12/07/2017 Outside Source


12/07/2017

Ros Atkins with an innovative take on the latest global stories.


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Hello, I'm Ros Atkins, this is Outside Source.

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Donald Trump Junior has defended his meeting

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with a Russian lawyer las year, who he believed had incriminating

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Again, this is before the Russian mania, before they built it up in

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the press. For me, it was opposition research. They had something.

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The President is calling the greatest witch hunt

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But here's his nominee for FBI Director in his

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Is the future FBI director, do you consider this endeavour a witchhunt?

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I do not consider direct A Mullen to be on a witchhunt.

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Brazil's former president, Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, has been

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sentenced to nine-and-a-half years in jail for corruption

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In an interview with the BBC, President Erdogan of Turkey has

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denied claims that his country has jailed over 150 journalists.

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TRANSLATION: Those people inside jail are not titled as journalists.

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Some corroborated with terrorist organisations.

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And some of the world's biggest tech companies are staging a day

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of protest in support of net neutrality.

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We'll explain what it is - and why it affects all of us.

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Donald Trump Jr has a lot of explaining to do -

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Yesterday he released emails which show him setting up a meeting

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on the promise of damaging information on Hillary

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Clinton that the Russian government wanted to supply.

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Now Donald Trump Jr has spoken to Fox News.

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Here he is on what his father knew about the meeting.

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A lot of people will want to know this about your father. Did you tell

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your father anything about this? It was such a nothing, there was

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nothing to tell. I wouldn't have even remembered it until you started

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scouring through the stuff, it was literally a wasted 20 minutes, which

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was a shame. It is hard to imagine how the interview could have been

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more gentle. We'll see more of that

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interview in a moment. On the 3rd of June 2016

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Donald Trump Junior received an email from this man,

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Rob Goldstone. He's a music publicist and

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acquaintance of Donald Trump Junior. In it, he explains a former Russian

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business partner of Donald Trump had been contacted by a Russian

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government official - and the offer was of "information

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that would incriminate Hillary To which the reply is,

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"If it's what you say, I love it". Four days later, Rob

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Goldstone emails again - asking Donald Trump Junior

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if he would meet with a woman called She was described in the email

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as a Russian government attorney. The meeting took place two days

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later at Trump Tower in New York. We know as much because here's

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Rob Goldstone, on Facebook, checking in at Trump Tower

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and announcing that he's there. Donald Trump Jr says no useful

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info was handed over. That was much, much later in

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proceedings. Here's more of his

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interview on Fox News. In retrospect, I probably would have

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done things a little differently. Again, this is before Russia mania,

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before they built it in the press. For me, it was opposition research,

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they may had concrete evidence to the stories that I heard about which

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were probably underreported the years, not just during the campaign,

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I wanted to hear it out but it went nowhere and it was apparent that was

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not what the meeting was actually about.

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Let me ask you a hypothetical, maybe you have thought about it since now

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that it has become Russia collusion etc. Did you ever meet with any

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other person from Russia but you know? I don't know, I have probably

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met with the people from Russia but not in the context of a formalised

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meeting or anything. Why would I? In the grand scheme of how busy we

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were, it was much more important... This was a courtesy to an

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acquaintance. Some people ask... Hear him asking

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why would I, they look at an e-mail exchange during which he is offered

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information about Hillary Clinton from the Russian government and

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think, why wouldn't you? Here's the President's

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verdict on that interview. "My son Donald did

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a good job last night. He was open, transparent

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and innocent. This is the greatest Witch Hunt

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in political history. Let's see how Anthony Zurcher

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describes it. He is live from Washington, DC. Sad as one word, bad

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might be another? Absolutely. Donald Trump, Vice President Mike Pence,

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everybody in the administration spent months saying there was no

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corroboration or contact between Russian officials and members of the

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Trump campaign, now we have actual e-mail correspondence that has

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Donald Trump Jr not only meeting with someone that he thought was a

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representative of the Russian Government but welcoming and

