13/04/2016 Newsnight


13/04/2016

Is Labour too quiet on Europe? Should the culture secretary regulate the press? Nick Clegg talks about drugs. Helen from The Archers. With Evan Davis.


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Transcript


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Maybe he has been busy with his tax return, but Jeremy Corbyn has been

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noticeably absent from the referendum campaign, that will

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change tomorrow so is he ready to go full throttle for the Remain side.

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He says he wants us to stay in the European Union, I believe that but I

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think it has to give the impression that it is absolutely what he

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authentically believes. We will ask Chuka Umunna if Labour is planning

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to set the referendum out. And should knowing this lady disqualify

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the culture secretary from regulating the press? What does

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former Chief Whip Andrew Mitchell say? Also tonight: Nick Clegg takes

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us to Colombia to see how they ended the war on drugs.

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And you might not know her face but you might well know her voice. I am

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sorry. Helen, darling, the last thing I want to do is upset you but

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you must admit, why all this subterfuge? I don't know. You don't

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know? We will clock about one of the stars of the archers about its

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portrayal of psychological abuse. Guess what, the referendum is ten

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weeks away and we can see the arrangements are all firming up. Two

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campaigns, one on each side were giving official designation today.

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There is still come petition on the Leave side on which group will make

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the best pitch to the public. The one group which did not get official

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designation might take it to court but there remains a mystery on the

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Remain am a where is Jeremy Corbyn? Tomorrow is a big day because Jeremy

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Corbyn will set out his support for staying in. All eyes on him to see

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how sincerely enthusiastic he sounds and it matters to the Remain side

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because it want win unless it supporters turn out on the day and a

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lot of them will not be inspired by David Cameron to do so. Our

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political editor reports. The days are getting longer, the

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Midsummer referendum will soon be upon us, Labour is official position

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is to campaign for Remain. But is the party, specifically the

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leadership, doing enough campaigning? Critics say Jeremy

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Corbyn has been nowhere near noisy enough in making the case. If we end

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up exiting the European Union we will partly, as a Labour Party, have

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ourselves to blame and people will naturally asked did we do enough to

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pull our weight? I don't want that on my conscience, I think Labour has

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to be full throttle, and equivocal, passionately in favour of staying

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within the European Union. So how might people have got the impression

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that Jeremy Corbyn is lukewarm about the European project? Perhaps

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because he has been arguing against it for most of his adult life. There

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are literally dozens of examples of Jeremy Corbyn's hostility the EU in

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the archives. You have European bureaucracy to uncountable to

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anybody, powers have gone to national parliaments -- have gone

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from. These are quite serious matters. The public don't seem to

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know where Jeremy Corbyn stands, 78% of those asked recently identified

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David Cameron in favour of remaining. 74% knew that Boris

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Johnson was in favour of leaving. But less than half correctly

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identified Jeremy Corbyn's position. I think there are two categories,

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there are people like myself who have been passionate pro-European

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campaigners all our lives,, that is one set of people and there is

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another set of people who have doubts about the way the EU works

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and Jeremy has maybe fallen into that category historically, who are

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now swinging behind in and I think it's important you get both the

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categories of people because the country, not everyone has decided,

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people do want to hear rational argument. There is another reason

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Labour are not focused on the referendum, made a fifth is election

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day and a whole swathe of contests. In Wales where Ukip is calling

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strongly Labour does not want to shout about its pro-EU position

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whereas in Scotland it has been identified that some in the party

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fear it could be dangerous to align with David Cameron. But tomorrow

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Jeremy Corbyn will be delivering what is being billed as a major

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speech on Europe. If pro-EU Labour MPs are expecting their leader to

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give a passionate defence of our membership when he gives his speech

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tomorrow I think they will be disappointed. I understand he will

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give a far more nuanced argument saying on balance we are better off

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in, but that the EU should reform itself utterly. That is unlikely to

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satisfy his critics. He says he wants us to stay in the European

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Union and I believe that but I think it's got to be, give the impression

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that it is absolutely what he authentically believes. If we send

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out the vibes that it is half-hearted somehow the public will

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notice that, they will spot it and maybe that would motivate the

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millions of voters that we need to make sure this is not a knife edge

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vote, that this is a decisive vote for staying in the European Union.

