10/01/2014 Newsnight


10/01/2014

News stories with Emily Maitlis. Including the plebgate policeman who admits he lied, the French president and reports of a secret lover, and the health tech debuting in Las Vegas.


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A guilty plea from the police officer who admits he never

:00:09.:00:13.

witnessed the original plebgate row. Keith Wallis says he made the whole

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thing up. The Prime Minister calls his behaviour "completely

:00:18.:00:20.

unacceptable". Where does this leave the trust in our police?

:00:21.:00:25.

The President, the actress, the motorcycle and the French libel law,

:00:26.:00:31.

rumours of an affair at the top of French politics, but are the press

:00:32.:00:35.

being told to leave well enough alone.

:00:36.:00:38.

Can technology rescue the human body, we go to the bastion of the

:00:39.:00:43.

healthy lifestyle, Las Vegas. To demonstrate the next piece of

:00:44.:00:45.

fitness technology, I need these. Hello, good evening, there were many

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at the time within politics and the public who seemed more than happy to

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accept the police version of events over the plebgate row that led to

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Andrew Mitchell's downfall. Today an officer at the centre of the row

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admitted to court he lied. Accepted a charge of misconduct in public

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office, he may face jail. The met commissioner has offered to meet the

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former Chief Whip to apologise. The Prime Minister called the behaviour

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of Keith Wallis "completely unacceptable". But the whole sorry

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episode is bound to raise questions of police trust and openness.

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A police officer admits he lied. The Prime Minister calls the behaviour

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"unacceptable "q the country's most senior policeman says "sorry". There

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really isn't any end in sight for the plebgate saga. PC Keith Wallis

:01:44.:01:47.

pleaded guilty to misconduct in public off. In an e-mail to a senior

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Tory MP he falsely claimed to have seen Andrew Mitchell swear at police

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officers in Downing Street. At first, Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe

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gave his officers his full backing, now the Met Police Commissioner

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wants to meet Andrew Mitchell to apologise. But saying sorry may not

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be enough to satisfy MPs like Richard Ottoway, who today

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questioned whether Sir Bernard can stay in office. It is a black day

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for the Metropolitan Police police, -- Metropolitan Police, for a

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policeman to lie to bring down a cabinet minister is as serious as it

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can get. If it can happen to him it can happen to anyone. It is not just

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in Westminster where they are losing faith in the Met, this was the scene

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outside the High Court on Wednesday night. A senior police officer is

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drowned out by an angry crowd, after a jury concluded that Mark Duggan

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was killed lawfully by police. On the one hand plebgate we could see

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as Westminster, Conservative, white, distrust of what the police have

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been saying. And on the other hand you have the black community of

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Tottenham pointing out that actually the shooting of Mark Duggan comes on

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the back of the shootings of other black men. So uniting those two

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groups of people seems to be quite, ordinary. Both those groups of

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people are united in their distrust of the police. What about the rest

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of the public, how do they now view the police? A BBC ComRes poll found

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that two thirds of the public say plebgate has made no difference to

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whether they trust the police. While 26% said it made them less likely to

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trust them. And an Ipsos-Mori poll has said support for the police has

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held steady over the last 30 years. 5% of people say they trust them,

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which makes them much less trusted an doctors, teachers and scientist,

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but three-times more trusted than journalists and politicians. Over

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the last 30 years what we have found is that trust in the police hasn't

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variedied much at all. When you break the findings down by age,

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region, class, gender, there really isn't very much variation. Nearly

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all groups in British society tend to say, on balance, they trust the

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police. You are lucky I didn't knock you out to be fair. This is the

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voice of an unidentified Gloucestershire police officer,

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apparently making threats against a member of the public. I will make

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your day living hell, because you will be in the cell all day... A

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misconduct investigation is now under way. The footage shows that

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officers' conduct is being scrutinised like never before. The

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vast majority of officers in the vast majority of interactions they

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have every day, and there are millions of interactions every day,

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they are fine. Some are very good, some are good, most are OK, some are

