30/01/2017 Inside Out East


30/01/2017

Women who wear a hijab or niqab are increasingly being abused. Sophie Sulehria goes to Luton to try and understand what can be done to tackle the problem.


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Transcript


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Women living in fear because of their religion.

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We meet the women who face abuse because they wear Islamic dress.

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It's just clothes, it's just a piece of cloth.

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It shouldn't give the people the chance to define you as worthless.

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What's it like when you take over the care

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of relatives and loved ones?

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Who is accountable, do you speak to the agency,

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do you speak to social services?

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I was going around in so many circles, it was so frustrating.

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And how a discovery in Norwich set the art world on a quest

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for a missing part of a painting.

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To be the person who discovered it is rather exciting,

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it doesn't happen every day.

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Revealing the stories that matter closer to home,

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that's tonight's Inside Out.

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Hello, welcome to Cambridge.

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It's a sad fact that hate crime in this country is on the rise.

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Now, the Government says it's putting more money into stopping

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it, but what it really like for the women who stopped going

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out and don't know whether they can follow their religion as they like?

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Sophie Sulehria has been to Luton to see what can be done

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to tackle Islamophobia.

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Nishrat Islam is a student studying fashion and business

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at Hertfordshire University.

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She is Muslim and from Luton.

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And she's at crossroads with her religion about whether to

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cover her hair and her face.

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I dress really modest, I make sure that buy

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clothes are all baggy.

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You can see, like, I wear baggy tops, I make sure

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I wear baggy jumpers, I wear skirts so it

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is covering stuff.

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I really like dressing modest.

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I'm still 18 and I'm still young so I am trying to find myself

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and I don't know if I will find myself in the next three years

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or probably four years, and I don't know whether I am

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going to wear the hijab or the niqab, even.

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With me, my family have come over from Pakistan in the '50s

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and my dad's family are Muslim and I've made a decision not

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to wear, not to cover but I also understand that debate and dilemma

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about whether to or not.

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It's a big decision for niche rat and part of the reason she's unsure

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is because she went out wearing the niqab and three men

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hurled abuse at her.

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It's now put her off.

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In a day, I experienced all that.

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Imagine how the girls and the women who wear the niqab

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every day must feel.

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And they must ignore this, they must think its normal

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but it's not normal, they shouldn't

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experience that at all.

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Members of my family cover their heads and I understand

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that as a sign of devotion to their faith.

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But what I want to understand is why the niqab and hijab are causing such

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animosity and what can be done to allow Muslim women

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to practice their faith without fear of abuse.

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Some women wear a headscarf to cover their head and hair.

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This is the hijab.

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While others wear a niqab, which also covers their face.

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They are worn as a symbol of modesty and devotion to their faith.

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But recently, women who cover have been abused and this is on the rise.

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In the last 12 months in Bedfordshire, there were over 800

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hate crimes reported, but police believe this is only

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a fraction of the true number committed, especially when it

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comes to Islamophobia.

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Jahira has lived in Luton for over 40 years, but it is the escalation

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of terror attacks abroad that has led her to receiving abuse here.

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So have you noticed a direct correlation, then, between a world

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atrocity like a terrorist attack...

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Yeah, like after the Paris attack, I was in town, I was just doing

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shopping for my children and this man came up to me and he picked

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up my niqab, which is this, he picked it up and it really,

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really did throw me, I was so scared.

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For a very long time, I did not go to the town by myself.

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And because I stopped, even now, I hardly, hardly ever go,

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maybe twice a year.

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It brought this fear in me and for a while,

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I avoided it and then I got used to not going out so much.

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But hearing that story, to me, it sounds like he violated you,

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that's how I respond to that and for me, I think it is just

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as important a crime as being attacked, punched

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and whatever else.

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You know, it was not expected, it was so unexpected.

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Jahera didn't report it as she thought the police

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would see it as trivial.

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She has since learned to drive to avoid walking to places.

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But even this is causing problems.

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Say like, if I'm driving somewhere, you know, I do get abuse.

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Sometimes I ignore it, sometimes it makes me cross and I do

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open a window and I do shout back at them.