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celebrating that fact, hoping he would be provided information that

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was incriminating to Hillary Clinton. He says nothing came of

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that meeting but the simple fact that there was an openness to such a

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meeting, that Donald Trump Jr was able to get the chair of the

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campaign, Paul Manafort, to sit on the meeting, as well as his

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brother-in-law Jared Kushner, that undermines much of what we have

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heard from the Trump White House over the past few months and shows a

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little bit about how members of the Trump campaign were being so

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defensive about Russian contacts. People like Jeff Sessions said he

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had never met with Russian officials, only to have to

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contradict that later. Michael Flynn said he did not talk with Russians

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about sanctions, only to have to recant that and ended being fired

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about it. It plays into perceptions about a lot of smoke circling the

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Trump administration when Russia is the topic of discussion. There are

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difficult perceptions, but in terms of the practical politics, has

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anything changed for the White House? The White House has dug in,

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formed battle lines again. It used to be there was no contact, no

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interest in coordination with Russia, now it is a little

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different, the contact was meaningless, nothing came of it, it

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was before Russia became the big story. They have changed a bit, but

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then you see stories in the New York Times and the Washington post about

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the chaos going on within the White House. They don't know where these

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leaks came from, these e-mails got out, the stories about Donald Trump

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Jr all came out into the press and there is a lot of finger-pointing

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within the West Wing of the White House, trying to figure out who is

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trying to get Hugh, who will benefit and who needs to protect themselves.

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That is the main story in Washington, but stay with us,

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Anthony. Let's also talk about

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Christopher Wray - this is Donald Trump's pick

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to become the next FBI Director. His senate confirmation

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hearing has begun. No surprises, there have

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been a lot of questions And this one was specifically

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about Donald Trump Jnr and the meeting we've just been

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discussing. Let's see how that went. Here is

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what I tell every politician, if you get a call from somebody suggesting

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that a foreign Government wants to help you, by disparaging your

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opponents, tell us all to call the FBI. To the members of this

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committee, any threat or is it to interfere with our elections from

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any nation state or any non-state actor is the kind of thing the FBI

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would want to know. Google do you believe that in light of the double

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junior e-mail and other allegations that this whole thing about the

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Trump campaigning in Russia is a witchhunt? -- in light of the Donald

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Trump Jr e-mail? I can't speak to the basis for those

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comments... I am asking you. As the future FBI director, do you consider

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this endeavour a witchhunt? I do not consider the former director to be

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an witchhunt. In a normal situation the

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President's nominee for director of the FBI directly contradicting the

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president might be a story in itself, but it feels a little

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overshadowed? This was a fairly routine confirmation hearing for a

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nominee who was not all that controversial, but a huge shadow was

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being cast over this based on James Comey's firing by Donald Trump, the

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ongoing Russia investigation, Wray was asked time and time again would

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you pledge loyalty to President Trump the wake only said he was

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asked to, and cellar Christopher Wray said that my loyalty is only to

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the rule of law and the Constitution. He said he was a

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straight shooter, he said he was not going to pull any punches. All other

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questions, at least from Democrats in particular, to be to try to make

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sure that Wray was independent from Donald Trump that would be a strong

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and standing up to pressure from Trump is James Comey was, maybe even

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stronger. If anything happens in the next 50 minutes, Anthony, you know

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where we are! Let's move a lot further south from Anthony.

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He used to be President of Brazil - and he's just been sentenced

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to nine-and-a-half years in prison for corruption.

