10/02/2017 Daily Politics


10/02/2017

Andrew Neil is joined by Anne McElvoy of the Economist to review the day's political news, including the ongoing Labour Party reshuffle.


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Transcript


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Afternoon folks, welcome to the Daily Politics.

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Another day, another Jeremy Corbyn shadow team reshuffle -

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this time after one fifth of his MPs defied his order to vote in favour

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We'll take a look at the Labour leader's new top team.

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With the start of Brexit talks just weeks away,

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who will the UK Government be negotiating with?

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We report from Brussels on the EU's Brexit Negotiators.

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Do potholes in the road drive you crazy?

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We meet the local volunteers in Devon who are helping to repair

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Do you think we should have new legislation for robots?

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And should we be worried about the rise of robots?

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Why Members of the European Parliament are demanding

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new regulation to protect humans from artificial intelligence.

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All that in the next hour, and with me for the first half

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of the programme today, Anne McElvoy, senior

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First today, MPs and campaigners have described their shock

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at the Government's decision this week to limit the so-called Dubs

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scheme, which allowed a number of unaccompanied migrant children

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In total, 350 children will be resettled here,

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far short of the 3,000 that had originally been suggested -

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although the Government never committed to a specific figure.

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Here's Home Secretary Amber Rudd in the Commons yesterday.

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The Government has always been clear that we do not want to incentivise

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perilous journeys to Europe, particularly by the most

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That is why children must have arrived in Europe before the 20th

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of March 2016 to be eligible, under Section 67 of

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The Section 67 obligation was accepted on the basis

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that the measure would not act as a pull factor for children

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to Europe and that it would be based on local authority capacity.

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The Government has a clear strategy and we believe this

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So is there any credibility in the Government's position that we should

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really only be taking from the camps in the region rather than the

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unaccompanied children refugees who have made it to Europe already?

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There is credibility to the extent that the British Government and this

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goes back to David Cameron, were more corn -- concerned about pull

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factor arguments than other, and that has broadly turned out to be

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right. There is a very large number of vulnerable young adults, and

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children, who can be sucked into people trafficking, if that pull

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factor isn't addressed. I think the problem she has, is that that

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number, the 3 thousand 0. Were, although the Government never

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directly said, there was an expectation they had given into the

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spirit of the Dubs proposals so to suddenly say now, it is going to be

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a small number and it is very small, they are saying the scheme won't end

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but it will be very small in come before a son, it sound like they

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didn't believe what they said last year, or they have changed tack,

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that is where I think Amber Rudd, who is often a very Admiral, still

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emerging Home Secretary, she needs better narrative skill, she needs to

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explain, a lot people won't agree, she needs to explain more clearly.

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The fact is these kids are in Europe, now, the European council

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themselves have a responsibility but it is all our responsibility in a

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way. Would it not, does it not seem churlish, even if we are bringing

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people in from the camps, does it not just seem churlish to limit the

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number to 350, one of the richest countries in the world, with a

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record of welcoming people who have hit on bad times, I mean, does not

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just, it is not really very good for what we think of ourself, as a

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nation. I think that, all of that has a lot of truth to it, but it

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doesn't answer the question you are faced as Home Secretary, you are

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saying 350 is a small number, I agree. I don't feel good about that.

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But let's say you doubled it or trebled it. You would have the same

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argument. When you say they are already in Europe, yes, that is how

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pull factor work, some people who made it through a system, that

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wasn't really working very well, the camp at claim has to be disbanded,

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the fate of those children probably worse having got to the camp... But

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you would have to go back to saying you wanted the original figure. I

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think many people thought we were proceedings on the basis of the

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original figure. Why is there this talk of the pull factor now if it is

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a factor, many people doubt that, why was there not talk of that when

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the scheme was first mooted? Amber Rudd's argument, is that they

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didn't, as far as they were aware it does seem that the pull factor

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matters. Therefore, she has, in effect changed tack, and that is the

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thing she is struggling with. If you think in end this is such a

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humanitarian crisis that doesn't matter, then, you will always say

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the numbers are too small and the 3,000 figure will come back on the

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table. The pressure she will be under is why change tack at all? If

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you do you better be able to explain in a more convincing way why.

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As a presidential candidate, Donald Trump used Twitter to bypass

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the mainstream media and mint several slogans key to his campaign,

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and in his first weeks in the White House he's shown no

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The question for today is, what new phrase has the 45th

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And in about half an hour Anne will give us the correct answer.

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Jeremy Corbyn reshuffled his shadow cabinet -

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The mini-reshuffle was needed after Clive Lewis, Rachel Maskell

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and Jo Stevens resigned from the Shadow Cabinet

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in order to rebel on this week's Article 50 Bill.

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Rebecca Long-Bailey has been promoted from Shadow Chief Secretary

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of the Treasury into Lewis's old role of Shadow

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She is seen as a rising star of the party, loyal

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to Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell, who described her as "brilliant"

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and part of the next generation of socialist leadership.

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Coming into her old position is Peter Dowd, who became MP

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for Bootle on Merseyside in 2015 having previously led

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The new Shadow Environment Secretary is Sue Hayman, another MP

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from the 2015 intake, who represents

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She had previously served as Maskell's deputy

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Christina Rees, MP for Neath, is the new Shadow Welsh Secretary,

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having previously quit her shadow justice role during

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the mass-resignations last summer, before being reappointed last

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Three frontbench positions remain unfilled this afternoon,

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including the shadow equalities brief previously

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Rumours of other moves include a new role for Jon Trickett,

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who could be removed from his elections co-ordinator

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brief just two weeks before crucial byelections in Stoke and Copeland.

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That gives you an idea of what is going on. Let's, let's go now to our

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discussion, we are joined from Glasgow by our guest and our guest

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in London. Is he scraping the bottom of the barrel? I don't think, so I

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am very excited to see Rebecca Hobb in the role of shadow business, I

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think to say scraping the barrel is totally, does not reflect the talent

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put in. What is her qualification for being Shadow Business Secretary?

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He has been working in the economy team since she became an MP, and I

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think she will bring something new. What does she know about business? I

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don't know her full-back ground but I would say we didn't ask questions

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about Clive Lewis, it is important we allow everyone to grow into a

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role... It is important you pick people who are qualified to do it.

