16/02/2017 Outside Source


16/02/2017

Ros Atkins with an innovative take on the latest global stories.


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Well-to-do Outside Source. A few hours back Donald Trump gave a press

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conference. He was on the attack from the very beginning. I inherited

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a mess and got 306 electoral college votes. This administration is

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running like a fine tuned machine. It was bothered opening statement

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which covered a huge number of topics but then there was an

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extended Q and A and there were no subject is off-limits. Wait expect

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light! I know who you are, let me tell you about the travel ban. In

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terms of the National security of Isa, this was the verdict. The leaks

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were real. You saw it. The news was fake. Lots of questions are coming

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in and if you use the hashtag they come straight to the BBC screen as

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well. We will play you more clips of that almost hour and a half long

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press conference. Let's turn to the issue of Mr

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Trump's connections with Russia and alleged contacts with Russia of his

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campaign team during the election. This came up several times during

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the press conference on the president was very clear on the

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issue. I can tell you, speaking for myself, I own nothing in Russia, I

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have no loans in Russia, I don't have any deals in Russia, President

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Putin called me up very nicely to congratulate me on the wind of the

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election. He then called me up next grimly nicely -- extremely nicely to

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congratulate me on the inauguration, which was terrific. But so did many

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other leaders. Almost all the leaders. Russia is fake news. This

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is fake news that out by the media. There were so many sound bites in

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this press conference, rush of being fake news was another one. He was

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pushed again by other journalists at this press conference. When you

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aware that anyone in your campaign had contacts with Russia during the

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course of this election? General Flynn, but he was dealing as he

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should've been. During the election? Nobody that I know. So, you are

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aware of anybody during the election? Russia is a ruse. I know

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you have do get up and ask a question, but Russia is a ruse. I

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haven't made a phone call to Russia in years. Live from Washington, DC,

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the president is genuinely exasperated at that point. Guess. He

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has been asked about this before. The reason is because his answers

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are not definitive. You know it is very clearly that he said that there

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were no contacts that he knew of, that is a big escape hatch if need

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be. We saw an article in the New York Times just the other day saying

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that there were contacts between people in Trump's team during the

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campaign and Russia and intelligence operatives also did Trump know about

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that or not? We don't know. Whether those contacts amounted to anything

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sensitive, we also don't know that. That would be a big area of concern

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of either of those things were true. -- substantive. He's going to be

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asked about that, as the FBI investigation keeps going on. That

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is not going to go anywhere anywhere soon. I want to play everyone now a

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question from the BBC's North America editor Jon Sobel. Here is

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how John got on with the president. Where are you from? BBC. Here is

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another beauty. It is a good line, impartial, free and fair. Just like

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CNN. On the travel ban, would you accept that that was a good example

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of the smooth running of Government? I do! Weight! Weight! I know who you

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are, just wait. Let me tell you about the travel ban. We had a very

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smooth roll-out of the travel ban. We had a bad court. We got a bad

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decision. We had a court that has been overturned again, I think it is

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80% of the time, I maybe wrong. A lot. We had a bad decision. We will

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keep going with that decision, we will put in a new executive order

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next week sometime. Let's bring in the BBC's Acehnese against. We mind

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which way it is, but it does not seem particularly accurate of the

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president to say that roll-out is moved. I don't think he can say that

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with any kind of justification. He says the court made a bad decision.

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That lower court level didn't happen until later in the week. What

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happened when he first imposed that travel ban was a lot of confusion on

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the part of the implementing agencies that weren't informed about

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how to put it into effect, whether to allow green card holders into the

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country or not. You saw conflicting messages, people coming to the

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country thinking they would be admitted but then being detained for

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hours, sometimes even longer. Sometimes put back on planes and

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sent back to where they came from. That is not an audibly

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implementation of the travel ban. -- orderly. Geoffrey would like to ask,

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what is this rally in Florida? What is it and who is paying for it? It

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is a rally in an aeroplane hangar near new Melbourne Florida which is

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in the upper area of Florida, even with Orlando, he had a campaign

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event there that I was actually at earlier this year. Last year in

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October. He pulled up in his the aeroplane and gave a speech to