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Let's bring in Katy Watson, the BBC's correspondent in Brazil, she

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is live from Rio. Could you start by telling us what his crimes? He has

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been accused... Sorry, sentence for nine and a half years the corruption

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and money laundering, it refers to a beach-front property that he

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received in return for the construction company to be able to

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get some contracts from a state-run oil company, Petrobras. This is part

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of the country's biggest ever corruption operation, Operation Car

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Wash, which started in March 20 14. It is a sentence for one of five

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cases against him. Earlier you told me he will appeal this, he denies

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his guilt? He says this is a primitive -- politically motivated

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case, he denies wrongdoing and he will not be going to prison, he has

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the right to appeal. In the past he has hinted perhaps wanting to run

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for presidency again, so this sentence we have heard today does

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not stop him from potentially running for presidency. If he is

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convicted, if the sentence is upheld in the Appeal Court, he would not be

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able to run, but in the meantime nothing much changes in terms of

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that. If you look at the polls, he is the frontrunner for next year's

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presidential elections. Even if he can run legally, it seems

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astonishing he might have a chance given he has been found guilty of

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these crimes? But you tell me he does? This case really divides

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Brazilians. Millions of Brazilians see him as the country's saviour. He

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was the most well-respected politician in recent history. When

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he left power at the end of 2010 he had approval ratings of 80%. Buy a

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big part of Brazilian society he is very much still supported, but the

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other half feels he has become a symbol of the problems of corruption

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in the country. There is still a lot of support if he decided to run for

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president. I feel that every time we talk about the trouble of

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politicians in Brazil, the accusation that the judiciary is

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political comes up time and time again. Is there any evidence that

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that is true? I mean... All of this, whether it's is Lula, Dilma, it

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divides everybody. When you look at the judge who has brought the

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sentence against Lula he is seen as a symbol of exactly that, some

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people serious too politically motivated, others see him as a

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symbol of cracking down on corruption. Operation Car Wash has

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implicated so many politicians and people in power. A third of the

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current Cabinet is linked to the corruption investigation. It is very

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hard to separate politically and be able to remove it and say that these

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judges have their views, people here all have views on whether the judges

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are doing this to serve a political purpose or not.

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Thank you for explaining it, Katy Watson, live from Rio.

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An iceberg four times the size of London and thought to weigh

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a trillion tonnes has broken away from Antarctica.

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Fire Service advice to residents to stay put inside flats in Grenfell

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Tower during the fire lasted nearly two I was, the BBC has learned. A

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change in policy recommending residents tried to leave was made

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one hour and 53 minutes after the emergency call. Tonight, survivors

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confronted the senior investigating police officer looking into the

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fire. Some others cannot sleep, because

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when we sleep we dream of it! (INAUDIBLE)

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. SHOUTING. The test of an investigation is whether it is done

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properly, not quickly. An investigation of the skill will not

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be quick, but it will be thorough. It will get to the bottom of what

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ever happened and hope those two accounts, whether it be an

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individual or an organisation -- and hold those two accounts.

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This is Outside Source live from the BBC newsroom.

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President Trump's eldest son has said he didn't tell his father

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about a meeting last year with a Russian lawyer,

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who was apparently offering documents that would damage

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The main news from BBC World Service.

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Scientists are demanding new rules to protect

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A report prepared for the UN says nearly two-thirds of open sea falls

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outside the jurisdiction of any one country - and that that leaves

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ecosystems at risk as natural resources are exploited.

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A boost for the Brazilian President Michel Temer -

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the senate has approved labour reforms aimed at giving companies

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more freedom in employee contract negotiations.

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Perhaps only respite for the President -

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Police in Berlin have raided homes after a huge solid gold coin

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It weighs 100 kilograms, and the suspected robbers

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are believed to have used a ladder and a wheelbarrow to

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The suspicion is that it's since been melted down and sold.

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If you're in the US and you've been to sites like Google,

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Facebook and Amazon today, you may have seen pages like this.

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Titled this is a battle for the future of the Internet.

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The sites are running slowly - and it's on purpose.

