35:58.:36:04.

that figure? Let's be clear what we are talking about. We are talking

:36:05.:36:09.

about tax that should have been collected under a Labour government,

:36:10.:36:11.

raised by a collected under a Labour government,

:36:12.:36:16.

I do dispute the figures he gives. It is quite rightly that this is

:36:17.:36:21.

done independently by HMRC, but I am absolutely clear that no government

:36:22.:36:26.

has done more than this one to crack down on tax evasion and aggressive

:36:27.:36:31.

tax avoidance. No government, and certainly not the last Labour

:36:32.:36:37.

government. Mr Speaker, my question actually was if the Prime Minister

:36:38.:36:42.

thinks an effective tax rate of 3% is right or wrong? He did not answer

:36:43.:36:48.

it. The Chancellor of the Exchequer described this arrangement as a

:36:49.:36:53.

major success, while the Prime Minister's official spokesperson

:36:54.:36:58.

only called it a step forward. The Mayor of London described the

:36:59.:37:04.

payment is quite derisory. What exactly is the government's position

:37:05.:37:11.

on this 3% rate of taxation? We have put in place a diverted profits tax

:37:12.:37:15.

which means this company and others will pay more tax in future. More

:37:16.:37:21.

tax in future than they ever paid under Labour were the tax rate for

:37:22.:37:27.

Google was 0%. That is what it means. Let me tell him what we have

:37:28.:37:31.

done. We have changed the tax law so many times that we have raised an

:37:32.:37:37.

extra 100 billion from business in the last parliament. When I came to

:37:38.:37:40.

power banks did not pay tax on all their profits, allowed under Labour,

:37:41.:37:46.

stopped under the Tories. Companies could cut their tax bill, allowed

:37:47.:37:52.

under Labour, stopped under the Tories. Companies could figure

:37:53.:37:57.

accounting rules, allowed under Labour and stopped under the Tories.

:37:58.:38:02.

We have done more on tax evasion and tax avoidance and Labour ever did.

:38:03.:38:07.

They are running to catch up, but they have not got a leg to stand on.

:38:08.:38:14.

Mr Speaker, it was under a Labour government that the inquiry began

:38:15.:38:21.

into Google and in addition as a percentage of GDP corporation tax

:38:22.:38:27.

receipts are lower under this government than they were under

:38:28.:38:32.

previous governments. I have got a question here, Mr Speaker, from a

:38:33.:38:38.

gentleman called Jeff. You might well laugh, but Jeff actually speaks

:38:39.:38:46.

for millions of people when he says to me... Can you ask the Prime

:38:47.:38:55.

Minister is as a working man of over 30 years whether there is a scheme

:38:56.:38:59.

that I can join that pays the same rate of tax as Google and other

:39:00.:39:04.

large corporations? What does the Prime Minister say to Jeff? What I

:39:05.:39:10.

say to Jeff is that his taxes are coming down under this government

:39:11.:39:14.

and Google's taxes are going up under this government. Let me say

:39:15.:39:20.

something, something he just said was factually inaccurate. He says

:39:21.:39:24.

corporation tax receipts have gone down, they have gone up by 20% under

:39:25.:39:29.

this government because we have got a strong economy with businesses

:39:30.:39:33.

making money, employing people and paying taxes into the exchequer. If

:39:34.:39:38.

like me he is genuinely angry about what happened to Google under

:39:39.:39:43.

Labour, maybe he should start by calling Tony Blair. You can get him

:39:44.:39:50.

and JP Morgan. Call Gordon Brown, you can get him at a Californian

:39:51.:39:55.

bond dealer. Alistair Darling is at Morgan Stanley. There is other

:39:56.:39:59.

people to blame for Google not paying their taxes. We are the ones

:40:00.:40:10.

who got them to pay. The problem is, Mr Speaker, that the Prime Minister

:40:11.:40:16.

is responsible for government and therefore is responsible for tax

:40:17.:40:22.

collection. Mr Speaker, Google made profits of ?6 billion in the UK

:40:23.:40:33.

between 2005 and 2015 and is paying 130 million pounds in tax for the

:40:34.:40:36.

whole of that decade. Millions of people this week I'm filling in

:40:37.:40:44.

their tax returns to get them in by the 31st. They have to send the form

:40:45.:40:50.

back, they do not get the option of 25 meetings with 17 ministers to

:40:51.:40:57.

decide what their rate of tax is. Many people going to their HMRC

:40:58.:41:00.

offices or returning them online this week will say this, why is

:41:01.:41:07.

there one rule for big multinational companies and another for ordinary,

:41:08.:41:10.

small businesses and self-employed workers? All those people filling in

:41:11.:41:16.

their tax returns will be paying lower taxes under this government. I

:41:17.:41:23.

have to say, he can if he wants criticise HMRC, but their work is

:41:24.:41:27.

investigated by the National Audit Office and when they did that

:41:28.:41:30.

they've found the settlements they reached with companies are fair.

:41:31.:41:36.

That is how it works. The Shadow Chancellor is pointing. The idea

:41:37.:41:40.

that those two right honourable gentleman would stand up to anyone

:41:41.:41:45.

in this regard is laughable. This week they met with the unions and

:41:46.:41:50.

they gave them flying pickets. They met with the Argentinians and they

:41:51.:41:54.

gave them the Falkland islands. They met with a bunch of migrants in

:41:55.:41:58.

Calais and said they could come to Britain. They never stand up for the

:41:59.:42:02.

hard-working British people and British taxpayers. Mr Speaker, we

:42:03.:42:17.

have had no answers on Google, we have had no answers on Jeff, can I

:42:18.:42:26.

raise with him another unfair tax policy that does it affect many

:42:27.:42:30.

people in this country? This morning, the Court of Appeal ruled

:42:31.:42:34.

that the bedroom tax is discriminatory because of its

:42:35.:42:41.

impact... I do not know why members opposite find this funny because it

:42:42.:42:45.

is not for those who have to pay it. The ruling is because of its impact

:42:46.:42:53.

on vulnerable people, including victims of domestic violence and

:42:54.:42:57.

disabled children. Will the Prime Minister now read the judgment and

:42:58.:43:01.

finally abandon this cruel and unjust policy which has now been

:43:02.:43:07.

ruled to be illegal? We always look very carefully at judgment on these

:43:08.:43:11.

occasions, but our fundamental position is that it is unfair to

:43:12.:43:16.

subsidise their rooms in the social sector if you do not subsidise them

:43:17.:43:21.

in the private sector where people are paying housing benefit. That is

:43:22.:43:26.

a basic issue of fairness. It is interesting that the first played he

:43:27.:43:29.

makes is something that could cost as much as ?2.5 billion in the next

:43:30.:43:36.