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What are her qualifications? I would say she has been working and the

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Labour Party with John McDonnell, has been, he has been at the core of

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doing that policy she has been integral to our policy round

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business, and negotiations round building this new policies,

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anti-austerity policy. I am excited to see what she comes with up. It is

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British politics could do with fresh names, particularly some more women

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in top positions, what is wrong with this I think the issue is these are

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2015er, I am old enough... You mean they entered Parliament in 2015? Yes

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I remember when they had to serve a few year, understand the mechanics

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of the House of Commons, become familiar at the despatch box because

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the danger of throwing in Newbies in this way, is up against experienced

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opposition they sufficient, they will make mistakes but it speaks to

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the broader challenge Jeremy Corbyn face, because people don't want to

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serve. That is why the kids have been thrown to the front, us in the

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front line. Rebecca Long-Bailey is 37. In Parliamentary terms. May seem

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like a kid to me! John McDonnell describes her as brilliant, do you

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agree? My one observation was at Labour Conference when she was

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shadow chief secretary, she was speaking on the economy, and her

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opening remarks including good help us if I get to be Chancellor. So I

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am not sure that... Really? OK. That may be at least honest. I am not

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sure that is the sort of firm opening gambit you want. George

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Osborne made it and many people felt the same. Who knows? Knows? There

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are a further 14 front bench MPs who voted against this whip, are they

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expected to be fired or will they keep their jobs? I'm not sure what

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is going to happen, it is in the hands of Nick Brown, it will be down

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to him. To look at what is going to happen. But overall I think that we

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have had a pretty mature, you know, process around the Brexit vote,

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there has been disagreement between the party but the party stayed

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together and I am quite heartened by the way things have unfolded over

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the past couple of days with Clive Lewis's resignation being put in a

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joint press conference. That the way we need to progress. Isn't it the

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harsh truth is, that whoever was leader of the Labour Party, would

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have a difficult time at moment. The party is split, over its attitude to

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the Brexit negotiations and triggering them. This would be a

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difficult job of party management, whoever was leader, and you could

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argue that Mr Corbyn has made the best of a bad hand. That is the test

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o of a party leader. Every party is composed of no -- different groups.

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The test of a leader is to ewe ghiet them through their personality and

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force of Will and thes of expect of pour. Jeremy Corbyn doesn't offer

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the prospect of power because they have alienated most of the PLP. He

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has spent his life breaking three line whips. No wonder the party is

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coming apart. Another leader would have found that challenge but would

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have been much more effective. What do you make of this, Anne? Isn't the

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problem for Labour at the moment, because they, they are doing all

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these reshuffle, names are coming forward, and it is just passing the

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rest of the country by, they have no idea who we are talking about.

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Indeed, you remember the historic case of Lord derby and the Cabinet.

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I remember that! You probably covered it. I was the only one who

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could name them! In fairness I would say discussing Rebecca Long-Bailey,

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she has a cut through factor, I may not remember-from the start of the

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last Labour Conference but a young left leaning voter they think she is

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good. She is getting her chance, let us see how she does. The bigger

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problem for Jeremy Corbyn, a lot of people who rebelled were people who

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had been loyal to Jeremy Corbyn, before, and I am thinking like tough

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technocratic left leaning MPs, Clive Lewis of course, so there is a

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number of people you would expect to keep faith with Jeremy Corbyn, who

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share a lot of his views, who don't think he is competent. He is in a

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bad intersection where a lot of the party don't think his I ideas are

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any good. Some think they are good but his execution is terrible and

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that is a dangerous place to be in the Venn diagram of party politics.

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There we go, we have gone from Lord Derby to Venn diagrams.

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Is Jon Trickett still the election coordinator? As far as I am aware. I

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have not heard anything about him moving. Things change, we are a long

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way from a general election. I know he remains a core part of any team,

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he is still in that position as far as I have heard. The election

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coordinator, there are two important by-election is coming up, surely

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that would be an important matter for the NEC as well, you are in the

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business of winning elections? It would be important, it has not come

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through to the NEC. I was part of the team short listing candidates

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for Stoke and I am excited about the candidate we have put forward for

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that. Are you going to win? Yes, I think we are. OK, we will see what

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happens. Finally, on this, it is Clive Lewis on manoeuvres? Is he

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beginning to build up a leadership team? I think everyone whose name is

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in the papers is on manoeuvres. Everybody can see there is another

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impending crisis in Jeremy Corbyn's leadership. Really? How is that? It

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may not Ed Sheeran to a leadership challenge. When is the crisis going

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to come? It is engulfing him at the moment, it always starts at the same

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point, it is Europe, the European referendum kicked off Owen Smith's

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challenge, his performance over Brexit and Article 50 has kicked off

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this one. You have your ear to the ground, are these stories that Clive

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Lewis is testing the waters, talking to people, seeing if there is an

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appetite for him to be leader, do you have any indication that is

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happening? Absolutely, people are speaking on Clive Lewis's behalf, as

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they are for several others. Stick with us, because we are going to

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look at this from a different angle. Earlier in the week we profiled

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the key members of Theresa May's Today we're taking a look

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at Jeremy Corbyn's inner circle. The olive branches outside the

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Leader of the Opposition's office have been metaphorically offered to

:17:14.:17:17.

members of the Labour Party during tough times. You see, Jeremy Corbyn

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says he is not a traditional kind of party leader, he does things in a

:17:23.:17:26.

different type of way. To see how, you only have to look at the

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close-knit team of advisers in his office. But who are they and how do

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they influence on? Karie Murphy is executive director of the leader 's

:17:35.:17:40.

office. She likens herself to the Princess from the Disney film,

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Brave. She keeps the show on the road, used to work for Tom Watson,

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has close links with Len McCluskey, was caught up in a selection row in

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Falkirk and was in a bad mood when she saw the Mood Box at the

:17:55.:18:00.

conference, testing opinion on the cabinet. This is a stunned by ill

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informed people. Nice to meet you too(!) Andrew Fisher is director of

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policy. Known by insiders as Jeremy's brain, it was his idea to

:18:14.:18:17.

ban companies that don't pay a living wage from handing out

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dividends to shareholders. Before he became camera shy and join the team,

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he was often at the podium himself. We need to talk about economic

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rights. Ensuring the right to a free press is Seamus Mallon. He is the

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architect of Project Suit, to get his boss to smarten up. The

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government EU is in a difficult position. It has gone through one

:18:43.:18:48.

disastrous season of events after another. The former Guardian

:18:49.:18:59.

journalist is a highly trusted assistant. Cyber-crime not sure this

:19:00.:19:05.

is a good idea. Looking at the longer term strategy, the former

:19:06.:19:11.

Africa reporter James Schneider. An ex-Lib Dem and Green supporter, he

:19:12.:19:17.

is a key link to Momentum, which he represented when he took to the

:19:18.:19:22.

screens in the wake of the EU referendum result. MPs are

:19:23.:19:25.

incredibly out of touch. That is why we have seen shocks in politics.