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In the end this referendum might be decided by turnout. If a labour

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voters are unenthused and unconvinced then it could be

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decisive. Jeremy Corbyn speaks tomorrow and

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another big Labour figure is also speaking tomorrow, Chuka Umunna who

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joins me now. You think there is room for nuance in the Remain

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campaign? If Jeremy Corbyn goes out and says on the one hand, on the

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other hand but on balance I am in favour of staying in, is that a good

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way of selling it? I am delighted he is giving this speech and I told him

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that today. To some extent, the EU is not perfect and it needs reform.

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But that's not the question on the paper, the question is whether we

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want to stay in or out the European Union and ultimately if you want to

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reform it and let's not forget we come out we are still going to

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probably everyone to trade with the EU, we'll have to comply with its

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rules and regulations. But to reform it you have to be in the room at the

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table, if you are outside you have no impact. I think there is a

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strong, progressive centre-left case for continued membership of the

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European Union. Is it, as a campaigning tactic, does what Jeremy

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Corbyn seems to be up doing, does it work to say probably we should be

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staying in or do you have to beat the drum for the in side? I think

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Jeremy will beat the drum, you have to be full throttle. This contest of

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globalisation, it was interesting seeing historic footage of Jeremy at

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the end of the 70s, early 80s because globalisation has run across

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our country and unleashed forces which have been positive and

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negative. If we want to stop multinational companies holding

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countries to ransom for example, playing of terms and conditions of

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workers here against those abroad, being in a European Union which sets

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minimum standards across 28 member states provide huge protection to

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that. If you look at other big left causes, the environment, pollution

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knows no borders and you have to deal with that on eight cross-border

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basis. And global poverty. What you would say is a left-wing case, why

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has the left, and why does the left or many on the left remain so

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equivocal on membership of the EU? I think it is changing, I think there

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has been hesitancy because there was nervousness around the EU

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renegotiation. The Prime Minister said... It goes back to the early

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80s and many have not switched from that position. It does because some

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on the left saw the EU as a corporate club but as I have said I

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think when you are looking at how we ensure multinationals pay their fair

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share, operate fairly, you have two operate at a supranational

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cross-border level with other partners to make sure they are good

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global citizens. I think why there was hesitancy is that people were

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worried about the renegotiation, that the Prime Minister was going to

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bargain away the social protections which are so fundamental. But that

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did not happen. Now we are faced with a clear choice, you are either

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in or out, you either join the likes of Nigel Farage, Chris Grayling and

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Iain Duncan Smith used a in and make sure we can build a more fair and

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equal world and not just at home but abroad. I am listening to your

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obvious passion on this but let's be honest, you feel much more strongly

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about June 23 the local elections -- than the local elections only the

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theft. Those pale into insignificance converted a decision

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about Britain permanently stays in the EU comes out. -- compare to.

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Both are very important. In London we have a mayor who has not built

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enough homes, I'm thankful we have a fantastic candidate who has made

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housing and transport the priority and that is why I think Sadiq Khan

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is on course to hopefully be elected. But this EU referendum

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campaign is fundamental. I am leading the London campaign and it

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is one of Europe's great capital cities and I don't want that to go

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away. I don't want the country to be diminished, let's keep the great in

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Great Britain. I think that is what you will hear from our leader

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tomorrow. Thank you very much. We asked vote Leave to provide us with

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an interview but they said nobody was available. The media has been

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playing what is the scandal today. Is it the fact that an important MP,

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John Whittingdale, went out with a dominatrix the fact that the papers

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did not report it, the fact that the BBC did report it or was it that

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John Whittingdale did not report it himself? Or finally that he had to

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oversee the press knowing they had something on him, a potential

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conflict of interest? Let's see what Mitchell thanks, he was caught up in

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a media storm of his own at one point. What do you think is the

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issue is at the heart of this? I don't think there is an issue. The

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fact is that this is a middle-aged single Conservative member of

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Parliament who went out with someone who turned out not to be quite what

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they thought. That happens to lots of people and there is no story

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here. I can't understand... Move along, nothing to see. Would you

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think it was a story if he had known she was a dominatrix? Arguably,

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single man dating someone with an interesting career, is that a story?

