18/04/2017 Daily Politics


18/04/2017

Jo Coburn with the latest political news, interviews and debate.


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Transcript


LineFromTo

I have just chaired a meeting of the Cabinet where we agreed

:00:08.:00:10.

that the government should call a general election to be

:00:11.:00:12.

So in the past hour Theresa May has called a general election -

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we'll bring you the latest from here at Westminster.

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Reaction from all the parties and - of course - the best analysis...

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So - Westminster taken completely by surprise this morning

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with the announcement from the Prime Minister of the early

:01:09.:01:12.

General Election that she had insisted would not happen...

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Let's listen to what Theresa May has to say.

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I have just chaired a meeting of the Cabinet where we have agreed

:01:31.:01:34.

the Government should call a general election to be held

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I want to explain the reasons for that decision.

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What will happen next, and the choice facing the British

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people, when you come to vote in this election.

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Last summer, after the country voted to leave the European Union,

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Britain needed certainty, stability and strong leadership

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Since I became Prime Minister the Government has

:02:04.:02:10.

financial and economic danger, since the referendum we have seen

:02:11.:02:18.

Economic growth that has exceeded all expectations.

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We have also delivered on the mandate that we were handed

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Britain is leaving the European Union and there

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As we look to the future, the Government has the right

:02:27.:02:35.

plan for negotiating our new relationship with Europe.

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We want a deep and special partnership between a strong

:02:41.:02:44.

and successful European Union and the United Kingdom that is free

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That means we will regain control of our own money, our own laws,

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We will be free to strike trade deals with old friends

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and new partners all around the world.

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This is the right approach and it is in the national interest.

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But the other political parties oppose it.

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At this moment of enormous national significance,

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there should be unity here in Westminster.

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The country is coming together but Westminster is not.

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In recent weeks, Labour has threatened to vote

:03:33.:03:36.

against the final agreement we reach with the European Union.

:03:37.:03:39.

The Liberal Democrats have said they want to grind the business

:03:40.:03:42.

The Scottish National Party said it will vote against the legislation up

:03:43.:03:51.

formally repealed Britain's membership of the European Union.

:03:52.:04:00.

Unelected members of the House of Lords have vowed to fight us

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Opponents believe that because the government 's majority is so small,

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they can force us to change course. They underestimate our determination

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to get the job done. I am not prepared to let them

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endanger the security of millions of working people

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across the country. What they are doing jeopardises

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the work we must do to prepare And it weakens the Government's

:04:29.:04:31.

negotiating position in Europe. If we do not hold a general election

:04:32.:04:38.

now, their political And the negotiations

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with the European Union will reach their most difficult

:04:42.:04:47.

stage in the run-up to the next Division in Westminster

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will risk our ability to make a success of Brexit and it

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will cause damaging uncertainty We need a general election

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and we need one now. We have, at this moment,

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a one-off chance to get this done while the European Union

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agrees its negotiating position I have only recently and reluctantly

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come to this conclusion. Since I became Prime Minister,

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I have said there should be no Now I have concluded that the only

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way to guarantee certainty and stability for the years ahead

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is to hold this election and seek your support

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for the decisions I must take. And so tomorrow I will move a motion

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in the House of Commons, calling for a general election to be

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held on the 8th of June. That motion, as set out

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by the Fixed Term Parliaments Act, will require a two thirds majority

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by the House of Commons. I have a simple challenge

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to the opposition parties. You have criticised the Government's

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decision for Brexit, challenged our objectives,

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threatened to block the legislation This is your moment to show you mean

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it, show you are not opposing the Government for the sake of it,

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to show that you do not Let us tomorrow vote

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for an election. Let us put forward our plans

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for Brexit and our alternative plans for government and then let

:06:29.:06:31.

the people decide. And the decision facing the country

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will be all about leadership. It would be a choice between strong

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and stable leadership in the national interest with me

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as your Prime Minister, or weak and, unstable,

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coalition government led by Jeremy Corbyn,

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propped up by the Liberal Democrats, who want to reopen the divisions

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of the referendum and Nicola A vote for the Conservatives

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will make it harder for opposition politicians who want to stop me

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from getting the job done. Every vote for the Conservatives

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will make me stronger when I negotiate for Britain

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with the prime ministers, presidents and chancellors

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of the European Union. Every vote for the Conservatives

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will mean that we can stick to our plan for a stronger Britain

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and take the right long-term It was with reluctance that

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I decided the country It is with strong conviction that

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I say it is necessary to secure the strong and stable leadership

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the country needs to see us So, tomorrow, let the House

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of Commons vote for an election. Let everybody put forward

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their proposals for Brexit and their programmes for government

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and let us remove the risk of uncertainty and instability

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and continue to give the country the strong and stable

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leadership it demands. Theresa May having delivered that

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very dramatic statement that no one was expecting, except we were told

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that there would be a statement from Theresa May outside Number 10 but

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there was no government logo on that lectin which was an indication that

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she might be calling an early General Election.

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Joining me in the studio now is former Conservative

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Leader Iain Duncan Smith and the Shadow Energy

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We are also joined by Laura Kuenssberg. Before I get reaction

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from you gentlemen, take us through the hour before she walked those few

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paces from the black door at Number 10 to the podium. This is a very

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significant turnaround from her. No question. For months there has been

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speculation, always killed off by her team, always killed by senior

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minister said she does not want an election and we are not going to do

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it yet this morning, around 9:30 a.m., there is going to be a left

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turn moment. They are huge moments. There was all sorts of speculation,

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as you can imagine, first day back from the Easter holidays, everyone

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is full of vigour, looking to get going. Rumour mill goes into

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hyperdrive, mysteriously, senior sources in government, their phones

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and text were not been answered and the news was we have to wait and see

:09:45.:09:48.

that the Prime Minister says. Shortly after 11 o'clock, one of my

:09:49.:09:53.

contacts told me it would be a General Election on June the 8th.

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She even came I'd earlier than expected and she confirmed that. She

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has changed her mind, if we are to believe that. There is an element of

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trust here, she has said repeatedly, she would not call a snap election,

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it would lead to uncertainty and instability and now she is doing

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exactly what she promised she wouldn't and she is calling a

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General Election. I think she was right. She said she reluctantly came

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to the conclusion and I think it is a balance, all these things are a

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balance of decisions about greater instability lies. Do you try and

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press on a small majority, get through the biggest single thing any

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government has had to do since we joined the European Union? You have

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got the negotiations and the European Union to take place where

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you need to have a very strong showing and a strong mandate and the

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second part is domestically, but also the bill and I was here for the

:10:51.:10:57.

