14/11/2017 Outside Source


14/11/2017

Live from the heart of the BBC newsroom, an innovative take on the latest global stories.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 14/11/2017. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello. This is Outside Source. #

tens of thousands of Iranians are

0:00:080:00:14

still waiting for help two days

after a

0:00:140:00:16

still waiting for help two days

after a major earthquake killed

0:00:170:00:17

hundreds. The US Attorney-General

has denied misleading members of

0:00:170:00:22

Congress over what he knew about the

Trump election campaign's contacts

0:00:220:00:26

with Russia.

I do now recall that

the March 2016 meeting at the Trump

0:00:260:00:37

hotel that Mr Papadopulous attended,

but I have no clear recollection of

0:00:370:00:40

the details what have he said at

that meeting.

As the US Secretary of

0:00:400:00:45

State heads to Myanmar what pressure

can the White House bring to help

0:00:450:00:49

stop the violence in Rakhine State.

British MPs are turning a magnifying

0:00:490:00:55

glass to a key piece of Brexit

legislation. Our correspondent will

0:00:550:00:58

explain what it all means.

0:00:580:01:09

Hello welcome to Outside Source.

Nearly 48 hours after the

0:01:170:01:24

devastating earthquake in Iran, tens

of thousands of people are still in

0:01:240:01:27

need of help. Well the earthquake

struck and at least 460 people were

0:01:270:01:38

killed after this 7. 3 magnitude

quake struck on Sunday. The

0:01:380:01:46

epicentre was here. There have been

around 200 aftershocks felt in all

0:01:460:01:49

those areas, marked in red.

The image that's are coming from the

0:01:490:01:55

area have been a real devastation

with thousands of buildings

0:01:550:01:58

destroyed. Around 8,000 people have

been injured during this quake.

0:01:580:02:02

Thousands more are now facing their

third night camped out and during

0:02:020:02:07

the night, the weather conditions do

get really cold. It becomes

0:02:070:02:10

freezing. The devastation is

phenomenal. Iranian authorities have

0:02:100:02:15

called off rescue operations saying

that there is quite frankly little

0:02:150:02:18

chance of finding any more

survivors. If we look at the amount

0:02:180:02:24

of devastation, there's a lot of

road structure damage as well,

0:02:240:02:27

making it really hard for rescue

services to get through. 30,000

0:02:270:02:32

homes have been damaged in this

quake. There are also reports of two

0:02:320:02:38

entire villages being destroyed.

Despite the earthquake epicentre

0:02:380:02:43

being on the Iraqi side of the

border, most of the fatalities, most

0:02:430:02:48

of the injuries and most of the

damage to the buildings actually

0:02:480:02:52

happened in Iran. Now that has led

for many people to ask why so many

0:02:520:02:58

buildings collapsed in what is an

earthquake-prone area of Iran. The

0:02:580:03:09

country's president has visited the

damaged areas. He says anyone found

0:03:090:03:13

to fail to meet proper building

standards will be held accountable.

0:03:130:03:16

He's also made this pledge to help

survivors.

0:03:160:03:22

TRANSLATION:

We'll provide tents for

those who need them and give loans

0:03:220:03:25

and grants to all those whose houses

were damaged and are unsafe. We'll

0:03:250:03:29

give money to everyone who needs

temporary accommodation.

If you were

0:03:290:03:34

watching yesterday, you might

remember this particular footage.

0:03:340:03:38

This is of a dam in Iraq. That is

not water. That is actually rubble

0:03:380:03:43

and giant bolders that were

dislodged by the very force of the

0:03:430:03:48

quake crashing then into parked

cars. Moments beforehand, you can

0:03:480:03:51

just see a person are youing from

the area. -- running from the area.

0:03:510:03:55

There are concerns about the

structural integrity of the dam. Our

0:03:550:03:59

correspondent has travelled there

and he sent this report.

