17/02/2014 Inside Out Yorkshire and Lincolnshire


17/02/2014

Why was a disabled man charged more to travel by taxi? Plus the men building a steam train for the 21st century, and the reason why burlesque was banned in Hebden Bridge.


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Transcript


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Welcome to Inside Out from the warnings

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Welcome to Inside Out from the National Railway Museum in York.

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Good evening, and welcome to Inside Out, I am Toby Foster. Later, we

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will find out about plans to build a brand`new steam train designed by

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the man who built this beauty. First, why do many disabled people

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have to pay more to travel by taxi? We test a handful of firms to find

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out. Can I have a receipt. It was ?20. Also, we meet the enthusiasts

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building a new steam engine from the original 1930s designs. And it has

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been banned by a Yorkshire Council ` welcome to the new burlesque. It is

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regressive. I think it is empowering.

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I get a taxi into work every Friday and Saturday night, and I always

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know what it's going to cost me ` ?20 from my house into the centre of

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Sheffield. But if you're a wheelchair user, it seems, it's not

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that simple. One man from Keighley has found that he has been quoted

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sometimes more than double the normal fare. So, we decided to

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investigate. Meet Paul Anderson. He lives in Riddlesden near Keighley

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and he travels to work in Bradford every day. Most of the time he

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drives himself in his specially adapted car but sometimes he takes a

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cab. I might use a taxi if I'm going to an area where I can't park my own

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car. I also use a taxi if I'm going on a night out. I do occasionally

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use taxis around and about where I work in Bradford because it's easier

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than trying to find a parking space. Paul works for a disability charity

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and some of his friends and colleagues have discovered that they

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seem to be paying a lot more for taxi journeys than the rest of us,

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which doesn't seem fair. But what does the law say? If a provider has

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an accessible vehicle within their fleet and they charge the disabled

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person a higher rate for using that vehicle than a non`disabled person,

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it would be likely that a court would find that unlawful. In fact,

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according to the Equality Act, it's unlawful to discriminate against

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disabled people when providing them with goods and services, like a

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taxi. And yet apparently, it's still happening. A number of wheelchair

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users have come to me and said that they have experienced being charged

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higher prices. Please can I get a quote on a taxi. So we decided to

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test the theory. Paul got together with one of our researchers and rang

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31 taxi firms in the Bradford and Keighley area to see what they would

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charge a wheelchair user as opposed to an able bodied person. Out of

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those 31, 12 firms quoted at least a 30% increase, rising to well over

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100% for some firms. 11 didn't have any suitable cars and one couldn't

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give a quote when we rang. Out of the 31, only seven quoted us the

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same price, or slightly more. It would be interesting to look into

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what is behind the firms who were quoting up to 50% difference. So,

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that is what we did. We picked the four firms which according to our

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research, quoted the biggest mark`up on disabled cars.

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Only seven companies out of 31 quoted

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`` This is what happened. Paul's office is at the Carlisle Business

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Centre in the Manningham area of Bradford. So for each of the four

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cab companies, we're going to call a taxi for me, and one for Paul, and

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do exactly the same journey to the street Paul lives in in Keighley.

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First up, Euro Cars of Bradford. I wonder if you could give me a quote

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for a taxi from the Carlisle Business Centre in Bradford to

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Grange Road in Riddlesden, Keighley? It's showing up about ?13. Sorry I

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forgot to say, it needs to be wheelchair accessible. A wheelchair

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one? Oh that'll be more than that then ` about ?20. Amazingly, the

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operator is completely open about the fact that Paul will be charged

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over 50% more because he's in a wheelchair. Where about you going?

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Grange Road, Riddlesden. Well, that's Paul on his way. So now I'm

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going to call a cab from the same company and see what they charge me.

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Can I order a taxi please? Where from. I am at the Carlisle Business

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Centre. I will get someone to do now, Mr Foster. Thanks, goodbye.

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Let's see what happens, shall we? Paul and I arrive safely in our

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cabs, which interestingly are both around the same size, but the damage

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to Paul's wallet is a fair bit more than to mine. I've got my receipt,

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it says ?15. It was actually ?14, he just put an extra pound on the

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receipt. How much was yours? ?20.50 but he charged me ?20. So we came

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exactly the same route and yours was ?6 more. So onto our second company

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` First Choice taxis of Keighley. Hello, first choice? Can I order a

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taxi please? Can I order a taxi for order to three? `` quarter to three.