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a bit bad, and some are awful. I think the public recognise that

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there is this range there. I don't think they stereotype police

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officers in the same sort of way that politicians seem to be doing

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this last few years. What is still in dispute is whether Andrew

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Mitchell ever used the word "pleb". But then plebgate has become about

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so much more than just that word. Joining us now is the former

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Metropolitan Police Officer, and the lawyer who represented Ian

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Tomlinson's widow, and the former prisons minister and close friend of

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Andrew Mitchell. You have talked to Andrew Mitchell today, this evening,

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just tell us where he is now on this one?one? 'S to see what the

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Metropolitan Police Commissioner is going to say to him. We know he has

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made a public offer to meet him. We will see just exactly how, and what

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shape the apology takes and exactly how contrite and how understanding

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the commissioner is of really the disaster that has overtaken the

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service around this issue. What do you think he wants to hear? I think

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he wants to be clear that an explanation as to the way in which

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the investigation was carried out, the fact that it was Channel 4 that

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identified the fact that this gentleman was a police officer who

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was giving this evidence. The fact that it was Channel 4 who identified

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that the CCTV tape was inconsistent with the account given by the

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officer who made the statement about Andrew Mitchell. The fact that

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within 36 hours of a pretty small incident happening at the end of

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Downing Street it is splashed over the front of the Sun and the police

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can find no evidence of a conspiracy, when they have

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investigated themselves. All of this, frankly, seems like the whole

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thing is a pretty poor show from the police from start to finish,

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particularly the decision of the commissioner to quickly leap to the

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defence of his officers, one of whom has -- pleaded guilty today. Have

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you spoken to Andrew Mitchell about this? He's a close friend, and of

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course I have spoken to him about the event. I have plainly asked him

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about what happened. What was absolutely clear to me is Andrew's

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account felt completely truthful to me, knowing Andrew. The suggestion

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that Andrew would use these words in the way, knowing precisely how toxic

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they are never made the slightest sense from the beginning. If that

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all made sense to you as Andrew Mitchell's friend, surely that is

:07:35.:07:38.

exactly what happened to Bernard Hogan-Howe, who trusted his own

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officers? The Police are in this unique position where they have to

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investigate themselves. It is not like the military. My background is

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as a soldier, loyalty goes down the chain of command as well as up. You

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look after your people and try to protect them. There is an element in

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which the police have to do that as well. They have the unique position

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where they got to investigate themselves. They have conducted an

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investigation in themselves which is, frankly, pretty laughable. Are

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you saying that the police cannot be trusted as a result of this? As we

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saw in the film, there are, of course, a very large number of

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police officers and one sincerely hopes that the majority of them are

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doing extremely good job. Working very hard on behalf of the public.

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You may get on to a discussion about whether or not the police should

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wear recording device, and many of those devices I suspect will then

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see the police on the receiving end of some pretty poor behaviour from

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the public they are trying to police and how challenging being a police

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officer is. But we rightly demand the highest possible standards from

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the police, and that needs to be consistent across the piece. And

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here we have the unit, charged with protecting the Royal Family,

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diplomats and senior members of the Government, fitting up a senior

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member of the Government. It is pretty appalling. It was very clear

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for you, between your friend, a cabinet minister and the police, you

:09:04.:09:07.

take the word of the cabinet minister, your friend? That is my

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starting position. My point is just to let me finish, I'm not talking

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about that. The evidence supports Andrew. But then when you put the

:09:17.:09:20.

police next to a crowd of demonstrators or a newspaper seller,

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would youamically assume the police are -- would you automatically

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assume the police were right? We have the right to expect the highest

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professional standards from the police, a highly-trained police

:09:34.:09:37.

force where if they are in situations of demonstrations the

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proper and minimum use of force to achieve their objectives. These are

:09:41.:09:43.

things that we are entitled to expect from the police. And we're

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entitled to expect discipline and integrity from them. Would you like

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to respond to some of those thoughts you have heard from Chris? Some of