0:03:590:04:04

This is the dam with a reservoir

capacity of three billion cubic

0:04:040:04:09

metres. After the earthquake, there

were fears it would collapse causing

0:04:090:04:14

cat strong flooding and the tragedy

far greater in scale than the

0:04:140:04:17

earthquake itself. The authorities

swiftly ordered the evacuation of

0:04:170:04:23

several villages down stream and

specialist teams have been studying

0:04:230:04:26

the damage that was caused to the

dam. They're hoping that this is

0:04:260:04:30

only superficial damage and not the

kind of deep, structural damage that

0:04:300:04:34

could cause a collapse. To be on the

safe side, they aim to keep the

0:04:340:04:39

water in the reservoir well below

capacity and they have not yet told

0:04:390:04:42

residents that it's safe for them to

return home.

0:04:420:04:50

An update on the survivor situation

now.

I'm sure those people who in

0:04:500:04:55

the countryside, particularly 1900

villagers, which has been affected

0:04:550:04:58

severely by the earthquake, they

will be surprised because we have

0:04:580:05:03

talked to people on the ground. They

say the rescue efforts has been

0:05:030:05:07

focussed on two major cities. They

are the worst affected area and

0:05:070:05:18

President Rouhani was there today.

Those villages, the government even

0:05:180:05:23

yesterday they said from tomorrow,

which is today, they will put effort

0:05:230:05:27

actually to rescue those remote

areas. I just don't understand how

0:05:270:05:30

come the government have managed to

search and rescue 1900 villages in

0:05:300:05:36

the remote area and the people on

the ground, talking to us, they say

0:05:360:05:41

they haven't seen anybody and no-one

have gone to their rescue.

This is

0:05:410:05:44

an area that is prone to earthquakes

and yet these buildings they

0:05:440:05:48

couldn't with stand this.

Absolutely. One of the most affected

0:05:480:05:52

building was one of those affordable

housing complex initiated by the

0:05:520:06:04

former president Amijinidad. They

are damaged the most. Even today the

0:06:040:06:08

president said we hold those people

who are responsible for this

0:06:080:06:12

building accountable. The reality is

many people in that region they

0:06:120:06:19

don't respect the building code.

That's why the authority, the

0:06:190:06:23

contractor, the building companies

they don't enforce those building

0:06:230:06:26

codes. That's why we see those

buildings can not resist the

0:06:260:06:30

earthquake and then you see some of

the older buildings stand up.

With

0:06:300:06:35

the more remote areas, you were

saying that some of them have been

0:06:350:06:38

reporting they haven't seen any aid

whatsoever. Temperatures are really

0:06:380:06:41

falling now. This is going to be

really difficult for those people

0:06:410:06:44

who are homeless.

The government

said they will try to reach

0:06:440:06:49

everyone. It is understandable, it's

a remote area. Some of the roads

0:06:490:06:53

might have been cut off. But this is

almost third night. Some people say

0:06:530:06:57

the road is open. And even one of

the areas, the epicentre of the

0:06:570:07:03

earthquake, the people from there

they send us video. They talk to us,

0:07:030:07:08

they send out their testimony. They

said no-one have Agassis Ted this

0:07:080:07:13

part -- have visited this part. They

say no-one have come there. That's

0:07:130:07:17

why people say they need water, they

need food, they need tents. The

0:07:170:07:23

temperature in this mountainous

region drops at night. People are

0:07:230:07:27

worried about those people

particularly who are injured, the

0:07:270:07:29

most vulnerable - children and

elderly.

0:07:290:07:34

Now let's turn to the US where for

the past few hours the

0:07:340:07:40

Attorney-General Jeff Sessions has

been giving testimony before a

0:07:400:07:43

Congressional panel. It's all to

explain his position in light of the

0:07:430:07:48

revelations that members of the

Trump campaign had contacts with

0:07:480:07:51

Russia. He had to clarify a few

things, particularly about a certain

0:07:510:07:55

meeting last year, which he attended

with this man. This is the recently

0:07:550:08:04

disgraced campaign advisor George

Papadopulous. It was at this meeting

0:08:040:08:08

that Mr Papadopulous suggested he

could use his Russian connections to

0:08:080:08:11

set up a meeting between Mr Trump

and Vladimir Putin.