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Because it is just so frustrating, it does frustrate you and I am

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only human, you know?

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As we chat, it becomes clear that this seems

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to happen all the time.

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So, Jahera, sorry...

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Until we spoke just now, you are essentially telling me that

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you didn't realise how much animosity you have come up

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against wearing what you wear?

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Yes, it seems like I am finding out myself.

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Today?

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Yes.

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Because, you know, I haven't really spoken about it to anyone.

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Like Jahera, Nishrat also didn't report what happened

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to her to the police, but she has decided to give wearing

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the niqab another try.

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This time, she's going to ask shoppers in Luton

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what they think of her dress.

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It may help make her mind up.

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Can I ask you what you think of this attire?

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I don't agree with it.

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OK.

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Hi...

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Oh, right.

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SHE LAUGHS

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Oh, God.

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Can I ask you what you think of the niqab, what I wearing?

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Can I ask you what you think of the niqab, what I'm wearing?

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What you think of it?

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It looks all right.

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Really?

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Because a lot of people hate on this.

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So I want to know if I should wear this in the future or not?

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Is this the right decision for me?

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You don't want to hide your face, do you?

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Huh?

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You don't want to hide your face, do you?

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Really.

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Because what you're doing there, you're hiding your face.

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I'm hiding my face?

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What, I would be better like this?

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Would I be better like this?

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Course you would.

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Hi, Nishrat.

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How was that?

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What were people's reactions like?

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It was mixed.

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It was mixed emotions.

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Some people were OK and they were respectable,

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Some people were OK and they were respectful,

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but some people wouldn't even look me in the eye and wouldn't

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engage with me at all, they just walked away, really rude.

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Today, Daniel McHugh does his usual round of community policing.

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Very good policing, excellent.

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He's well-known across this part of Luton and sometimes

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work with Rahana Faizal, who campaigns for women's rights.

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They both deal with hate crime complaints.

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Their focus is to get more Muslim women like Nishrat

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and Jahera to report abuse.

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It so important to report.

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I think it's become so normalised for some women.

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It's almost accepted.

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Although hate crime conviction rates are going up, this isn't the case

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for abuse against Muslim women.

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Obviously, it's important to report these hate crimes,

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but then once they are reported, are they ever brought to court,

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are people ever convicted of a hate crime?

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What happens next?

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Well, the conviction rate for Bedfordshire

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police is very high.

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The people that report a hate crime, they went to court, 88% was how big

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the conviction rate was, so it is almost nine

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out of every ten.

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We are talking about Islamophobia in particular and is that targeted?

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They are hard to prove, as well, because often somebody

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is shouted at in the street, a scarf taken off, so it is not

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necessarily things that have been seen and when I speak to women,

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I acknowledge that it's possible that this will never go to court.

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But there is again a narrative saying that Islamophobia isn't real

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and this is not happening.

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What I've realised from my time here is that reporting hate crime

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is important if we want to stop it from happening in the future,

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but what's also important is raising awareness of Islamophobia,

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because that is what will change people's attitudes.

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The world is full of different people, different ethnicity

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and different religious people.

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I mean, my outfit shows that I'm a Muslim and you should

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respect me for who I am.

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As for Nishrat, she is still deciding whether to cover her hair

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and face and whether she feels safe to do so.

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At the end of the day, the niqab is just clothes,

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is just a piece of cloth.

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It may define you, who you are, but it shouldn't give the people

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the chance to define you as something like

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you are worthless, like you are not worth it.

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Well, look, if that story struck a chord with you or you feel

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there's something we should be really doing on the programme,

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get in touch with me at Twitter or send me an e-mail.

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You are watching Inside Out for the East of England here on BBC One.

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Later on, we are with the experts unravelling and art mystery.

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Later on, we are with the experts unravelling an art mystery.

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There comes a time when some of us may have to make the difficult

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decision about choosing a care home for say, Mum,

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Dad, or even a partner.

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But what if you want to look at that person yourself,

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But what if you want to look after that person yourself,

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your way, even in your home?

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Jo Taylor has been to seek BBC radio presenter Sue Marchant, who decided

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Jo Taylor has been to see BBC radio presenter Sue Marchant, who decided

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to sort her mum's care herself.