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I don't think that would have been a story but I have struggled hard with

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this one to understand the mob descending, the Labour Party, which

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is what they are paid to do, start it up and quite well, but at the end

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of the day that is what you're left with, somebody who is single and

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went out with someone and the relationship didn't work and that's

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about it. Therefore we get onto some of the arguments, your personal

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experience, did you know anything about this? You were the Chief Whip

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before this was taking place but had it gone around, was everyone talking

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about it? take confection tweet confession

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from every middle-aged member of the party who had gone out with a

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girlfriend or boyfriend and found out they weren't what they thought

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he wouldn't be able to do his job looking after the Parliamentary

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party and making sure the government gets its business. The reason why it

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is an issue, some people think it is an issue, is because there is a

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feeling that the man overseeing regulation of the press might have

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wanted to court favour with the press and was conflicted because the

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press had something on him and he might have wanted to stop them

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publishing it. Now, do you recognise that as a conflict and is it

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important? No, it's not, I don't recognise it as a conflict. The

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press can't make up their mind where they stand on it. Is it the fact the

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press didn't publish this because so it is possibly a matter of interest

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to the public I think it can be overstated. It's not a matter of

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public interest. Rather press being criticised for publishing now when

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they didn't before or for not publishing when they knew about it?

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Seems the system is working quite well. They didn't publish because

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there is nothing there to publish. The potential conflict, the

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appearance of conflict, might have been alleviated if John Whittingdale

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had said to the Cabinet Secretary or David Cameron, there is this thing,

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the press have a story they haven't run about me. I just want you to

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know that, we don't need to put it into the public domain. Should John

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Whittingdale have told David Cameron when he was appointed culture

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Minister with responsibility for the press that this had been lurking

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around? I don't think so, no. It's a debatable point. But the fact is the

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poor fellow is entitled to his private life, this happened some

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time before he was appointed to the Cabinet. I just don't think it was

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something he would wish to raise with the Prime Minister or that the

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Prime Minister would have expected him to raise. When you become

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Cabinet minister, I'm sure people have you read ideas that MI5 run a

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quick check on you and all of that. Is it like that? Does the Prime

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Minister interview you and say, now, Mr Mitchell, is there anything you

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want to tell me? Skeletons cost to mark we know our colleagues pretty

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well. -- skeletons? We all know each other pretty well. The fact is, in

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the case of John, he was a single man. I'm mystified. I can't

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understand why this has taken up so much bandwidth of the media today.

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If you would, because you've had pleb gate and all of that, living

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through the furore, regardless of whether there is substance to it or

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no substance to it, what is that like? It's not a pleasant

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experience, one of the reasons I'm very pleased to come on your

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programme tonight and give my view that John has been put through the

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mill today and really in a way he should not have been. We saw the

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same thing over the Prime Minister's tax return.

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There wasn't really so gory but the mob descended at the Labour Party

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did what they are supposed to do and stirred it up. -- there wasn't

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really a story. The mob stayed for about three weeks in my case because

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there wasn't a lot of other news. It isn't a pleasant experience and I

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don't think John deserves this and I'm very pleased to come on here as

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former Chief Whip and make it very clear. Finally, the fact he changed

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the policy of the last government, moved it to something more

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favourable to the press, you don't think of anything to do with the

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fact the press were sitting on files with a story they could have run on

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him? Nothing whatsoever, he has been a very distinguished chairman of the

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culture media and sport select committee, his views are very

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well-known, he didn't change his views and he has been utterly

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consistent. Story should go away. Next week, the UN hold a special

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general simply session on drugs. Have you heard of it? No, probably

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because it isn't going to change anything and the only leaders

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attending will be those of Latin American companies in Accra

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countries, the most desperate for something to change. -- Latin

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American countries, the most desperate for something to change.

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Most of Europe treats drug as a legal but takes a soft approach to

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soft drugs. Some states in the US, Uruguay and Canada, which have legal

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regulated markets for cannabis. It is basically all over the place. One

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of the staunchest supporters of the new approach is the former Deputy

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Prime Minister here, Nick Clegg, who famously argued with Theresa May

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over the issue while he was in government. Now he's been to

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Colombia, one of the countries that called for this special UN summit,

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to meet President Santos. While there he made a report for us.

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I'm visiting Colombia because it's a country that we can learn from. It's

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a place that knows better than anywhere else how organised crime

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controls the drug trade. I'm going to talk to its president

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to discuss whether regulating and legalising drugs is a better way

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forward. Go to the other side. OK, guys? Yeah.