I would like to

0:08:110:08:19

address recent news reports

regarding meetings during the

0:08:190:08:24

campaign attended by George

Papadopulous and Carter Page among

0:08:240:08:27

others. Frankly I had no

recollection of this meeting until I

0:08:270:08:30

saw these news report. I do now

recall that the March 2016 meeting

0:08:300:08:37

at the Trump hotel that Mr

Papadopulous attended is, but I have

0:08:370:08:41

no clear recollection of the details

what have he said at that meeting.

0:08:410:08:46

Jeff Sessions there remembering the

meeting not much on the detail.

0:08:460:08:51

Let's get clarity. Anthony Zurcha

joins us from Washington. At least

0:08:510:08:58

he's remembered the meeting now.

At

least we have. It's not the first

0:08:580:09:02

time that Jeff Sessions has

forgotten about meetings he had. He

0:09:020:09:06

had forgotten about meetings he had

with Russian ambassador during the

0:09:060:09:09

campaign only to be reminded of them

later, when evidence of them came

0:09:090:09:13

out. Again, we have him blaming a

fuzzy memory. It's kind of a

0:09:130:09:17

delicate walk that Jeff Sessions is

having to do here. He's saying,

0:09:170:09:21

well, I don't remember any of these

meetings. Now I start to remember

0:09:210:09:25

them, or as much as I do having

researched it, what happens in those

0:09:250:09:28

meetings, when I said to George

Papadopulous, when he told us he was

0:09:280:09:31

thinking about going to Russia,

thinking about reaching out to

0:09:310:09:34

Russian officials is that he

shouldn't do that and he certainly

0:09:340:09:37

shouldn't do that in the name of the

campaign. He's vindicated by what

0:09:370:09:42

sort of memories he does have, the

problem however is that in testimony

0:09:420:09:47

just about a month ago, when asked

about whether there was any sort of

0:09:470:09:52

meetings between Trump campaign

officials and Russians he said I'm

0:09:520:09:55

not aware of anyone else having

those meetings, I don't believe that

0:09:550:09:58

it happened. He's basically having

to go back and explain these

0:09:580:10:02

comments he made under oath about a

month ago.

That's the point isn't

0:10:020:10:05

it, he had to do this under oath.

He's now changing his statements.

0:10:050:10:09

Can he get into trouble for all of

this?

Well, if you listen to the way

0:10:090:10:15

he phrased that response before,

"I'm not aware of anyone else. I

0:10:150:10:19

don't believe that it happened."

He's very careful. He's a lawyer and

0:10:190:10:24

a career politician who knows how

these things work. I don't know if

0:10:240:10:30

he will be having legal exposure.

That seems unlikely. That's not the

0:10:300:10:33

issue here. The issue is whether

people buy his explanation, buy his

0:10:330:10:38

account that his memory was faulty

in this case. There's a political

0:10:380:10:41

dynamic to it that is more

important. I think it's safe to say

0:10:410:10:44

the people who are criticising

Donald Trump and who have concerns

0:10:440:10:48

about what the Trump campaign did

and any ties it may have had to

0:10:480:10:54

Russian government, they aren't

going to be satisfied by Jeff

0:10:540:10:57

Sessions saying he can't remember

these meetings. But what he does

0:10:570:11:01

remember was perfectly legitimate

and a proper explanation for what

0:11:010:11:04

happened.

Anthony as always, thank

you very much.

0:11:040:11:11

We've got lots more coming up here,

do stay with us. We'll be talking

0:11:110:11:16

about the digital drug revolution.

That's a new pill that tells your

0:11:160:11:21

doctor if you've taken your

medicine.