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It's a protests to changes being made to rules which govern

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what's called net neutrality, this is the idea that all internet

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Right now all Internet traffic is treated the same, no matter where it

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has come from, where it is going or what it is doing. We call that net

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neutrality. Without it, campaigners worry that Internet service

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providers might be able to intentionally slow down your

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Internet connection unless you pay more for things like video

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streaming, or they warned there could be some kind of Internet fast

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lane where big, rich companies could pay to make sure their site load

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quickly but other, smaller sites macro would be stuck in touch with

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their politicians to pressure them into supporting net neutrality. Over

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70,000 websites will push people towards the NCC to make their voices

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heard, we will push people towards the members of Congress. We want the

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FCC to hear that net neutrality is widely popular, which it is. But net

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neutrality has some very powerful opponents, including companies like

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Verizon, AT, IBM, Cisco, Nokia and, crucially, the new head of the

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US Federal Communications commission has spoken out against net

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neutrality. Those against it say it adds unnecessary new regulation to

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the Internet. They say it makes it harder for Internet service

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providers to make back the money they invested in building the

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infrastructure that gives people high-speed Internet. I have had

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plenty of questions on this story. Technology analyst

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Tim Mulligan explains. There was research last year which

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showed that 35% of all download traffic on

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the US Internet systems last year was because of Netflix.

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And Netflix is not contributing to that? Yes, and this gets to the hub

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of the issue. We are transitioning from an ownership culture to access

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to ownership, effectively streaming. Netflix is the leading provider of

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video on demand streaming services. In music you have Spotify with music

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streaming services. What we are looking at is an increased

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significant increase in demand upon existing infrastructure to provide

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what the public wants, which is instant access to entertainment. Why

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is the discussion not about who should bear the cost of the

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infrastructure, rather than at the point where the consumer gets the

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experience, whether that should be neutral? The reality, and this is a

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painful reality for the streaming services, they are on very tight

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margins. Especially if you are an entertainment -based streaming

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business. Most of your revenue goes on providing the entertainment,

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getting licences, paying for the content. I mentioned Netflix, they

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have 6 billion... Is 6 billion content expenditure this year, only

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20% of that is going on original content, the rest is to place the

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content to serve the expectations of the general public, and that is for

:19:53.:19:59.

very low competitive pricing compared to traditional pay-TV. What

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changes are being proposed in the US that Amazon and Google etc are upset

:20:05.:20:10.

about? We have already seen attempts to try to test net neutrality. So

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look at T Mobile, they have launched a binge on viewing service which

:20:18.:20:23.

includes major streaming services, so if T Mobile customers pay for a

:20:24.:20:28.

premium tier of data access they get zero rating on access to streaming

:20:29.:20:34.

services like Spotify, Netflix. AT have tried a different thing with

:20:35.:20:39.

preferred advertising partners and they have been chastised by the FCC

:20:40.:20:44.

because of this. Right now we are in a grey zone where people are testing

:20:45.:20:47.

the boundaries, there is a recognition that change needs to

:20:48.:20:50.

become but it is difficult to know where to turn to. Are we likely to

:20:51.:20:58.

underpin a situation where different regions will have different

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approaches to this? Inevitably, yes. If you look at the distinction

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between the approach that the EU takes versus the approach that the

:21:07.:21:10.

US regulators take, there are significant differences of, for want

:21:11.:21:17.

of a better word, worldviews. The EU is primarily focused on providing a

:21:18.:21:21.

good consumer level playing field. The US is more of a laissez faire

:21:22.:21:28.

business friendly environment, which inevitably creates a contrast and

:21:29.:21:32.

how this will play out going forward. We will keep an eye on that

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story. The Royal Bank of Scotland is one

:21:35.:21:35.

of Britain's biggest banks - and it's agreed to pay a US

:21:36.:21:38.

regulator $4.7 billion dollars. It's to settle claims that it

:21:39.:21:41.

mis-sold mortgage-backed securities. Many of these products proved

:21:42.:21:46.

to be almost worthless, and were a significant factor

:21:47.:21:48.

in triggering the global The bank still faces action

:21:49.:21:50.

from the US Department of Justice. Here's what one banking

:21:51.:21:57.

expert has to say. It's likely that there will be

:21:58.:22:11.

billions more in fines to come. They'd really like to get it done

:22:12.:22:16.