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We ask them to send two cabs to take us back from Keighley to Bradford,

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but this time there's a bit of confusion as they send Paul a

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non`accessible car. Hi there, it's Paul. I ordered a wheelchair

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accessible taxi and you've sent a normal one. Are you going to be able

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to sort me out? I haven't got wheelchair accessible cab at the

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moment. Luckily, Paul's condition means he is able to stand for short

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periods so he manages to get in a second cab sent by the company and

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off we go back to Bradford. So we're back here at the Carlisle Business

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Centre. ?13, that journey. Let's see what Paul gets charged. Just ?13

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please. So this time, we both get charged the same amount. And yet it

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took longer to get you in and out of the car? Yes, it takes longer to get

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someone with a wheelchair into a car, and sometimes that is an excuse

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for charging more. It is an amazing difference in price between the

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Bradford form dumb Akram and the Keighley firm, nearly 50% more. It

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is a big difference and would make a big difference to a disabled person

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to find that extra ?7. Day two, and Paul and I are ready to test out two

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more taxi firms ` so you know the drill. Can I have a wheelchair

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accessible taxi? Can I have a taxi to the Carlisle Business Centre? The

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two companies today are Girlington All Over and Bank Top Taxis, both

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based in Bradford. So off we go on exactly the same journey as

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yesterday. Or this way and go up the top of the lane, go down that way.

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Go down here. It is not far. There is a car park on the Drop me over

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there, but is fine. And you've guessed it? Paul, we've had two

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days. `` can I have a receipt please? We

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have used four different taxi firms. One gave us the same price

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and the rest, 12 or ?13, yours was ?20. It seems to be the way. We had

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a bit of a problem with the last one. The car was not wheelchair

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accessible. We left the car park and he said, I think I have a puncture.

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There is something wrong with my engine, and he stopped, and he took

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us back and kicked us out. And that taxi, again, charge to try ``

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charged you ?20. It will be interesting but taxi firms say when

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we put it to them, would? It would. It'll be interesting to see how it

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will be justified. Bank Top Taxis told us they actually asked another

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firm to pick Paul up after their driver had a puncture, so they

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couldn't take responsibility for what was charged. Girlington All

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Over weren't available for interview, but the boss told us that

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they had now changed their policy and are now charging disabled

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passengers the same as everyone else. The only fair we could speak

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to on camera was Euro Cars. I am here to see them now. On the day,

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two taxes, same journey, I got charged ?14, Paul got charged ?20.

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What is the difference? We have only two tariffs. We have a minibus

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tariff and a normal car tariff. The Equality Commission told us that

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taxi companies need to make what they call "reasonable adjustments"

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to their fares to ensure that disabled people aren't discriminated

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against. Do you think you're doing that? I can see both sides. I can

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see where you're coming from, but the price of a wheelchair accessible

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minibus is considerably more than a normal minibus. It has to be

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converted. They need ramps and clamps and things like that, which

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cost a lot of money. We are going to review our prices in March but at

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the moment, we've only two tariffs. So, some hope then that things might

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change, but at the moment it seems that despite what the law says, Paul

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may still be paying more than me to get around by taxi.

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If you have got any views on that story, or what to tell us about

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something we should cover, you can contact us on Facebook or Twitter.

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Coming up on Inside Out... It has been banned by a Yorkshire Council `

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welcome to the new burlesque. Six years ago, a group of

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enthusiasts built a new steam engine from scratch. Now they are going to

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do it all over again, and this time, it will be much bigger.

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Six years ago, an extraordinary thing happened. People across the

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world sat up and watched. A group of enthusiasts built a brand new steam

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engine to run on Britain's main line. At times it was tricky. One is

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in danger of burning one's Hinkley C... It took 18 years and cost ?3

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million. But when it work, no one was more delighted than them. Yes!