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what he has said there is quite right. People should, quite rightly,

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expect the highest ethical standards and professional and integrity from

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our police officers. And the 99. 9% of our police officers do that day

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in day out. Look at what we are dealing with here. I have given

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plenty of interviews about the plebgate, if we call it, scenario, I

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have always kept it quite clear there was a rogue officer. I was

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aware of this rogue officer from the early days. If you look at it

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separately, we had the incident at Number Ten when the time Andrew

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Mitchell left Number Ten. Then we had what happened afterwards,

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completely separate, this individual, this rogue officer, and

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then we have what happened in the Midlands. Those are completely

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separate events. The original event, when Andrew Mitchell left Number

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Ten, there was an altercation, Andrew Mitchell admitted himself

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that he had an altercation. Let's not go back over the history of it.

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I'm trying to be clear as to where I'm going. Where I'm going is this,

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there has been an investigation, by the Metropolitan Police, and by the

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IPCC, they have absolutely said there was no collision, there was no

:11:03.:11:06.

conspiracy, there was no, wait, I'm trying to. Let him finish. We are

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talking about a man who admitted today he had lied? There was no

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conspiracy, no collusion between those officers, the original events,

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I have no reason to doubt whatsoever. That is where Bernard

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Hogan-Howe has backed those officers 100%, and we have this

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extraordinary, we are all baffled by somebody took it upon themselves to

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lie. Who has now admitted they have lied. But they have absolutely

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proven there is no link between the two. It is not a change in a story?

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It is just one rogue element? Clearly it is not, apart from

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everything else the federation officers found by the West Mercia

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force to have a disciplinary case to answer they were due to face

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disciplinary proceedings, but then there was an intervention by senior

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officers who said that they shouldn't have case to answer. It

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clearly is not one rogue officer, because at least five of them are

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facing disciplinary proceedings, it is ridiculous to try, yet again, to

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say this is an isolated incident, it is not, it is systemic and there are

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problems throughout the Metropolitan Police and other forces. Absolutely

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not, historically we have heard about it, we have had a number of

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people who should know better. This is not a time for Andrew Mitchell

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and his friends to be celebrating in any shape or form. What I have seen

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today is absolutely shocking, we have Toby Rowland, a police officer

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can highest integrity, who has done his job at Number Ten. The whole

:12:33.:12:36.

policing service has been let down by this officer and he will face the

:12:37.:12:42.

consequences. But there are up to 11 other officers. The original

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incident, Andrew Mitchell admitted himself. This is preposterous... He

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stood down from the Government, it was his choice to stand down. He

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didn't lose his job. The wider issue, and you called it systemic,

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it is a big word, this hasn't eroded public trust, from what we have seen

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from the numbers, it has washed over the public imagination hasn't it? It

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is absolutely bizarre. If those statistics are to be taken at face

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balance. Robert Peel, going back to the founder of the police officer,

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said you know when the public has lost confidence by the amount of

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force and army on the streets. It is no coincidence we are introducing

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water canon this summer. I think the introduction of water canon, the

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massive escalation in the number of Taser, the multiplication of rubber

:13:33.:13:36.

bullets is evidence that actually policing by consent is becoming a

:13:37.:13:40.

thinner and thinner issue, it is much more by force these days. This

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one man who has admitted his guilt in that circumstance? We have

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something like eight or ten officers facing disciplinary inquiries and it

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is pretty odd, frankly, that with an incident that happens on a Wednesday

:13:55.:13:59.

night in doubt is on the front page of the Sun on -- Downing Street, is

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on the front page of the Sun on Monday morning. Someone needs to

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explain to me how the information came out in such a toxic way for

:14:08.:14:12.