:19:26.:19:29.

Nobody knows what is going on. Politics has changed, we are in a

:19:30.:19:33.

national crisis period. If you fancy a quick rebuttal, here is your man.

:19:34.:19:38.

Jeremy Corbyn's spokesman used to campaign against fixed odds betting

:19:39.:19:44.

terminals at his own addiction to them. They are the most addictive

:19:45.:19:49.

form of gambling, you can bet up to ?100 every 20 seconds. They are the

:19:50.:19:55.

crack cocaine of gambling. When it comes to current campaigns, Simon

:19:56.:19:58.

Fletcher has a firm grip on them. He was previously a close aide to Ken

:19:59.:20:01.

Livingstone and is tasked with election planning. One election

:20:02.:20:08.

winning member of Jeremy Corbyn's team is Katy Clark, an MP in

:20:09.:20:11.

Scotland for ten years, including during the aftermath of the Scottish

:20:12.:20:16.

independence referendum. You need a significant move to the left. What

:20:17.:20:20.

this is about is not just about organisation, it is about policy. It

:20:21.:20:23.

is clear the message from the referendum is that they want to

:20:24.:20:26.

political change. People want Labour to be what it was created to be in

:20:27.:20:31.

Scotland. She is now the bridge between the high command and the

:20:32.:20:34.

parliamentarians, alongside Chief Whip Nick Brown. The official

:20:35.:20:40.

opposition does not get help from the civil service, but it does have

:20:41.:20:43.

the party machinery to fall back on here at the Labour Party

:20:44.:20:46.

headquarters, in the heart of Westminster. Ian McNicol is the

:20:47.:20:51.

general secretary of the Labour Party. Its organisational chief,

:20:52.:20:59.

through thick and thin. Here is the truth of it, Labour has, and has

:21:00.:21:06.

always had, the strength to fightback, strength in values, to

:21:07.:21:09.

strengthen our ideas, the strength in our people. National broadcast

:21:10.:21:14.

manager Katie Dylan helped sharpen the leader's image, but not any more

:21:15.:21:18.

from inside the leader's office. He hasn't been able to convince one of

:21:19.:21:27.

his own members, who told the press, you might shout,... The growl was

:21:28.:21:33.

just play acting during PMQs Prep, not her true feelings.

:21:34.:21:43.

Our guests are still here. Ria Wilson, under the team around Mr

:21:44.:21:51.

Corbyn, he has managed to gain a net and favourability rating of 46

:21:52.:21:55.

points behind Theresa May. Even those that voted Labour 2015 think

:21:56.:22:04.

unfavourably towards him. Even the 18-24 year-old age group now feel

:22:05.:22:10.

unfavourably. How long can this go on? I think that we have seen a

:22:11.:22:16.

marked difference in the approach to Jeremy Corbyn's leadership over the

:22:17.:22:21.

last couple of months, I think it is a positive transition. We have seen

:22:22.:22:24.

a lot more of him, we have seen him on the Sunday Politics. I think that

:22:25.:22:34.

is a positive change. Why was it not reflected in the polls? Theresa May

:22:35.:22:38.

has a net rating of plus six, Jeremy Corbyn a net rating of -40! Mr

:22:39.:22:47.

Farren only manages -19. When is that going to change? I think it is

:22:48.:22:52.

going to be a process. Jeremy has not been in front of voters enough

:22:53.:22:56.

and I think that is changing. We have seen a lot of exciting things

:22:57.:23:01.

recently, we have seen a lot more coverage of policies, we have seen a

:23:02.:23:05.

lot more fightback. It is going to be a process. I want to see those

:23:06.:23:10.

numbers get better. If it is like this in a year, what do you do?

:23:11.:23:14.

Supposing it is like this in one year, we have to look at how much...

:23:15.:23:19.

The messaging we are putting across. To be honest, I don't think it will

:23:20.:23:23.

be like that in one ear's time, I think positive change is going to

:23:24.:23:26.

happen. I think it will be interesting with the by-election

:23:27.:23:30.

coming forward. We should not understate how much of a difference

:23:31.:23:34.

it is going to make, seeing the team, and Jeremy, growing in

:23:35.:23:36.

confidence and having more face time with the electorate. More face time

:23:37.:23:42.

with the electorate? I remember Gordon Brown telling me that, it

:23:43.:23:46.

turned out the more they saw of him, the less they like him? If you talk

:23:47.:23:51.

to him in Stoke or Copeland, the last thing we need in close

:23:52.:23:55.

by-elections is face time from Jeremy Corbyn. The more our

:23:56.:23:58.

supporters see him, the less we do well. At the end of the day, you can

:23:59.:24:04.

collect different people around the leader, they can do this and that,

:24:05.:24:08.

but the leader is the product, he is the brand. That is the fundamental

:24:09.:24:13.

problem. One point on that report, it was interesting that we had a

:24:14.:24:17.

clip from Karie Murphy, being particularly cross and angry. If we

:24:18.:24:22.

are looking at the reshuffle, Jon Trickett's departure, the word is

:24:23.:24:27.

that it is partially with disagreements with her, a break down

:24:28.:24:31.

in relations with the leader 's office. It is a sign of the pressure

:24:32.:24:36.

accumulating around him. Rhea Wolfson says it is beginning to come

:24:37.:24:39.

together and they have a team in place. Is the team functioning

:24:40.:24:45.

properly around Mr Corbyn? Patently not. Since Jeremy Corbyn relaunched

:24:46.:24:48.

at the start of the year, our figures have gone backwards. If you

:24:49.:24:54.

speak to campaign that are open Copeland and stroke, his brand

:24:55.:25:01.

deteriorating. He has been doing nothing to turn that around. To be

:25:02.:25:05.

fair to his team, there is little you can do. You can avoid things

:25:06.:25:08.

like the other night, when he tweeted after Article 50 has been

:25:09.:25:12.

passed, the real fight starts now. Many would have said it was last

:25:13.:25:16.

year, or before the vote. To misunderstand that is to

:25:17.:25:19.

misunderstand the Labour Party and politics. Rhea Wolfson thinks they

:25:20.:25:23.

can hold onto the by-elections, what is your view? Do it we have got is

:25:24.:25:28.

that Copeland started badly, but we are coming back. That is looking a

:25:29.:25:31.

bit more positive, particularly because of the local hospital issue.

:25:32.:25:35.

