23/10/2017 Inside Out Yorkshire and Lincolnshire


23/10/2017

The people whose lives have been changed forever when antibiotics failed to work. And the French Cold War jet which has landed in Yorkshire.


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Transcript


LineFromTo

Good evening from York.

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This week, the Cold War fighter plane which has

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found a new home in Yorkshire.

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And why we should all be taking fewer antibiotics.

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Hello.

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This week we're in the city of York which has become home to the French

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fighter plane which was created to deliver a devastating nuclear

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payload.

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It's highly advanced, it's beautiful looking, and it's superb

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performance.

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But it is a bringer of death and destruction.

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Also tonight, why antibiotic resistance poses a

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huge danger to our health.

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I lost my big right toe and almost half of my

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foot within a period of 12 hours.

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And, later in the programme, the marriage agency which says it can

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find men up to four wives.

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We have heard the warnings.

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Antibiotics, the basis of modern medicine, are losing their effect

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and we could be facing a worldwide catastrophe.

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So what is being done?

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Well, a team of scientists from Leeds have come up with a device

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that might be able to hold back this health apocalypse.

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Jamie Coulson reports.

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Let's start with a quiz question.

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Should you give this patient antibiotic?

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What can I help you with this morning?

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I can't get rid of this cold.

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My throat's burning, my nose is all blocked,.

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My throat's burning, my nose is all blocked.

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The symptoms are the same.

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If it's a bacterial

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infection it could be just what the patient needs.

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But if it's a virus it will have no effect whatsoever.

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And handing out a prescription could take is one step closer to an

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And handing out a prescription could take us one step closer to an

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antibiotic Armageddon.

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It's happened and in many cases it has rendered

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the drugs, the antibiotics, unusable.

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What we really need is efforts to reduce demand and stop

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treating these things like sweets.

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Potentially by 2050, we could have 10 million

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deaths a year globally.

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So what if you could invent something that would tell you if it

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is bacterial or not?

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It is the scientific Holy Grail.

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It's a very quick device.

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It takes five to ten minutes to take a measurement.

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And it gives the GP the information that

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they need to prescribe.

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A miracle out of mould!

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Bacteria have been developing resistance to antibiotics

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ever since Alexander Flemming discovered penicillin.

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Put an antibiotic next to a bug or next to

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a series of bugs and as sure as light is day some of those will

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develop resistance to that antibiotic.

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And that resistance can cause devastation.

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How do I know you're going to be here at 10am,

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Monday, Wednesday, Friday, for the next six weeks?

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Because I want to do something to break the habit of just

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work, work, work...

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This was Jonathan Lewis 17 years ago, trying

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to get hit.

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to get fit.

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Since then he went on to develop type two diabetes and an

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infection in his toe.

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I lost my big right toe and almost half of my foot

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within a period of 12 hours.

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It is as poisonous as that.

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He had picked up sepsis caused by a drug resistant bacteria.

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So every time I have an infection, I have a different strain

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of the infection, I therefore have to have different treatment.

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It has put an Exocet missile right through

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my ability to function properly.

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I have had numerous MRIs, numerous x-rays, numerous operations,

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and I can never get rid of it.

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Jonathan has spent much of the past five

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years in hospital.

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It is frightening when the theatre staff recognise you

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and say, "Hello, Jonathan, you're back with us again."

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And Jonathan is one of the lucky ones.

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He is still alive.

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Across Europe about 25,000 people die every year of drug

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resistant infections.

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And I am really worried, as are experts, that

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if we don't do things to control this, we will risk losing

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antibiotics.

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And they underpin modern medicine.

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One important step is to reduce the number of people

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taking antibiotics.

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But the more we take the quicker the bacteria adapt

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and become resistant to them.

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People are using antibiotics when they

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don't necessarily need them.

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This may be because they are being prescribed them or they are taking

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antibiotics that they've got sitting in the cupboard.

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But the key thing is, if you take antibiotics when you

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don't need them they will stop working for you in the future.

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# Antibiotics, we're wonderful pills...#.

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Public-health England has launched a national advertising

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campaign to persuade people not to ask for them.

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# Don't always think that we can make you better #.

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But are we listening?

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If we look at how many antibiotics were prescribed in

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Yorkshire and Lincolnshire in the first three

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months of this year, in

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the Vale of York there were enough issued for around one in seven

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people.