Maastricht Treaty and I have to tell you, the bill, weather was no chance

:10:58.:11:01.

we would ever be allowed to vote it down, that took ages to get through,

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because every device was used. I use them to slow it down. That was

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because the small majority. In the last few days, the polls have

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confirmed, in her mind, that there is an opportunity here, Labour is 20

:11:19.:11:22.

points behind, that is a massive gap not seen since the mid-19 80s. Like

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anything else, you want to know you have the chance of having a strong

:11:29.:11:31.

mandate. The most important poll was not about party polling, it was one

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that came out that showed nearly 70% of the public now want to just get

:11:37.:11:41.

on with it. They don't really want to continue to discuss the Brexit

:11:42.:11:45.

issue, but they want to see the government make progress and I think

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the key point they do not get is the Parliamentary mess that is likely to

:11:51.:11:53.

happen and I think that is the bit and she really does need to do this,

:11:54.:11:58.

I know what it is like with the government with a small majority

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trying to do that, it is difficult. If you do not have a strong mandate

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with a strong vote in Parliament, it makes it more difficult to get this

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through. You can hardly blame Theresa May when you look at the

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polls and Labour has been digesting them, over the last few weeks and

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months, it is an ideal chance for her to capitalise on that and

:12:20.:12:22.

increase her majority and at the same time in her statement, Blaydon

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Labour, the Liberal Democrats, the Scottish Nationalists but their

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opposition to Brexit negotiations. She must be the first Prime Minister

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ever to begin a General Election campaign with a U-turn. That is the

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first thing. That is quite extraordinary, quite extraordinary.

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You say, well she is blaming the opposition in Parliament for being

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so weak and if we are so weak, wide to she need a bigger mandate? If in

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fact she is saying that it is because of the chaos in Parliament,

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the key thing and the key poll, the weekend was not about the questions

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on the polling on the votes, I think it was on the policies. Every

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Conservative candidate and every Conservative canvasser will have to

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answer three questions. They will have the answer why is it that today

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the average earnings are 10% lower in real terms than they were in

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2007, why is it today that 1.8 million people are not being seen

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within four hours in a and D, when in 2010, that number was 350000 and

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why is it today, that we have 200,000 fewer home owners in this

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country under a Conservative government. These are the policies

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that I am confident resonate with the voters out there. The polls at

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the weekend showed that they did. What we have been saying about

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carers allowance, what we have been saying about free school meals for

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all primary school students, these things are actually popular. Before

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we get to the policies, what about the Labour position on the General

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Election? We have had a statement from Jeremy Corbyn and the author

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that they will vote in favour of the motion that will be put to the House

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of Commons to bring on this General Election. The sooner we can get rid

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of this Conservative government the better. She says she wants to put

:14:30.:14:36.

this on Brexit, we know that they want a hard Brexit, it is one that

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actually is turning this country backwards and what we want to be

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able to articulate and I think what the public actually wants is a

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positive Brexit that enables us, yes to have the new relationships that

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we need with other countries around the world, but that still maintains

:14:54.:14:56.

the access and movement of people that is necessary to keep our

:14:57.:15:02.

business wheels turning. Isn't there a danger of framing this General

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Election, presuming everything passes through and it will, isn't

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there a danger of framing it along the lines of Brexit and the argument

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would be repeated? Absolutely and that was one of the

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reasons articulated by people privately close to Theresa May is

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they did not want to have an election all about Brexit. That was

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one of the arguments in the negative column for not having a general

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election and waiting until the deal was finished by 2020. You have had

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the pros in one column and the cons in another. The polling suggests

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having an election would be advantageous for the Conservatives.

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The state of the Labour Party has been in real turmoil in the last 12

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months is also in the positive column. In the negative column is a

:15:58.:16:02.

threat of instability. The idea of going back on her words after she

:16:03.:16:05.

said she did not want to have an election. But at the end of the day

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the political logic, the appeal of looking at polls that puts her so

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far ahead of Jeremy Corbyn and the appeal of her having her own mandate

:16:15.:16:20.

is what has won out. One reason for that is Theresa May in a strange

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way, as we saw during the referendum campaign, is not one of those Tory

:16:25.:16:30.

members who got up to have an argument about the European Union.

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She is more interested in the domestic agenda. She was on the

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remain side. Yes, she was called the submarine for trying to stay out of

:16:44.:16:46.

the debate. She has always wanted to do a lot on the domestic front,

:16:47.:16:50.

grammar schools and changes to social care. The only way she would

:16:51.:16:55.

be able to do that is where her own majority and this would be one of

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the factors that pushed her. Having her own mandate is clearly

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important. What is amazing when you talk about Westminster and the

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gossip machine is how they managed to keep this under wraps and secret

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because nobody knew it. It is one of the features of Theresa May's team.

:17:15.:17:19.

She has a small circle of people that she trusts. Very small. That

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was her at the Home Office and she has taken that into Downing Street.

:17:25.:17:28.

She has been criticised for that, but it means they have been able to

:17:29.:17:33.

keep things tight as a drum. There is a fascinating anecdotes in her

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biography. Andrea Leadsom told Theresa May two hours before she was

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pulling out of the leadership race that she was going to do it. She

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told her, you will be the PM, I am off. Theresa May did not even tell

:17:49.:17:52.

her husband that within a couple of hours she was a dead cert to be

:17:53.:17:57.

moving into number ten. That is quite a capacity for keeping

:17:58.:18:01.

secrets. But it also tells us something about her, which is her

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vulnerability. Ministers did not know about this idea until this

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morning. She has not been cancelled by that many people. A very senior

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minister who would be heavily involved in the election told me a

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couple of weeks ago there had not been a single conversation with the

:18:20.:18:21.

Prime Minister about having a general election. Strain is keeping

:18:22.:18:27.

secrets, but it does not mean the Tory party is very well for this. Or

:18:28.:18:33.

anybody else. Or anybody else. We will let you go because you have got

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weeks and weeks to fill. Thank you for coming in. Let's turn to this

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issue of her changing her mind on something fundamental. Was she wrong

:18:44.:18:50.

initially to rule it out? She ruled it out repeatedly in endless

:18:51.:18:53.

interviews, saying it was not the right thing to do. Let's hear what

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she said to our very own Andrew Neal on this subject.

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When you do the deal, when it's clear the terms

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with which we will leave the EU, why would you not take that

:19:02.:19:04.

to the country either in a second referendum or go to the country

:19:05.:19:07.

in a general election and get the people to vote

:19:08.:19:09.

What I have said is when we have the deal there will be a vote

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Of course there will be votes in parliaments across Europe

:19:16.:19:19.

because they will need to be a ratification process.

:19:20.:19:21.

I believe that is the right way to do it, to say to the UK

:19:22.:19:24.

Parliament this is your opportunity to vote for this deal.

:19:25.:19:27.

Well, I'm confident we are going to get a deal that is going to be

:19:28.:19:32.

The British people have basically said to us go on and get on with it,

:19:33.:19:38.

we want to leave the EU, go out there, get on with it,

:19:39.:19:41.