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This engine is named Tornado, and may God bless all who are lucky

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enough to drive behind her. Today I am at Barrow Hill near Chesterfield

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to find out what happened next, and to find out about plans to do the

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impossible once again. Barrow Hill is a fascinating place if you're

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mechanically minded. There's every type of locomotive here. Some are

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being repaired, some are being restored, but all are the object of

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someone's affections. And this is where we find Tornado. But to be

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honest, in a few more bits than when I last saw it. We have had some

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damage in the past. John Wilkinson used to be a banker. He swapped

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spread sheets for steam and has now gone loco full time. Hello, John.

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What is the story here? I was expecting to see Tornado ready to

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go, but there are sparks flying and it is not going anywhere. What is

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the story? The way we like to present the engine is clean and as

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you would expect, but you have to come and do all of the jobs. We have

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to lift parts off and strip things down to get to where you want to

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work. It can be a matter of weeks rather than days. Out of sight, out

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of mind. It is not hauling passengers are earning money? Ella

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mac we would like it to be earning, but we needed to be reliable. `` we

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would like it to be earning. There is a lot at stake. Tornado has

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pulled the Royal Train three times, starred in an episode of Top Gear

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and delighted thousands of passengers. Its reputation as a

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steam star has gone global. These hands had to clean. Have you got a

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job? We have a superb job lined up for you. Should I be worried?

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Always! One quick change and an induction to spanners later... The

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whole thing will come off. It will be heavy.

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I think this is today's 20 minutes of exercise sorted out. One of the

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interesting things about working at the front of the engine is you are

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reminded just how long it took to build because these cylinders were

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cast not far away from here, just down the road. That has long closed.

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It's a housing estate. How are we going get this off? Not a word of a

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lie. It took three of us 20 minutes, using a selection of tools and words

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not necessarily in the dictionary to wrestle this off. No wonder they

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call it a piano front. That was a really big job and just one

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component, too, which makes me wonder, the people who look after

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it, surely they have enough on. Why on earth do they want to build

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another steam engine? 80 years ago, a prototype locomotive rolled out of

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the Doncaster plant works. This is the most powerful steam locomotive

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ever built in Britain. If you go back to the origins of the design,

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they were designed for a specific role and that was to haul heavy

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trains from Edinburgh to Aberdeen, when the trains were getting the

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Google cache more luxurious during the early 1930s. Why build another?

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This locomotive can haul more coaches. It will be able to haul

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those coaches up steeper hills than the other locomotives, and Hills

:15:41.:15:45.

equals beautiful scenery. Beautiful scenery equals more passengers. The

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official works portrait of the first of these locomotives reveals these

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is dashed their size. `` reveals their size. This is number 2001,

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with another famous steam name ` Cock O The North. However a lot of

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the engineering and even some of the parts are the same as on Tornado.

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What do you need? Let's start with the wheels. You have two of the

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front to lead them locomotive into tight curves, eight other wheels and

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two wheels at the back to support the weight. Next come the frames.

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Think of them is a big metal rectangle that hold everything in

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just the right place. It's normally the part build first. The P2 has

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three cylinders and they conferred the seeming to war power which is

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transmitted to the reels by connecting rods. To make this team,

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you need a boiler. Think of that like a big cattle. It gives ?250 per

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square inch. At this end of the boiler, you have a box which collect

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the waste gases from the fire and sends up the chimney. You have two

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defectors to make sure the smoke is lifted well clear of the cab. The

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other end of the boiler, the driver sits. Stickler: The water on the

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back and you have just created a living, breathing monster, capable

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of hauling hundreds of tonnes. Six of them were built but they were all

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ultimately scrapped which means the closest you'll get to seeing one is

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as a model, like here, at the National Railway Museum in York.

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Terrific stuff. You may know the name of the man who designed the

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machine, Nigel Gresley. It is very unusual to see footage of him.

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Anthony Coulis is the senior curator at the National Railway Museum. He

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created something that would pull the side of the house. He was not

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averse to being influenced by people. The very fact that the first

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one was tested here as well. He was working as an international level.

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Are you excited about seeing one for what would have been the first time?

:18:05.:18:09.

I think so. It is such a different way. The engines have been described

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as his Enigma variations. They are all slightly different. You know

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that this is going to do the job but he had the eye towards the athletic.

:18:21.:18:27.