Stoke is more difficult. Stoke is more vulnerable to Ukip? Much more

:25:36.:25:44.

vulnerable. Lets leave it there, Rhea Wolfson and Atul Hatwal, thank

:25:45.:25:45.

you for joining us. Now, one of the big issues of our

:25:46.:25:50.

time. How prepared would you be to mend

:25:51.:25:52.

the potholes in your local roads? In Devon, the local authority has

:25:53.:25:55.

set up a scheme so that volunteers But as Jenny Kumah reports,

:25:56.:25:58.

not everyone's happy about it. But here in Devon, around 100

:25:59.:26:03.

volunteers have signed up to a council-run scheme to patch up

:26:04.:26:10.

the smaller holes themselves. Ken Browse lives in the village

:26:11.:26:20.

of Halverton, and he is part of the yellow army of

:26:21.:26:24.

volunteer road wardens. He has training and insurance

:26:25.:26:28.

from the County Council and he's Grants are available to help

:26:29.:26:30.

pay for the materials, but the parish council also has

:26:31.:26:37.

to contribute towards the cost Some people say it's double

:26:38.:26:40.

taxation, because we pay our council tax, all this should be done,

:26:41.:26:47.

but trouble is, when the money won't go round and the money's been

:26:48.:26:50.

spent on childcare and adult social So, you know, it's a job that

:26:51.:26:53.

needs doing, we're here, People in Devon are being asked to

:26:54.:26:58.

do more for their local community. Volunteers already cut

:26:59.:27:09.

the verges, weed the pavements So maintaining the roads

:27:10.:27:11.

is an expensive business, especially here in Devon,

:27:12.:27:17.

which has the largest road According to the County Council it

:27:18.:27:19.

would cost ?750 million to complete the backlog of repairs and to get

:27:20.:27:26.

the roads in tip top condition. Show me how do this

:27:27.:27:29.

Ken, can I have a go? Yes, you just keep tapping

:27:30.:27:37.

until it sounds different. This certainly keeps

:27:38.:27:39.

you fit, doesn't it. This year the council got

:27:40.:27:42.

?45 million from the Government for road repairs, but the council

:27:43.:27:48.

says it needs around ?15 million So is this scheme

:27:49.:27:51.

a form of cheap labour? No, I don't think

:27:52.:27:59.

it is cheap labour. We find that the parish

:28:00.:28:05.

councils are coming to us, and they're taking pride

:28:06.:28:08.

in their communities, and they're saying they would like to come

:28:09.:28:10.

and help the County Council doing things around their communities,

:28:11.:28:13.

because they understand at the end of day that the County Councils

:28:14.:28:15.

aren't getting so much The council is investing ?100,000

:28:16.:28:18.

in the volunteer scheme, to cover the cost of training,

:28:19.:28:26.

insurance and materials. And it still repairs the bigger

:28:27.:28:32.

potholes that meet the set criteria. But not everyone's happy

:28:33.:28:35.

about this scheme. The road warden scheme means

:28:36.:28:40.

they expect free labour to fill in holes in the road,

:28:41.:28:43.

dig out the ditches and clean signs, but we're all paying our council

:28:44.:28:46.

tax, we don't get any discount. They just pretend they

:28:47.:28:50.

haven't got enough money. They should be more productive,

:28:51.:28:52.

more efficient and still The national repair bill

:28:53.:28:54.

for potholes will reach 14 billion by 2019, according

:28:55.:29:02.

to the Asphalt Industry Alliance, and with councils across the country

:29:03.:29:07.

seeing their government grants diminish, schemes like this one

:29:08.:29:09.

could become more common. Devon County Council says it's

:29:10.:29:13.

already had 11 other local authorities show interest in it,

:29:14.:29:15.

so the prospect of volunteers maintaining your local highways may

:29:16.:29:18.

not be too far down the road. And we've been joined

:29:19.:29:30.

by Councillor Martin Tett, leader of Buckinghamshire County Council

:29:31.:29:35.

and chairman of the Local Government Association's transport

:29:36.:29:37.

board, and by Alex White So, we have seen the future of Tory

:29:38.:29:54.

Britain, you have to fill in your own potholes? It is an interesting

:29:55.:29:57.

scheme, with looking at. Councils already fill in something like 200

:29:58.:30:03.

million potholes every year. There is not enough money to fill in all

:30:04.:30:07.

of the ones that are being reported. An interesting scheme in Devon,

:30:08.:30:11.

where you have quiet roads. A lot of them are on busy main roads, the

:30:12.:30:15.

idea of somebody wandering out to throw some tarmac into a pothole on

:30:16.:30:22.

a main road, it gives me the heebie-jeebies. Isn't this the Big

:30:23.:30:27.

Society inaction? The idea of volunteers hoping out, we have been

:30:28.:30:33.

devolving money down to town and parish councils, where we can train

:30:34.:30:36.

them to do things like cut hedges, clearing ditches and cutting grass,

:30:37.:30:39.

which is really good. I'm just worried about the safety aspect of

:30:40.:30:42.

people in the middle-of-the-road without safety precautions.

:30:43.:30:46.

It's a good idea. He is worried about the safety. I don't know about

:30:47.:30:51.

the safety, maybe you are right about that, but I mean, the

:30:52.:30:55.

important thing I think we have to recognise is that motorists are

:30:56.:30:58.

completely fleeced in this country, if you look at how much is spent on

:30:59.:31:03.

fuel duty, you get to about ?35 billion a year, what is spent on

:31:04.:31:07.

roads is only about 9 billion. So while I am not... The tax isn't high

:31:08.:31:15.

pot Kated I am not suggesting that. I am not suggesting it should be but

:31:16.:31:20.

it is an indicator, if you look at how much we spent on roads compared

:31:21.:31:26.

to rail with their subsidies for instance, you know, motorists are

:31:27.:31:31.

fleeced and I think that the priorities and the transport budgets

:31:32.:31:35.

are not correct and we should spend more on roads and Les on rail. You

:31:36.:31:39.

would have to spend billion ports on the roads to get them up to the

:31:40.:31:44.

standard, if you go round knocking on doors like I do, it is rods,

:31:45.:31:50.

pavement and schools. Things like adult, social care, where the vast

:31:51.:31:53.

amount of money goes doesn't get a mention on the doorstep. Fancy a bit

:31:54.:32:00.

of poll hole filling? I have a high advice jacket. Of course, you didn't

:32:01.:32:06.

do it terribly well so text year it flooded again and one thing that

:32:07.:32:10.

councils could do which would try to square this difficult circle about

:32:11.:32:15.

the Monday which is is a real thing, is if you were incentivised to do it

:32:16.:32:19.

with guidance, you would provide the labour but you would need a bit of

:32:20.:32:23.

training, that wouldn't be a bad idea. I think that is nearest you

:32:24.:32:28.

get to the big society in action, where it nowry sides after David

:32:29.:32:32.