Parliament. Who will pay for that? Jeff will pay for it. People handing

:43:37.:43:41.

in their tax returns will pay for it. Why is it he wants to see more

:43:42.:43:47.

welfare, higher taxes, more borrowing, all the things that got

:43:48.:43:51.

us into the mess in the first place? We have not had any answers on

:43:52.:43:58.

Google or the bedroom tax. I ask the Prime Minister this, shortly before

:43:59.:44:02.

coming into the chamber I became aware of the final report of the

:44:03.:44:06.

United Nations panel of experts on Yemen which has been sent to the

:44:07.:44:09.

government and it makes disturbing reading. It says, I quote, it has

:44:10.:44:16.

documented that coalition forces have conducted air strikes,

:44:17.:44:21.

targeting civilians and civilian objects in violation of

:44:22.:44:24.

international humanitarian law, including cabs for internally

:44:25.:44:28.

displaced persons, civilian residential areas, medical

:44:29.:44:31.

facilities, schools and mosques. This is a disturbing report. Will

:44:32.:44:37.

the Prime Minister launched immediately and inquiry and a full

:44:38.:44:42.

review into the arms export licences to Saudi Arabia and suspend those

:44:43.:44:45.

arms sales until that review has been concluded? We have the

:44:46.:44:52.

strictest rules for arms exports of almost any country anywhere in the

:44:53.:44:57.

world. We are not a member of the Saudi led coalition. We are not

:44:58.:45:02.

involved in their operations, British personnel are not involved

:45:03.:45:06.

in carrying out strikes. I will look at this report as I looked at all

:45:07.:45:11.

other reports, but arms exports are carefully controlled and we are

:45:12.:45:15.

backing the legitimate government of the Yemen not least because

:45:16.:45:18.

terrorist attacks planned in the Yemen would have a direct effect on

:45:19.:45:23.

people in our country. I refuse to run a foreign policy by press

:45:24.:45:27.

release, which is what he wants, I want one in the interests of the

:45:28.:45:29.

British people. The explosion of spurious legal

:45:30.:45:40.

claims against British troops including those pursued by a law

:45:41.:45:45.

firm who has contributed tens of thousands of pounds to the Shadow

:45:46.:45:49.

Defence Secretary, undermine the ability of our Armed Forces to do

:45:50.:45:52.

their job. Will the Prime Minister join me in repudiating the disdain

:45:53.:45:57.

this shows that our brave service women and men? I absolutely agree

:45:58.:46:05.

with my honourable friend. We hold our service personnel to the highest

:46:06.:46:09.

standards, and that is right, but it is quite clear there is now an

:46:10.:46:14.

industry trying to profit by spurious claims. I am determined to

:46:15.:46:18.

do everything we can to close this bogus industry down and we should

:46:19.:46:22.

start by making clear we will take action against any legal firm we

:46:23.:46:27.

fight to abuse the system to pursue is fabricated claims. That is

:46:28.:46:34.

absolutely not acceptable. May I begin by associating the Scottish

:46:35.:46:37.

national party with the comments of the Prime Minister in reference to

:46:38.:46:41.

the Holocaust Memorial Day, and I commend governments across the UK

:46:42.:46:45.

for supporting the Holocaust commemoration trust. Does the prime

:46:46.:46:49.

ministers agreed that there is no justification for discrimination or

:46:50.:46:52.

and fairness towards women in the private sector, public sector or by

:46:53.:47:00.

government? Let me welcome what the right honourable gentleman says

:47:01.:47:03.

about the Holocaust educational trust. I remember as a new

:47:04.:47:07.

constituency MP meeting them and seeing the work they were doing in

:47:08.:47:11.

my constituency. They work hard around the clock. This day is

:47:12.:47:15.

particularly important for them. I would urge colleagues who haven't

:47:16.:47:18.

visited Auschwitz, it is something you will never forget, no matter

:47:19.:47:22.

what you have read or films you have seen or books you have read, there

:47:23.:47:26.

is nothing like seeing for yourself. In terms of wanting to end

:47:27.:47:30.

discrimination against women in the public sector, private sector, and

:47:31.:47:35.

in politics, absolutely. I welcome what the Prime Minister has to say

:47:36.:47:42.

on both accounts. He is aware of the state pension inequality which is

:47:43.:47:46.

impacting on many women and that this parliament voted unanimously

:47:47.:47:51.

for the government to immediately introduce transitional arrangements

:47:52.:47:54.

for those women negatively affected by pension equalisation. What is the

:47:55.:48:00.

Prime Minister going to do to respect the decision of this

:48:01.:48:03.

parliament and help those women who are affected, those born in the

:48:04.:48:08.

1950s, who should have had proper notice to plan their finances and

:48:09.:48:14.

retirement? First of all, the equalisation of the retirement age

:48:15.:48:17.

came about on the basis of equality, which was a judgment by the European

:48:18.:48:22.

court that we put in place in the 90s. When this government decided,

:48:23.:48:27.

rightly in my view, to raise the retirement age, we made the decision

:48:28.:48:31.

that nobody should suffer a greater than 18 month increase in their

:48:32.:48:34.

retirement age, and that is the decision this else took. In terms of

:48:35.:48:39.

ending discrimination in the system, I would say that the introduction of

:48:40.:48:45.

the single tier pension, at ?165 a week, is one of the best ways we can

:48:46.:48:49.

end discrimination because so many who are retiring will get much more

:48:50.:48:54.

under this pension which, under this government, is triple lock

:48:55.:48:56.

protected, so they will get inflation earnings or 2.5% and never

:48:57.:49:06.

again a derisory increase. Our prisons could still beat centres of

:49:07.:49:10.

radicalisation. We'll be Prime Minister look at all measures

:49:11.:49:13.

including those from the all-party report on preventing young people,

:49:14.:49:18.

troubled young people, from falling into the jaws of these dangerous,

:49:19.:49:24.

screwed up, predatory extremists? It is very disturbing that, when people

:49:25.:49:29.

are in our care, when the state is looking after them, that, on

:49:30.:49:32.

occasion, they have been radicalised because of what they have erred in

:49:33.:49:36.

prison, either from other prisoners or perhaps, on occasion, from

:49:37.:49:42.

visiting imams. We need to sort the situation out. The Justice Secretary

:49:43.:49:47.

has put in place a review. I will look carefully at her report. We

:49:48.:49:53.

must look at making sure that prisoners and the radicalise rather

:49:54.:49:58.

than made worse. Since the Chancellor took control of the

:49:59.:50:02.

public purse, he has utterly failed to get the deficit under control,

:50:03.:50:07.

and to date this year he has borrowed over ?74 billion to plug

:50:08.:50:11.

the gap or, to use the vernacular that his party is bond, for a

:50:12.:50:18.

hypothetical independent Scotland, a monumental black hole in his books.