The maestro signed off his symphony eight decades ago. He could never

:18:28.:18:35.

have guessed that one day, the plans would be taken from a museum, dusted

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down, scanned into a computer and catalogued, ready to build another

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one. And already one big decision has been taken. How did that royal

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connection come about? Prince Charles was kind enough to name

:18:51.:18:56.

Tornado. He enjoyed himself on the day. You were there, Tom, and saw

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that. He has been kind enough to ask us to pull the Royal train on two

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occasions since then. We were thinking about what we should name

:19:06.:19:08.

them locomotive. There was only one name that came to mind and that was

:19:09.:19:14.

Prince of Wales. This is the Darlington workshop.

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Right now, it is filling with people and activity all over again. These

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wooden patterns are being cleaned off, ready to be sent to the foundry

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which will cast the very first parts for the brand`new steam engine. The

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trust has already raised ?300,000 towards the cost. They reckon they

:19:32.:19:36.

will need around ?5 million but buoyed by their successful Tornado,

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they claim they can do the job by 2021.

:19:40.:19:47.

Burlesque entertainment is enjoying something of a revival but after one

:19:48.:19:52.

Yorkshire Council banned the show, some have questioned whether it is

:19:53.:19:56.

liberating or demeaning for modern women. John Harris investigates the

:19:57.:20:01.

politics and the business behind the new burlesque.

:20:02.:20:05.

The finishing touches before a show. But for some, this type of

:20:06.:20:10.

entertainment crosses a line. Burlesque is sexual entertainment

:20:11.:20:14.

and I do think it's regressive. I would say it's totalling empowering.

:20:15.:20:20.

There are those who think it's very raunchy, like striptease. Rubbish.

:20:21.:20:25.

It's not just about stripping. Burlesque is booming. More classes

:20:26.:20:36.

are being set up, training would`be performers in the art of the tease.

:20:37.:20:46.

The question is, does the new burlesque empower or demean women in

:20:47.:20:51.

21st century Britain? In a city centre store, shop assistant Emma

:20:52.:20:57.

Knight tempts a customer. Within hours, she'll offering a different

:20:58.:21:07.

exotic mix. How I you? Thank you for coming. Outside a Leicester night

:21:08.:21:13.

club, the former university student is transformed into her stage

:21:14.:21:16.

personality, Eliza De Lite, a rising international star of modern British

:21:17.:21:19.

burlesque. The thing to overcome about burlesque is that it's not

:21:20.:21:22.

about the nudity. It's about what you are not showing and teasing the

:21:23.:21:23.

audience with fabric and costumes. Eliza is one of an increasing number

:21:24.:21:34.

of burlesque performers in a thriving East Midlands scene. She

:21:35.:21:40.

runs her own club. A lot of burlesque performers are coming off

:21:41.:21:43.

a stage wearing more than you would see on a beach. Burlesque with pens

:21:44.:21:56.

and felt tips. Artists onstage and sketched by artists in the audience.

:21:57.:22:01.

There is no traffic to stop the Yorkshire performer, , but the new

:22:02.:22:07.

burlesque revival almost shuddered to a halt when a council banned her

:22:08.:22:13.

show. As soon as somebody tries to tell me what I chose to do with my

:22:14.:22:17.

time, and what is a genuine passion in my life, I'm going to fight for

:22:18.:22:21.

that. The Hebden Bridge Picture House in West Yorkshire, where

:22:22.:22:30.

burlesque was banned. There were a lot of concerns by a sizeable number

:22:31.:22:33.

of people in the community. I went to see Susan Press, the chair of the

:22:34.:22:36.

town's Picture House Committee. Her politics were forged in the heat of

:22:37.:22:44.

1970s feminism. I see it as a sexual form of entertainment and it's

:22:45.:22:46.

regressive and it's something we fought against a generation against

:22:47.:22:49.

in the '70s and it's sexually orientated. This is Jeremy Vine on

:22:50.:23:03.

BBC radio 2... The ban was gold`dust for radio phone`in hosts. Die in

:23:04.:23:06.

Nottingham

:23:07.:23:07.

Toby Foster investigates why a disabled man has to pay more than him to travel by taxi, Tom Ingall meets the men building a steam train for the 21st century and John Hess finds out why burlesque dancing was banned in Hebden Bridge.


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