Cameron. Why is why it is worth looking after. It is easy on quiet

:32:33.:32:38.

country lanes with proper training. You wouldn't want to be in the

:32:39.:32:44.

middle of the M1. If you come to Buckingham you would get run over.

:32:45.:32:48.

Don't let the best be the enemy of the good. It is port an experiment.

:32:49.:32:57.

Are you going to try it? That is a temporary fitting, that won't last,

:32:58.:33:01.

that will come out within about... I worked that one out myself. Bear in

:33:02.:33:05.

mind, if that comes out and somebody has an accident, a cyclist gets

:33:06.:33:10.

injured or killed, who is the responsible party in probably the

:33:11.:33:14.

County Council so there is a real responsibility when you start to

:33:15.:33:18.

devolve this stuff. One of the basic snucks of Government is to keep the

:33:19.:33:22.

roads safe. Absolutely. Why can't we do that? Because we are spending

:33:23.:33:26.

money on the wrong things, because we... Such as? Let us look at

:33:27.:33:33.

transport. We are spending a lot of money on HS2, there are far better

:33:34.:33:36.

smaller rail schemes and road schemes that money should be going

:33:37.:33:45.

on. It is not glamorous. More pothole filling, less HS2 You could

:33:46.:33:50.

get more filled, and you would have money left over for minor road and

:33:51.:33:55.

rail improvements. The money is there within the budget to fix this

:33:56.:33:58.

programme, it is not being spent properly. We will leave it there,

:33:59.:34:02.

We will leave it there, that is enough potholes.

:34:03.:34:05.

It's time now to find out the answer to our quiz.

:34:06.:34:08.

The question was what is the latest phrase Donald Trump has

:34:09.:34:10.

Did he say in court because he is going to do a legal challenge? He

:34:11.:34:26.

said see you in court when the court ruled against him on the travel ban

:34:27.:34:30.

to which the Attorney General of Washington state replied we've seen

:34:31.:34:34.

you in court twice and we've won twice, now it has to go to the

:34:35.:34:39.

Supreme Court. It is a real interesting judicial problem for the

:34:40.:34:45.

United States, at the moment. Not least given the Supreme Court.

:34:46.:34:46.

Coming up in a moment, it's our regular look at what's been

:34:47.:34:52.

For now it's time to say goodbye to Anne McElvoy

:34:53.:34:55.

So for the next half an hour we're going to be focussing on Europe.

:34:56.:34:58.

We'll be looking at who the EU's Brexit negotiators are,

:34:59.:35:01.

how the EU has responded to Donald Trump's arrival

:35:02.:35:03.

in the White House, and whether robots need

:35:04.:35:05.

First though, here's our guide to the latest from Europe -

:35:06.:35:09.

MPs overwhelmingly agreed to let the Government begin the UK's

:35:10.:35:23.

departure from the EU as they voted for the Brexit Bill.

:35:24.:35:26.

Romania's Prime Minister insisted he won't resign,

:35:27.:35:33.

despite mass protests calling for him and his cabinet to step down

:35:34.:35:36.

over a now abandoned anti-corruption measure,

:35:37.:35:37.

with many saying they had lost trust in their leaders.

:35:38.:35:44.

Following the surge in fighting in eastern Ukraine

:35:45.:35:46.

between government forces and Russian backed separatists,

:35:47.:35:48.

EU foreign ministers condemned the attacks on civilians.

:35:49.:35:53.

23 of the 28 member states are breaching air standards,

:35:54.:35:55.

according to the European Commission.

:35:56.:35:56.

It recommends phasing out environmentally damaging subsidies

:35:57.:35:58.

such as tax breaks for privately used company cars.

:35:59.:36:01.

And the idea to provide free inter-rail travel passes to all EU

:36:02.:36:06.

citizens on their 18th birthday hit the buffers.

:36:07.:36:08.

The European Commission will instead offer a cheaper plan,

:36:09.:36:10.

awarding a general travel budget to schools.

:36:11.:36:24.

And with us for the next 30 minutes I've been joined

:36:25.:36:26.

by the UKIP MEP Gerard Batten, and Labour's Anneliese Dodds.

:36:27.:36:31.

Welcome to you both. What happens in the European Parliament votes

:36:32.:36:36.

against this deal in a couple of years' time? I think that is a very

:36:37.:36:40.

good question and there is a possibility of that, it is just

:36:41.:36:44.

before European elections so not always a great time to have rational

:36:45.:36:49.

dispassionate debate on issues. Do we have any idea what the answer is?

:36:50.:36:54.

Well I just hope we can get away from the kind of conflict eventual

:36:55.:36:58.

argumentative approach we have had. You don't know? Well... I don't

:36:59.:37:06.

know. If there is no deal which our British dealer said she would prefer

:37:07.:37:10.

to a bad deal, I wouldn't, if that there is no deal, that means

:37:11.:37:14.

exiting, World Trade Organisation rule, no clear future relationship.

:37:15.:37:19.

It wouldn't be good for Europe either. It would be bad on all side.

:37:20.:37:24.

What do you think would happen? Perhaps the council would do what it

:37:25.:37:27.

does when the European Parliaments votes for a directive it doesn't

:37:28.:37:31.

want because it has been amended in such a way, it ignores that and does

:37:32.:37:36.

it any way, whether it has the power to reject the vote of Prince

:37:37.:37:41.

Charlesment on this I don't know. That would be nigh on impossible. If

:37:42.:37:45.

the European Parliament took a vote as Bray sick as the Brexit deal it

:37:46.:37:51.

could hardly ignore it. What would happen is what Mrs May said would

:37:52.:37:57.

happen, we would exit on World Trade Organisation... That is why going

:37:58.:38:01.

down the Article 50 route wrong any way. That boat has left the harbour.

:38:02.:38:06.

What we will do is have two-years of negotiation with people who don't

:38:07.:38:10.

want to negotiation with us, and the end they have to have a deal they

:38:11.:38:14.

can reject. What the Government could still do, and I am the Brexit

:38:15.:38:20.

spokesman man for Ukip by the way, step one should be to repeal the

:38:21.:38:25.

communities act, which would under our law mean we are no longer

:38:26.:38:29.

member, all legislation would remain in place because it has been

:38:30.:38:33.

incorporated as acts of Parliament. Bill Cash has done a good draft. We

:38:34.:38:39.

haven't got time for that. But it that route, that has gone, that is

:38:40.:38:41.

is not the Government's strategy. Exactly. It is also not how the

:38:42.:38:47.

issues have set out in the treaties. We have to somehow make it work, we

:38:48.:38:51.

have to be grown ups about this, we need to start actually having a

:38:52.:38:55.

decent conversation, stop shouting at each other, stop threaten the

:38:56.:39:01.

rest of the EU saying we will slap tariffs on the car, we need to have

:39:02.:39:05.

an adult conversation ssm The Europeans have been vocal. I have

:39:06.:39:09.

noticed a change in tone. A more constructive tone in the past couple

:39:10.:39:13.

of weeks even. I think so. It is no good for the rest of the EU, if we

:39:14.:39:17.

don't have a deal that will work for everybody at the end of this. We

:39:18.:39:22.

have to somehow take some of the steam and the high fall

:39:23.:39:25.