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She's found it difficult but also very rewarding.

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The cosmic camper is here, 30th anniversary of Ely Folk Festival.

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Sue Marchant is a busy woman, she's out and about covering folk

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festivals and is a presenter on BBC radio Cambridgeshire.

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And at the end of her day, she's caring for her

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90-year-old mum Eleanor.

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Hello.

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Sue made the decision to move Eleanor in with her two years ago.

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I daren't say this, but I did feel sometimes,

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what is the point of living, you know?

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But then, while there is life, there's always hope,

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isn't there and that sensible thing always comes back to me,

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do you know what I mean?

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When Sue's father was dying from cancer, she promised him

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Elinor wouldn't be left alone.

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And I held his hand and just said, you know, look, dad,

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And I held his hand and just said, you know, look, Dad,

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don't worry, I'll look after mum and that is something

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don't worry, I'll look after Mum and that is something

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always stuck with me, so that's what I'm doing.

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Sue's on a mission to provide care that really is caring.

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It's about lifting her mum's spirits as well as looking

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after her physical needs are particularly as Elinor needs

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to pay for her care, so why shouldn't it be

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exactly what she wants?

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So Sue is now taking matters in hand and designing a bespoke care

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package for her mum.

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Hello, there, I'm just enquiring about care...

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She phones around the agencies.

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?20 in the week and 22 at the weekends, but it

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would have to be, what, three one-hour calls or three

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hours at a time?

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One of them can only do a three-hour call at ?20 per hour

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because of travelling time.

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That will mean ?60 a call and Sue needs at least two a day.

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That's unbelievable.

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Right, let's try another one.

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Some of the agencies are so expensive, she looks

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at hiring an independent care.

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at hiring an independent carer.

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Her neighbour works as one but he is fully booked.

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He is willing to give advice, though.

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What about these checks, then?

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Would they already have that?

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Do you do yours annually or would I have to do that?

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It is the employer's responsibility to get the checks done.

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Sue will have to take on all the admin of an employer, such

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as insurance or criminal checks.

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Simon spent eight years working in a care home so he knows

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all about paperwork, but not any more.

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I was able to get rid of a lot of the administration,

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the bureaucracy and I was able to just focus on my clients

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and the family, 100% of the time from when I started

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to when I finished.

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And that kind of rekindled my kind of love for caring,

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because I was actually caring, rather than being bogged down.

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Having done the research, it's decision time.

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Sue has worked out costings for all the options to come up

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with a monthly figure.

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Council?

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The council was ?925.10p.

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Next is agency.

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And this is the one that only does three hour calls.

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That comes to ?3360 a month.

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Blimey, OKed.

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Blimey, OK.

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And personal assistant.

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This is just for the hours Sue needs but some will only

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want to be full-time.

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And then we've got, finally, care home.

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?3600 a month.

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Your package?

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My package...

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So what is Sue's package?

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She's found an agency that actually does hour-long visits

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and because Sue is designing this

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herself, she also built in some social calls from the Age UK warden

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and a friend.

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It's time to put the care package into action and Sue is keeping

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a diary of how it's going.

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At the end of the first week, it seems to have gone quite well.

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The morning carer who has been coming is an absolute delight,

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very caring.

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When the bed was in a state, she had taken the sheet up and put

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it in cold water to soak.

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What did you have for your tea?

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So far, so good, but there's still the odd niggle.

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You've got quite a lot of potato on your plate.

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That's what she's given me.

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Having checked in the bin, she's given you a whole pack.

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Of mashed potato.

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You know, that normally does you two portions, doesn't it,

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a whole pack of potato?

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So that's a waste.

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But on the whole, the care is good.

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Because Sue is managing her mum's care, if her mum's health changes,

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it's down to Sue to arrange any changes in her care package.

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Suddenly, Elinor is taken to hospital.

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My mum was brought in last night, Elinor Walker.

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Elinor has severe stomach ache and got problems.

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Elinor has severe stomach ache and gut problems.

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Sue wants to find out when she can bring her home.

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No, she's not OK on her own, she has to have care,

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which is a package that I've put together.