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This first time? Yeah. This was where the original narco-traffickers

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operated with such ruthless efficiency. It was home to the

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infamous Pablo Perez go back, who controlled a fast criminal network

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that extended across Colombia and reach into many other countries. --

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Pablo Escobar. He was the fifth richest man in the world at one

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point. Sinew mayor has only just been

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elected, but he remembers the days of Escobar's rule. Jim

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now Pablo Escobar is dead, his sister, Tim two lives here. She

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tries to keep a low profile, it's no longer good to have the name

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Escobar. Luz Maria thinks the death of her

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brother didn't lead to the end of the problem.

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There is still crime in Colombia and its link to drugs remains strong.

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The Colombian government has tried to address many of the security

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issues. They were helped by $16 billion of US support. They also

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believe cocaine and its use could be eradicated by aerial spraying huge

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swathes of the plant that is needed to make the drug cocaine. It didn't

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work. Colombia remains the number one producer of cocaine in the world

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and, with it, the crime gangs persist.

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Fabiola is a farmer, she just wants to grow coca, not for cocaine.

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The aerial spraying was finally halted in October last year, but

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this method in the war on drugs had already proved destructive to many

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ordinary Colombians. I think he's here, I'd like to see

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him. I had breakfast with Columbia's president in the 1990s at the height

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of the powers of the narco-traffickers. He survived many

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assassination attempt on some of his family members were murdered. It was

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under his watch that Pablo Escobar was killed and he had some

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interesting ideas about drugs. Your view is if you decriminalised

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that, it will help the security issue.

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In fact, Colombia has gone further than the UK towards decriminalising

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drugs. A lesson we could learn from. In the UK, many people are forced to

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steal to fund their drug habit because both drug dealing and drug

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use are illegal. In Colombia, possession of small

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amounts is legal. I was fascinated to visit a

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government funded clinic that tests pupils drugs to prove they don't

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contain dangerous chemicals. -- test pupils drugs.

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With Columbia now making progress in undermining cartels, this city is

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now a different place. It was recently voted one of the best

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cities to live in in Latin America. It really is a fantastic

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illustration of how even in a very poor part of Latin America things

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can change. And the grip, the terrible deadly grip of narco

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trafficking and narco criminality does eventually end. Leave Nick

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Clegg ably helped by BBC producer Rachel Wright. Mr Clegg is with me

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here. We're joined from New York by a former drug policy adviser to the

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Obama administration. Nick Clegg, thanks for making the film, very

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interesting. What would your policy be, not on cannabis, we note Lib

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Dems have had a decriminalisation policy on that for ages. Cocaine,

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crystal meth, what would be your view is, and this is the big... By

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far the biggest drug. That's the easy one. I don't think it easy at

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all. You've just made a film in Colombia where they supply cocaine.

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If you spit to the present, you spoke score cut the bit where I

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spoke to the president of the country, he says, if you want to

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shift the world's approach to the war on drugs, which has clearly

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failed because criminals are getting... The potency, the harm on

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the drug stock market you have to start with cannabis. They

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understand. What would be your policy on cocaine? For me, the focus

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is on cannabis because I think it is by far the biggest share, the lion's

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share of the profits of criminal gangs, it is where other parts of

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the world are experimenting by regulating it, taking the sale in

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the interaction... You don't have a policy on cocaine, crystal meth, all

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these other drugs? Of course you have a policy... Your policy is the

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same as the UN policy, the same as the war on drugs everybody has been

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fighting. There is one point of consensus, everybody wants to reduce

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the harm of drugs. I'm a dad I don't want my kids taking drugs. You have

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a different policy to the world on cannabis, but the same policies on

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cocaine. Because cannabis is by far the biggest drugs consumed, given

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that is the great thing which fuels the bank account of the criminal

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community around the world, you've got to deal with that and that above

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and beyond everything else. Of course it means you also give