Lieutenanting politics out of this and talk about it rationally. Good

:39:26.:39:31.

luck with that. Any way. When the Brexit talks get under way they will

:39:32.:39:35.

be led by David Davis, for existing the EU we know that, but what about

:39:36.:39:41.

the people he will be facing across the negotiating table? Adam Fleming

:39:42.:39:46.

reports from Brussels on the EU figures going head-to-head with the

:39:47.:39:47.

UK Government. Yes, he's going to negotiate

:39:48.:39:51.

the Brexit deal with the UK. Y-yes...

:39:52.:40:07.

Big deal-ish. French Foreign Minister,

:40:08.:40:19.

a former European Commission and who was mastermind

:40:20.:40:24.

of the 1992 Winter Olympics. His catchphrase is keep

:40:25.:40:26.

calm and negotiate. Let's get a more three-dimensional

:40:27.:40:29.

picture from MEPs who know him. I think he is a bit

:40:30.:40:31.

taller in real life? What is Mr Barnier

:40:32.:40:38.

like, do you know him? He is very expert can also come

:40:39.:40:42.

in one of the most sensitive areas, He is not someone with anti-British

:40:43.:40:54.

feeling, not at all. When he was Commissioner he always

:40:55.:40:59.

looked for balanced solutions But of course, as a chief EU

:41:00.:41:02.

negotiator, he will try, first of all, to protect

:41:03.:41:09.

the interests of the union and also I could say that he is French

:41:10.:41:11.

with a British style. That means he is very

:41:12.:41:25.

concise, very precise. When someone gives him

:41:26.:41:28.

an argument or an idea, if it is something reasonable,

:41:29.:41:30.

he will say, OK, it was not my first But if he thinks there is a red

:41:31.:41:33.

line, he will be always firm Parliament has its own negotiator,

:41:34.:41:38.

Guy Verhofstadt, leader of the Liberal Group -

:41:39.:41:52.

although his precise Is he going to be in

:41:53.:41:54.

the room, actually? And he is a very good negotiator

:41:55.:42:02.

and everybody recognises that. As Prime Minister of Belgium,

:42:03.:42:05.

you gain a lot of experience if you have done that

:42:06.:42:09.

and done it successfully. You know, we represent

:42:10.:42:11.

half a billion people. It is absolutely vital that any

:42:12.:42:16.

negotiation takes into account the needs and aspirations

:42:17.:42:18.

of the people of the European Union. Then there's the man

:42:19.:42:21.

from the council, Didier Seeuws. A Belgian lawyer,

:42:22.:42:30.

hardly a household name. Let's find out more

:42:31.:42:32.

from an old colleague. His excellent at coming

:42:33.:42:41.

up with compromises when you have positions

:42:42.:42:45.

which are seemingly irreconcilable. He often finds a way

:42:46.:42:46.

of reconciling them. He will have the knowledge,

:42:47.:42:48.

he will know the positions of the member states,

:42:49.:42:51.

so will often be able to say to Barnier, yes, you can agree this,

:42:52.:42:53.

or that would be a bit risky, it might not get endorsed

:42:54.:42:57.

by the other member states, the 27. But wait, the cast of

:42:58.:43:00.

characters gets even bigger. The trade Commissioner,

:43:01.:43:10.

Cecilia Malmstrom will be a big player if the UK and the EU also try

:43:11.:43:16.

and do a free-trade And never far from any

:43:17.:43:19.

decision is Martin Selmayr, chief of staff to the commission

:43:20.:43:22.

President, Jean-Claude Juncker. Give me one name, who is going to be

:43:23.:43:24.

the most influential person It's the elected

:43:25.:43:27.

representatives on both sides. So far, with his Gallic flair,

:43:28.:43:35.

towering presence and ability to captivate the British press,

:43:36.:43:38.

it does seem like the commission's Monsieur Barnier will be the one

:43:39.:43:41.

who dominates the headlines. Any way. When the Brexit talks get

:43:42.:43:46.

under way they will be led by David Davis, for existing the EU we know

:43:47.:43:49.

that, but what about the people he will be facing across the

:43:50.:43:51.

negotiating table? Adam Fleming reports from Brussels

:43:52.:43:58.

What do we know of Mr Barnier? He has said one of the key things in

:43:59.:44:05.

this debate, which is freedom of movement is is not up for

:44:06.:44:08.

discussion, he said it can't be changed. Britain has to accept it.

:44:09.:44:14.

But it, now that Mrs May said we are leaving the single market. The free

:44:15.:44:19.

movement is not a matter for debate He is supposed to be negotiating our

:44:20.:44:25.

position. No, theirs. In order to arrive at this mittical deal, he

:44:26.:44:30.

said that freedom of movement is is not up for negotiation. It isn't a

:44:31.:44:36.

matter now. I am not sure, Freeman was one of the four freedoms that

:44:37.:44:43.

comes with being a member of the supermarket. We are saying rightly

:44:44.:44:48.

or wrongly we will not be a member of the single market freedom of

:44:49.:44:52.

movement is not an issue. The issue about tariff free trade. You went

:44:53.:44:56.

saying that, you were talking about freedom of movement They are talking

:44:57.:45:00.

about that to sort out the trade issues which is probably the second

:45:01.:45:04.

biggest issue. A free trade deal you can do. We do them at the European

:45:05.:45:10.

Union, the other countries bilateral, they don't involve

:45:11.:45:14.

freedom of movement issue, the EU Canada deal which is the latest one

:45:15.:45:18.

has no freedom of movement implications. Is that right.

:45:19.:45:24.

Sometimes, when Britain is trying to secure trade deals with countries

:45:25.:45:29.

like India, we have come a cropper on that. That is a Visa issue.

:45:30.:45:35.