0:11:210:11:31

Now here, inflation remained

unchanged last month at 3%, a

0:11:310:11:35

five-year high, despite a rise in

food prices. Earlier this month, the

0:11:350:11:38

Bank of England raised interest

rates for the first time in a decade

0:11:380:11:42

to try and deal with the threat of

higher inflation.

0:11:420:11:49

Inflation was really pushed up by

one big thing, the fall in the value

0:11:490:11:53

of the pound after the referendum.

That produces an inflation spike.

0:11:530:11:57

But because it's a currency change,

that spike is pushed through the

0:11:570:12:01

economy quite quickly. Just as you

suggest, in the real world, people

0:12:010:12:05

are still feeling that income

squeeze. Household incomes are only

0:12:050:12:09

going up by 2. 2%. So well below the

rise in prices. And again as you

0:12:090:12:15

said, on things like food inflation,

that's the highest figure since #20

0:12:150:12:19

13. So people are still feeling the

impact of those price rises in their

0:12:190:12:24

pockets. But it does seem that we've

reached the top of that curve on

0:12:240:12:29

inflation rates.

Welcome. You're watching Outside

0:12:290:12:40

Source, live from the BBC Newsroom.

Our lead story: Thousands of people

0:12:400:12:43

in Iran are still waiting for help,

nearly 48 hours after a devastating

0:12:430:12:49

earthquake. Let's look at what else

is being reported around the BBC

0:12:490:12:54

Newsroom.

The ruling party in Zimbabwe has

0:12:540:12:58

accused the country's army chief of

treason, after he challenged the

0:12:580:13:07

president Robert Mugabe over the

sacking of the Vice President.

0:13:070:13:12

ZANU-PF said the general's criticism

was calculated to disturb national

0:13:120:13:15

peace.

The Lebanese politician who

0:13:150:13:22

dramatically resigned as Prime

Minister while in Saudi Arabia says

0:13:220:13:26

that he will return to Beirut in the

next few days. He stunned his

0:13:260:13:31

country when he stepped down.

Now let's go to the British

0:13:310:13:36

Parliament, where politicians have

begun the first day of debate of the

0:13:360:13:42

all important Brexit bill or to give

it the official term, the EU

0:13:420:13:46

withdrawal bill. This sets out the

mammoth task of transferring 40-odd

0:13:460:13:53

years worth of EU law into the UK

statute books. This is all the UK

0:13:530:14:00

politicians in Westminster right

now. They've been talking for six

0:14:000:14:04

hours and it is still counting.

They're going to have eight more

0:14:040:14:08

days of this. Now they do have to

consider hundreds of amendments

0:14:080:14:12

after all. Just actually a handful

of those will be selected for vote.

0:14:120:14:17

Now they just finished the first

round of voting with another taking

0:14:170:14:22

place in a few hours. One really

contentious issue in one of the

0:14:220:14:28

amendments put forward by the

Government, which should enslirn the

0:14:280:14:32

Brexit date and -- enshrine the

Brexit date and time and that date

0:14:320:14:35

and time, there it is, 2300 hours,

GMT on March 29, 2019. We got a

0:14:350:14:44

response already. The Telegraph is

saying exclusive nearly 20 Tory MPs

0:14:440:14:50

are preparing to rebel against the

Government over the Brexit date,

0:14:500:14:55

including loyalists. With a

minority, the Government would face

0:14:550:14:57

a defeat. So this legislation is a

big deal for the Prime Minister.

0:14:570:15:04

Let's discuss all of this. Our chief

political correspondent Vicki Young

0:15:040:15:07

is at Westminster. So talk us

through the whole - what exactly is

0:15:070:15:14

going on at Westminster today? What

is all this?