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Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridgeshire

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is keen to discharge her.

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Well, I would need to be here for her to come home,

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quite honestly.

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She hasn't got a coat or anything, she's only

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got her dressing gown and stuff.

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Thank you very much, bye-bye.

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What's that?

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They are going to send her home on her own?

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Yeah.

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Without you being here?

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Yeah.

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Are you kidding me?

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Is there any problem with her coming home,

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will she be able to get in?

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I know.

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There's no way...

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Sorry, how old is your mum again?

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90.

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Is that them?

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A few minutes later, the hospital called back.

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Hello.

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A rectal suppository, right.

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Oh, blimey.

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Elinor's medical needs are changing, which means Sue's care package

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will have to change too.

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Suppository is where you put it at the other end

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Suppository is where you put it up the other end

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and that is something to help reduce inflammation in the gut.

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So that's quite a process, to do that.

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Are you going to be doing that?

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Well, I think it looks like it, doesn't it?

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Because I don't see how the carers can.

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And she's right, the carers tell how they aren't qualified to do it,

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And she's right, the carers tell her they aren't qualified to do it,

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so Sue needs the hospital to assure her that a district

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nurse will come out.

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She checks when she goes to visit her mum that evening.

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She said, oh, it will probably be the district nurses that will come

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in and I said I am not going to take mum home until I know

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in and I said I am not going to take Mum home until I know

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everything is in place.

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The next morning and there's good news.

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Sue's mum is coming home.

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She's got to reorganise the care and fingers crossed

0:16:590:17:01

the district nurse will turn up.

0:17:010:17:02

She gets on the phone again.

0:17:020:17:04

It's about my mum, Elinor Walker.

0:17:040:17:06

And what I need to know from you guys is are you able to put

0:17:060:17:10

care in place again?

0:17:100:17:12

You are?

0:17:120:17:15

Addenbrooke's told us that the majority of patients

0:17:160:17:18

want to be at home as soon as possible, so they work

0:17:180:17:23

on a patient's discharge from the moment they are admitted

0:17:230:17:26

and that it should be explained clearly by a specialist team

0:17:260:17:29

what will be provided by the NHS and that where possible,

0:17:290:17:32

they use volunteer schemes to make sure elderly patients have someone

0:17:320:17:34

to welcome them home.

0:17:340:17:42

Managing this care for her mum is clearly wearing Sue down,

0:17:420:17:45

so what would help her?

0:17:450:17:46

I'd like to have had someone to talk to out of hours,

0:17:460:17:49

because I was working.

0:17:490:17:50

Who is accountable, you know?

0:17:500:17:51

Do you speak to the agency?

0:17:510:17:52

Do you speak to social services?

0:17:520:17:54

I was going around in so many circles, it was so frustrating.

0:17:540:17:57

Even though Elinor has to pay for care, it was still managed

0:17:570:18:00

by the local authority before Sue decided to take over.

0:18:000:18:05

Cambridgeshire County Council says it's made improvements since then.

0:18:050:18:11

In a situation where it's complex, a lot of people, what they actually

0:18:110:18:14

need is a conversation with someone who is knowledgeable

0:18:140:18:16

and so the idea that they can go through to our contact centre,

0:18:160:18:19

who can pass them onto a specialist team who can give them direct

0:18:190:18:23

advice, this is a service we've had in place for about six months

0:18:230:18:26

and the feedback we're getting is that it makes a real difference.

0:18:260:18:28

But the council is facing a planned budget cut

0:18:280:18:31

of ?6 million to care next year.

0:18:310:18:37

This is our biggest challenge, probably, is have we got enough care

0:18:370:18:40

to meet the needs and therefore it is always a constant

0:18:400:18:42

balancing act, really.

0:18:420:18:44

It's about three months since Sue started her mission to provide care

0:18:440:18:46

that really is caring.

0:18:460:18:48

So is it working?

0:18:480:18:51

The carers I talk more to

0:18:510:18:56

and I'm getting my voice back

0:18:560:19:02

know what I mean?

0:19:020:19:03

I'm looking upon them as friends more than anything, you know?