quickly, but it has been overhanging the shares. The UK Government

:22:17.:22:20.

ownership position, for a long time. RBS says they are not sure when such

:22:21.:22:27.

a settlement etc might occur. It is not a horrible products, the product

:22:28.:22:32.

was abused and got out of hand. The wrong people got mortgage credits,

:22:33.:22:38.

the banks did it for all kinds of awful financial incentives, they

:22:39.:22:40.

were distributed to investors for all the wrong reasons, the wrong

:22:41.:22:46.

incentives, but the concept but some people's financial records might not

:22:47.:22:48.

be perfect and they should be banned from getting a mortgage is wrong. It

:22:49.:22:53.

should be a market open to everyone. To my knowledge the only major

:22:54.:22:57.

institution that still has to come to terms with this or is fighting it

:22:58.:23:03.

is Barclays, another big UK bank. Staying with the US, this is Janet

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Yellen, the head of the US central bank.

:23:10.:23:09.

The boss of the US central bank has told Congress that the US economy

:23:10.:23:12.

is healthy enough to sustain more gradual rises in interest rates.

:23:13.:23:15.

Janet Yellen was reporting to members of Congress about bank

:23:16.:23:17.

Let's bring in Michelle Fleury in New York. I feel like if I had a

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dollar for every time we considered the possibility rates could go up

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but then they don't in the end, I would be a rich man. What has

:23:30.:23:35.

changed? I think the key thing is she is saying about the economy is

:23:36.:23:41.

growing, albeit slowly, it continues to add jobs. Much as you point out,

:23:42.:23:45.

that we have heard from her in recent months. The difference here

:23:46.:23:49.

is that she said interest rates would not have to go much further to

:23:50.:23:56.

reach a neutral level. What did she mean? A neutral level does not

:23:57.:23:59.

encourage or discourage economic activity. The market interpreted

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that as a sign that maybe we will see one more rate increase this

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year, but generally speaking the pace of rate rises will be slow. As

:24:09.:24:13.

a result, that boosted stocks, we have seen the Dow hit another record

:24:14.:24:21.

close, up just over .5%. Why this analysis lead her to think that a

:24:22.:24:25.

higher point than the one we are rat serves American people better? After

:24:26.:24:32.

the financial crisis, to try and spur activity in the economy, to get

:24:33.:24:37.

the economy going and kick-started, interest rates were brought to very

:24:38.:24:42.

low levels. The question became when would we return to normal and what

:24:43.:24:47.

with the new normal look like? That is the part, if you like, of the

:24:48.:24:51.

journey we are on, the return to what the Fed describes as a new

:24:52.:24:56.

normal, in other words rates are starting to climb back up that they

:24:57.:25:00.

will not settle at the levels they were at before, in other words they

:25:01.:25:04.

will be slightly below where they were before. So that period of when

:25:05.:25:08.

we were used to seeing interest rates of around 5%, 4%, forget that,

:25:09.:25:15.

we will be much, much lower. I only have 30 seconds, when might we get a

:25:16.:25:20.

definitive decision from Janet Yellen? This is an evolving process

:25:21.:25:25.

and monetary policy continues to develop. They have always said they

:25:26.:25:30.

are watching the data. We have seen American jobs market improves, the

:25:31.:25:34.

inflation picture remains weak. The other unknown is what happens to

:25:35.:25:39.

fiscal policy, which is controlled by Congress and the White House.

:25:40.:25:44.

Thank you for taking as too large, Michelle Fleury, live from New York.

:25:45.:25:50.

We have been talking about net neutrality with the help of Dave Lee

:25:51.:25:55.

and other guests, they have been discussing that in the US. We had a

:25:56.:26:02.

tweet saying somebody needed more information, we will get that for

:26:03.:26:03.

you later. Before we talk you to, Piazon

:26:04.:26:11.

monsoons, let's bring an update on the winter storm battering New

:26:12.:26:14.

Zealand. It looks very

:26:15.:26:17.