:50:19.:50:26.

Is he now likely to reach the target by the year of something in the

:50:27.:50:30.

region of ?9 billion? Will the Prime Minister finally concede...

:50:31.:50:37.

SHOUTING I don't wish to be an guide to the

:50:38.:50:41.

honourable lady, but I think we have got the gist.

:50:42.:50:46.

SHOUTING That was a polite way of saying that

:50:47.:50:52.

the honourable lady had concluded. I would say that the Chancellor and

:50:53.:50:55.

the economic strategy this government has pursued as cut the

:50:56.:50:58.

deficit in half from the record level we inherited and soon it will

:50:59.:51:02.

be down by two thirds. We are meeting what we want to see in terms

:51:03.:51:05.

of debt falling as a share of GDP. What a contrast with a situation

:51:06.:51:11.

which Scotland would be facing if Scotland had voted for independence

:51:12.:51:14.

in just six weeks' time. We have actually seen a collapse of 94% of

:51:15.:51:21.

oil revenues. Because we have the broad shoulders of the UK, that

:51:22.:51:26.

collapsed in the oil price and the taxation won't affect people in

:51:27.:51:30.

Scotland but, at Scotland dream independent, it would be a very dark

:51:31.:51:35.

day indeed. -- had Scotland been independent. I recently helped a

:51:36.:51:41.

mental health -- mental health forum where I broad service users and

:51:42.:51:45.

commissioners together to explore how we could improve mental health

:51:46.:51:50.

services. And I welcome the Prime Minister's Wiese and announcement on

:51:51.:51:53.

increased funding for mental health services? -- recent announcement.

:51:54.:52:01.

His commitments are a clear indication of our desire to have a

:52:02.:52:03.

revolution in mental health services in Britain, and he has delivered

:52:04.:52:10.

some commitments on that. I am grateful to what my honourable

:52:11.:52:14.

friend says. There is further to go by this government is investing more

:52:15.:52:17.

in mental health, we have introduced waiting times. Young people

:52:18.:52:22.

suffering episodes of psychosis should be seen within two weeks.

:52:23.:52:27.

There is funding, parity of esteem, waiting time, but there also needs

:52:28.:52:32.

to be a bigger culture change, not just in the NHS but across the

:52:33.:52:35.

public and private sectors so mental health commissions are given the

:52:36.:52:40.

attention they deserve. From this April, a woman who works full-time

:52:41.:52:45.

stands to lose thousands of pounds in tax credits if she becomes

:52:46.:52:50.

pregnant with her first child. When will this prime ministers stop

:52:51.:52:55.

attacking working people? Forwarding like that, we are making sure that

:52:56.:52:59.

this year they can earn ?11,000 without paying any income tax. If

:53:00.:53:03.

they are on low wages, the minimum wage, they get a 7% pay increase

:53:04.:53:08.

because of the national living wage. For the first time, there will be 30

:53:09.:53:13.

hours of free childcare for those people. That is what we are doing

:53:14.:53:17.

for hard-working people. Do we need to look at reforming welfare? Yes,

:53:18.:53:22.

we do. If the honourable gentleman read the report into why his party

:53:23.:53:26.

lost the election, not the one that they published, the secret one that

:53:27.:53:31.

we read over the weekend, it is by endlessly arguing for higher and

:53:32.:53:35.

higher welfare the British public rightly concluded that, under

:53:36.:53:41.

Labour, there would be higher taxes. I warmly welcome the Prime

:53:42.:53:46.

Minister's words on creating a national memorial to the victims of

:53:47.:53:51.

the Holocaust. Tonight in Harrow, representatives of the whole

:53:52.:53:54.

community will come together to listen to be people who survived the

:53:55.:53:58.

Holocaust, because that is the only way we can really preserve their

:53:59.:54:02.

memory. My right honourable friend is rightly alluded to the wonderful

:54:03.:54:06.

work of the Holocaust educational trust in allowing literally

:54:07.:54:10.

thousands of young people to visit Auschwitz and see for themselves

:54:11.:54:15.

first-hand. Will he commit the government to continue funding the

:54:16.:54:18.

Holocaust educational trust so that many thousands more can see the

:54:19.:54:23.

horrors of the Holocaust? I certainly can make that commitment.

:54:24.:54:28.

We have funded it by over ?10 million since I became Prime

:54:29.:54:31.

Minister. It does excellent work. I think there is a real need now, as

:54:32.:54:35.

tragically the remaining Holocaust survivors are coming to the end of

:54:36.:54:39.

their lives, many of them are now speaking up in the most moving and

:54:40.:54:43.

powerful way. I will be sending some time today with some of them,

:54:44.:54:46.

recording their test dummies, which must be part of our memorial --

:54:47.:54:55.

testimonies, we must capture that for generations to come. In 2013,

:54:56.:55:04.

the energy and climate change select committee recommended extending the

:55:05.:55:07.

retention of business rates to include new build nuclear power

:55:08.:55:11.

stations. The centre for nuclear excellence is in my constituency and

:55:12.:55:17.

the new build is a vital for our economic prosperity. Given the

:55:18.:55:20.

government cuts to Cumbrian councils, does the Prime Minister

:55:21.:55:24.

agree that, if we are to truly build a northern powerhouse, our local

:55:25.:55:32.

authorities must retain all from nuclear new-build? We are committed

:55:33.:55:38.

to the new nuclear industry. We are obviously making good progress with

:55:39.:55:41.