0:19:030:19:05

Elinor is now back from hospital and feeling much happier.

0:19:050:19:08

To cheer her up, Sue has got a new kitten.

0:19:080:19:11

I suppose in a way, I'm her mother now.

0:19:110:19:13

I've taken the place of her own mother.

0:19:130:19:15

New York, Stockholm, Norwich.

0:19:210:19:25

Three cities, wildly different, but now connected by an incredible

0:19:250:19:28

story from the art world.

0:19:280:19:31

Inside Out was given exclusive access to the Norfolk section

0:19:310:19:34

of a trail art experts hope will need them to solve the mystery

0:19:340:19:40

of a trail art experts hope will lead them to solve the mystery

0:19:400:19:43

of the missing Magritte.

0:19:430:19:49

It's Autumn 2016 and the couriers are at Norwich Castle Museum

0:19:490:19:52

to collect a painting by the 20th century Belgian

0:19:520:19:54

surrealist Ren Magritte.

0:19:540:19:56

Hidden in the crate, the picture is bound

0:19:560:19:58

for the Pompidou Centre in Paris.

0:19:580:20:00

It will form part of a major exhibition of an artist whose work

0:20:000:20:03

sells for as much as Picasso's.

0:20:030:20:07

This particular painting, The Human Condition,

0:20:100:20:13

has sent shock waves through the art world.

0:20:130:20:17

Beneath its surface, a section of a missing

0:20:190:20:22

masterpiece has been found.

0:20:220:20:26

And the discovery has led this man to jump on a plane

0:20:260:20:29

from New York to see for himself.

0:20:290:20:33

I think it looks beautiful, the surface is really,

0:20:330:20:35

really saturated, kind of nice, and you see all the nuances

0:20:350:20:42

of the brushwork, particularly in the flames.

0:20:420:20:46

Now that we know it's there, when you've got a bit

0:20:460:20:50

of light on it, you can just about see one of the legs...

0:20:500:20:55

The Human Condition is painted over one quarter of another Magritte

0:20:560:21:01

called The Enchanted Pose.

0:21:010:21:06

There is one in Norwich that we know in the collection,

0:21:060:21:09

The Human Condition, and now it contains part

0:21:090:21:12

of another Magritte, so it is made all the more special.

0:21:120:21:15

But how was the hidden quarter detected?

0:21:150:21:19

When an artwork is prepared for loan, it is standard

0:21:210:21:24

practice for it to be looked at by a conservator to see

0:21:240:21:28

whether it needs any restoration work or cleaning.

0:21:280:21:30

It was then that the discovery was made.

0:21:300:21:32

The Human Condition was sent here to the Hamilton Kerr Institute

0:21:320:21:35

in Cambridge to be inspected by specialist conservator

0:21:350:21:38

Alice Tavares da Silva.

0:21:390:21:41

The first thing I did was to just look at it generally,

0:21:410:21:44

take it out of its frame.

0:21:440:21:46

In this case, it's a canvas painting, so I was particularly

0:21:460:21:50

concerned with looking at the strength of the canvas fabric

0:21:500:21:53

and whether it is still robust enough to be moved.

0:21:530:22:00

And then also we look at how it looks, what its appearance looks

0:22:000:22:07

like, if it looks how it is meant to be, how the artist intended it

0:22:070:22:10

to look as much as possible.

0:22:100:22:12

Alice, what caught your eye to make you think there

0:22:120:22:14

was something else there?

0:22:140:22:15

When I turned the painting over and I saw the edges,

0:22:150:22:18

there was definitely paint on the outer edges of the canvas

0:22:180:22:20

and it was quite obvious, there was so much colour

0:22:200:22:23

and composition, that Magritte had reused a canvas,

0:22:230:22:29

an elder composition, to paint over.

0:22:290:22:30

Alice was curious to discover if there were other paintings

0:22:300:22:32

by Magritte where the edges didn't match with the picture itself.

0:22:320:22:35

I went and researched a bit more and quickly came

0:22:350:22:40

across the discovery that had been done previously in New York at MOMA.

