26/01/2017 Outside Source


26/01/2017

Ros Atkins with an innovative take on the latest global stories.


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LineFromTo

Welcome back and welcome to Outside Source. Theresa May will be meeting

:00:13.:00:20.

Donald Trump tomorrow, and she has already addressed his Republican

:00:21.:00:23.

colleagues. We have the opportunity, indeed the responsibility, to renew

:00:24.:00:28.

the special relationship for this new age. A few hours before, on the

:00:29.:00:34.

same stage, the president addressed the same Republican gathering after

:00:35.:00:37.

a diplomatic spat on Twitter. He spoke about a meeting with the

:00:38.:00:42.

Mexican president, that's off. Unless Mexico is going to treat the

:00:43.:00:46.

United States fairly, with respect, such a meeting would be fruitless,

:00:47.:00:52.

and I want to go a different route. He also touched on Obamacare, which

:00:53.:00:59.

millions of Americans rely on for health coverage. We will have a

:01:00.:01:02.

report from Nick Bryant on what might happen if it is scrapped. I

:01:03.:01:07.

have to have health in order to survive. If I don't have that health

:01:08.:01:12.

care, if he gets rid of it, I'm dead in the water. Actually and we will

:01:13.:01:19.

be live at the State Department, where the entire senior management

:01:20.:01:23.

team has resigned. Barbara Plett will explain that one for our

:01:24.:01:37.

struggle -- for us. How about this for a headline from the Washington

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Post - when it was put on nine, it was shared thousands of times every

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minute. The entire senior management team has resigned. Barbara

:01:52.:01:56.

Plett-Usher can explain. What is the story? Well, yes, senior members of

:01:57.:02:06.

the management team have resigned. Actually, Ros, it is not so unusual,

:02:07.:02:11.

whenever there is a change of administration, fulfilling these

:02:12.:02:14.

kinds of postings, which are appointed for term limits, have to

:02:15.:02:18.

offer their letter of resignation. It is not unusual, especially for

:02:19.:02:21.

senior people, to be kept on for a to smooth the transition in the

:02:22.:02:26.

State Department. But in this case, all of these people were apparently

:02:27.:02:30.

told, we don't need you, and so they are leaving. It means that the

:02:31.:02:35.

incoming Secretary of State will have quite a void at the top, and

:02:36.:02:39.

these are jobs that are needed to manage the State Department building

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and the State Department overseas, the foreign missions, complete

:02:44.:02:47.

experience receives, something that will have to be done fairly quickly.

:02:48.:02:52.

And the labour union that represents these four service officers said,

:02:53.:02:57.

yes, this is a regular rotation, but it is a large number of people

:02:58.:03:01.

leaving in a short period of time, and they have rare skills which you

:03:02.:03:04.

cannot really find outside of the foreign service. So they expect the

:03:05.:03:10.

Secretary of State to be able to find other people within the State

:03:11.:03:12.

Department to fill these positions, strongly suggesting that that is

:03:13.:03:15.

where he should look, rather than trying to bring somebody in from the

:03:16.:03:19.

outside. It is all about how this place is run and how effective it

:03:20.:03:24.

can be. We do not actually have the Secretary of State yet, he has not

:03:25.:03:27.

been confirmed yet. The latest we have heard is that that process will

:03:28.:03:31.

start on the Senate floor on Monday evening. I want to ask you know

:03:32.:03:36.

about this increasingly tense relationship between Mexico and the

:03:37.:03:42.

US. And what Donald Trump said earlier, here is some of it... The

:03:43.:03:48.

president of Mexico and myself have agreed to cancel a planned meeting

:03:49.:03:52.

scheduled for next week. Unless Mexico is going to treat the United

:03:53.:03:59.

States fairly, with respect, such a meeting would be fruitless, and I

:04:00.:04:04.

want to go a different route. I have no choice. Barbara, I guess there is

:04:05.:04:09.

an inevitability to this meeting being cancelled, given the rhetoric

:04:10.:04:14.

from both sides? Yes. It is amazing, really. Mr Trump has barely finished

:04:15.:04:18.

his first week in office and already he is involved in this foreign

:04:19.:04:22.

policy spat with a key neighbour. And it was being played out on

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Twitter. In the morning, Mr Trump tweeted, if Mexico is not going to

:04:28.:04:30.

pay for the wall, then perhaps we should cancel the meeting. And the

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Mexican President tweeted back, all right, I will not come - not those

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words exactly, but that was the effect. And then Mr Trump spoke

:04:41.:04:45.

about slapping a 20% tariff on Mexican goods coming in to pay for

:04:46.:04:49.