Exactly. You have said the British people have decided they don't want

:45:36.:45:38.

to have freedom of movement, most opinion polls show that even a

:45:39.:45:43.

majority of Leave voters said if there was a decision between having

:45:44.:45:46.

access to trade across the EU and having some freedom of movement,

:45:47.:45:50.

they would prioritise access to trade. Theresa May has decided she

:45:51.:45:53.

wants to take us in a particular direction. There will be some

:45:54.:45:58.

freedom of movement and some access to the single market. These are the

:45:59.:46:02.

issues that have to be negotiated? Do we know anything yet, there were

:46:03.:46:08.

so many names in that film, all with their own constituencies, and I

:46:09.:46:11.

don't mean that in a political sense, their own interests in

:46:12.:46:15.

Brussels, do we have any idea what the common line is going to be?

:46:16.:46:20.

Ultimately, the EU 27, whether we are talking about them represented

:46:21.:46:24.

in institutions or member states, they are wanting to ensure the best

:46:25.:46:27.

outcome for all of them and that is one that has a good deal for Britain

:46:28.:46:31.

as well. That will not happen if we keep having a 0-sum politics. If we

:46:32.:46:35.

keep having a trade-off, if we have a deal that works for the rest of

:46:36.:46:41.

the EU it will not work for Britain and vice versa. Who is saying that?

:46:42.:46:46.

Some political voices, we have had the threats from Theresa May, if we

:46:47.:46:50.

don't get that deal we will turn ourselves into a bargain basement

:46:51.:46:55.

tax haven. That is your party's phrase, she never said that. She

:46:56.:47:01.

said if we did come out on WTO rules, we would also need to

:47:02.:47:05.

consider our economic model. There are plenty of choices between being

:47:06.:47:10.

what we are now and Singapore, which is not much of a bargaining chip.

:47:11.:47:17.

Philip Hammond push the same line, they know the messages they are

:47:18.:47:19.

sending and I think they are damaging when we should be building

:47:20.:47:22.

bridges, rather than blowing them up. If you hear what has come out of

:47:23.:47:27.

Europe recently, listening to one of the Baltic states' ministers on

:47:28.:47:34.

another channel, he was much more conciliatory. Poland is saying the

:47:35.:47:40.

same. Even Michel Barnier says he understands the importance of the

:47:41.:47:42.

London capital markets to the whole of the EU. I wanted to ask you this,

:47:43.:47:47.

we have a rough idea I put it no higher than that because of the

:47:48.:47:53.

White Paper, of the British negotiating position. Doesn't the

:47:54.:48:00.

European Union now need to give its equivalent of its rough idea? That

:48:01.:48:06.

is a very good point. We are going to have a very long two years of

:48:07.:48:09.

protracted negotiations to end the Banega position, and we really

:48:10.:48:14.

should know where we want to be now. We want freedom to make our laws, we

:48:15.:48:20.

want to continue trading tariff free. Parliament has a vote on this,

:48:21.:48:25.

these are things the European Parliament can scupper, by voting

:48:26.:48:28.

against it, it is actually the council that makes the decision to

:48:29.:48:32.

accept it or not. The Council of ministers does that. They are the

:48:33.:48:36.

heads of government in their own countries. They will come under

:48:37.:48:39.

tremendous pressure from their own industries and businesses to reach a

:48:40.:48:44.

sensible agreement. Rather than the ideologues in the European

:48:45.:48:48.

Parliament. One thing that could scupper negotiations would be the EU

:48:49.:48:52.

insists on agreeing some kind of Brexit Bill upfront, whether it is

:48:53.:48:59.

40 billion, 60 billion or whatever. I would suggest no British

:49:00.:49:04.

Government can agree to that? Well, in an ideal world, would we be here

:49:05.:49:08.

at all? I can understand their thinking. More recently, they have

:49:09.:49:12.

been saying they want to agree a methodology for deciding what the

:49:13.:49:21.

figure would be. What would we be paying for? Take one example,

:49:22.:49:25.

imagine a Lithuanian civil servant who joined the commission when she

:49:26.:49:30.

was 25. When she joined, the British state had a liability for part of

:49:31.:49:35.

her pension. When she retires, in 40 or 50 years, whatever. That will

:49:36.:49:39.

still be there in the future, in the same way that the British state has

:49:40.:49:43.

a liability for my pension when I paid national insurance. But you are

:49:44.:49:46.

not leaving the British state. You are aware that the pensions of

:49:47.:49:53.

Brussels bureaucrats are between two and three times the average earnings

:49:54.:49:56.

in Britain. You think the British people are going to stand for that,

:49:57.:50:00.

paying for pensions that are up to three times their average wage? I

:50:01.:50:05.

agree there will be difficult discussions about that. What I worry

:50:06.:50:09.

about is that if this gets turned into something about bashing quite a

:50:10.:50:14.

small number of people, and we are talking about small amounts of money

:50:15.:50:17.

in comparison to the overall amount we are going to lose in trade deals,

:50:18.:50:24.

and I'm not saying it is peanuts, but in comparison to what we could

:50:25.:50:27.

lose, we need to look at these issues with an adult head on our

:50:28.:50:33.

shoulders. What would you say to the demand, if that is what it is, for a

:50:34.:50:43.

divorce Bill? The EU is going to do what everybody else is going to do,

:50:44.:50:47.

when their income drops, they have to reduce their outgoings. There

:50:48.:50:50.

will be people with pension liabilities and that will be fairly

:50:51.:50:54.

minimal, I think, and he governments can agree between them how to deal

:50:55.:50:59.

with that, when obligations, to particular people that have been

:51:00.:51:06.

working. The idea of what Guy Verhofstadt is proposing, giving

:51:07.:51:09.

billions of pounds to pay for our membership until the current budget

:51:10.:51:15.

period end, it is pure fantasy. But there are a lot of things that you

:51:16.:51:19.

promised we would keep getting, like research funds, different streams of

:51:20.:51:22.

funding we were told we would still get. Potentially, the money has got

:51:23.:51:28.

to come from somewhere. Research funds is quite a small proportion,

:51:29.:51:32.

the Government could easily make that up. We will see. Ledge of time

:51:33.:51:36.

to debate this in the weeks and months ahead.

:51:37.:51:37.

Donald Trump's arrival at the White House just three weeks

:51:38.:51:40.

ago has caused something of a political earthquake

:51:41.:51:41.

in Brussels - with EU leaders going public with their concerns

:51:42.:51:44.

about the new US president's approach to trade, defence

:51:45.:51:46.

In an open letter the President of the European Council,

:51:47.:51:51.

Donald Tusk, wrote "Donald Trump's presidency and the change in

:51:52.:51:54.

Washington puts the European Union in a difficult situation,

:51:55.:51:56.

with the new administration seeming to put into question the last 70

:51:57.:51:59.