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In Bradford, Harlow and Scarborough, that figure goes up to

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around one in five.

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--

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-- hole

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-- hole and

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-- hole and Scarborough.

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-- Hull and Scarborough.

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But the worst culprit of all is South

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Lincolnshire, where there were enough issued for almost one in four

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people.

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So what were they taking them for?

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We asked people in Stamford.

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Probably a chest infection.

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I think it was a sinus infection.

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I had a tooth infection.

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For a toe infection.

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It was for interstitial cystitis, yeah.

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They don't work, though.

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GPs are under pressure for lots of different

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reasons, and they have very short appointments in which to see people.

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But I think if you've got a patient sitting in front of you and their

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expectation is that they want to go away with a prescription for

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something, it can be quite hard to say no.

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In Leeds, GPs have been targeting students.

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We're trying to get the message across to people

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that viruses don't respond to antibiotics,

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because it is still an

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issue that a lot of our community don't understand that.

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So they could do, with a bit more help.

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It would be really useful if we had a test

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that we could use to check whether the patient had a viral or a

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bacterial infection.

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Researchers around the world are working on this very problem.

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And at the forefront is a team from Leeds.

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This little plastic slide could be a weapon in

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the fight against antibiotic resistance.

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A lab would take a few days to identify whether an is viral

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or bacterial.

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What we are trying to do is to develop a simple test that

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can indeed be used next to the patients, that can say

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in five, ten minutes, this is a really high

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chance of being viral, or it's a really high chance of being

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bacterial.

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Scientists in Leeds have created a chip that can do just that.

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So that's simple.

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It's a very simple concept.

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However, the science and the research that has gone into

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developing all this technology, to make it work, that's a very

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challenging enterprise and has taken us many,

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many years to get to this point.

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Here's how it should work.

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They have had to find five different molecules to load onto the chip

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and test the infection.

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That has taken 12 years so far.

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What we are measuring is a response of the body,

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as a result of the infection.

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It is not just one measurement of one

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marker as we call it, but we have to melt

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the word measure a multiple of

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these markers at the same time.

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They have finally reached the point where

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the molecules are being added to the chips.

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This is where the engine sort of gets integrated into the chassis,

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if you like.

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And if the integration is not perfect then the device won't work.

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And this is the end result.

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When a patient goes and sees a GP, the GP will take blood

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and what the GP wants to know is

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the concentration of certain markers

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which are a response of the body as a result of the infection.

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The blood then flows onto this device, into

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this end of the device, where the actual

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measurements will be taken by

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an electronic chip.

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The results of the measurements are then

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transferred to a computer where the GP can read off

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the results and make a diagnosis from that information.

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The device now has to go through clinical trials.

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We are at least five years away from instant

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diagnosis, but the fight to save antibiotics has begun.

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If we can reduce that pressure early on in the

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antibiotic bug chain, then we really can slow down this

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rush towards resistance.

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It might mean fewer people in Jonathan's situation.

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I saw it on the night and I haven't seen it since.

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And it takes me back.

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After three weeks, Jonathan's lost over a stone.

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I was fit, I had never been ill in my life before.

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How times have changed!

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I won't let this defeat me.

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And...

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You know, I will fight till the end.

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How do you feel about a world where antibiotics

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don't work any more and many people may have to go through what you have

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been through?

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Well, I hope first of all that no one will have to go

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through what I've been through.

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But it will be a world of pain, it will

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be a world of increasing deaths, and it will be a world, frankly,

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that people wouldn't want to live in.

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And if you've got a story you'd like to tell us about, you can

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contact us on Facebook or Twitter.

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Coming up on Inside Out:

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The Cold War bomber that has landed in Yorkshire.

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Polygamy, the practice of a man marrying more than one woman,

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is becoming more common in the UK.

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But why would a man want several wives

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and why would a woman wants to share her husband?

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Well, Chris Jackson has been investigating a website which

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offers a matchmaking service with a difference.

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This is the man who markets second wives.

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Hello, my name is Azad Chaiwala.

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I am the founder of polygamy.com and secondwife.com...

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..the world's first-ever polygamy-based relationship website.

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Even though it's not recognised by the law here,

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Azad believes polygamy is the future.

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The whole idea is to build bigger and better families.

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Ten years from now, it's not going to be

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a taboo any more.

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So you're convinced there's a demand out there.

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100,000 plus people are already signed up, so of course there is.