Hinkley Point but we need to see another big station go ahead. I will

:55:42.:55:46.

look carefully at what she says about business rate retention and

:55:47.:55:49.

business rates more broadly, but the most important thing is to have an

:55:50.:55:52.

energy infrastructure that allows for the delivery of new nuclear

:55:53.:55:57.

power stations. That is the position on this side of the house. A closed

:55:58.:56:07.

question. This government is committed to regenerating coastal

:56:08.:56:11.

towns and ensuring that everybody, regardless of where they live, as

:56:12.:56:14.

access to high quality public services and the best opportunities.

:56:15.:56:22.

On this question, Ian Paisley. I beg your pardon, Mr Vickers first. I

:56:23.:56:34.

thank the Prime Minister for his reply and I recognised the

:56:35.:56:36.

initiatives that the government has taken. He will know that many

:56:37.:56:41.

coastal towns like Cleethorpes suffer from poor educational

:56:42.:56:46.

standards. We have many high performing academies who are trying

:56:47.:56:50.

to reverse that and to ensure that our young people have access to

:56:51.:56:53.

sports, arts and culture at the highest level. The council are

:56:54.:56:59.

currently preparing a report with the private sector. Will he commit

:57:00.:57:03.

the government to work with the council to deliver regeneration to

:57:04.:57:08.

Cleethorpes? Nobody could silence the voice of the number! I think my

:57:09.:57:11.

honourable friend is right and I am happy to look at that proposal with

:57:12.:57:17.

him. We have to make sure we tackle both failing schools and coastal

:57:18.:57:22.

schools, and there are some in coastal areas. One of the issues is

:57:23.:57:27.

making sure we get talented teachers and leaders into those schools, and

:57:28.:57:31.

that is what the national leaders of education service is all about.

:57:32.:57:41.

Wratten Island is the only inhabited coastal village town in my

:57:42.:57:44.

constituency. No British Prime Minister has ever had the privilege

:57:45.:57:53.

to visit. I hope that the Prime Minister will make a plan to visit,

:57:54.:57:55.

which has considerable economic needs. I am the first British by

:57:56.:58:03.

Minister to visit many parts of the country. The first to go to

:58:04.:58:09.

Shetland! I fear that, if I were to visit, many people might like me to

:58:10.:58:12.

stay there. But I will bear it in mind. Rugby is the fastest growing

:58:13.:58:19.

town in the West Midlands with work underway to provide 6200 much-needed

:58:20.:58:23.

new homes at the Rugby radio site, but my constituents are keen to

:58:24.:58:26.

ensure that public services keep pace with developers and

:58:27.:58:30.

particularly to seek more services at the local hospital. Does the

:58:31.:58:35.

prime ministers agreed with the NHS chief executive that district

:58:36.:58:37.

hospitals such as this play an excellent role in the NHS? I am a

:58:38.:58:43.

believer in district general hospitals and I know what a strong

:58:44.:58:47.

support of Saint Crossed he is. I know there is a dedicated outpatient

:58:48.:58:54.

facility there. We are going to achieve these very aggressive

:58:55.:58:58.

house-building targets that we put forward, there will be more houses

:58:59.:59:02.

built in most our constituencies. As far as we can, we will try to

:59:03.:59:07.

welcome that, that is important, and to make sure that the infrastructure

:59:08.:59:12.

is provided. Not everybody is as satisfied as the Chancellor with

:59:13.:59:17.

what, for Google, is loose change to cover their tax liabilities. On

:59:18.:59:21.

Monday, the honourable member for ABBA valley called on the government

:59:22.:59:27.

to make companies publish their tax returns. In that way, we can all see

:59:28.:59:31.

how they make the journey from their tax profits to their tax bill. Does

:59:32.:59:37.

the Prime Minister agree? I want to wonder whether the right honourable

:59:38.:59:41.

lady whether raised this issue when she sat in the Labour cabinet, when

:59:42.:59:46.

Google were paying no tax. What we have is a situation where we make

:59:47.:59:50.

the rules in this house and where HMAC ether to enforce them. That is

:59:51.:59:54.

the system that we need to make work. -- H MRC. As cancer survival

:59:55.:00:02.

rates continue to improve, and given that this is cancer talk week, will

:00:03.:00:06.

my right honourable friend join me in welcoming a new state cancer

:00:07.:00:12.

information centre due to enter at Royal Bolton hospital, and praise

:00:13.:00:19.

the commitment of Midland cancer care, Bolton hospice, and the local

:00:20.:00:24.

cancer commissioning group, who are all making this happening is to mark

:00:25.:00:32.

--? Everybody in this house knows a family member who has been touched

:00:33.:00:37.

by cancer. The good news is that cancer survival rates are improving.

:00:38.:00:40.

We need to make sure they improve across all cancers, not just the

:00:41.:00:45.

best-known ones. What he says is that this is not just an issue for

:00:46.:00:49.

the NHS but all of those because IT bodies which also want to campaign

:00:50.:00:56.

and act on helping cancer sufferers. --. In 2014I wrote to the Prime

:00:57.:01:03.

Minister asking him to join the Scottish Government and Highland

:01:04.:01:08.

Council in taking forward a city deal for Inverness. Highland Council

:01:09.:01:12.

have submitted a detailed plan on the region for young people. Will be

:01:13.:01:16.

Prime Minister committed to giving this the green light in the coming

:01:17.:01:21.

weeks? We are committed to examining the city deal with Inverness, as we

:01:22.:01:24.

have made good progress with Aberdeen. I think these bring

:01:25.:01:28.

together the best of what the Scottish Government can put on the

:01:29.:01:32.

table but also the best of what the UK Government can put on the table

:01:33.:01:36.

because, without wanting to be too political, the two governments

:01:37.:01:40.

working together can do even more. Could I thank the Prime Minister for

:01:41.:01:47.

meeting the deposed mould even Prime Minister -- president on Saturday?

:01:48.:01:54.

Will he work towards an international consensus on targeted

:01:55.:01:58.

sanctions so that the regime of the Maldives may reconsider their

:01:59.:02:03.

appalling human rights record and their record on democracy? It was an

:02:04.:02:08.

honour to meet with the former president, who I think did an

:02:09.:02:12.

excellent job for his country in cutting out corruption and turning

:02:13.:02:16.

that country around. He suffered terribly by being in prison and it

:02:17.:02:20.

is good that he is able to get out to seek medical treatment, but we

:02:21.:02:24.

want to see a change in behaviour from the government of the Maldives,

:02:25.:02:28.

to make sure political prisoners are set free, and we are prepared to

:02:29.:02:33.

consider targeted action against individuals if progress isn't made.