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adoring crowds. About 10,000 people there, through popular there. That

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is why he's going back there probably. Who is paying for it, that

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is interesting. It is the Donald Trump for President 2020. This is a

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campaign event for a presidential race that isn't going to happen for

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more than three and half years. You serious? That is a fact that I

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didn't know. We are already on to talking about whether Donald Trump

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will be re-elected. Remember, we are still in February and the president

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was inaugurated in January. Anthony was live with this in Washington,

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DC. They say it is hard to find in Government diplomacy in DC. ... Mr

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Trump would say he's not interested in Washington, he is interested in

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the country who have selected him. Michelle has asked other polls,

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investigations into grassroots supporters beyond Twitter to gauge

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their thoughts Post investigation miss these are approval ratings.

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Memory the sixth was when the poll was conducted. Republicans are 87%

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in favour. Independents 37%, Democrats 11%. At least 41% -- that

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leads to 41% approval rating which would at this point be considered

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low. Here he is talking about the media. I never get phone calls from

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the media. However they were right a story like that in the Wall Street

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Journal without asking me or in the New York Times put it on the front

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page? That was likely story they wrote about the women and me,

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FrontPage. The massive story. It was nasty. They called and said we never

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said that. We like Mr Trump. On that particular issue as to whether

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journalists are asking Mr Trump about the stories they are covering,

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the moment he stepped back, many, many completely reliable journalists

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queued up to say that we do this every time. This is Maggie Hagerman

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from the New York Times saying... I can really many, many e-mails from

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other journalists saying they have the call records and journalists to

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say. Dot-macro I think we can see the president is not sharing with us

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the truth. It was an astonishing achievement that the election

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result. We talked about the scale of it with Benjamin Netanyahu. It did

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so again today. I put it out for the American people. I got 306 electoral

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college votes. I wasn't supposed to get 222. They said there was no way

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to get you to do. 230 is impossible. 270 is what you need and that is

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laughable. We got 306 because people came out and voted like they have

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never seen before. That is the way it goes. I guess it was the biggest

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electoral college win since Ronald Reagan. That is Ronald -- Donald

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Trump Social Democratic and the biggest electoral college win since

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Ronald Reagan. Remember that each state gets a certain amount of

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electoral college votes. The first one to get the clear majority

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becomes president. Unfortunately, the president told you something

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there that was completely untrue. As he was in a room full of

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journalists, it was unlikely that he was going to get a way with not

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being picked up on that. You said that you got the biggest electoral

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margins and Ronald marking of 304 and 306. In fact, President Obama

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got 365. I'm talking about Republican. Jos Buttler 426 when he

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won as president. Why should Americans trust you? I was just

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given that we got a big margin. Why should Americans trust you when you

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are providing false information? I have seen that information. Thank

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you. If you want to watch back some of these clips from the press

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conference, you can find them online from BBC News. Probably the most

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single most controversial action that Donald Trump is taken as the

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travel ban. In a while, I will play you a report about the Somali

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American communities get their response to the proposed ban. A deal

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reached two weeks ago which promise to help end the country's rail

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strike has collapsed raising the prospect of more industrial action.

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Leaders of the train driver was Mancunian Asef said... For nearly a

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year, nearly -- many users have had strikes and delays. Thanks everybody

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for coming. After two weeks of talks hosted by the TUC, it was thought

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that the deal had been done. We are pleased to announce that Aslef and

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Southern Rail have reached an agreement. Now that deal has

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unravelled and for commuters in Brighton are unhappy. I'm not happy.

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It is wasting my time. It is terrible. What can we do? It is a

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lot of money on Uber, isn't it? Around 900 Aslef drivers voted on

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the ballot. There was a turnout of over 72%, nearly 46% voted in favour

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of the deal, but over 54% voted against. This is an embarrassment

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for Aslef, a deal negotiated by their leadership has been overturned

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by rank and file membership. The general secretary of Aslef says we

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understand and support the decision arrived at democratically by our

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members. The dispute is over how many members of staff should be on

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every train. Can there be driver only trains or must they are always

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be a second person, a conductor on board? Aslef said they had got a

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deal where there would always be to staff on the train with some

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exceptions. Southern's parent company Govia said in the statement

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that we are disappointed... The RMT has already scheduled

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another 24-hour strike on the southern network next Wednesday and

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the same distribute about driver operated trains is breading to other

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parts of the country. Ballots are being sent out today to staff on a

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Riva trains north, there is also the prospect of industrial action on

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Merseyrail. We live on the BBC newsroom. Our

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lead story confirms Donald Trump's press conference which was arranged

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at the last minute. According to multiple sources, at the behest of

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the president. He took many questions across an hour or more.