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I want to tell you about polygamy.com -

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the very first matrimonial website...

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Polygamy.com is for everyone, but Azad's first website,

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secondwife.com, is specifically aimed at Muslims.

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My name is Azad Chaiwala and I welcome

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you to secondwife.com, where you will find like-minded

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brothers and sisters who are wanting to revive the last

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tradition of polygamy.

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Azad's business was founded on recruiting willing

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wives for Muslim men, as he explained to me

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on a break from the office.

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You must have heard the arguments, people saying

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it sounds a bit like the man who wants to have his cake and eat it.

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You know...

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What's wrong with that?

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I mean, there are other means of doing it.

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There are other deception all ways of doing it.

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Like affairs, prostitution, etc.

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And those are not necessarily good for relationships.

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Here it is more honourable, because you are upfront about it.

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Most Muslims in the UK don't practice polygamy.

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But some interpretations of the Quran say a man they married

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two, three or even for women, as long as he can deal justly and

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fairly with each of them.

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So how does that work out in practice?

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Well, I am on my way to meet one couple in Yorkshire to find out.

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Tarek, a doctor, was using Azad's website to find a second wife

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when he met Tracy by chance.

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They got together in February.

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Cosy cottage.

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Cosy cottage.

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Cosy cottage.

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Yeah.

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Log burner.

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Oh, I would love a log burner.

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Two horses, and then me and you can go riding.

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Yeah.

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And go for romantic picnics.

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Of course.

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I have currently two wives and an ex-wife.

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I found there is a lot of ladies who are not

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married, whether they are

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growing old or they have been divorced and nobody is really

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interested in them, or they are single mothers.

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So I thought, well, if I have the ability to manage more

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than one wife then I would like to take this opportunity.

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And do people outside of the Islamic faith,

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friends of yours, do they understand?

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Do they get this?

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Quite a few people are asking me how can

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you manage that?

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I say, it sounds complicated or difficult, however,

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once you reach an agreement together you will find it easy.

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I am not just doing it to have.

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I am doing it to give.

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I thought long and hard about polygamy and I thought, OK, this

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could actually work out to my advantage.

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I want to be married to somebody but I still want to be able

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to travel and have my independence.

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So really you were only after a part-time husband, really?

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Physically, it's a part-time husband.

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Emotionally...

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It's a full-time husband.

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I will do it, I will do it.

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I've got it on the first one.

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You want it on which one?

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There.

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Tighten it up.

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Maybe just move that one up one.

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OK.

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The way I see it, I've got the best of everything.

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You signed up for one day a week.

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Has that worked out?

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He has always been very straight with me in what he can

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manage and everything.

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And he did say one day and one night per week.

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Tracy has now asked to renegotiate the written marriage contract.

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She wants Tarek for two days and nights each week.

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I've found myself being more insecure with my marriage, with

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just being one day and one night.

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And what about his other wife, though?

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That means less time with her, of course.

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I do think about my co-wife.

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And the situation that she is in.

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They are at home, they have got child number six coming along.

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So she does need more support.

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But polygamy is not for everyone.

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When it comes to users of secondwife.com, men outnumber

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women three to one.

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If someone is offering themselves up as a second

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wife, they may not know what is going on with the first wife.

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And whether she is happy.

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True.

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This is why I encourage everybody to be open.

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So you have to have everybody involved on the table.

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From the outside, some people might say that

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this is just the guys having their own way.

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You can't...

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And having a lot of fun and the women don't really get

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much of a say in this.

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It takes two hands to clap.

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A guy can't do it on his own.

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And the fact that we've got so many successful marriages and the fact

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that we've got so many women that have signed

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up themselves - a lot of

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these women are highly educated and professionals,

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doctors, teachers, lawyers, business ladies - and they

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are opting to enter this kind of relationship.

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Bigamy, that is when you marry again before getting

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divorced, can land you in prison for up to seven years.

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But polygamous marriages are marked by spiritual or

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religious ceremonies and, as they are not

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recognised by law, there is

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no reliable figure for how many take place in the UK.

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Polygamy should be thought of in terms of a hub and

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spoke model, where typically you have a husband with multiple

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wives, where the husband is the one choosing who the wives are.

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So in a sense the husband has full control over who every single member

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of that family is.

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Is there a wider impact of polygamy, not just on

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those at the centre of it?