:02:34.:02:37.

Let's hope that diplomatic efforts will lead to the changes we want to

:02:38.:02:43.

see, but Britain, and our allies, including Sri Lanka and India,

:02:44.:02:52.

watching situation carefully. 46% of five-year-old children in Bradford

:02:53.:02:56.

suffer from dental decay compared with 28% across England, and less

:02:57.:03:00.

than half the children living in Bradford district has seen a dentist

:03:01.:03:03.

in the last two years. Given the cost of treating toothpick care --

:03:04.:03:09.

tooth decay, they exceed the cost of prevention, would the Prime Minister

:03:10.:03:14.

look at dental provision in the area? If you take a view across the

:03:15.:03:21.

country, before 2010, we had huge queues around the block when a new

:03:22.:03:24.

NHS dentist turned up was there were not enough. They may not and shake

:03:25.:03:28.

their heads, but that is what happened. Some of us can remember.

:03:29.:03:35.

We have seen a big increase in NHS dentistry, but I will look carefully

:03:36.:03:39.

at the situation in Bradford. As my right honourable friend knows, a

:03:40.:03:45.

task force is set to deliver its report on a resilient railway to

:03:46.:03:49.

Devon and Cornwall. Would the Prime Minister be prepared to meet with me

:03:50.:03:52.

and a number of colleagues to make sure that Network Rail and the task

:03:53.:03:57.

force is enough for two studies, the electrification of the line and the

:03:58.:04:01.

reduction in journey time is necessary to do this? I had an

:04:02.:04:04.

excellent meeting with the south coast -- south-west peninsula task

:04:05.:04:09.

force and I will make sure that I continue to liaise closely with

:04:10.:04:12.

them. We need to find an answer and we need to find the funding. We

:04:13.:04:16.

can't have happen what happened in the past, where a problem on our

:04:17.:04:21.

Railways led to the peninsula being cut off. Would be Prime Minister

:04:22.:04:29.

join me in congratulating my constituents, Dominic and Rebecca

:04:30.:04:32.

from Mitcham, on the birth of their daughter, Alice. Like every parents,

:04:33.:04:36.

they want their daughter to have better opportunities than they had

:04:37.:04:41.

but, with average London house prices increasing by ?40,000 in 2013

:04:42.:04:46.

alone, and the average house in London being now worth over half ?1

:04:47.:04:50.

million, does he understand their fears and Alice will never have the

:04:51.:04:54.

chance they had to buy her own home in the area she was born in? I want

:04:55.:05:00.

to help Alice and many like her get on the housing ladder, which is why

:05:01.:05:03.

we are introducing shared ownership, which brings housing in reach of

:05:04.:05:08.

many more people. It is why we have helped by London, which is twice as

:05:09.:05:12.

generous as the rest of the country. It is why we selling off the most

:05:13.:05:16.

expensive council houses and rebuilding more affordable homes. --

:05:17.:05:22.

help to buy London. These are all under the guidance and drive of Zac

:05:23.:05:25.

Goldsmith, who will make an excellent...

:05:26.:05:29.

SHOUTING That is the best chance of a home,

:05:30.:05:34.

to have a Conservative mayor and a Conservative government working hand

:05:35.:05:41.

in glove. Someone experiencing a mental health crisis who goes in

:05:42.:05:46.

desperation to A needs prompt specialist help. Can I welcome my

:05:47.:05:51.

right honourable friend's recognition of psychiatric liaison?

:05:52.:05:58.

Does he agree that 20 47 psychiatric liaison in A is an important step

:05:59.:06:06.

towards self-esteem? We are seeing more mental health and psychiatric

:06:07.:06:10.

liaison in our A We need overtime to see it in all. So often

:06:11.:06:14.

people are arriving not in the right setting, where they should be

:06:15.:06:17.

looking after. Whether it is getting people with mental health conditions

:06:18.:06:22.

out of police cells or making sure they are treated properly in prison

:06:23.:06:27.

or, crucially, when they arrived in A, make sure they get this

:06:28.:06:30.

treatment is very much part of our plan. I commend the Prime Minister

:06:31.:06:35.

for his remarks about Holocaust Memorial Day. In honouring the

:06:36.:06:39.

memory of those murdered by the Nazis, we provide the best candidate

:06:40.:06:44.

to extremism and anti-Semitism anti-Semitism in our age. The

:06:45.:06:47.

biggest challenge Europe today is the predicted 3 million refugees who

:06:48.:06:54.

will flood into Europe. Does he agree that the only way to challenge

:06:55.:06:58.

a crisis of that magnitude is by starting working with our European

:06:59.:07:03.

colleagues at the heart of a united Europe? Would you take this

:07:04.:07:07.

opportunity to welcome in and provide a home for the 3000

:07:08.:07:10.

unaccompanied children, as recommended by save the children?

:07:11.:07:16.

Where I agree with the right honourable gentleman is the

:07:17.:07:19.

importance of taking action to help with this crisis. No country in

:07:20.:07:24.

Europe has been more generous than Britain in funding refugees, whether

:07:25.:07:32.

they are in Syria, Turkey, Lebanon or Jordan. Where I don't agree with

:07:33.:07:38.

the right honourable gentleman is thinking that the right answer is

:07:39.:07:43.

for Britain to opt into the EU relocation and resettlement schemes.

:07:44.:07:47.

Let me tell him as for why. We said we will resettle 20,000 people in

:07:48.:07:50.

our country. We promised 1000 by Christmas. Because of the hard work

:07:51.:07:56.

of the honourable member for Watford, we achieved that. If you

:07:57.:08:00.

add up all that Europe has done under its relocation scheme and its

:08:01.:08:08.

recent resettlement scheme, they have done less than we have done in

:08:09.:08:13.

the UK. Yes, we should take part in European schemes when it is in our

:08:14.:08:18.

interests, helped to secure the external European border, but we are

:08:19.:08:22.

out of the Schengen agreement, we keep our own borders and, under this

:08:23.:08:25.

government, that is how it will stay.

:08:26.:08:40.

The Prime Minister referred to those in the calorie count as a bunch of

:08:41.:08:47.

migrants. We welcome back to that in a minute. As expected, the Leader of

:08:48.:08:54.

the Opposition went on the tax settlement. It will make the news

:08:55.:08:59.

tomorrow as well. Jeremy Corbyn raising the question of whether the

:09:00.:09:03.