0:27:340:27:36

treatment to people who have addictions of other varieties of

0:27:370:27:40

drugs, but the cannabis question is the question the world faces right

0:27:410:27:45

now. Kevin. Do you agree with that, do you draw distinction between

0:27:460:27:48

cannabis, which you might have one policy to come and cocaine and hard

0:27:490:27:51

drugs, where you take a different policy? Obviously they are different

0:27:520:27:55

but I must correct one thing. The vast majority of revenue coming into

0:27:560:28:00

transnational criminal groups and drug trafficking organisation isn't

0:28:010:28:02

from cannabis, it is the vast majority of illegal drug use,

0:28:030:28:07

cannabis, but these are violent gangs, violent criminal

0:28:080:28:10

organisations getting their money from human trafficking mainly. Then

0:28:110:28:13

we are talking about things like extortion, kidnapping, became the

0:28:140:28:17

methamphetamine and heroin. That is why there with absolutely no... You

0:28:180:28:23

can't take it seriously to say we will be legalising cocaine and

0:28:240:28:27

methamphetamine possession in parts of the world where institutions are

0:28:280:28:31

weak. On the cannabis policy, is declared and his colleagues have

0:28:320:28:35

forwarded for legalisation, I find it very disappointing given the

0:28:360:28:39

incredibly progressive and congratulatory policy we should give

0:28:400:28:42

the Lib Dems on mental health. But the issue is mental health is

0:28:430:28:47

absolutely connected, especially, to heavy high potent cannabis use. You

0:28:480:28:51

can't have one strategy odyssey for mental illness and health and turn

0:28:520:28:54

around and say Colorado and Washington may be having it right. I

0:28:550:28:58

can tell you from the US the increasing use use and the problems

0:28:590:29:01

coming out of this massive commercial industry, it is the

0:29:020:29:05

global tobacco industry all over again, we don't want to be copying

0:29:060:29:07

alcohol and tobacco for cannabis. As that specific point, it is

0:29:080:29:16

interesting because there are links between mental health damage and

0:29:170:29:19

cannabis use which you want to legalise and I suspect... The worst

0:29:200:29:25

people to help either your mental health or your cannabis consumption

0:29:260:29:28

or any other health problem you have is the criminal fraternity around

0:29:290:29:32

the world, why on earth are we allowing these damaging substances

0:29:330:29:40

to be held in the hands of people who wish us ill? Criminals? Surely

0:29:410:29:45

it's better to bring it into the open, to regulate it so you can make

0:29:460:29:49

sure what people consume is safer for them. You can tax it and

0:29:500:29:55

restricted by age, you can make sure that you can go after the criminals

0:29:560:29:59

who at the moment are getting away scot-free. The extraordinary thing

0:30:000:30:03

at the moment is we are locking up people because of possession of

0:30:040:30:06

drugs and we are allowing the panel to sell it to get away scot-free.

0:30:070:30:13

Kevin, come in. That is a Paule Sticheping me that we have do lock

0:30:140:30:18

people up in prison or allow it to go to Philip Morris and the global

0:30:190:30:22

alcohol industry which has been a disaster in the UK. You do not have

0:30:230:30:27

to go to criminalising and throwing people in prison, I don't think you

0:30:280:30:31

should do that anyone using drugs, they need treatment. But we don't

0:30:320:30:34

want to increase the availability and promotion that would come with

0:30:350:30:38

this idea of legalisation. Let's not get caught in that trap. The UK has

0:30:390:30:46

made process on this with specialist courts which deal with this complex

0:30:470:30:50

connection between crime and addiction because people are

0:30:510:30:53

committing crime to fuel their drug habit which they will do whether it

0:30:540:30:57

is legal or not, or under the influence of drugs which they will

0:30:580:31:00

do more if it is legal. This has to be looked at in a much more nuanced

0:31:010:31:05

way. Thank you Kevin, I will let you go now. Nick Clegg, an interesting

0:31:060:31:11

set of discussions, whilst we have got you I wonder if we can talk

0:31:120:31:15

briefly about John Whittingdale and what you make, Andrew Mitchell

0:31:160:31:19

telling us that there is nothing to see, move along. What do you make of

0:31:200:31:23

the change in policy which has occurred under John Whittingdale as

0:31:240:31:26

culture Secretary, there was a different policy under the last

0:31:270:31:32

government. I don't care at all about what John Whittingdale gets do

0:31:330:31:35

in his private life, it is his private life. As you imply in your

0:31:360:31:40

question, the reason has any resonance and I suspect it would

0:31:410:31:44

even if it was a different Secretary of State, whether he did or did not

0:31:450:31:48

have a relationship with this individual, this Conservative

0:31:490:31:52

government, and the most open secret in government, is desperately trying

0:31:530:31:57

to wriggle out of delivering on the commitments that David Cameron and

0:31:580:32:01

the party made with other parties in the last parliament following the

0:32:020:32:03

recommendations of the Leveson Inquiry. Very solemn promises were

0:32:040:32:12

made by the Conservative Party, an act of Parliament was passed on a

0:32:130:32:17

cross-party basis. The Royal charter approach was a conservative

0:32:180:32:20

invention and now for reasons you would need to ask the Conservatives

0:32:210:32:24

about the are keen not to offend some of the newspapers who don't

0:32:250:32:29

like that whole process, for rather misplaced reasons in my view. But

0:32:300:32:34

that is the point. That is what you are looking at rather than photos of

0:32:350:32:39

John Whittingdale? His personal life is his personal life. Some have said

0:32:400:32:46

is there not a conflict of interest? He might be wanting to court favour

0:32:470:32:50

with the press, do you think there is a conflict Wychwood Warrior you?