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I think that as the country is trying to get

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a greater sense of equality, certainly trying to make some steps

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towards greater gender equality, I think this is something that would

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be a stumbling block.

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This would be a setback.

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So you should be able to just feel his mouth.

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Lift your reins up a bit.

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Try to keep...

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So within polygamy do you feel you are an

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equal partner in this?

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No.

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No, I don't.

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As much as it is an experience and I really love Tarek,

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I wouldn't do it again, because it is not easy, emotionally.

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It really isn't.

0:17:340:17:36

According to the Quran, of course, he could actually find a

0:17:360:17:39

third wife or even a fourth.

0:17:390:17:41

How would you feel about that?

0:17:410:17:43

I don't want that.

0:17:430:17:46

If Tarek is absolutely adamant that he wants that, then...

0:17:460:17:53

I have to think very strongly about my options.

0:17:530:17:57

Are you OK?

0:17:570:17:58

Yeah, I'm OK.

0:17:580:17:59

It is up to the man, as wise as he could be,

0:17:590:18:02

to treat them fairly.

0:18:020:18:04

And kindly, and caring.

0:18:040:18:06

So if he doesn't have this skill or ability,

0:18:060:18:08

it might be very difficult to avoid, you know, higher chances of jealousy

0:18:080:18:12

which can cause problems.

0:18:120:18:16

The women have the choice that she can walk

0:18:160:18:18

away from the marriage at any point.

0:18:190:18:20

Whoa!

0:18:200:18:21

Good boy.

0:18:210:18:22

Good boy, good boy.

0:18:220:18:23

Back in the office, Azad has just launched his third

0:18:230:18:26

matchmaking website.

0:18:260:18:27

As part of the practical marriage guide, I will

0:18:270:18:30

give you 100 questions to ask your future spouse prior to getting

0:18:300:18:32

married.

0:18:330:18:34

He believes a lot can be learned from how some Muslims go

0:18:340:18:37

about finding a husband or wife.

0:18:370:18:39

But he has boundaries.

0:18:390:18:42

Is the natural extension of this that there might

0:18:420:18:44

be secondhusband.com?

0:18:440:18:47

Me, personally, that's not something I advocate.

0:18:470:18:49

But if somebody wants to start that website,

0:18:490:18:51

that's their own choice.

0:18:510:18:52

I'm not going to go around protesting.

0:18:520:18:55

And what about Azad's personal quest for a second wife?

0:18:550:18:58

So far he has only managed to bag one.

0:18:580:19:01

Because I'm quite picky.

0:19:010:19:03

And when I say picky, I'm being quite practical.

0:19:030:19:05

I have said this before - I would like to marry somebody

0:19:050:19:08

fairly local to me.

0:19:080:19:09

The website came about from my need and thinking,

0:19:090:19:11

well, there will be other people in my situation.

0:19:110:19:14

It is benefiting a lot of people and that gives me a lot of

0:19:140:19:17

satisfaction.

0:19:170:19:18

Myself, my number will come.

0:19:180:19:20

I am a very patient person, and I believe in divine decree -

0:19:200:19:23

that maybe there is a reason that it has not happened.

0:19:230:19:26

Thank you very much.

0:19:260:19:27

Polygamy.com.

0:19:270:19:29

Bye-bye.

0:19:290:19:31

One of the fastest nuclear bombers ever built has been

0:19:400:19:43

transported from France to the Yorkshire Air Museum

0:19:430:19:44

in Elvington near York.

0:19:440:19:45

The French Mirage IV was designed to carry a

0:19:450:19:48

gigantic nuclear bomb.

0:19:480:19:49

And with rising tensions between North Korea

0:19:490:19:52

and the US, it is a timely reminder of a threat many thought had been

0:19:520:19:56

consigned to the history books.

0:19:560:19:57

Lucy Hester reports.

0:19:570:20:04

The Mirage IV in flight.

0:20:040:20:06

A supersonic aircraft, capable of 1,800 miles an hour.

0:20:060:20:09

But its beauty belied its deadly purpose.

0:20:090:20:12

It was built to drop a nuclear bomb 40 times more

0:20:120:20:15

powerful than the one that destroyed Hiroshima.

0:20:150:20:20

It's highly advanced, it's beautiful looking and it's

0:20:200:20:23

superb performance.

0:20:230:20:25

But it is a bringer of death and destruction.