0:22:400:22:50

In 2013, New York's Museum of Modern Art, or MOMA,

0:22:500:22:52

was preparing for its own Magritte retrospective when examining

0:22:520:22:59

one of the Magrittes owned by the gallery,

0:22:590:23:05

entitled The Portrait, they noticed the edges did not

0:23:050:23:07

correspond to the painting on top.

0:23:070:23:08

X-rays of the portrait were taken and revealed the hidden picture

0:23:080:23:11

was part of the lost composition The Enchanted Pose.

0:23:110:23:13

Painted in 1927, the painting was exhibited the same year.

0:23:130:23:17

Magritte said of the exhibition,

0:23:170:23:22

"It was the first to represent truly what I consider

0:23:220:23:25

"valuable in my work."

0:23:250:23:26

But mysteriously, The Enchanted Pose disappeared without trace.

0:23:260:23:28

Only a black-and-white photo was left.

0:23:280:23:33

By matching the photo against the x-ray, the team at MoMA

0:23:330:23:36

was able to confirm the portrait was painted over the upper left

0:23:360:23:46

Events moved quickly.

0:23:520:23:53

Another painting destined for the exhibition in New York,

0:23:530:23:56

once unframed, also revealed painted edges.

0:23:560:23:57

Called The Red Model,

0:23:570:23:58

it came from the Moderna Museat in Stockholm.

0:23:580:24:00

They had the experts in Stockholm to quickly look at it and look

0:24:000:24:03

at the edges and they also realised that they had another section

0:24:030:24:06

of The Enchanted Pose.

0:24:060:24:08

Once x-rayed, it was clear the second section was from

0:24:080:24:12

the lower-left quarter of the painting.

0:24:120:24:16

Three years after the first discoveries were made, the third

0:24:160:24:19

quarter was found in Norwich.

0:24:190:24:23

And it's time for Alice to show me the evidence.

0:24:230:24:25

There it is.

0:24:280:24:30

Yes, this is the x-ray image of The Human Condition

0:24:300:24:39

and what you're looking at, you can see the structure,

0:24:390:24:42

the wooden structure

0:24:420:24:43

that holds the canvas, with tacks.

0:24:430:24:44

You can see part of the composition, so you can make out the fire

0:24:440:24:47

here and the opening of the cave.

0:24:470:24:49

But then, can you see there's other shapes that you can make out?

0:24:490:24:53

Which are actually upside down.

0:24:530:24:59

So we have to rotate this image to be able to see the fragment

0:24:590:25:02

of The Enchanted Pose.

0:25:020:25:03

You can make out really well the hand and arm and the legs

0:25:030:25:10

of the standing figure, standing next to the pillar,

0:25:100:25:12

and of course, that then relates to this quarter

0:25:120:25:14

of The Enchanted Pose, so this is the whole composition

0:25:140:25:17

of The Enchanted Poseand you can see that this stunning

0:25:170:25:24

figure matches this one.

0:25:240:25:25

Oh, my word.

0:25:250:25:26

It is like something out of a movie, isn't it?

0:25:260:25:29

Yes.

0:25:290:25:30

And found by you.

0:25:300:25:31

Yes.

0:25:310:25:32

Yes, to be the person to have discovered it is rather exciting.

0:25:320:25:34

It doesn't happen very day.

0:25:340:25:36

It doesn't happen every day.

0:25:360:25:37

The man who discovered the first quarter of the hidden painting,

0:25:370:25:40

MoMA conservator Michael Duffy, just had to get on a plane and get

0:25:400:25:43

to Norwich to see the picture before it was put back in its frame.

0:25:430:25:49

I could immediately see which bit of composition it had to come

0:25:490:25:52

from and then from that, it was very easy to then follow

0:25:520:25:56

that this must be the arm for modelling and this

0:25:560:25:59

was the modelling of the torso and going that way,

0:25:590:26:02

you have the shadow that the figure casts on the wall and

0:26:020:26:04

then that is the wall.

0:26:040:26:06

There is much more of the original composition visible in your painting

0:26:060:26:11

than in the MoMA painting or the Stockholm painting.

0:26:110:26:19

We know from this colour here that the background is not brown,

0:26:190:26:21

as I initially thought, but as you know, we only really

0:26:210:26:24

discovered the left part.