Iain Duncan Smith, she went back on her word. She said in a statement

:19:42.:19:56.

you saw earlier on, and I am a bit like this, a reluctant convert to

:19:57.:19:59.

the idea of a general election, and she was as well. A few things have

:20:00.:20:05.

changed over the last couple of months. The first is that getting

:20:06.:20:10.

that four lying bill through demonstrated how tough it will be to

:20:11.:20:14.

get this very complex legislation through. It is really complex. This

:20:15.:20:18.

makes Maastricht looked like a picnic. This will be very big and

:20:19.:20:25.

very detailed. The Lords is in a peculiar position. You do not have a

:20:26.:20:30.

majority. We do not, the Liberals are disproportionately represented,

:20:31.:20:36.

100 Liberals in the Lords and nine members of Parliament. But the Lords

:20:37.:20:40.

will react to a strong mandate from a general election. They know when

:20:41.:20:44.

the game is up and they know their limitations. At the moment they have

:20:45.:20:48.

been able to argue, particularly from the Liberals, but also Labour,

:20:49.:20:53.

that you do not have a mandate, you were not elected as Prime Minister

:20:54.:20:56.

and this government was not elected to see this thing through. There has

:20:57.:21:01.

been a lot of kind of let's have some kind of election. She has

:21:02.:21:05.

reached a conclusion in the sense that there is a window of

:21:06.:21:10.

opportunity to do this. France has an election that will not complete

:21:11.:21:13.

until June. While we have that election they will not be any great

:21:14.:21:19.

negotiation taking place. Practically this window works. If

:21:20.:21:22.

you are going to do it, now is the time to do it. Looking at the polls,

:21:23.:21:28.

the Conservatives will increase their majority and it will make life

:21:29.:21:33.

much easier for Theresa May to push through the type of Brexit she wants

:21:34.:21:39.

to say. I admire Iain Duncan Smith's attempt to spin what is clearly a

:21:40.:21:47.

polling advantage into high principle. It is not. Let's not

:21:48.:21:52.

pretend it is. You are right, the polls have had an influence in what

:21:53.:21:57.

she is doing here. But is it in the best interest of not just this

:21:58.:22:01.

country, but look at what is happening in the world at the

:22:02.:22:05.

moment? Is it in the best interest of the country when we have a

:22:06.:22:09.

two-year window to negotiate this deal? Only two years. Nothing will

:22:10.:22:15.

be done in the German and French elections. She ignored it. She said

:22:16.:22:21.

the negotiations can go on and they will not be able to go on for two

:22:22.:22:25.

and a half months as we have an election. No, no, they will be. They

:22:26.:22:32.

will not be in control, they will be out on the streets. The first stage

:22:33.:22:37.

of this is negotiation about the overall political... We were talking

:22:38.:22:44.

about polling and whether that is in the end what changed Theresa May's

:22:45.:22:48.

mine. Let's talk about it a little further with John Curtice who is in

:22:49.:22:54.

Edinburgh. First of all, your reaction, general election on June

:22:55.:22:58.

the 8th. I have to admit I am very surprised. Like Laura Kuenssberg I

:22:59.:23:04.

took the Prime Minister at her word that she did not want to call a

:23:05.:23:08.

general election in June. Calling one is not so straightforward. You

:23:09.:23:15.

will not do that again. The person who really has a decision to make is

:23:16.:23:19.

Jeremy Corbyn. Despite what Barry Gardiner has been arguing about, the

:23:20.:23:24.

Labour Party is in favour of an election and we will have one. If

:23:25.:23:29.

Jeremy Corbyn said no, Theresa May could not have her election, so

:23:30.:23:33.

Jeremy Corbyn is also making a big decision today as well as the Prime

:23:34.:23:39.

Minister. And what about the polls? We have already discussed the

:23:40.:23:43.

headline that Labour is 20 points behind the Conservatives. Some of

:23:44.:23:47.

the opinion polls suggest Labour's position is as bad as it has been

:23:48.:23:52.

any time since 2009 in the worst days of Gordon Brown's

:23:53.:23:56.

administration. But if you take all of the polls, we are looking at a

:23:57.:24:02.

Conservative lead of around 15 points, 22-27, and if that was to

:24:03.:24:06.

transpire in the ballot boxes it would result in a majority for the

:24:07.:24:12.

Conservatives. But we should be careful about talking about a

:24:13.:24:17.

landslide. These days not only is Northern Ireland out of the frame as

:24:18.:24:20.

far as the UK wide scene is concerned, but so is Scotland. I

:24:21.:24:25.

would be surprised if the SNP do not hang onto most of the seeds north of

:24:26.:24:30.

the border. Dire though Labour's position is, it does have a lot of

:24:31.:24:37.

very safe seats and getting a majority of 100 is possible, getting

:24:38.:24:44.

a majority of 170 like Tony Blair got in 1997 could be beyond the

:24:45.:24:49.

Conservatives. If the poll lead does begin to fall, let's say Jeremy

:24:50.:24:54.

Corbyn surprises us all and fights a good campaign and the Tory lead goes

:24:55.:24:59.

down to seven or eight points, Theresa May could discover she does

:25:00.:25:02.

not have much of a majority than she does already and she might even lose

:25:03.:25:07.

a few seats to the Liberal Democrats. You can see the

:25:08.:25:10.

temptation placed in front of her, despite what she said because Labour

:25:11.:25:14.

had been behind the Conservatives over a long period of time. But it

:25:15.:25:20.

seems in the last few days something has crystallised in her mind and

:25:21.:25:23.

pushed her to do this you turn to change her mind and it must be that

:25:24.:25:29.

massive gap. The opinion polls clearly provide a very substantial

:25:30.:25:33.

temptation. The interesting thing is what she has not done is to wait for

:25:34.:25:40.

the results of the local elections on the 4th of May. If you remember

:25:41.:25:44.

what Margaret Thatcher did in 1983 and 1987 when we were all

:25:45.:25:51.

speculating about an election, and she decided to call an election. We

:25:52.:25:59.

will now be intensely looking at the results of those elections and even

:26:00.:26:03.

in Scotland and Wales, but the dye will already have been passed. What

:26:04.:26:09.

about voter fatigue? Everyone has been taken by surprise and Laura

:26:10.:26:12.

Kuenssberg mention people will not be prepared in politics, but also

:26:13.:26:17.

they will not have been expecting it in the country. Will they thank

:26:18.:26:23.

Theresa May for this? One of the thing opponents will use against

:26:24.:26:26.

Theresa May is the fact that you have said she was opposed to the

:26:27.:26:31.

idea of a general election and the opposition will use that to say, you

:26:32.:26:35.

cannot trust the Prime Minister at her word. But at the end of the day

:26:36.:26:40.

that probably is not something voters will be too concerned about.