Andrew Mitchell, with statements he plainly wouldn't use, they are then

:14:13.:14:16.

aduced in the report and the rest of it. Would you like to see Bernard

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Hogan-Howe go? Needs to give an explanation as to how his force have

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failed to actually find the evidence of the links between a Wednesday

:14:27.:14:32.

night' vent ending up on the -- a Wednesday night event ending up on

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the front of the Sun on a Friday morning. It brings discredit that

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someone comes on and attempts to defend the police in this way. The

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original officers will be vindicated of this, there was a thorough

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investigation in the most spotlight news item of 2013, Bernard

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Hogan-Howe should support his officers, but during the

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investigation a rogue officer was identified early, nobody wants to be

:14:58.:15:01.

associated with that here. The French press have strict privacy

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laws and a tendency to turn a blind eye to the odd presidential love

:15:06.:15:09.

affair, which is what makes today's revelations so odd, the gossip

:15:10.:15:14.

magazine Closer, published images they claim is Francois Hollande in a

:15:15.:15:20.

motorcycle helmet, visiting the apartment overnight of a French

:15:21.:15:23.

actress. This incursion into the once sacred lives of French

:15:24.:15:27.

politicians has been met with legal action by the President himself. Jim

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Reid went to Paris and spoke to the magazine that broke the story.

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It is a scandal made for Paris, the President, his motorbike, and claims

:15:41.:15:46.

of secret night rides to meet a glamorous movie star. It's all

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across seven pages of France's Closer magazine. The glossy tabloid

:15:54.:15:57.

claims to have evidence that President Hollande has been cheating

:15:58.:16:04.

on his partner, with the actress Julie Gaiie. First it was a rumour

:16:05.:16:08.

going around Paris, we started looking into it. We have the photos

:16:09.:16:12.

of Julie as she arrived at the apartment. Hollande arrives on the

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back of his scooter and goes up with his helmet on, spends the night

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there. The 59-year-old President who lives with a prominent French

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journalist, has now said he's considering legal action. He has not

:16:25.:16:29.

denied the story. The 41-year-old at the centre of the galeses a well

:16:30.:16:34.

known TV and movie actress and once appeared in Francois Hollande's

:16:35.:16:41.

adverts. Rumours of presidential infidelity have been circling for

:16:42.:16:45.

months, on this French talk show the panel couldn't resist dropping

:16:46.:16:52.

hints, here saying how much Mr Hollande loves Julie's new film. The

:16:53.:16:55.

scandal does have a serious political side, Mr Hollande won the

:16:56.:16:59.

presidency last year on a promise to keep his private life out of the

:17:00.:17:02.

headlines. Since then he has lurched from one crisis to another, the

:17:03.:17:06.

economy is stuttering, unemployment is rising and there are protests

:17:07.:17:10.

against tax rises. The latest poll ratings show his popularity has

:17:11.:17:14.

fallen to just 26%. The first time a French President has ever gone below

:17:15.:17:22.

the 30 point mark. Eight out of ten voters don't think he can win the

:17:23.:17:25.

next presidential election. Today's revelations come days before a big

:17:26.:17:29.

political relaunch and potentially embarrassing state visit to the

:17:30.:17:32.

Vatican. I don't think it is a scandal. When you look at Closer

:17:33.:17:36.

magazine you see a President in love, and scooting with just one

:17:37.:17:41.

bodyguard who actually delivers a bag of croissants the day after. It

:17:42.:17:46.

is quite endearing, on the other hand the problem is that there are a

:17:47.:17:50.

lot of domestic issues that the French want their head of state to

:17:51.:17:55.

actually resolve. And as fast as possible. The fact these claims were

:17:56.:17:58.

made public in the first place is a surprise to many. The French might

:17:59.:18:02.

be happy to talk about sex, but they don't shout about it in public.

:18:03.:18:07.

France has some of the toughest privacy laws in the world. In theory

:18:08.:18:12.

at least it is a crime to publish information about someone's private

:18:13.:18:15.

life without their express permission. Past French Presidents

:18:16.:18:19.

have never had this level of intrusion. France so Is Mitterrand

:18:20.:18:28.

kept a mistress and had a daughter in his presidency. And Jacques

:18:29.:18:33.