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Let's come back to the outsize source screen to talk further about

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this conference. The covered a lot of ground. He did not leave out the

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economy. He has plenty of to say on business, jobs and fair trade. Their

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response abilities will be ending the bleeding of jobs from our

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country. And negotiating fair trade deals for our citizens. Fair trade,

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not free. Fair. If a country is taking advantage of this, it is not

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going to happen any more. Every country takes advantage of this. I

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may be able to find a couple that don't, but the most part, that would

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be a tough job us to do. Michelle, this message that America needs to

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realign itself economically with the world was one of the reasons Mr

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Trump got the presidency. It certainly was. It is a claim he said

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talking about the bleeding of jobs. On balance, it is very say that is

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not quite true. If you go back to the height of the recession, what

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happened afterwards, unemployment peaked at 10%. Now we're back down

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to 4.8%. We are talking about an unemployment rate in the country

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that suggests America is close to full employment. Where Donald Trump

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is referring to is specifically the manufacturing sector, there can ever

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since 2000, it is fair to say the manufacturing jobs has been falling

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in declining at a faster rate. They did not decline between that period

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between 1994 and 2000, the reason I mention those dates is because the

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North American Free Trade Agreement was introduced then. He has

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criticised that in asked to roll it back. If you look at manufacturing

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jobs immediately after that came into effect, you don't see much

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change until as I mentioned 2000. I would like to play a couple more

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clips of the press conference. Here is the president talking about the

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car industry. Jobs have already started to surge since my election.

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Ford also be will -- Ford say they will invest in Michigan. Ford the

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Lima Chrysler say they will invest in Michigan, they were with me a

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week ago. General Motors committed to invest millions of dollars in its

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American manufacturing operation. Keeping many jobs here that were

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going to leave. If I didn't get elected, they would have left. These

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jobs and things that I am announcing would never have come here. What is

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your assessment of the President's description of his impact? We know

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this is a president who likes to talk things up and I think that is

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perhaps what is going on here. These investments, if you look at

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businesses, they planned years in advance. When you are talking about

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a car factory, plant, something that is going to cost them millions if

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not billions of dollars. This is not a decision that they just took

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overnight. In response to a tweet from the president. Many of these

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were carefully planned for months, perhaps as long as years. But

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perhaps they did time the announcement or rush it out to carry

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favour with the incoming administration, with the new

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president and also for Donald Trump committee gets to call it a win. It

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is something we have seen again and again from American companies. It is

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a win-win for both sides, American companies gets to say they have

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created jobs, carry favour with the incoming administration, Donald

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Trump gets to claim a victory. Very useful. Next, Mr Trump focused on

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two other companies, Intel which makes microchips are very

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successfully and the retail giant Walmart, have listened. Intel just

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announced that it will move ahead with a new plant in Arizona that

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probably was going to not be moved ahead with. That will result in at

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least 10,000 American jobs. Walmart announced it will create 10,000 jobs

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in the American A E United States -- United States because of our

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various plans and initiatives. There will be many, many more. These are a

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few that were named. You can talk to me about those big deals. How

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involved is the president getting in these corporate decisions? I hate to

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sound like a broken record, but I think it is a case of these being a

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long-term investment. Companies can't spend that kind of money

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overnight. Intel, it is not false or true, it is more complicated. Intel

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actually planned on spending $7 billion, that is the announcement

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that Trump was referring to. That was a factory in Arizona. That

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factory with actually started in 2011, it was announced under

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President Obama and the reason it was not completed was that there was

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a lack of demand for the product. That isn't and we have not heard

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from Donald Trump that economies to Lee E but economists worried about.