Chief Brexit Negotiator Guy Verhofstadt told think-tank

:52:00.:52:11.

Chatham House in January that on a trip to Washington

:52:12.:52:13.

after Donald Trump's election "Every European that I met in the US

:52:14.:52:16.

Which is that the EU has fewer friends than ever in USA today."

:52:17.:52:31.

And this week the EU's Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom

:52:32.:52:33.

attacked Donald Trump's protectionist policies on trade

:52:34.:52:35.

and migration saying: "Those who in the 21st century think

:52:36.:52:37.

that we can become great again by rebuilding borders,

:52:38.:52:39.

reimposing trade barriers and restricting people's freedom

:52:40.:52:41.

One thing that is clear is that for the first time since this was an

:52:42.:53:03.

issue, the White House is run by somebody that is basically hostile

:53:04.:53:07.

to the European Union. That is a total change from any previous

:53:08.:53:13.

administration. How should the EU handle this? I think it is very

:53:14.:53:17.

important that we try to get some kind of workable relationship, but

:53:18.:53:23.

not one where the EU, and we will talk about Britain as well, a

:53:24.:53:29.

supplicant relationship. The idea that we have to support everything

:53:30.:53:33.

Donald Trump is doing, or not criticise it, in order to have that

:53:34.:53:36.

relationship. We will still have commercial relationships at the same

:53:37.:53:40.

time as criticising him on human rights. Still going to depend on

:53:41.:53:44.

America for your defence? Potentially. This whole development

:53:45.:53:51.

could push more defence cooperation, across the EU, could push them into

:53:52.:53:56.

working closer together. Spending more money? Who knows? That is for

:53:57.:54:02.

the EU 27 now. We meet our 2% on Nato. An interesting point raised,

:54:03.:54:11.

it could be, if the 27 now regard the White House as something that is

:54:12.:54:15.

hostile to them, this could actually pull Europe together on a number of

:54:16.:54:22.

fronts? Yes, I think they should cease their hostility to Mr Trump

:54:23.:54:25.

and accept the situation in the real world, talk to his ambassador,

:54:26.:54:29.

rather than insulting him. He has not been appointed yet. Here's a

:54:30.:54:34.

fantasist. You are quite right, Andrew, if the

:54:35.:54:45.

EU wants to preserve itself in some form, it should look at what has

:54:46.:54:49.

gone wrong. All of these political things we have been talking about it

:54:50.:54:53.

does, it should get back to the idea of facilitating trade and

:54:54.:54:56.

cooperation, then it could have some kind of a future, like the European

:54:57.:55:00.

free trade Association. That is what we were told it was supposed to be.

:55:01.:55:03.

Nobody would object to that kind of thing. It is difficult for you, the

:55:04.:55:08.

transatlantic trade deal is dead, it is over. It is dead in the water.

:55:09.:55:12.

There is a huge argument over defence and the attitude to Russia.

:55:13.:55:17.

We haven't even touched on the White House's attitude to trade and

:55:18.:55:25.

currency policies. Rough times ahead? Yes, and the way we can face

:55:26.:55:29.

up to them is not by supplicating ourselves in front of Donald Trump.

:55:30.:55:33.

You talk about trade deals, we have had no assurance from the UK

:55:34.:55:36.

Government, as part of a new deal between the UK and the US, our

:55:37.:55:40.

services will not be opened up, health services, to the US. We

:55:41.:55:44.

haven't even started negotiating yet. Mrs May said she wanted to

:55:45.:55:49.

start... She said the NHS was not for sale. The trade deal, if it does

:55:50.:55:54.

that, it is a matter for Parliament to decide. The British people will

:55:55.:55:59.

decide. Yes, but I think the British people are quite disturbed by having

:56:00.:56:04.

their leader appearing to fawn and supplicate herself in front of a

:56:05.:56:09.

foreign leader. If people wanted control when they wanted to leave

:56:10.:56:12.

the European Union, surely we don't want to leave the EU to become

:56:13.:56:14.

controlled by the US? MEPs are gearing up for a vote next

:56:15.:56:16.

week on proposals for a new law governing non military robots,

:56:17.:56:19.

after a committee decided that great leaps in technology required

:56:20.:56:22.

regulation at an EU level. Here's Adam again, who's been joined

:56:23.:56:28.

by his new friend Sheldon. Do you think we should have

:56:29.:56:35.

new legislation for robots? And MEPs on the Justice

:56:36.:56:38.

committee agreed. They've spent two years coming up

:56:39.:56:47.

with ideas for new legislation. The robots before were in industry,

:56:48.:56:49.

they were kept far away from humans But it is also linked

:56:50.:56:53.

to the interconnectivity, because the new generations

:56:54.:57:02.

of robots are connected to networks So, they have become

:57:03.:57:04.

a lot more intelligent, and how will we interact with them,

:57:05.:57:14.

and what will be the influence Top of their list is sorting

:57:15.:57:17.

out who is responsible They've also suggested that robots

:57:18.:57:21.

have the legal status Parliament was turned into a sort

:57:22.:57:25.

of low-budget edition of Robot Wars to get everyone ready

:57:26.:57:31.

for a vote next week. For all the new technology

:57:32.:57:34.

on display, there is plenty of old-fashioned human

:57:35.:57:36.

politics as well. MEPs are split on a whole range

:57:37.:57:40.

of issues, whether there should be a new EU robotics agency,

:57:41.:57:43.

whether there should be a tax on robots for all the jobs

:57:44.:57:46.

they replace, even whether robots If MEPs vote it through next

:57:47.:57:48.

Thursday, the report will be handed to the commission,

:57:49.:57:55.

who will decide whether to proceed with legislation

:57:56.:57:57.

which could take years - meaning one country

:57:58.:57:59.

is unlikely to be affected. A problem with communication. The

:58:00.:58:23.

French Socialist candidate for President is suggesting we should

:58:24.:58:26.

tax robots. That would put them in their place, wouldn't it? On a

:58:27.:58:30.

serious note, we do need to think about what we are going to do to

:58:31.:58:33.

support people that might be made unemployed through many of these

:58:34.:58:37.

developments. In Finland they have brought in a universal income,

:58:38.:58:41.

partly to help people whose jobs are being digitised. Tax robots? Try

:58:42.:58:47.

sending a tax bill to the Terminator, see what you get. I will

:58:48.:58:52.

leave that to you. That is it for now. Thanks for joining us. Goodbye.

:58:53.:59:01.

When author Sir Terry Pratchett died,

:59:02.:59:02.

When author Sir Terry Pratchett died,

:59:03.:59:06.