:26:41.:26:45.

In so far as the election does focus on the issue of Brexit, given that

:26:46.:26:50.

we have got a 71% turnout in the referendum, which is relatively

:26:51.:26:55.

high, I am not sure we should be too concerned about the level of

:26:56.:27:00.

turnout. I think we will see some reiteration of the arguments about

:27:01.:27:03.

Brexit and its merits and hard versus soft for much of the campaign

:27:04.:27:07.

and the question is whether voters will feel that is sufficiently

:27:08.:27:11.

important and responding by turning to the polling station. The Prime

:27:12.:27:17.

Minister has announced her intention to call a general election on the

:27:18.:27:18.

8th of June. So, now the Prime Minister has

:27:19.:27:22.

announced her intention to call a General Election for 8th June,

:27:23.:27:25.

what process needs to happen before The Fixed Term Parliaments Act -

:27:26.:27:28.

introduced under the Coalition government and enshrining

:27:29.:27:31.

the timescale for elections to be held every five years -

:27:32.:27:33.

allows two methods for calling The first would be if

:27:34.:27:36.

two-thirds of MPs backed a motion calling for one -

:27:37.:27:40.

that would be 434 This is the method Theresa May

:27:41.:27:43.

has said she will use, and that she will introduce a motion

:27:44.:27:47.

to parliament tomorrow. The other option is if Parliament

:27:48.:27:50.

passed a motion of no confidence in the government,

:27:51.:27:53.

and no other government If the Prime Minister fails to get

:27:54.:27:56.

the two-thirds majority required in the Commons to call an election,

:27:57.:28:02.

there are two other The Fixed Term Parliaments Act

:28:03.:28:06.

could be repealed, which would only require a simple majority of MPs

:28:07.:28:12.

to vote for it, a lower threshold Or the government could enact

:28:13.:28:15.

a new law, amending the Act and setting a date

:28:16.:28:21.

for the next election. Labour this morning confirmed

:28:22.:28:25.

they will support the motion for an early general election,

:28:26.:28:29.

meaning it will pass with the two-thirds majority

:28:30.:28:32.

needed in the Commons. Their election coordinator,

:28:33.:28:35.

Andrew Gwynne, had told Andrew Neil So as an opposition not wanting

:28:36.:28:37.

to be in opposition, wanting to be in government,

:28:38.:28:42.

so should the government put forward a measure in accordance

:28:43.:28:45.

with the Fixed Term Parliaments Act, then that is something we would very

:28:46.:28:48.

seriously have to consider. If the government was to issue

:28:49.:28:52.

a motion in the Commons for an early election,

:28:53.:28:56.

the Labour Party would vote It would be very difficult not

:28:57.:28:59.

to because if the government wants to dissolve parliament,

:29:00.:29:04.

wants a general election, we don't want the Tories

:29:05.:29:09.

we want to be in government, we want to have that

:29:10.:29:12.

opportunity to put that case to the British people.

:29:13.:29:20.

Andrew Quinn, Labour's election coordinator, but you could not say

:29:21.:29:27.

anything else apart from welcome a general election, otherwise you

:29:28.:29:31.

would be running scared. The nice thing is we do welcome it and also

:29:32.:29:35.

the government recognises that the Labour Party will support it. They

:29:36.:29:40.

have known that, we have made our position very clear. Which is why

:29:41.:29:46.

she could gain confidence from that. And that is why she is able to do

:29:47.:29:51.

it. Now she has to work out what is her pitch to the British people? We

:29:52.:29:57.

have come out with eight very clear, new policies that are very popular

:29:58.:30:00.

and opinion polls at the weekend showed that. We have come out with a

:30:01.:30:05.

very clear policies. The government is not running on a new policy

:30:06.:30:09.

agenda. It is running on a record that has not resolved the economic

:30:10.:30:15.

problems the country has faced. It has precipitated a crisis within the

:30:16.:30:20.

health service. We have seen the BMA and the junior doctors dispute. We

:30:21.:30:25.

have got a crisis in social care and all these problems that the

:30:26.:30:28.

government has to now come out with manifesto commitments on and there

:30:29.:30:30.

was nothing of that in her speech. The opposition parties will make it

:30:31.:30:43.

difficult in terms of the Brexit negotiations, you have reflected on

:30:44.:30:47.

how hard it was during Maastricht, but is now but this General Election

:30:48.:30:52.

will be about? Will not be about a domestic agenda on the critical

:30:53.:30:56.

issues that Barry Gardner has been talking about? It will only be

:30:57.:31:00.

serving what the Conservative Party seems to be interested in at the

:31:01.:31:05.

moment and that is the Brexit negotiations? The Conservative Party

:31:06.:31:08.

is not that interested in the Brexit idea. The vote has been taken and we

:31:09.:31:15.

have triggered Article 50. That process is in place and that is all

:31:16.:31:19.

about negotiation and discussion and that is mostly now the government

:31:20.:31:24.

going out... Why is she calling our General Election? It is about

:31:25.:31:30.

domestic issues. The fact is she needs a mandate, that this her view,

:31:31.:31:34.

to get the Brexit legislation through domestically, which is

:31:35.:31:37.

hugely an issue of numbers in Parliament and the second element is

:31:38.:31:41.

there is a domestic agenda and she wants to get that through. That was

:31:42.:31:47.

not mentioned in her statement. We have been announcing that through

:31:48.:31:49.

the budget and the statement she made in Downing Street. Today, we

:31:50.:31:56.

talked about the business strategy, the industrial strategy, those are

:31:57.:31:59.

the things she wants to take forward. They are all part of it.

:32:00.:32:05.

The fact is the government deals with foreign policy and domestic

:32:06.:32:09.

issues and as Europe strives both of those, it will be part of it. There

:32:10.:32:13.

is a really important point. She wants a mandate to be able to govern

:32:14.:32:16.

with the government that is strong enough in numbers to get their

:32:17.:32:21.

legislation through, after Brexit, Brexit changed everything. The vote

:32:22.:32:25.

to leave the European Union changed everything. The public now will face

:32:26.:32:29.

a choice, do you want a government with a clear and strong leader or do

:32:30.:32:33.

you want a government that is at war with itself as the Labour Party is,

:32:34.:32:37.

led by Jeremy Corbyn, that most of his MPs do not want and which has

:32:38.:32:42.

been foisted on them by the party at large and a Coalition between a

:32:43.:32:46.

messy Labour Party and the Liberal party that wants to reverse the boat

:32:47.:32:53.

on Brexit. She did say she would be able to get a good deal for the UK

:32:54.:32:57.

and on the basis of that good deal, then we could have the General

:32:58.:33:01.

Election in 2020. Let me come to Barry on that point, she did frame

:33:02.:33:05.

in her statement that it would be Labour propped up by the Liberal

:33:06.:33:09.