0:32:510:33:01

-- Wychwood Warrior you? It falls on the desk of David Cameron, and it

0:33:020:33:04

was David Cameron not John Whittingdale who made clear promises

0:33:050:33:09

to the country, to Parliament, to the victories of phone hacking, that

0:33:100:33:14

it would be permitted in full -- to the victims of. That is what this

0:33:150:33:18

government is choosing not to do. You think it is not a John

0:33:190:33:21

Whittingdale conflict of interest because it is David Cameron's

0:33:220:33:29

decision? Absolutely. Thank you very much. If you have ever flirted with

0:33:300:33:35

the idea that radio is a feeling medium you would discard that fought

0:33:360:33:38

with the current amount of attention being lavished on Archers. Helen and

0:33:390:33:47

Rob explained why. A slowly developed plotline of the bullying

0:33:480:33:53

husband and eight wife which ends up in violence. We are together, a

0:33:540:34:00

couple. I love him, he loves me and it is over with him and Jess. As

0:34:010:34:04

soon as possible we will be moving in with him. So now you know. Tell

0:34:050:34:10

me, I just want to understand. It looks a bit funny. More than funny,

0:34:110:34:16

you planned an afternoon out with Henry? On a steam train with Henry?

0:34:170:34:28

Yes. And with Kirsty? Yes. Behind my back? Deceivingly? Lying to me about

0:34:290:34:36

it and lying to the school as well? I am sorry, I am sorry. Do you

0:34:370:34:41

relate want to leave? I will show you, do you want to know how you can

0:34:420:34:48

leave? You see this night? Take it! Put it in your hand! Do what Greg

0:34:490:34:58

did, ended all now. Go on, idea you! Because you are nothing without the

0:34:590:35:04

Helen! Nothing! A bit of a spoiler, at one point you will lead to think

0:35:050:35:08

that Helen had killed Rob but tonight we learned that he has not

0:35:090:35:12

only survived but is pulling through after an infection. She will be

0:35:130:35:16

charged with attempted murder, how will this end, don't ask Louiza

0:35:170:35:22

Patikas who plays Helen or the editor of the archers who are here,

0:35:230:35:26

I want to give anything away. How long ago did you know this plotline

0:35:270:35:34

would come to this? About three years ago when I first accepted the

0:35:350:35:39

job. I went to Vanessa Whitburn's house who formerly ran the Archers

0:35:400:35:43

and pitched for the idea and she said we must do it. The next day I

0:35:440:35:47

called one of the writers and spoke about how we might make a tricky

0:35:480:35:53

relationship between Helen and Rob which was not very romantic and we

0:35:540:35:55

find out about this syndrome called gas lighting which is based on the

0:35:560:35:59

play which is effectively coercive control. You had written a book in

0:36:000:36:06

your previous life about a handsome murderer basically? Yes, it is very

0:36:070:36:12

Rob, someone who is an ex-RAF pilot in the Second World War who is

0:36:130:36:18

charming and charismatic and ended up killing two women in 1946. It is

0:36:190:36:24

a fable in some way about not believing the surface and what has

0:36:250:36:28

happened here is the old buy into Rob and his charming hunting,

0:36:290:36:33

shooting, fishing behaviour when in fact, at the beginning of the story

0:36:340:36:37

he seems to be a sort of tall dark and handsome man but he is actually

0:36:380:36:44

rather sinister. Louiza, when did you get let into what was about to

0:36:450:36:50

happen? Was that three years ago? It was slightly drip fed to me as well,

0:36:510:36:54

I had an idea of what might be going on, it was much more true for us

0:36:550:36:59

because we just knew a month in advance pretty much. We are slightly

0:37:000:37:05

ahead of the audience. Your character has changed quite a bit,

0:37:060:37:10

it's quite an revolution, the confidence being taken way, becoming

0:37:110:37:14

more neurotic -- quite an evolution. It has presumably been the most

0:37:150:37:19

interesting thing you have done with the part in the 16 years you have

0:37:200:37:23

been there? She has had a few exciting storylines but I guess you

0:37:240:37:27