the war. There is no sense of diplomacy here, which is really very

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strange. His framing it all in this big issue of economic fairness,

:04:56.:04:58.

saying it is unfair for the Mexicans not to pay for the war, and going on

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to say, they're treating us unfairly with the North American Free Trade

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Agreement, which is the thing which has the Mexicans really worried,

:05:08.:05:10.

because their whole economy has been organised along the lines of that

:05:11.:05:14.

treaty, with 80% of their products coming here. It is really

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extraordinary to watch. Are we seeing a parallel to what we saw

:05:21.:05:24.

during the political campaigns, where clearly Mr Trump thrives on

:05:25.:05:28.

opposition, whether it is creating opposition in the media, opposition

:05:29.:05:32.

to Hillary Clinton, whatever it might be, it seems he's taking a

:05:33.:05:37.

similar approach to diplomacy, that through opposition, he will achieve

:05:38.:05:41.

his goals? That may be the case. But it needs all the parties, including

:05:42.:05:45.

the other country, including his own diplomatic staff, including I expect

:05:46.:05:53.

congresspeople, wondering what the game plan is and where this will

:05:54.:05:57.

lead. It's really quite uncharted territory. One more story to ask you

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about, and we spoke about this last night, Donald Trump has hinted that

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he would support the idea of safe zones for civilians who are being

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displaced in Syria. It is a huge suggestion, because it would involve

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the Syrian government agreeing to it, and secondly, you would have to

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put troops on the ground to protect those safe owns, and whose troops

:06:24.:06:31.

with baby? The Kremlin spokesperson has responded to say...

:06:32.:06:39.

Barbra, to get this off the ground would take a huge amount of

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diplomatic work, wouldn't it? It would be of huge project, yes. Let's

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just say that the outset, that safe zone is mentioned in a draft

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executive order that's been circulating, it has not yet been

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signed. But the draft is out there. It is related to an order that

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Syrian refugee admissions should stop. The Americans would stop

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accepting Syrian refugees for an indefinite time, and instead they

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would try to set up a safe some in the region, says the draft, for

:07:14.:07:19.

those people to stay instead. But there is nothing about what it would

:07:20.:07:26.

look like. But we know as you said, that any plan would have to involve

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some kind of military commitment, especially if it was set up against

:07:30.:07:32.

the wishes of the Syrian government. It is really an unknown. The Qataris

:07:33.:07:38.

have already said, yes, it is a good idea. Also we will have a no-fly

:07:39.:07:44.

zone to enforce it. That is not something that has been mentioned.

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The Turks have been the strongest proponents of a safe zone, and they

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have said, we would like to see what they come up with in detail. The

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Russians in the past have specifically warned the US not to

:08:00.:08:03.

take on the Syrian government militarily and have said that if the

:08:04.:08:07.

Syrian government is targeted, that the Russians will use their own air

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defence weapons against them. There is all of this in the background,

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and Mr Trump has just thrown this suggestion into the midst of it all.

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I guess we will be speaking to you around this time on Outside Source a

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lot. As we are waiting for Rex Tillerson to come in and to get his

:08:30.:08:37.

team in place below him. Theresa May, should this be seen, what she

:08:38.:08:44.

said, as a conflict with Trump's ideals, says one viewer. I think it

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is fair to say that she wants a strong nation state for the UK that

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but that it must be internationalist in its view of the world. We cannot

:08:53.:08:58.

really speak for what Donald Trump wants, in terms of how America will

:08:59.:09:03.

be positioned. Forget what he said today was that he did want to deal

:09:04.:09:06.

with the rest of the world, he wants to cut of bilateral trade deals, but

:09:07.:09:12.

it was always be from the position of putting America's interests

:09:13.:09:18.

first. If you can do that and be an internationalist, we will have to

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see if he manages to pull that off. Next, the issue of health policy.

:09:23.:09:25.

Donald Trump today launched another stinging attack on Obama. Obamacare

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is a disaster. The Democrats are saying, they're putting up signs

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like it's wonderful. It's a disaster. I actually talked with

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Paul and the group about just doing nothing for two years, and then we

:09:43.:09:47.

would have them coming begging to do something. Because 2017 is going to

:09:48.:09:53.

be catastrophic price increases, your deductibles are through the

:09:54.:09:57.

rich, you can't use it. Who can't use it. And they would come to us,

:09:58.:10:03.

except we have one problem is that we have to take care of the American

:10:04.:10:07.

people immediately. It looks like Obamacare will be scrapped by

:10:08.:10:10.