Democrats with an anti-Brexit tone to the whole campaign. You happy to

:33:10.:33:15.

painted in that way? If you are seen as the party, with the help of the

:33:16.:33:19.

SNP and the Liberal Democrats, who will frustrate something that the

:33:20.:33:23.

Tories keep referring to as the will of the people? We are not

:33:24.:33:27.

anti-Brexit, we have said that now the referendum has taken place, we

:33:28.:33:32.

are leaving the European Union. Let us kill that one. Ian has said, it

:33:33.:33:40.

is a week Labour Party and weak opposition in Parliament, but the

:33:41.:33:45.

Prime Minister is saying that the reason she is calling this is that

:33:46.:33:48.

she needs a bigger mandate because of all the problems. The law you are

:33:49.:33:55.

overrepresented in the Lords and in a wet and you will frustrate...

:33:56.:34:01.

Barry, finish point. It shows the weakness. The point I'm trying to

:34:02.:34:10.

make is this an if we are as weak as he says we are, then she does not

:34:11.:34:13.

lead to increase mandate in the Commons. You know that everything

:34:14.:34:17.

will go through the Lords eventually because the Lords will respect the

:34:18.:34:20.

Commons, they always do, but she cannot have it both ways, we cannot

:34:21.:34:24.

be so weak that she needs a bigger mandate or if she needs a bigger

:34:25.:34:28.

mandate, it is because she fears that we may be able to influence

:34:29.:34:32.

legislation and her legislative programme in way she does not want.

:34:33.:34:39.

We want to see a softer Brexit, not the Brexit that she wants to take a

:34:40.:34:43.

stand. Let's get more reaction. Theresa May has announced that she

:34:44.:34:46.

is calling a General Election to take place on June the 8th. She made

:34:47.:34:51.

the announcement outside Downing Street just after 11 o'clock this

:34:52.:34:56.

morning to the surprise of everyone. Jeremy Corbyn has been giving his

:34:57.:34:59.

reaction to the announcement of the Prime Minister.

:35:00.:35:09.

This is left NHS problems, left her is underfunded and let so many

:35:10.:35:15.

people uncertain. We want to put a case out there to the people of

:35:16.:35:21.

Britain of a society that cares for all, an economy that works for all

:35:22.:35:25.

and a Brexit that works for all. Jeremy Corbyn.

:35:26.:35:29.

We're joined now by Tom Newton Dunn of the Sun and Paul Mason.

:35:30.:35:35.

Tom, your reaction to the announcement. I am really surprised

:35:36.:35:42.

but I am not the only one, so is everyone in NSW won at the moment,

:35:43.:35:46.

not least because Theresa May said she did not want to do this and

:35:47.:35:50.

their huge amounts of good reasons for that, not least, they have not

:35:51.:35:53.

passed the boundary changes which gives the Tories 20 more seats and

:35:54.:35:58.

takes 20 from Labour so why not wait until October 20 18th of that. What

:35:59.:36:04.

does it say to the EU? You're going into and credibly complicated

:36:05.:36:08.

renegotiation not knowing which Prime Minister will be around the

:36:09.:36:12.

table. We note that this is what Theresa May wanted to avoid and the

:36:13.:36:17.

question remains, why has she changed her mind? To me, that is not

:36:18.:36:23.

clear. My best bet would be, on top of the Brexit problem she already

:36:24.:36:27.

has, she was aware of the lack of parliamentary majority months ago is

:36:28.:36:31.

the domestic legislation, it is things like grammar schools, her

:36:32.:36:35.

reforms to corporate governance and even possibly her energy reforms,

:36:36.:36:39.

she may not have had a majority for that the monster of MPs and perhaps

:36:40.:36:45.

that is a very good reason, unspoken reason why she wants to do this.

:36:46.:36:51.

Your thoughts on why she has changed her mind? Is it the polls that put

:36:52.:36:55.

Labour so far behind? Is at the domestic legislation? There is a

:36:56.:37:05.

whiff of panic and incompetence in the decision. It is not the polls,

:37:06.:37:14.

whatever you want to pick, that will be panicking Theresa May, it is the

:37:15.:37:18.

fact that she has kicked off Article 50 without a plan and on first

:37:19.:37:24.

contact with the opposition, the EU 27, finds that the EU 27 are

:37:25.:37:30.

prepared to absolutely destroy her negotiating position. Of course she

:37:31.:37:33.

needs a mandate, I hope she does not get it and that the British people

:37:34.:37:38.

will give a mandate to the Liberal Democrats, SNP and Jeremy Corbyn to

:37:39.:37:45.

engineer and minimal soft, socially just format to Brexit and I think

:37:46.:37:50.

Theresa May may be about to find out that Turkey just do not vote for

:37:51.:37:57.

Christmas. Looking at the figures, 48% Remain, 52% Leave, if this

:37:58.:38:01.

campaign turns out to be a rerun on that referendum, what is the best

:38:02.:38:07.

she can hope for? It will turn into a rerun of the referendum, because

:38:08.:38:14.

it will be what type of Brexit and it is unclear where the country

:38:15.:38:20.

stance on that. Some of the West Country MPs are really unhappy about

:38:21.:38:25.

this, the Tories have their wafer thin majority simply because they

:38:26.:38:29.

cleared out the Liberal Democrats in the South West in areas that were

:38:30.:38:34.

really quite Remain and have a strong Liberal Democrat vote. 20

:38:35.:38:39.

Tory MPs could be in trouble, so the gamble clearly is, Labour is in such

:38:40.:38:44.

pieces at the moment, Theresa May would hoover up far more Labour MPs

:38:45.:38:47.

than the one she would lose to the Liberal Democrats. This is really

:38:48.:38:50.

unclear at the moment which is why there is an element of risk. Having

:38:51.:38:56.

your own mandate is the key. That was always going to be the

:38:57.:38:59.

difficulty for her, that things could be thrown at her as Prime

:39:00.:39:04.

Minister because she had not won a General Election and with both

:39:05.:39:08.

domestic policies and the Brexit negotiations, she will be stronger,

:39:09.:39:12.

psychologically, if she wins a General Election on her own terms?

:39:13.:39:18.

We need to see what those terms are because there are now people on the

:39:19.:39:23.

Tory backbenchers saying that they want to use the so-called Great

:39:24.:39:28.

Repeal Bill to actually tinker with the regulatory situation in Britain

:39:29.:39:32.

right now. The Tories did to come forward now with a manifesto, not

:39:33.:39:36.

just say we are going to kick-start article 20 and in two years' time we

:39:37.:39:39.

will tell you what the outcome is, we need to know what the

:39:40.:39:43.