0:20:250:20:28

The ultimate threat.

0:20:280:20:33

The Mirage IV, pride of the French air force,

0:20:350:20:38

now the latest exhibit at Elvington Air Museum.

0:20:380:20:42

And the plane buffs will love this one.

0:20:420:20:44

Sleek lines, more like a rocket than a plain, and a

0:20:440:20:47

huge bomb bay built into its undercarriage.

0:20:470:20:52

So why is this relic of the Cold War here in a hangar in

0:20:520:20:57

the Yorkshire Air Museum?

0:20:570:20:58

Well, the big clue is right next to it.

0:20:580:21:03

A British Halifax Bomber but with French air force markings.

0:21:030:21:08

France was defeated and occupied in 1940.

0:21:080:21:12

But the bulk of her air force was safe in North Africa.

0:21:120:21:22

And from there air men formed two bomber

0:21:260:21:28

squadrons that served at Elvington from 1944.

0:21:280:21:30

There were so many French airmen here it became known as

0:21:300:21:33

La Petite France.

0:21:330:21:34

And this bit of Yorkshire became a central part of

0:21:340:21:36

the campaign to liberate Europe.

0:21:360:21:41

This memorial garden in Elvington commemorates over 2,000 who with two

0:21:410:21:46

French squadrons, and they paid a heavy price for their bombing

0:21:460:21:50

raids against their own country.

0:21:500:21:53

Over 200 of them died trying to liberate France.

0:21:530:22:01

It is that French connection that led to the gift of the finest

0:22:010:22:04

surviving French bomber from a very different era.

0:22:040:22:11

The two squadrons are still flying today, but during the

0:22:110:22:14

60s, 70s, 80s, the French nuclear deterrent was

0:22:140:22:19

done by these Mirage IV aircraft.

0:22:190:22:22

The two French squadrons that were based here flew them.

0:22:220:22:26

So there is a really strong connection.

0:22:260:22:29

It took more than a decade of red tape and high-level

0:22:290:22:31

negotiations before the Mirage could be removed from France.

0:22:310:22:37

Any transfer of a major nuclear defence aircraft

0:22:370:22:40

to another country, let alone a museum third party in another

0:22:400:22:45

country, obviously has to be taken at the highest levels of Government.

0:22:450:22:50

But with the final hurdles cleared, earlier this year on the outskirts

0:22:500:22:55

of Paris, a team began the painstaking task of taking the

0:22:550:22:58

aircraft apart and loading it on board a huge lorry.

0:22:580:23:05

But it is as long as a swimming pool and, with a

0:23:050:23:08

12 metre wingspan, this was never going to be easy.

0:23:080:23:13

After a whole day spent loading, the giant consignment

0:23:130:23:16

was finally on its way to Yorkshire, in a convoy of two lorries and

0:23:160:23:20

two vans.

0:23:200:23:25

I have made the reverse journey to the one that brought the

0:23:250:23:28

Mirage to Yorkshire.

0:23:280:23:29

It was just a few miles from here, in Paris, that

0:23:290:23:32

the aircraft was once displayed at the city's science Museum.

0:23:320:23:35

The Mirage IV is an iconic aircraft in France.

0:23:350:23:40

I am here to learn more about it from one of the elite group

0:23:400:23:44

of pilots who flew it during the Cold War.

0:23:440:23:46

The Mirage IV was the most beautiful aircraft that they

0:23:460:23:51

built from the beginning.

0:23:510:23:53

It was a fantastic aircraft.

0:23:530:23:59

Capable of flying at very high altitude, 52,000 feet.

0:23:590:24:03

It was a bomber, but in dogfights some fighter pilots were

0:24:030:24:08

very surprised.

0:24:080:24:11

The only problem that we had - the visibility due

0:24:110:24:15

to the nuclear flash is very small.

0:24:150:24:20

No doubt DeGaulle took a military man's pride in the Mirage IV...

0:24:200:24:24

The Mirage IV was the poster boy of the French air force - built

0:24:240:24:29

in 1964, its ultimate weapon of attack in the new nuclear age.

0:24:290:24:38

The Cold War began with the final collapse of Germany's Third Reich by

0:24:380:24:43

the end of World War II.

0:24:430:24:45

Relations between the Allies, the commonest

0:24:450:24:46

soviet Union in the East and the capitalist West quickly soured.