Chirac was known as a ladies' man, confessing there were women he loved

:18:34.:18:37.

a lot as discreetly as possible. Closer magazine said this evening it

:18:38.:18:41.

would take the story off its website after a privacy complaint from the

:18:42.:18:45.

actress. At the same time its entire print run has already sold out

:18:46.:18:48.

across Paris. TRANSLATION: We have taken one article off the website,

:18:49.:18:52.

but it had nothing to do with the voracity of the information. We took

:18:53.:18:56.

off the article because a lawyer asked us to. We don't want to be

:18:57.:19:01.

sudden, for the on -- sued, for the on-line version at least. A day of

:19:02.:19:06.

rumour and intrigue in Paris, for a President dubbed Mr Normal, a man

:19:07.:19:09.

seen by many without a strong permity, some think this scandal

:19:10.:19:15.

could be more of a boost an setback. Jacques Myard is a French MP from

:19:16.:19:20.

the UNP party in Paris, and with me is Benedicte Paviot, the London

:19:21.:19:23.

correspondent for the international channel France 24. I will start with

:19:24.:19:28.

you, here we have a print run that has run out, and yet the French

:19:29.:19:33.

privacy laws, as stringent as ever, does that strike you as a kind of

:19:34.:19:38.

crunch moment. The public want it but the ls won't permit it? It is

:19:39.:19:45.

not a crunch moment. The same editor of Closer, was defending and saying

:19:46.:19:49.

that it was really important because the world was interested when

:19:50.:19:56.

Katherine Middleton, or the Duchess of Cambridge had taken her top off

:19:57.:20:02.

in a private villa in the heart of Provence, and it was captured with a

:20:03.:20:09.

long lens. This is not a watershed moment, President Sarkozy that was

:20:10.:20:16.

the moment. When Carla Brunei posed on the top of the palace, I found

:20:17.:20:20.

that wholly inappropriate. She who was so successful at first of

:20:21.:20:24.

banning President Sarkozy from wearing Rolex watches and big

:20:25.:20:28.

sunglasses et cetera, and being the bling, bling President, she really

:20:29.:20:34.

helped tone that down. She then to pose on the Elysee Palace for many

:20:35.:20:39.

people was disrespectful. You can't just get good press when it suits

:20:40.:20:46.

you. Normally French Presidents are distant, they have a certain

:20:47.:20:48.

distance, a Government and Prime Minister. The watershed moment was

:20:49.:20:52.

with President Sarkozy, this is a man who has, she is now called his

:20:53.:20:57.

official partner, this is the first time we have a President who is not

:20:58.:21:01.

married. President Sarkozy was the first to get married, to get

:21:02.:21:04.

divorced and to have a child. We have another first. Jacques Myard me

:21:05.:21:12.

when you put it like that it is hard to have a President say it is a

:21:13.:21:17.

deplorable invasion of privacy, surely we have moved on. The British

:21:18.:21:21.

don't find that kind of invasion of privacy anything new at all? It is

:21:22.:21:28.

not very new. It is a long tradition in France that men and women have

:21:29.:21:34.

you know a love affair. The point is it seems very annoying because it is

:21:35.:21:40.

very strange as a President on a motorbike is visiting his

:21:41.:21:45.

girlfriend, you know. I think this is the case, this is not the case of

:21:46.:21:52.

scandalous liaison, a scandalous love affair, but this is the way it

:21:53.:21:56.

happens. It seems very strange that the President is riding a motorbike

:21:57.:22:01.

behind his guard and visiting his girlfriend like that. There are many

:22:02.:22:06.

other ways to meet a woman you love and you don't need to hide like

:22:07.:22:12.

that. I think this is very clumsy. No different, sorry, Jacques Myard,

:22:13.:22:19.

what about President Giscardt, when he infamously, allegedly, he would

:22:20.:22:24.

pose a problem because he would disappear very often, had an

:22:25.:22:28.

accident allegedly on the river banks of the Seine with a milk cart.

:22:29.:22:38.