are right, it's a dream for any actor to work this sort of material,

0:37:280:37:32

slow burn, highly dramatic peaks, incredibly conceived and written and

0:37:330:37:38

paste. I'm incredibly lucky. Here is a theory about why the attention is

0:37:390:37:42

so focused on it and what makes good soap it's that you been very

0:37:430:37:48

patient. Three years is a long time to be planning it, it's not like it

0:37:490:37:52

is getting boring let's have a domestic violence thing. It's about

0:37:530:37:57

900 episodes which is a lot. It's quite an old-fashioned way of

0:37:580:38:00

telling stories, Charles Dickens used to do serial dramas in all of

0:38:010:38:04

his big novels and people would say to him why do you think they are so

0:38:050:38:07

successful and he would say make them laugh, make them cry and make

0:38:080:38:12

them wait. Holding of satisfaction for the audience is part of the

0:38:130:38:16

reason for its success. We don't try to create a big showdown for

0:38:170:38:22

Christmas or Easter, we drag it out as long as we can. What do you think

0:38:230:38:29

of the reaction, Louiza? It's been a lot, money has been raised for

0:38:300:38:35

domestic abuse, it's extraordinary. Absolutely extraordinary, the

0:38:360:38:39

listeners have been incredible, it is really special what is happening.

0:38:400:38:44

The media coverage as well has been extraordinary, you can never really

0:38:450:38:49

anticipate how the story will land and I think as much as I knew it was

0:38:500:38:52

powerful it has gained its own momentum I think, showing how great

0:38:530:38:58

the show is and more importantly how how vital it is we talk about this

0:38:590:39:04

issue. Do people confuse you and Helen? Never! It's never happened

0:39:050:39:09

yet. I thought your little boy said you tried to stab somebody? He had

0:39:100:39:15

heard from somebody, asked if it was true. Why do you think Rob is like

0:39:160:39:21

he is, what is driving it? It doesn't appear to be sexual jealousy

0:39:220:39:25

in this case. People keep asking what does he want to achieve, he

0:39:260:39:29

wants to achieve control and he is site at it. Why are people like

0:39:300:39:38

that? -- he is psychotic. I think it's a very complex issue, there is

0:39:390:39:46

a book called snakes in suits, when psychopaths go to work and the claim

0:39:470:39:50

that psychopaths are not out there murdering people they are owed

0:39:510:39:52

running big companies or governments. Don't give anything

0:39:530:40:02

away... How do does this go on? We have a lot more to go? Yeah, this is

0:40:030:40:09

just the beginning. It's interesting that people think this is the

0:40:100:40:12

climax, it is just the beginning really. That is very enticing. 16

0:40:130:40:20

years in the archers, how long are you going to keep it going? I hope

0:40:210:40:27

to be as old as June Spencer. She has been in the job since 1950 so a

0:40:280:40:36

few years to go yet. You are allowed to do other things? Yeah, everyone

0:40:370:40:42

does other things as well. Thank you for coming in. That's about all we

0:40:430:40:46

have time for, let's take a quick look at the front pages.

0:40:470:40:53

The daily mirror going quite big on that. Facing investigation after

0:40:540:41:02

taking his lover on a free trip to the MTV awards in Amsterdam. The

0:41:030:41:07

Telegraph believing it is a different scandal, the BBC smeared

0:41:080:41:13

cabinet minister is their lead. The guardian has moved straight off it,

0:41:140:41:19

benefit fraud or tax evasion, row over the tourist targets. Voters

0:41:200:41:23

turn away from EU is trust in Camelon slide is the lead in the

0:41:240:41:29

Times. And the Daily Mail, new foreign aid outrage, not focusing on

0:41:300:41:34

John Whittingdale at all. And the Independent, a generation left

0:41:350:41:38

behind, the UK child poverty shame. That is it, I will be back tomorrow,

0:41:390:41:43

we will have a little bit of Jeremy Corbyn's speech to go on by then I

0:41:440:41:47

expect. Until then, have a very good night.

0:41:480:41:58

England and Wales saw the highest temperatures of the

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