HMRC has really raised as much as it could have done over a tax

:09:04.:09:09.

settlement that goes back to 2005 with a company that generates

:09:10.:09:12.

billions of pounds every year. The Prime Minister retorted it had not

:09:13.:09:18.

paid any tax under Labour and I guess the general line of the

:09:19.:09:23.

government is 130 million is better than nothing. It went back and

:09:24.:09:27.

forward a bit like that. Let's hear from our experts and a minute.

:09:28.:09:33.

First, let's hear how you reacted. The tax settlement angered many of

:09:34.:09:38.

our viewers. Thomas said, can I pay 3% tax on my earnings? Somebody

:09:39.:09:44.

said, love it, ten minutes in and Cameron is losing his rag. Someone

:09:45.:09:48.

says, I would like to pay the same rate as Google.

:09:49.:09:53.

Michael says labour and Jeremy Corbyn are returning to the spiked

:09:54.:09:58.

agenda. The Prime Minister handled this attack with ease. John Glenn

:09:59.:10:04.

says, it is becoming pitiable. I feel sorry for Jeremy Corbyn, camera

:10:05.:10:08.

and savages him every week and makes him look ill suited to the role.

:10:09.:10:15.

Somebody says, you cannot equate Google in 2009 and Google today,

:10:16.:10:21.

that shows how bad he is at fairness. And the Prime Minister's

:10:22.:10:29.

use of the phrase a bunch of migrants. Chuka Umunna says it is

:10:30.:10:32.

inflammatory and unbecoming of his office. Diane Ah but said it was

:10:33.:10:36.

callous. Was that appropriate language? We often have debate about

:10:37.:10:43.

the language used by Prime Minister and other prominent politicians,

:10:44.:10:47.

particularly in the cauldron of the House of commons with a lot of

:10:48.:10:51.

pressure and hundreds of MPs baying at you. It is an excuse for not

:10:52.:10:56.

debating the real issue. Should we allow people count in Calais to come

:10:57.:11:00.

to this country? The Prime Minister is getting it right in terms of

:11:01.:11:05.

immigration policy. He is helping people in the camps in Syria. We

:11:06.:11:10.

have got a huge overseas aid budget. But was it regrettable language? We

:11:11.:11:16.

always talk about language, people have their views and the Prime

:11:17.:11:19.

Minister said he did not agree with Jeremy Corbyn that the people camped

:11:20.:11:24.

in Calais should come to this country and be given a free pass.

:11:25.:11:29.

Does that include unaccompanied children? There was talk that

:11:30.:11:33.

government may agree to unaccompanied children coming in? I

:11:34.:11:37.

have seen that talked and I gather it is being considered. I do not

:11:38.:11:42.

know if there was a conclusion reached. There are a range of issues

:11:43.:11:47.

you have to take into account, the law of unintended consequences, but

:11:48.:11:49.

the government will look at this issue. I can see in some way where

:11:50.:11:55.

the Google story goes because Apple, Amazon, Facebook are in the line for

:11:56.:12:01.

the same sort of treatment and I guess HMRC will come under pressure

:12:02.:12:05.

to be tougher with those that are still outstanding. But given HMRC is

:12:06.:12:11.

bound not to release the details of how it has calculated the 130

:12:12.:12:16.

million, I am not sure where this story goes next. In terms of new

:12:17.:12:22.

events and consequences of all the political anger, it is not clear

:12:23.:12:29.

either. But a spikier Jeremy Corbyn today succeeded in keeping this

:12:30.:12:34.

going, it will go for another 24 hours. It winds up members of the

:12:35.:12:39.

public, there is no question about that. At the same time David Cameron

:12:40.:12:43.

was very well prepped for that attack. It was inevitable he would

:12:44.:12:48.

go on that. Reading out the list of the senior members of the former

:12:49.:12:52.

Labour government now working for financial firms was designed to

:12:53.:12:57.

embarrass Jeremy Corbyn. The attack was Labour did not do anything about

:12:58.:13:01.

this either. But it is the kind of issue where Labour think they can

:13:02.:13:06.

make some ground by keeping the issue going and saying they are on

:13:07.:13:09.

the side of the ordinary person saying, this is not fair. The

:13:10.:13:14.

government needs all the money it can get. There was an implication

:13:15.:13:19.

the government was too close to Google and there was a lot of

:13:20.:13:23.

personal contact. But it may be a bit of a stretch to think that the

:13:24.:13:28.

closeness has resulted in a lower tax bill. Indeed. Jeremy Corbyn was

:13:29.:13:36.

almost suggesting there talking about contacts between the firms

:13:37.:13:40.

that there was some kind of interference. I agree, that is a bit

:13:41.:13:45.

of a stretch. It would be a great story if it was true. Yes, it would,

:13:46.:13:52.

but when you look at the lifestyle of the story, it is a mistake for

:13:53.:13:59.

George Osborne to claim it was a victory. He put himself in the story

:14:00.:14:04.

and ask for the credit and it turns out not to have been such a triumph

:14:05.:14:08.

after all in the public mind and he is left with a difficult position,

:14:09.:14:14.

it is difficult politically to claim credit for something and when it

:14:15.:14:17.

does not turn out to be such a try and say it is nothing to do with me.

:14:18.:14:24.

Did Number Ten distance themselves? After the coverage at the weekend

:14:25.:14:27.

they were not going to go on the record and say it was a marvellous

:14:28.:14:31.

success. As ever, these things are sometimes overdone. If George

:14:32.:14:38.

Osborne had not tweeted it, it would not have been politicised in the

:14:39.:14:43.

same way? They would have been a bit of a rumpus, but not in the same

:14:44.:14:48.

way. Yvette Cooper has raised as a point of order the Prime Minister's

:14:49.:14:52.

remark, a bunch of migrants. I thought it was surprising he used

:14:53.:14:57.

it. I thought he was in full flow and probably a bit angry and

:14:58.:15:00.

sometimes you say things you do not need to. Having just announced the

:15:01.:15:04.

Holocaust memorial to then say a bunch of migrants, he will be

:15:05.:15:10.

particularly jarred. I was also surprised by Jeremy Corbyn not

:15:11.:15:15.

taking a segue to react to that, given he had been in the camps and

:15:16.:15:21.

have called for unaccompanied children to come here and for

:15:22.:15:24.