Congress, possibly as soon as March or April. But no-one is that clear

:10:11.:10:17.

on what is going to replace it, and that's causing concern. Here is Nick

:10:18.:10:19.

Bryant with his report from New York. In New York City, it is

:10:20.:10:33.

estimated that one in five of the city's population could lose their

:10:34.:10:37.

health care, if it is repealed. Among them, Donna Leslie. She does

:10:38.:10:44.

not know what she would do if she lost her Obamacare coverage. It

:10:45.:10:46.

would be a disaster for me. I have to have health care in order to

:10:47.:10:53.

survive. If I don't have that health care, if he gets rid of it, I'm dead

:10:54.:11:00.

in the water, no doubt. No doubt. It's not just adults that could lose

:11:01.:11:03.

their coverage, but as many as 4 million children. And doctors are

:11:04.:11:07.

also worried about the impact of existing treatments being

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interrupted. We're talking about millions of people... This doctor

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says the human consequences across America of repealing Obamacare would

:11:17.:11:21.

be dire. We are talking about people dying, people suffering as well. A

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patient with high blood pressure who goes without their medicine for a

:11:26.:11:30.

few months is at higher risk of a stroke a heart attack. And a patient

:11:31.:11:35.

with cancer who has started treatment, an interruption in care

:11:36.:11:39.

would mean that they're no longer able to get the chemotherapy or the

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radiation therapy or the surgery that they might need. So from that

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aspect of, I'm very worried about the real consequences of what's

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playing out on a national level. -- from that perspective. The problem

:11:54.:12:01.

for the Trump administration and Republicans on Capitol Hill is, what

:12:02.:12:11.

do you replace Obamacare with? Within hours of taking office, with

:12:12.:12:16.

a flourish of his presidential pen, Donald Trump started rolling back

:12:17.:12:18.

his predecessor's signature achievement. Without a clear

:12:19.:12:22.

administration plan yet on the table of what to replace it with. But on

:12:23.:12:29.

Capitol Hill, Republicans claim they can draft an alternative that gives

:12:30.:12:31.

more access to more affordable coverage. I don't even like the use

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of the word replace. I would like to think that we are just repealing the

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bad that is out there now and fixing what's left over and putting new

:12:42.:12:45.

ideas in place, putting some market-driven ideas in place, and

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putting patients first. For decades, health care has been a polarising

:12:51.:12:53.

issue between progressives and Conservatives. Many in the

:12:54.:12:58.

Republican ace have been campaigning for years for the end of Obamacare.

:12:59.:13:03.

But its abolition carries political risks, especially with poor,

:13:04.:13:05.

working-class Americans, who helped Donald Trump reach Washington. I

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have been asking for your questions. Lots of you have been getting in

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touch with what I would call regular questions about the Trump

:13:18.:13:20.

administration. One of you saying, will Theresa May and Donald Trump

:13:21.:13:24.

dance at any point tomorrow? I have no idea. Another one says, is your

:13:25.:13:32.

tie from Somerset cricket club? No, it's not but thanks for asking. And

:13:33.:13:36.

the message from Peter Stringfellow, a very well-known nightclub owner in

:13:37.:13:42.

London. He says, Ros, please stop pretending that you're controlling

:13:43.:13:45.

this screen, it's really embarrassing. I prod, this is not me

:13:46.:13:49.

pretending. If I press that button, this comes up. If I press this, the

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map comes up. And if I pressed the wrong button, I promise you, the

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wrong thing will happen. Honestly, it's real. And if I get it wrong it

:13:59.:14:04.

doesn't work. Thank you very much for those questions should we will

:14:05.:14:07.

get to slightly more pressing questions about the Trump

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presidency. Anthony will be explaining that in a while.

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Particularly, we will focus on Mr Trump's complex relationship with

:14:18.:14:18.

the cable news networks in the US. There has been a rise in suicides,

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assaults and self harm inside prisons in England and Wales. A

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number of those taking their own lives is the highest since records

:14:34.:14:35.

began in 1978. The rise in assaults, suicides

:14:36.:14:43.

and self harming is relentless. The sense of crisis in the system

:14:44.:14:52.

was underlined by a riot in Birmingham prison,

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where inmates posed Just one of a string of jail

:14:56.:14:58.

disturbances in recent months. Amid the volatile atmosphere,

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today's figures show that in the past year, a record

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number of prisoners have It's very hard when you've got

:15:12.:15:14.

members of your family who... Sarah is a long-serving

:15:15.:15:18.

prison officer whose She describes having to deal

:15:19.:15:20.

with a teenage suicide. I came on duty, and I went

:15:21.:15:26.