Conservative hard Brexit programmers and my prediction is that the

:39:44.:39:46.

majority of British people will reject it. We need to find the

:39:47.:39:50.

organisational form for that to happen. I support a Progressive

:39:51.:39:59.

alliance between Labour, the Liberal Democrats, the SNP and the other

:40:00.:40:01.

nationalist parties to prevent this kamikaze Brexit. We have to scramble

:40:02.:40:04.

fast to make it happen. What about the preparedness? You have not had

:40:05.:40:08.

much time to talk to MPs, it has only been announced in the last

:40:09.:40:12.

couple of hours, but what is the general impression and reaction that

:40:13.:40:15.

you are being met with at Westminster? They are stunned, we

:40:16.:40:19.

all are, not least because the Prime Minister said she did not want to do

:40:20.:40:25.

this. Paul is right to the extent that the Prime Minister will now be

:40:26.:40:27.

pressed by Labour to define precisely what type of Brexit she is

:40:28.:40:31.

going to go for because the truth is, she cannot do that because she

:40:32.:40:35.

has not got a clue. She has got what she likes, her best but that is what

:40:36.:40:38.

you will put to the polls, but we will not get more detail. There are

:40:39.:40:44.

enormous issues, like the immigration system, we will not get

:40:45.:40:48.

any more detail on what immigration system the country will get, over

:40:49.:40:54.

the next four weeks or eight weeks. I think Theresa May's gamble is,

:40:55.:40:58.

although no party is prepared for this, she is just a tiny bit more

:40:59.:41:04.

prepared than Labour is, who really cannot unite around anything at the

:41:05.:41:09.

moment. I will stop you there. Thank you for your thoughts today. It is a

:41:10.:41:15.

gamble, it will allow a really hard Brexit, perhaps of the type that you

:41:16.:41:20.

would be a fan of, to go through, if you win the General Election. I

:41:21.:41:24.

don't know what they look like. I just know Brexit. It is all very

:41:25.:41:28.

well for people talking about hard versus soft, they do not know

:41:29.:41:31.

either. Negotiations are coming up and you want to get the best deal

:41:32.:41:35.

possible for the UK and that is what she wants the mandate for to make

:41:36.:41:39.

sure she is seen as a strong leader at home.

:41:40.:41:43.

We're joined now by the Labour backbencher and Jeremy Corbyn

:41:44.:41:45.

Do you welcome this General Election and will you be supporting it? It

:41:46.:41:55.

shows that the Conservative Party is in disarray. Theresa May is trying

:41:56.:41:58.

to duck the issue by having an election now before she gets to the

:41:59.:42:01.

point where the damage or more of the damage comes through after the

:42:02.:42:07.

final agreements. Are you firmly square behind Jeremy Corbyn and the

:42:08.:42:12.

leader's offers? Any Labour minister is better than a Conservative one

:42:13.:42:16.

and will do more for constituencies like mine and focusing on jobs and

:42:17.:42:21.

the NHS, I know he will make a better Prime Minister. You have been

:42:22.:42:26.

a very staunch critic of him. The last few days have seen one private

:42:27.:42:30.

e-mail I sent to Jeremy become the focus of office politics rather than

:42:31.:42:33.

the focus it should have been on. I said we need a communications agenda

:42:34.:42:42.

that delivers on things like policing and the police in

:42:43.:42:44.

Bermondsey do not have the resources they need. We are not focused to

:42:45.:42:47.

much an education. We want those to be the focus of the agenda and that

:42:48.:42:51.

is what I was asking for and instead I got reported to the Chief Whip. I

:42:52.:42:57.

think that nonsense will end. Which is nonsense? The Labour Party

:42:58.:43:03.

leadership nonsense? The internal silliness of reporting an MP to the

:43:04.:43:07.

Chief Whip for asking for a better communications agenda. Isn't it the

:43:08.:43:11.

internal infighting that is not going to put you in a good position

:43:12.:43:16.

for the General Election? I will be fighting as the Labour MP for my

:43:17.:43:19.

constituency and I hope my electors do not have a short memory and

:43:20.:43:22.

remember there was a Liberal Democrat before he voted for their

:43:23.:43:26.

bedroom tax and tuition fees, I think those issues will have

:43:27.:43:30.

salience with voters. There is nothing like a General Election to

:43:31.:43:34.

focus the mind of MPs, but with the Fixed-term Parliaments Act, it needs

:43:35.:43:37.

a majority of MPs to vote it through and I presume you will be voting in

:43:38.:43:45.

favour of it? There was also the option of a vote of no-confidence

:43:46.:43:50.

and then having an option for a different Prime Minister altogether.

:43:51.:43:53.

Theresa May said she would put a motion tomorrow for MPs to call for

:43:54.:43:57.

a General Election, Barry and Jeremy Corbyn said they would support that,

:43:58.:44:01.

will you? I don't know because we have not seen the detail of the

:44:02.:44:05.

statement. I apologise if that is not good enough for you at this

:44:06.:44:09.

stage. I have not seen it. When I see what is on the table tomorrow, I

:44:10.:44:14.

will make my mind up then. It is straightforward, if two thirds of

:44:15.:44:17.

MPs in the House of Commons call for an early election, it will happen.

:44:18.:44:21.

If that is the motion that goes tomorrow, to you and your colleagues

:44:22.:44:24.

will you vote in favour? It is not clear and there is a vote of no

:44:25.:44:28.

confidence as a possibility as well. If that is what she wants, Theresa

:44:29.:44:36.

May is taking a big gamble, we lost David Cameron and they lost

:44:37.:44:40.

Goldsmith in London because London and I oppose Brexit. This is a

:44:41.:44:43.

gamble on the part of the Prime Minister. I take your point but if

:44:44.:44:46.

that is what Theresa May asked for, will you vote in favour of it? I

:44:47.:44:50.

have not seen much she is asking for, so this is just speculation.

:44:51.:44:54.

Let us see what comes up tomorrow. My vote will be recorded in the

:44:55.:44:59.

public domain. Barry, it seems fairly straightforward, you will be

:45:00.:45:11.

supporting it and Labour said that they would. Absolutely. I have been

:45:12.:45:13.

in the position that Neil has been meant for I have not seen a motion,

:45:14.:45:16.

it caught us all by surprise and I understand his position that says I

:45:17.:45:19.

will wait and see, but the position of the party is clear and that is

:45:20.:45:22.

that we welcome the opportunity to get rid of this Conservative

:45:23.:45:24.

government and to put our policies in front of the electorate.

:45:25.:45:30.

Will the internal fighting stopped? He has been reported to the Chief

:45:31.:45:39.