Britain to be more generous. Did he miss an opportunity? I was shocked

:15:25.:15:30.

when I heard the Prime Minister say it, it was offensive, hurtful,

:15:31.:15:34.

divisive. It is not the first time we have heard David Cameron slip up

:15:35.:15:39.

in this way. I appreciate what you say about the heat of the moment,

:15:40.:15:43.

but this kind of language when you are a Prime Minister is so important

:15:44.:15:47.

to get it right. Jeremy Corbyn is also under pressure in the heat of

:15:48.:15:53.

the moment. But I think we were all really taken aback and silenced.

:15:54.:15:59.

Except Jeremy Corbyn had been there and he had seen these people in the

:16:00.:16:03.

camps. The Prime Minister has not been there. There is the question

:16:04.:16:12.

about whether we should not be more generous about our treatment of

:16:13.:16:16.

unaccompanied children, some of whom were in that camp. I think we should

:16:17.:16:21.

be speaking out really clearly from a moral position about our

:16:22.:16:25.

obligations towards those very vulnerable children at every

:16:26.:16:28.

opportunity. What Jeremy saw in the camps will have brought home to him

:16:29.:16:32.

about the horror of what those children are going through. We

:16:33.:16:37.

should be looking for opportunities across all parties to use the right

:16:38.:16:41.

language and to develop policies to bring these children here as quickly

:16:42.:16:46.

as possible. The run-up to the referendum, even the negotiation and

:16:47.:16:51.

up to the February summit and beyond, the backdrop of developing

:16:52.:16:55.

events in Europe could be horrendous and particularly horrendous for

:16:56.:17:00.

those who want this country to stay in Europe.

:17:01.:17:06.

There is no question this is in minister 's mind. That is part of

:17:07.:17:11.

the reason they are trying to get this deal done in February, partly

:17:12.:17:15.

because the expectation is that, in coming months and through the

:17:16.:17:19.

summer, the huge volumes of people and the distress that we see night

:17:20.:17:23.

after night on our television screens is not going to get better,

:17:24.:17:27.

and it may get worse. Politically, the situation is so much more acute

:17:28.:17:32.

now, now that we also see the kind of chaos and suffering in European

:17:33.:17:38.

capitals. This is no longer what we see, a question about people

:17:39.:17:45.

moving... In the Balkans. Indeed, places the British voters are

:17:46.:17:49.

familiar with, places they might have been on holiday. That might

:17:50.:17:54.

sound crass, but this is part of the population that ministers are aware

:17:55.:17:57.

of, the broader canvas of what is going on in the world when we choose

:17:58.:18:04.

whether to stay or leave the EU, in a lot of people's minds, that will

:18:05.:18:08.

be more significant than the campaigns themselves.

:18:09.:18:09.

Now, how old should you be before you're allowed to stick an X

:18:10.:18:13.

on a ballot paper and stick it in a box?

:18:14.:18:15.

Well, like the UK most people around the world are allowed to vote

:18:16.:18:18.

Some buck the trend and opt for 21, like Cameroon for example.

:18:19.:18:22.

Others, like Austria, have recently lowered

:18:23.:18:24.

Some people want to do the same here, but should we in fact be

:18:25.:18:29.

Here's political journalist Samual Hooper with

:18:30.:18:32.

Going to university used to signify growing up,

:18:33.:18:42.

leaving the family nest and taking your first steps

:18:43.:18:45.

as an adult but, for a growing number of today's students,

:18:46.:18:47.

Many of today's students want to turn university campuses

:18:48.:18:51.

and students' unions into safe spaces, where

:18:52.:18:54.

dissenting and controversial ideas are banned and free speech

:18:55.:18:57.

is suspended for their mental safety.

:18:58.:19:01.

MUSIC: Teenage Kicks by The Undertones.

:19:02.:19:11.

Student activists have taken to banning

:19:12.:19:13.

clapping in meetings, claiming that it triggers anxiety,

:19:14.:19:15.

and some are now even demanding the airbrushing

:19:16.:19:17.

or rewriting of history to remove any reference to controversial

:19:18.:19:20.

figures from the past, like Cecil Rhodes.

:19:21.:19:24.

Students here in the Oxford union voted last week to remove his statue

:19:25.:19:27.

If students want to be treated like emotionally fragile children,

:19:28.:19:38.

do they not forfeit the right to have a

:19:39.:19:40.

We don't let children drink, smoke or drive.

:19:41.:19:43.

Ironically, there is currently a push to lower the voting age

:19:44.:19:53.

in the UK, giving 16 and 17-year-olds the right to take

:19:54.:19:58.

But, since this generation of students feel harmed

:19:59.:20:02.

by hearing dissenting opinions or the mere act of public debate,

:20:03.:20:06.

rather than talking about lowering the voting age, shouldn't we be

:20:07.:20:09.

I am assured that you are over the age of 25, at least. What age would

:20:10.:20:31.

you raise the voting age to? It is an interesting question, and I am

:20:32.:20:34.

not the only one who has brought this up. After a number of

:20:35.:20:38.

high-profile incidents on American the respected American law professor

:20:39.:20:45.

and blogger Glenn Reynolds suggested raising the age to 25, which was

:20:46.:20:50.

after we saw Yale students go berserk over a flash in the pan

:20:51.:20:56.

drama over Halloween costumes. We saw the university of Missouri drum

:20:57.:21:04.

the team out of his job and then he insisted -- they apologise that he

:21:05.:21:08.

go and apologise for male privilege. Does that justify a campaign to

:21:09.:21:14.

raise the voting age? If you look at the background of these demands for

:21:15.:21:18.

trigger warnings and safe spaces, students saying that they feel

:21:19.:21:22.

emotionally fragile, they are encountering an opinion which goes

:21:23.:21:26.

against their views, akin to being physically punched in the face. They

:21:27.:21:30.

take it as if they are incurring emotional harm. I am saying, if you

:21:31.:21:35.

believe you are incurring emotional harm, maybe wait a few years before

:21:36.:21:40.

you enter the rough world of politics. It is heavy punishment on

:21:41.:21:46.

all young people of 18-25, denying them the right to vote because of a

:21:47.:21:50.

handful of student unions behaving liberally. I watched some of the

:21:51.:21:55.

youth Parliament earlier, and you saw some of the brightest 16 and

:21:56.:22:00.