0:24:460:24:52

Nazi occupied territories were carved up

0:24:520:24:54

and the so-called iron curtain came down across Soviet claimed Eastern

0:24:540:24:58

Europe.

0:24:580:25:01

The Cold War was fuelled by an arms race of nuclear weapons

0:25:020:25:06

capable of previously unimaginable destruction.

0:25:060:25:16

Against this backdrop, Pierre Alain Antoine

0:25:170:25:19

got his pilot's wings back in 1970.

0:25:190:25:21

He would one day fly a Mirage IV, armed with a 60 kilotonne

0:25:210:25:25

nuclear warhead, facing the Soviet Union.

0:25:250:25:30

That warhead was a freefall bomb, and had to be dropped directly

0:25:300:25:34

over its target.

0:25:340:25:36

You arrive at 600 knots, 200 feet.

0:25:360:25:40

You climb at 4.5 G.

0:25:400:25:45

When the bomb is dropped, you have to descend very quickly, by an

0:25:450:25:49

upside-down manoeuvre, at -20 degrees at night, in the clouds,

0:25:490:25:56

etc, to avoid the nuclear flash.

0:25:560:26:00

It was a very difficult manoeuvre.

0:26:000:26:06

It was a close-knit team of pilots who

0:26:060:26:08

flew the Mirage IV.

0:26:080:26:13

the mission they were trained for, thousands of people would die in an

0:26:130:26:16

action that would probably be the pilot's last.

0:26:160:26:19

The Mirage carried only enough fuel for the outward

0:26:190:26:22

journey.

0:26:220:26:24

It's not a question for me.

0:26:240:26:27

We were trained to launch the bombs.

0:26:270:26:30

And it was absolutely not in our mind to say yes or not.

0:26:300:26:37

No.

0:26:370:26:38

We were following orders, and if it is not

0:26:380:26:41

the case then change your job.

0:26:410:26:44

It took four days of convoy travelled

0:26:440:26:46

for the aeroplane to reach its new home.

0:26:460:26:50

When it arrived here in Elvington to join the collection,

0:26:500:26:53

the prize Mirage was in bits, like a giant Airfix model.

0:26:530:26:58

And it was then that the work to put it together had to begin.

0:26:580:27:05

It took two weeks of hard work from specialist French

0:27:050:27:08

engineers before the Mirage was complete.

0:27:080:27:15

It is now the only one in existence outside of France.

0:27:150:27:20

People understood that this was the place for it to come.

0:27:200:27:22

It has been a great project and you only have to look at

0:27:220:27:27

it to realise it was worth every minute, really.

0:27:270:27:31

An increasing proportion of the museum's

0:27:310:27:32

collection now comes from the Cold War era.

0:27:320:27:36

And the Mirage joins planes like the Victor nuclear bomber, its

0:27:360:27:40

British equivalent.

0:27:400:27:43

The front line of the French nuclear deterrent, the

0:27:430:27:47

Mirage was designed to keep France as a global power and,

0:27:470:27:50

after the bloodshed of the Second World War,

0:27:500:27:51

able to resist ever being invaded again.

0:27:510:27:57

Pierre Alain believes it played a huge part in post-war peace.

0:27:570:28:04

Absolutely for sure, 100%.

0:28:040:28:05

Because never, never a president took the

0:28:050:28:08

possibility to push the button first.

0:28:080:28:15

But now with North Korea, I am not sure.

0:28:150:28:17

And it is a real danger for us.

0:28:170:28:20

It was once cutting-edge military technology.

0:28:200:28:23

Now it is a museum piece.

0:28:230:28:26

But Mirage was designed to counter the threat of

0:28:260:28:29

nuclear war, and today, decades on, that threat remains ever present.

0:28:290:28:35

That's all from here in York, but make sure you join me next week.

0:28:390:28:43

We'll have the story of a spinal operation which could help soldier

0:28:430:28:46

and amputee Ben Parkinson to walk unaided, we investigate fire safety

0:28:460:28:51

in a Yorkshire tower block and meet

0:28:510:28:53

the twins whose lives have been studied since they were born.

0:28:530:28:59

Inside Out Yorkshire and Lincolnshire presented by Keeley Donovan.

We meet people whose lives have been changed forever when antibiotics failed to work, we meet the entrepreneur whose website promises to find men up to four wives, and the French Cold War jet which has landed in Yorkshire.


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