Whip. That took place prior to this morning's announcement. Based on

:45:40.:45:44.

what we have seen, the party has come back together and we had those

:45:45.:45:50.

two leadership elections and they are past history. The front bench

:45:51.:45:55.

has come back and it is operating properly and people are getting out

:45:56.:45:59.

there, doing the job both for the local elections and now for this

:46:00.:46:03.

general election. It is about putting policies there and

:46:04.:46:06.

persuading the public this is in their future best interest. That is

:46:07.:46:13.

what Neal and I will both be doing. We can now the Liberal Democrat

:46:14.:46:17.

leader Tim Farron who is in true row and he joins us now. Welcome. First

:46:18.:46:22.

of all, your response to Theresa May's statement. It is a fantastic

:46:23.:46:28.

opportunity for British people to change the direction of our country

:46:29.:46:32.

and vote against a hard Brexit and vote to keep the United Kingdom in

:46:33.:46:36.

the single market, something that was not on the ballot paper last

:46:37.:46:41.

year. But it is also an opportunity for Britain to vote for a strong and

:46:42.:46:46.

decent opposition, something they do not have under Labour, but something

:46:47.:46:49.

they could have under the Liberal Democrats. The Liberal Democrats see

:46:50.:46:56.

this as our moment, a moment where Britain could change the direction

:46:57.:47:00.

of our country. Will people thank you for wanting to rerun the

:47:01.:47:04.

referendum and the whole idea of Brexit in this general election?

:47:05.:47:11.

Well, I think the biggest issue of a generation is hardly not going to be

:47:12.:47:15.

discussed during this general election. It seems to me that given

:47:16.:47:18.

that membership of the single market was not on the ballot paper last

:47:19.:47:24.

year and people being for or against leaving the European Union, there

:47:25.:47:28.

seems to be a majority who think being in the single market would be

:47:29.:47:32.

good for our economy. To put that front and centre of our campaign

:47:33.:47:37.

seems to me wise and showed real leadership to bring the country

:47:38.:47:42.

together. Iain Duncan Smith, how worried are you by the threat of the

:47:43.:47:49.

Liberal Democrats? I was down in the south-west during the last election

:47:50.:47:51.

and there seemed to be a huge sense that the time had been and gone and

:47:52.:47:57.

we one all the seats down there. We won on issues of who do you want to

:47:58.:48:01.

govern you? I think my colleagues in the South West will have a very

:48:02.:48:06.

strong election campaign and win. To be fair, the Liberals have been very

:48:07.:48:11.

clear about their position on this. It is their opportunity to put this

:48:12.:48:14.

case for a second referendum. If that is what they want to stand on,

:48:15.:48:19.

let them put it during the general election. That is the point. It will

:48:20.:48:23.

be over on June the 8th and we will end up with the British mandate the

:48:24.:48:29.

British people want. Listening to Neill coil it was interesting, the

:48:30.:48:34.

Labour Party is divided. Some want to have the general election because

:48:35.:48:38.

they want to get rid of their leader and others want to have it because

:48:39.:48:43.

they want to win with their leader. Iain Duncan Smith, I think we are

:48:44.:48:47.

letting you go. Thank you for joining us today on this programme.

:48:48.:48:50.

A dramatic announcement from the Prime Minister. Tim Farron, what do

:48:51.:48:55.

you say to Iain Duncan Smith who is not worried about a Lib Dem

:48:56.:48:59.

challenge in the south-west? He would say that, wouldn't he? The

:49:00.:49:05.

result in the by-elections in the last ten months here have been

:49:06.:49:09.

spectacular. Interest in membership has doubled, so there is great

:49:10.:49:15.

energy down here. But in the last referendum whether people supported

:49:16.:49:18.

or did not support the outcome of the vote, they want to see a Britain

:49:19.:49:22.

that does not isolate itself from the rest of the world, but does not

:49:23.:49:27.

bode to make itself Pura. That is why being in the single market is

:49:28.:49:31.

critically important and it is one of the things we will campaign on in

:49:32.:49:38.

the election. It is about changing the direction of our country so it

:49:39.:49:46.

is open, United and tolerant and it is an opportunity to have a decent

:49:47.:49:53.

opposition. People favourable to the Conservative Party will agree we

:49:54.:49:55.

need a stronger Liberal Democrat voice during this election, given

:49:56.:49:58.

that the Liberal Democrats have been a decent opposition. We are joined

:49:59.:50:06.

in the studio by Ukip's deputy leader Peter Whittle. What do you

:50:07.:50:10.

say to Tim Farron saying this is the opportunity for those people who

:50:11.:50:13.

want to have a Brexit negotiation where we stay in the single market

:50:14.:50:21.

for those who are not in favour for a hard Brexit leaving the EU. The

:50:22.:50:24.

challenge is on in this general election. What you do know about the

:50:25.:50:30.

Lib Dems is basically they are standing essentially on an

:50:31.:50:33.

anti-democratic platform. They simply will not accept the result

:50:34.:50:37.

and whichever way Tim Farron dresses it up, if you want to basically go

:50:38.:50:43.

against democracy, that is the best way to do it, vote Lib Dem. Why is

:50:44.:50:50.

it against democracy? They have never accepted the actual referendum

:50:51.:50:56.

result. Whether you say you want to have a referendum on the eve of the

:50:57.:50:59.

negotiations or a second referendum, this is not accepting a democratic

:51:00.:51:05.

mandate. Do you think it was right of Theresa May to call for a general

:51:06.:51:10.

election? It is utterly cynical, it is putting party before country,

:51:11.:51:14.

there is no question about that. The Scottish Nationalists were told it

:51:15.:51:21.

was wrong to hold an independence referendum, independent during

:51:22.:51:23.

Brexit negotiation, but somehow it is right to have a general election.

:51:24.:51:28.

We are having one now and my party is excited about it. Will you win

:51:29.:51:34.

any seats? You have not done well up until now. Two years ago we got 4

:51:35.:51:40.

million votes. We have done a lot of organising since then. We have not

:51:41.:51:44.

been quiet and just sitting on our hands. Why vote Ukip if it is framed

:51:45.:51:52.

around Brexit? I huge amount. With this government people are getting

:51:53.:51:57.

more worried, even though she is having a honeymoon, they hear

:51:58.:52:01.

nothing about what the government is doing on migration. All they hear is

:52:02.:52:05.

that migration might well go on at the current levels for another ten

:52:06.:52:10.

years. This is still the number one issue. People know where my party

:52:11.:52:16.

stands on this issue. We have other issues, multiculturalism has failed

:52:17.:52:20.

in Britain. We have problems with radical Islam and extremism. Before

:52:21.:52:25.

we go to the Green Party's co-leader, what do you say about

:52:26.:52:30.

migration and multiculturalism? Ukip say that they will hold the Prime

:52:31.:52:34.