to perform a roll check. I lifted the flap, and this young

:15:27.:15:31.

man was suspended in his cell. and I saw it was his birthday,

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and I thought, what a waste. Just describe the thoughts in your

:15:35.:15:40.

head as you're going into work. When you open a door,

:15:41.:15:44.

you don't know what you're Prisons are awash with drugs

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and psychoactive substances that All adding to the underlying

:15:52.:15:58.

problems of staff shortages Vulnerable prisoners are suffering

:15:59.:16:03.

in the increasingly threatening I am very clear that the levels

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of violence in our prisons are too high, and the levels of self-harm

:16:08.:16:19.

are too high. Since I became Justice Secretary,

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I've focused on dealing That's why we are investing

:16:24.:16:25.

an extra ?100 million. 2,500 extra prison officers across

:16:26.:16:29.

the estate, so that we are able to have a caseload of one prison

:16:30.:16:32.

officer for every six prisoners. But Sarah says the challenge

:16:33.:16:36.

is not recruiting staff, And on top of that,

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you've got the fear. I've never been in fear

:16:39.:16:47.

of my life until now, and we just don't get paid enough

:16:48.:16:52.

to have that fear everyday. Welcome back to Outside Source. Our

:16:53.:17:09.

lead story is that Theresa May has urged America to engage with, and

:17:10.:17:16.

beware of, Russia. The comments came in a speech to senior Republicans in

:17:17.:17:18.

Philadelphia. She will meet resident Trump tomorrow. Coming up after

:17:19.:17:27.

Outside Source, its world news America next, if you're watching

:17:28.:17:32.

outside the UK, with a report from a survivor of Auschwitz. Here in the

:17:33.:17:34.

UK, the News at Ten is next. I'm going to bring in Anthony in a

:17:35.:17:51.

moment. But first of all, a couple of tweets which people have been

:17:52.:17:56.

highlighting. This is one where Mr Trump says, ungrateful traitor

:17:57.:17:59.

Chelsea Manning... These are important issues in their

:18:00.:18:18.

own right, but the reason I have highlighted those two tweets is the

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language and the statistics used in them. Exactly matching those used in

:18:23.:18:27.

stories which ran on Fox news units before the president tweeted. We

:18:28.:18:31.

cannot know if that is just a coincidence. We do know that the

:18:32.:18:34.

president watches a lot of network TV news. His relationship with these

:18:35.:18:39.

networks really matters. Anthony joins me now to talk about this.

:18:40.:18:43.

Would we expect that to be the case, that the Trump was taking some

:18:44.:18:47.

information, some policy needs, from a network? I think it certainly

:18:48.:18:52.

looks that way. And these are not the only examples, either. A few

:18:53.:18:58.

months ago, Fox news ran a story about flag burning, and then minutes

:18:59.:19:01.

later, Donald Trump early in the morning tweeted out a condemnation

:19:02.:19:06.

of flag burning and called for a constitutional amendment. So, his

:19:07.:19:09.

watching it, and it's influencing the way he views the world and views

:19:10.:19:13.

US politics and views policy. It is pretty remarkable that a morning TV

:19:14.:19:19.

programme could adjust the views of the leader of the free world. It

:19:20.:19:23.

used to be that the New York Times would be what everyone talks about

:19:24.:19:27.

in this town. But now it seems like Donald Trump is taking his advice,

:19:28.:19:31.

his insight, a different source. And he seems to be particularly focused

:19:32.:19:36.

not just on Fox but on CNN and the others, more so than perhaps other

:19:37.:19:41.

media outlets - is that because of the power of the networks? I think

:19:42.:19:45.

that has a lot to do with it. You noted CNN, and he talks about CNN

:19:46.:19:50.

almost as much as he mentions reports from Fox. CNN is the will in

:19:51.:19:56.

his mind, and he's constantly trashing them, saying that they have

:19:57.:20:00.

low ratings, but they're fake news. 'S picked a fight with a CNN news

:20:01.:20:04.

reporter joined that first news conference, before he was sworn in.

:20:05.:20:12.

Those are obviously two of the more prominent cable networks in the US.

:20:13.:20:15.

And Donald Trump obviously spends a lot of time watching them and cares

:20:16.:20:18.

a lot about what they say. Let's pick up this theme to more. Before I

:20:19.:20:25.

came into the set, I was down in the newsroom, and I saw that the New

:20:26.:20:27.

York Times had an interview with Stephen Pennant, the chief White

:20:28.:20:35.

House strategist, who used to be in charge of a right-wing news website.

:20:36.:20:38.