This is true, this is why this is very new. In France we have a huge

:22:39.:22:43.

tradition of polygamy for everyone. Nobody is going to blame him on

:22:44.:22:49.

that. Of course we will smile because in fact he will have a

:22:50.:22:54.

private problem with his official girlfriend, who is normally with him

:22:55.:23:01.

in the Elysse Palace, I think he will have to explain himself to her,

:23:02.:23:05.

you know. These are just allegations of course, do you think that the

:23:06.:23:09.

voters care, do you think it will affect his political standing?

:23:10.:23:12.

Traditionally we know two things, traditionally we know that there is

:23:13.:23:16.

this, as Myard was rightly saying, there is a long list of Presidents,

:23:17.:23:23.

whether it is President Mitterrand, or Sarkozy, we could go through the

:23:24.:23:28.

Presidents and the last 30 years. Normally there is great tolerance of

:23:29.:23:33.

infidelities. And by the way, who is to say that all the British

:23:34.:23:36.

ministers in the Government, or some of them, aren't, as we speak, having

:23:37.:23:44.

secr trysts et cetera, I'm not saying they are, let's be clear.

:23:45.:23:48.

There is a great tradition in France, and number one in France

:23:49.:23:51.

this does not affect your poll rating, and number two, the real

:23:52.:23:55.

number one is if it doesn't affect your job, it is not in the public

:23:56.:23:59.

interest. So it is not just about the strict private laws. Why,

:24:00.:24:03.

Jacques Myard, would he then take this to the courts. We know there is

:24:04.:24:07.

a threat of legal action, do you think he's genuinely worried? Of

:24:08.:24:14.

course everyone has a trite protect his private life. But since there

:24:15.:24:19.

has been the rumour in Paris, I think it is a mistake to bring that

:24:20.:24:26.

to a court. That will emphasise the rumour and say if there is some

:24:27.:24:30.

smoke it means there is a fire. But, in fact, I think that in terms of

:24:31.:24:35.

politics, it will affect the President only because you know he's

:24:36.:24:39.

dealing with these kinds of things, and not focussing on his job, that

:24:40.:24:43.

is to try to solve the economic problems and unemployment. This is

:24:44.:24:47.

the main point. It will pass very quickly. Have we got a new French

:24:48.:24:54.

First Lady? We will bring you back next week when we know.

:24:55.:24:59.

Late last year the tech giant, Gooling, made -- Google, made for

:25:00.:25:03.

them a low-key announcement that they would start a health project.

:25:04.:25:08.

They think technology can rescue the human body. They are not alone, the

:25:09.:25:12.

health tech world has exploded, at the world's biggest techno in Las

:25:13.:25:17.

Vegas this week, one in three gadgets were health-related. David

:25:18.:25:21.

Grossman put his body on the line to test a few out. If only can I just

:25:22.:25:37.

get to Vass Vegas, then I could really get -- Las Vegas, then I

:25:38.:25:42.

could get fit and healthy. That is not phrase you hear often, but among

:25:43.:25:46.

the bright lights of America's most excessive city, could lie our

:25:47.:25:48.

technological salvation. We use technology for everything, in

:25:49.:26:04.

our appliances, cellphone, computers, health and fitness is

:26:05.:26:07.

such an important part of our lives it makes sense. I'm a hiker, camper,

:26:08.:26:11.

sailor, I travel around the world, I love that, that's my life. This

:26:12.:26:15.

allows me to do everything. And I do it by myself. All right I'm ready

:26:16.:26:22.

for my close up! At the consumer electronic show in Las Vegas, the

:26:23.:26:26.

world is getting a closer look at some pretty amazing health and

:26:27.:26:30.

fitness technology. We have had fitness trackers that log your

:26:31.:26:33.

activity for a couple of years. Now think of an ailment or part of a

:26:34.:26:38.

body and there is someone here who wants to gadgetify it. Like this

:26:39.:26:44.

device which will tell you how fat bits of your body are. How much body

:26:45.:26:53.

fat do you have? 3%. There are pints of milk with more fat than you. 3%.