0:26:240:26:27

And now this gives us clues, obviously, to the rest

0:26:270:26:30

of the composition, which is really excellent.

0:26:300:26:33

Now we have further clues, thanks to the colleagues here in Norwich,

0:26:330:26:39

about the original colours of the underlying composition.

0:26:390:26:42

That's one of the more significant findings.

0:26:420:26:46

A painting that lay hidden for more than 80 years has

0:26:460:26:49

finally been unmasked.

0:26:490:26:50

Well, nearly.

0:26:500:26:51

So where do we look for the last missing piece of the puzzle?

0:26:510:26:55

We have some clues.

0:26:550:26:56

The other three were painted in 1935.

0:26:560:26:58

We know that the fourth quarter is pretty much likely to be the same

0:26:580:27:01

size as the other three and the edges were all painted,

0:27:010:27:05

none of them were white.

0:27:050:27:06

The others were found in New York, Stockholm and here in Norwich.

0:27:060:27:10

So where is that final piece of the painting?

0:27:100:27:14

It could be anywhere.

0:27:140:27:16

It could be in a private collection across the world,

0:27:160:27:20

across the globe, in a museum, we have this one in a museum,

0:27:200:27:29

we just hadn't looked in the right way to find this section

0:27:310:27:34

of The Enchanted Pose, it could be in any collection,

0:27:340:27:36

so hopefully a lot of publicity now with this latest discovery

0:27:360:27:39

will maybe alert people and remind people to look.

0:27:390:27:42

This is one part of the story I really love.

0:27:420:27:47

Magritte said, "We are part of a world which is itself

0:27:470:27:50

a mystery," but perhaps we are on the brink of solving

0:27:500:27:53

the mystery of The Enchanted Pose.

0:27:530:27:54

And art galleries around the world will be hoping to make a find just

0:27:540:27:58

like the one made here in Norwich.

0:27:580:28:00

So where is that final missing piece?

0:28:010:28:07

What a discovery that would be.

0:28:070:28:10

Now, it's 80 years since the first-ever radar station

0:28:100:28:13

was officially opened.

0:28:130:28:15

But can the historic buildings nestling in the Suffolk

0:28:150:28:17

countryside be saved?

0:28:170:28:19

Well, that's next week.

0:28:190:28:20

In the meantime, you can get in touch with me

0:28:200:28:22

on Twitter or e-mail.

0:28:220:28:26

But that's it from Cambridge.

0:28:290:28:30

I'll see you next week.

0:28:300:28:32

Bye-bye.

0:28:320:28:34

Also next week, we are on patrol with the police in Essex,

0:28:340:28:37

catching people driving under the influence of drugs.

0:28:370:28:42

You're under arrest on suspicion of driving with a drug level over

0:28:420:28:45

the prescribed limit.

0:28:450:28:53

And how one community took over the running of their daycare centre

0:28:530:28:56

and it's a big success.

0:28:560:28:57

That's next Monday, 7:30pm on BBC One.

0:28:570:28:59

Hello, I'm Riz Lateef with your 90-second update.

0:29:060:29:11

Hello, I'm Riz Lateef with your 90-second update.

0:29:110:29:13

Protests in Downing Street tonight against Donald Trump's travel ban

0:29:130:29:15

on several Muslim countries.

0:29:150:29:16

What's it really like for the women who have stopped going out and don't know whether they can follow their religion as they like? As the government declares its pumping more money into stopping hate crime, Sophie Sulehria goes to Luton to try and understand what can be done to tackle Islamophobia.

There are no figures to show how many people are looking after their relatives, paying for it and not using the system at all because they think they can do a better job. Jo Taylor has been following BBC Local Radio presenter Sue Marchant, who decided to design her mum's care herself. She has found it a really difficult job, but also incredibly rewarding.

And the mystery of the missing Magritte masterpiece - Inside Out has been given exclusive access to the Norfolk section of a trail that art experts' hope will lead them to solve the mystery of a lost Magritte painting. We follow an expert from New York's Museum of Modern Art who has come to East Anglia in his quest for the lost painting.


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