Minister's feet to the fire in a way you have not until now. It may have

:52:35.:52:41.

been a slip of the tongue, but you said it was the single biggest issue

:52:42.:52:44.

and then you said it was not the single biggest issue. Immigration is

:52:45.:52:51.

of great concern for most people, but the country other faces huge

:52:52.:52:53.

problems that none of the other parties talk about. The key thing

:52:54.:52:59.

people will look to vote on is what is going to happen in terms of the

:53:00.:53:04.

economy? What is going to happen in terms of their livelihood and their

:53:05.:53:10.

jobs? If they feel the sort of Brexit you and the Conservatives

:53:11.:53:13.

want to take us down the road of, this hard Brexit that will stop free

:53:14.:53:18.

movement of people, stop immigration entirely... That is what they voted

:53:19.:53:24.

for, an end to free movement of people. By all means continue to

:53:25.:53:29.

talk, but I have a right to reply. They will vote for their future jobs

:53:30.:53:34.

and security. At the moment this is a government that has given people

:53:35.:53:41.

the likelihood is that they had back in 2007 10% worse in real times.

:53:42.:53:44.

That is the key issue that most people will vote on. They did not

:53:45.:53:49.

just vote on economics, they voted on cultural things as well. We must

:53:50.:53:53.

talk to the Green Party co-leader who has been waiting patiently. You

:53:54.:53:59.

excited about the prospect of a general election on June the aid?

:54:00.:54:04.

Really excited. We think this is long overdue, she should have done

:54:05.:54:09.

this before. We are a party that is offering bold alternatives and an

:54:10.:54:16.

alternative to cuts in fighting the government's programme of austerity

:54:17.:54:19.

and we will protect the environment. We are the antidote to Ukip. There

:54:20.:54:24.

is so much to vote for in the Green Party. Were you surprised by the

:54:25.:54:30.

announcement? Yes, we were surprised, but we have been calling

:54:31.:54:34.

for it. She did not have a mandate to force through extreme Brexit. She

:54:35.:54:39.

needed to get the consent of the British people for what she is doing

:54:40.:54:42.

because this is not on the ballot paper. On the basis of the polls

:54:43.:54:48.

with Labour so far behind if they are to be believed, it would improve

:54:49.:54:52.

Theresa May's position to go ahead with the Brexit she wants, rather

:54:53.:54:58.

than the opposition parties. If the last two years have taught us

:54:59.:55:02.

anything, it is that things can happen very quickly and there can be

:55:03.:55:07.

seismic changes very rapidly. We are polling more highly than we were at

:55:08.:55:11.

the time of the 2015 general election and we would have had 25

:55:12.:55:17.

MPs under the basis of a fair voting system under that. We want true

:55:18.:55:21.

representation of the British people in Parliament. We are willing to

:55:22.:55:25.

work with other parties and we could see an interesting outcome in seven

:55:26.:55:30.

weeks' time if those parties commit to working together. We are

:55:31.:55:33.

different from Labour and the Liberal Democrats and we are making

:55:34.:55:38.

that clear. You have just one MP at the moment, Caroline Lucas, and she

:55:39.:55:43.

will vote in favour of the pit term parliaments Pratt said there can be

:55:44.:55:49.

an early election -- fixed term Parliaments at. What more can you

:55:50.:55:58.

do? Caroline Lucas won that in 2010 and 2015 and we have got more seats

:55:59.:56:04.

than Ukip. Once people see as debating and see the policies, we

:56:05.:56:09.

note in general elections our support goes up when we get fair

:56:10.:56:12.

exposure in the media and across the BBC. We will have that problem,

:56:13.:56:18.

democratic process where people can see what we stand for and we are

:56:19.:56:23.

optimistic about making gains. Well, you have had your fair hearing here

:56:24.:56:28.

on the BBC. Let's continue getting reaction from all the parties. Let's

:56:29.:56:32.

hear what Nicola Sturgeon had to say. Is is a big U-turn in recent

:56:33.:56:38.

political history, but it is clear the Prime Minister's announcement

:56:39.:56:42.

today is all about the narrow interests of her own party and not

:56:43.:56:47.

the interests of the country overall. Clearly she sees the

:56:48.:56:50.

opportunity, given the total disarray in the ranks of the Labour

:56:51.:56:54.

Party to crush all opposition, to get rid of people who disagree with

:56:55.:56:59.

her and to give herself a free hand to take the country in an

:57:00.:57:03.

increasingly right-wing direction. That would mean not just the hardest

:57:04.:57:08.

possible Brexit, but more austerity and deep cuts. Now is the time for

:57:09.:57:13.

Scotland's voice to be heard and for people in Scotland to stand up for

:57:14.:57:16.

the type of country we want Scotland to be and that is the campaign I

:57:17.:57:20.

look forward to leading in the weeks ahead. Everyone is an election

:57:21.:57:27.

footing. Before we go, time to get the latest odds from Jessica Bridge

:57:28.:57:32.

of Ladbrokes. Take us through the odds. As Christmas come early? We

:57:33.:57:39.

are looking at the most seats and the Tories are 1-10 favourites. You

:57:40.:57:45.

need to place ?10 to win just ?1 in return. That is how sure we are with

:57:46.:57:51.

that. Can Jeremy Corbyn spring the second political upset of his

:57:52.:57:59.

career? Frankly, no. Labour are 7-1. This represents a huge opportunity

:58:00.:58:04.

for the Lib Dems and Tim Farron at 33-1. They think they can steal some

:58:05.:58:09.

seats. Still a big prize, but not as big a prize as for Ukip at 100-1.

:58:10.:58:19.

The bet down here which a lot of punters will think is nailed, and

:58:20.:58:25.

1-5 is generous, Jeremy Corbyn to be replaced as leader of the Labour

:58:26.:58:30.

Party this year. Those odds will probably be 1-10 by the time I have

:58:31.:58:35.

finished. Jeremy Corbyn doesn't look like he will get much past June as

:58:36.:58:39.

far as the odds are concerned with a Tory victory. Let's get reaction to

:58:40.:58:47.

that. All of this is a great bit of fun and people will no doubt have a

:58:48.:58:52.

punt. But this is not a presidential race. This is not America. We do not

:58:53.:58:59.

do things like America in terms of presidential and personality. This

:59:00.:59:04.

is about policy. What every Labour MP and counsellor and member will be

:59:05.:59:08.

doing is going out on the doorsteps and making sure that we get across

:59:09.:59:11.

the policies that we have been talking about that this weekend were

:59:12.:59:16.

shown to be popular with people because they thought those were the

:59:17.:59:19.

things that really spoke to their lives. You are focusing everything

:59:20.:59:27.

on policy and not on Jeremy Corbyn as leader? Not at all, do not forget

:59:28.:59:32.

it is under Jeremy Corbyn that those policies have been put forward that

:59:33.:59:36.

found so much favour with the public this weekend. We are talking about

:59:37.:59:41.

carers' allowance, parents in schools, all of these things are

:59:42.:59:46.

important in this general election. Thank you for being with us right to

:59:47.:59:48.

the end, the last man standing. The one o'clock news is starting

:59:49.:59:59.

over on BBC One now.

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