He gave a very strong quote on the media. He said the media should be

:20:39.:20:42.

embarrassed and humiliated and keep its mouth shut and just listen for a

:20:43.:20:47.

while. He said, I want you to quote me on this, the media here is the

:20:48.:20:52.

opposition party, they do not understand this country, they still

:20:53.:20:56.

do not understand why Donald Trump is the president of the United

:20:57.:20:59.

States. What did you make of that, Anthony? Well, it's pretty strong

:21:00.:21:02.

language. Apparently the interview he gave to the New York Times came

:21:03.:21:07.

on the heels of Sean Spicer's very aggressive press conference on

:21:08.:21:09.

Saturday near the he bashed the media and said that they were

:21:10.:21:12.

misrepresenting the crowds at the inauguration. And Steve Bannon is

:21:13.:21:22.

someone who Donald Trump listens to, a very close adviser. Along with

:21:23.:21:28.

Stephen Miller, he calls them the two Steves, both of them firebrands

:21:29.:21:34.

with an anti-establishment view of politics. In his inaugural address,

:21:35.:21:40.

he bashed the establishment, bashed Washington, said he was giving power

:21:41.:21:43.

back to the people, Alec is rhetoric. And they might have been

:21:44.:21:48.

involved in that speech. You think the media in the US now see

:21:49.:21:51.

themselves as the opposition? I think they feel that they have a

:21:52.:21:54.

responsibility to challenge Donald Trump at every turn. I think that

:21:55.:21:59.

they took to heart some of the accusations that they did not take a

:22:00.:22:03.

Donald Trump seriously early enough in the presidential campaign. I

:22:04.:22:07.

think use or later in the campaign, particularly in that press

:22:08.:22:10.

conference which ended up not being a press conference, at the Donald

:22:11.:22:14.

Trump H, where he refuse to answer media questions and dismissed the

:22:15.:22:18.

allegations that he was responsible for questioning Barack Obama's birth

:22:19.:22:22.

certificate, I think from then on, the media took a much more

:22:23.:22:24.

adversarial view towards Donald Trump, and that has carried over

:22:25.:22:29.

into the transition and into his presidency. I don't think they would

:22:30.:22:32.

like being characterised as the opposition party, but I think they

:22:33.:22:36.

feel they have a responsibility to challenge him and question him when

:22:37.:22:40.

he says something that the facts are not bear out. Just a couple of

:22:41.:22:44.

questions here, firstly from Alex, watching in Manchester - do we know

:22:45.:22:52.

Mr Trump's thoughts on the European feeling towards his presidency? Be

:22:53.:22:57.

Pool C Trump as a radical, they disapprove of his attitude towards

:22:58.:23:01.

the press, they see him as dangerous. That is not

:23:02.:23:04.

representative of all attitudes in Europe, but I do not see Mr Trump as

:23:05.:23:20.

someone he does pay attention. He cares a lot about what people think

:23:21.:23:24.

of him. When he was over in the UK right after the Brexit folk, took

:23:25.:23:30.

that as a sign for a possible victory for him. So he was obviously

:23:31.:23:34.

paying attention to the Brexit folk. I think he sees ideological soul

:23:35.:23:38.

mates in some of the nationalist movements in the UK and in

:23:39.:23:45.

continental. So I would not be supposed if he is at least somewhat

:23:46.:23:48.

aware of it. Obviously, he has a close relationship with Nigel

:23:49.:23:52.

Farage, so there will be some information traded there. But as far

:23:53.:23:58.

as the average person on the street thinks in Europe, I don't think he

:23:59.:24:01.

cares that much. Thank you, Anthony. Just very quickly, the timings of

:24:02.:24:07.

tomorrow's events, please? We don't know a whole lot about what he will

:24:08.:24:11.

be doing tomorrow. There is talk of executive orders on visas, which we

:24:12.:24:15.

thought were going to come today. On immigration as well. So I would not

:24:16.:24:20.

be surprised if we saw something about that tomorrow. Thank you very

:24:21.:24:24.

much indeed. Just to tick up on that message I got 15 minutes ago from

:24:25.:24:28.

Peter Stringfellow, well-known nightclub owner here in London,

:24:29.:24:34.

about my screen. I replied to him, offering for him to come in and try

:24:35.:24:39.

it, and lots of you have been saying they would rather have a visit to

:24:40.:24:42.

his place than mine, which I'm frankly offended by! But thank you

:24:43.:24:47.

very much for all your messages! We'll take a breather now. We will

:24:48.:24:50.

be back at the same time on Monday. Thanks for your company.

:24:51.:25:13.

If you were watching this time yesterday, I was explaining

:25:14.:25:14.