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Where is the demand coming from? As the Walmart? Again, the company in

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its press release did not mention Donald Trump, but did say it was

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increasing jobs, go back to 2015, they cut as many jobs as they said

:20:25.:20:27.

they were going to add when they closed about 154 stores. It is a

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mixed picture, many people are excited about Donald Trump's tax

:20:40.:20:44.

policy, they are excited about what he's doing about regulation and that

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is something that you do uniformly hear from the business community.

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For the second time and final time, thank you for joining us from New

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York. Let's finish the programme by looking at Donald Trump's travel

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ban. It is suspended at the moment, but most polls suggest Americans

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supported. Or the majority of them. One of the countries it targets is

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Somalia and the BBC has visited a Somali American community in

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Minneapolis. An event to teach

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people their rights You should take a second look

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if they ask about your Organisers say it was badly needed

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after support groups were inundated with calls

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from anxious American Muslims. Those in Minneapolis

:21:30.:21:31.

mainly have roots in Somalia, one of the country

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is the president named in the ban. Donald Trump talked

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of Somali Americans as There are tens of thousands

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of people of Somali origin in Minneapolis, many came

:21:42.:21:46.

over as refugees but others were born here and some

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of them tell us this is the first time they feel

:21:52.:21:54.

the For some, that has happened

:21:55.:21:56.

in face-to-face encounters. This woman is a fashion

:21:57.:22:09.

designer, make-up artist and She says women like her

:22:10.:22:16.

who are visibly Muslim because of the hijab

:22:17.:22:21.

are having a tough time. She herself has had

:22:22.:22:24.

in cells hurled at her when Things have changed since

:22:25.:22:27.

the election because people are openly racist,

:22:28.:22:30.

people are not scared They tell us to go

:22:31.:22:32.

back to our country, In his music Mohammad talks

:22:33.:22:39.

of the tough problems people have. He thinks the president

:22:40.:23:01.

could have made He is not keeping America

:23:02.:23:02.

safe, he's giving It will make them

:23:03.:23:13.

harder and anger them because some people do not

:23:14.:23:17.

want to go to school no more because they feel there is hate

:23:18.:23:26.

there, at workplace, There have been cases

:23:27.:23:28.

of young Somali Americans being convicted of trying to go

:23:29.:23:35.

abroad to join militant groups, but there is an overwhelming feeling

:23:36.:23:41.

here among that score that the Presidents actions

:23:42.:23:43.

are counter-productive. You are helping groups

:23:44.:23:44.

like Isis and Al-Shabab and Passing the message

:23:45.:23:46.

America does not want you, you do not belong

:23:47.:23:53.

in the The same message Isis and al-Shabab

:23:54.:23:55.

used to recruit young men. Around the country, many think

:23:56.:23:59.

Donald Trump is doing the right things to counter extremism but

:24:00.:24:01.

people here warn he is only sowing the seeds of more

:24:02.:24:04.

alienation and hatred. Before I finish the programme, one

:24:05.:24:19.

more message coming in. Why is the BBC assigning so much time to Donald

:24:20.:24:25.

Trump? Wood ignoring and not attending his events be an option to

:24:26.:24:28.

science? We're not interested silencing Donald Trump we are

:24:29.:24:33.

interested in reporting and analysing and in terms of why we

:24:34.:24:37.

give so much time to one press conference, by the accounts of many

:24:38.:24:39.

people who were there and who watched, it was one of the most

:24:40.:24:44.

extraordinary press conferences and American president has ever given

:24:45.:24:48.

and also Donald Trump is reshaping the American presidency and

:24:49.:24:51.

America's role in the world. It is really important we understand that.

:24:52.:24:54.

Thank you very much for watching. See you next week. Goodbye.

:24:55.:25:06.

In a moment, I will take you somewhere that is about to get more

:25:07.:25:11.

rain than it can handle. Some of us have a wet day on Thursday, there

:25:12.:25:16.

were showers in Scotland. Here is a view of a rainbow looking out over

:25:17.:25:19.

Perth. Parts of south west Scotland have been

:25:20.:25:20.