17-year-olds you will ever see. Something seems to happen when you

:22:01.:22:04.

hit the age of 18. I don't know why, something goes crazy and... We say

:22:05.:22:11.

it is only a few students, but we take our view from America and this

:22:12.:22:15.

problem is getting a lot bigger in the US. People's careers are being

:22:16.:22:20.

ended, people's curriculum is limited. You were there inside the

:22:21.:22:26.

Oxford union. They make a point of inviting controversial speakers, and

:22:27.:22:30.

they have done over the decades, from Nick Griffin, Marine Le Pen, OJ

:22:31.:22:35.

Simpson, which I suggest is encouraging free debate. Let's put

:22:36.:22:39.

the point Ed Vaizey, who was laughing, about what happens when

:22:40.:22:43.

you turn 18. Do you think people are responsible enough at age 18? The

:22:44.:22:49.

thesis seemed to be developing that, given your experience of the youth

:22:50.:22:53.

Parliament, you could have the vote for 16-18 and then lose it and get

:22:54.:22:58.

it back at 25! I think people are responsible at 18. Kate and I go to

:22:59.:23:07.

our secondary schools and talk to 16 -- sixth formers. They are extremely

:23:08.:23:13.

articulate. I wouldn't go to 16, but I totally understand people who

:23:14.:23:17.

campaign for it. I don't think it is a ridiculous suggestion. I am happy

:23:18.:23:21.

with the status quo. I think 18 is right. But you meet a lot of

:23:22.:23:25.

articular and intelligent people younger than that, just as you meet

:23:26.:23:30.

people who are older who are not. There have been these examples of a

:23:31.:23:35.

liberal activity, depriving students of free speech, trying to stop

:23:36.:23:39.

Germaine Greer, for example, coming to Cardiff university because of her

:23:40.:23:43.

views on transgender people, and the debate over the Cecil Rhodes statue.

:23:44.:23:47.

Is this an indication that there is a lack of maturity among students,

:23:48.:23:52.

that they are trying to clamp down on free speech? I don't think it is

:23:53.:23:59.

a new thing. There have always been controversies in universities over

:24:00.:24:02.

who will be invited and given a platform, and that is part of

:24:03.:24:05.

exploring boundaries and debating issues. We shouldn't forget that the

:24:06.:24:08.

government is effectively clamping down on free speech in in

:24:09.:24:14.

universities with some of its counter extremism proposals. I don't

:24:15.:24:17.

think it is age related. It is a matter of getting the balance right.

:24:18.:24:19.

Now, how do you like to spend your annual leave?

:24:20.:24:22.

Are you like our Kate here, who enjoys sipping sangria

:24:23.:24:24.

Or are you, like our Ed, more of an opera in Tuscany sort

:24:25.:24:29.

Or would you rather spend your holidays somewhere

:24:30.:24:32.

# Get your passport and your bikini You need a holiday, come see me

:24:33.:24:37.

# I know you're tired of the same old scenery

:24:38.:24:40.

# And I could change all that so easily

:24:41.:24:42.

# Go wild, do your thing, yo, take a chance

:24:43.:24:44.

# I'll take you to the South of France, like Cannes

:24:45.:24:47.

And they should have never, ever, ever been in the country.

:24:48.:24:51.

# There's just a few days in the year

:24:52.:24:57.

# Plus I've got car So let's ride that...#

:24:58.:24:59.

And that means saying no to Donald Trump.

:25:00.:25:03.

Thank you everybody, thank you.

:25:04.:25:08.

# If you ain't doing nothing let's fly away

:25:09.:25:11.

# If you ain't doing nothing let's fly away

:25:12.:25:21.

# We can go to the club or hide away

:25:22.:25:25.

# We can do what you want to, baby...#

:25:26.:25:36.

Well, one travel company has raised eyebrows by offering a ?2,370

:25:37.:25:39.

package holiday to the European Parliament ahead

:25:40.:25:41.

And as you saw, there are separate trips on offer to North Korea,

:25:42.:25:49.

Israel and Palestine, Iran and the US in November

:25:50.:25:53.

The travellers will spend their time not relaxing

:25:54.:25:59.

on the beach, but instead having meetings with politicians

:26:00.:26:01.

Nicholas Wood, the Director of Political Tours, joins me now.

:26:02.:26:10.

Exactly why would I pay ?2500 to hang out in Brussels? Good question.

:26:11.:26:19.

One could ask why people watch this programme. The same kind of people

:26:20.:26:26.

come on our tours. Is it that bad? It is! Did this programme give you

:26:27.:26:33.

the idea? I used to be a journalist and I had family who would come and

:26:34.:26:36.

visit me in the Balkans. They found it fascinating. What would an

:26:37.:26:41.

average night out in Brussels be on this trip? It is five days long...

:26:42.:26:52.

Five days! You could go to Thailand for that! Some people enjoy opera

:26:53.:26:57.

and beaches and other people like learning how the world ticks. It is

:26:58.:27:00.

almost like having your own personal correspondent. You can go and get

:27:01.:27:06.

access to P2 sacred places you might not be able to normally. -- access

:27:07.:27:14.

to places. Andrew wants to go. Put his name down.

:27:15.:27:22.

JoCo wants to go to North Korea. Could you arrange that? I got you a

:27:23.:27:33.

present from Cuba. Where is mine? We can be bought. How much would you

:27:34.:27:41.

pay not to see a European Parliament debate? How many people go on these

:27:42.:27:46.

trips? Detours are quite small. You can't take a bus load of people...

:27:47.:27:54.

Basically, you are trying to replicate what journalists do. We

:27:55.:27:58.

take small groups between six and ten people and you get access to

:27:59.:28:00.

people involved actively in politics. You have senior

:28:01.:28:05.

correspondents working with you. It really brings the news to life. It

:28:06.:28:14.

is like a seminar on tour. It is called Political Tours, the clue is

:28:15.:28:18.

in the name. There are other package tours available. Monte Cristo, Romeo

:28:19.:28:29.

and Juliet. The answer to Guess The Year was 2009. Could one of you

:28:30.:28:34.

press the button? That was done tentatively. Carol and Gregory in

:28:35.:28:42.

Reading, well done. -- Caroline Gregory. You have won a political

:28:43.:28:48.

tour to North Korea as well as a mug. The one o'clock news is

:28:49.:28:52.

starting on BBC One. I will be here tomorrow with all the usual

:28:53.:28:54.

political stories of the day. Bye-bye.

:28:55.:28:59.

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