:26:54.:27:02.

What do you think I have about? 5%! I like this chap! In many cases they

:27:03.:27:08.

are exploiting the processing and connectivity of smartphones, like

:27:09.:27:12.

this ECG heart monitor. It is quite comfortable. It can send real time

:27:13.:27:18.

data to your doctor. You don't have to make a doctor's appointment or go

:27:19.:27:23.

through the process of calling up and making an appointment and

:27:24.:27:28.

getting hooked up to this device. You basically strap this on in the

:27:29.:27:31.

morning, it is really comfortable, you don't really see it, and you

:27:32.:27:34.

know you are doing something good for your health. The transmitter

:27:35.:27:38.

picks up this value and sends it to my receiver. I can show where I was,

:27:39.:27:44.

that was breakfast, that was lunch. That constant monitoring and

:27:45.:27:47.

connectivity is transforming diabetic care as well. The next

:27:48.:27:53.

generation of glucose monitors could liberate millions. So many people

:27:54.:27:56.

are afraid right now and they don't know where they are. Little kids,

:27:57.:28:00.

their parents won't let them do sleepovers or they are afraid, they

:28:01.:28:04.

make them up to check their fingers. They get this, and communicate to

:28:05.:28:10.

smartphone, moms across the room or across town and alert their parents

:28:11.:28:14.

when the kid goes high or low. To demonstrate the next piece of

:28:15.:28:20.

fitness technology I need these. Hold on, hold on. You get a yellow

:28:21.:28:25.

line. That is not bad. What does that mean? That means you tapped him

:28:26.:28:28.

slightly. If you are going to hit him, that would be good. The Rebok

:28:29.:28:33.

check light is designed to be worn under a helmet or whilst playing

:28:34.:28:39.

sport, using a traffic light system to indicate a potential head injury.

:28:40.:28:45.

In that zone you need to get assessed, even if it is are you

:28:46.:28:49.

doing OK or a more rigorous assessment depending on what we are

:28:50.:28:52.

doing and the resources available to us. With the explosion in wearable

:28:53.:28:57.

technology that we are seeing at this show, people are taking

:28:58.:29:01.

technology to parts of the body it has never been before. Places you

:29:02.:29:05.

wouldn't necessarily expect. For example your feet. This is a smart

:29:06.:29:12.

sock. Now why would you want a smart sock? Let me show you. As I'm

:29:13.:29:26.

running my foot, or the sock is sending data in real time to this

:29:27.:29:32.

smartphone. Why might that be useful? Well let's stop this and

:29:33.:29:42.

talk to one of the people behind it. He's easy to spot, the only person

:29:43.:29:48.

by the pool with a plastic foot! We can capture, not just how far and

:29:49.:29:52.

fast you walk or run, but also how well you walk and run. Is that just

:29:53.:29:58.

for athletes or are there other uses? No there are multiple use, you

:29:59.:30:02.

can think about golf, you can think about fall detection for elderly

:30:03.:30:12.

patients for example. We detect what doctors call gait analysis. Seeing

:30:13.:30:21.

how well you walk or run. So we have a basketball, what is it doing here?

:30:22.:30:26.

It is a digital coach, it is what is inside the basketball that is

:30:27.:30:29.

important. Nine sensors inside the ball, it measures the motion of what

:30:30.:30:33.

you are going to put into the ball when you shoot it. It will measure

:30:34.:30:42.

the forces. So in the future, it seems, there will be no excuse for

:30:43.:30:50.

anybody not having a body like this. Or you could do what I have done,

:30:51.:30:55.

become a robot, now I don't have to worry about health at all. If you

:30:56.:30:59.

will excuse me, I'm off to the buffet! That's all we have time for,

:31:00.:31:11.

but Jeremy is back on Monday, until then, have a great weekend. Good

:31:12.:31:13.

night.

:31:14.:31:16.

The plebgate policeman who admits he lied. The French president and the reports of a secret lover. The health tech debuting in Las Vegas. With Emily Maitlis.


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