A lot of is quite

0:15:140:15:18

technical. It is bringing over all

of that EU law and regulation into

0:15:180:15:23

UK law so that when we leave the

European Union we have a legal

0:15:230:15:26

system in place. So to that extent,

some of it is very detailed and some

0:15:260:15:32

of it is very hard to follow. Now

ministers insist they need a lot of

0:15:320:15:37

powers in order to do all of this

work. That is proving a bit

0:15:370:15:41

controversial. But as you say, it's

the idea of putting into law this

0:15:410:15:46

fixed leaving date, which has caused

quite heated arguments today. That's

0:15:460:15:50

because there are some, the

Opposition Labour Party, the other

0:15:500:15:53

Opposition parties and some

Conservatives, including very senior

0:15:530:15:56

people on the Conservative benches,

who think this is the wrong thing to

0:15:560:16:00

do, that it boxes the Government in.

Why would you want to put it there

0:16:000:16:03

unless you're just trying to keep

your Euro-sceptics happy. They say

0:16:030:16:09

if we get to the end of the line,

coming up to the date, we may want

0:16:090:16:12

to extend talks with the European

Union, they would have to agree, but

0:16:120:16:16

if it's in law it's harder to do.

They don't see why the Government

0:16:160:16:19

wants to really restrict themselves

in this way.

They're going to be

0:16:190:16:23

talking for eight days, debating all

of this. There are a lot of

0:16:230:16:28

amendments, what is actually going

to make it into the bill do you

0:16:280:16:31

think?

These are the changes that

people want to make, so you have the

0:16:310:16:35

bill and then you have MPs coming

forward saying, well, actually I

0:16:350:16:38

want to try and add this into the

bill, I want to try and change that,

0:16:380:16:41

I don't like this bit. That's why

we've ended up with hundreds of

0:16:410:16:44

those amendments. As you said

earlier, they do not all get

0:16:440:16:48

selected. They are whittled down.

Then they're debated. Some of them

0:16:480:16:51

are voted on. The one that the

Government will possibly be in

0:16:510:16:55

trouble with, with that discussion

that there might be up to 20

0:16:550:17:03

Conservatives willing to defy the

Government is on the final bill.

0:17:030:17:08

It's something that is a power grab,

that's no way to run this place.

0:17:080:17:11

Though Theresa May doesn't have a

majority, she obviously is in an

0:17:110:17:15

agreement with the Democratic

Unionist Party, the Northern Ireland

0:17:150:17:18

party, and there are also some

Opposition MPs who are in favour of

0:17:180:17:22

Brexit. They will vote with the

Government. These things and these

0:17:220:17:27

sums are not always straightforward.

We will know in the coming weeks

0:17:270:17:31

whether Theresa May has managed to

survive this unscathed and if she

0:17:310:17:35

doesn't, then what happens after

that?

As always, thank you very

0:17:350:17:38

much.

We're going to stick with something

0:17:380:17:45

that Theresa May said and she was

talking about the subject of Russian

0:17:450:17:48

interference in foreign elections.

You may remember the big banquet

0:17:480:17:53

that took place yesterday evening.

We brought you all of that major

0:17:530:17:58

foreign policy speech that Theresa

May gave last night. She had a few

0:17:580:18:03

things to say and this in particular

about Russia.

It is seeking to

0:18:030:18:10

weaponise information, deploying its

state-run media organisations to

0:18:100:18:15

plant fake stories and photo shopped

images in an attempt to sew disorder

0:18:150:18:22

in the West and undermine our

institutions. I have a simple

0:18:220:18:26

message for Russia: We know what you

are doing and you will not succeed.

0:18:260:18:30

So how has that speech gone down in

Moscow? Well, here's a rather

0:18:300:18:35

cryptic tweet that came from the

Russian

0:18:350:18:38

cryptic tweet that came from the

Russian ministry of foreign affairs:

0:18:380:18:43

The aimth that they tweeted with

this was of the British Prime

0:18:520:18:56

Minister drinking from a glass of

wine. I think that was an attempt at

0:18:560:19:00

humour there. The Russian embassy

also weighed in saying, "No Russian

0:19:000:19:07

media in UK has been found in breach

of due accuracy, hashtag fake news.

0:19:070:19:18

I spoke to Olga to get a Russian

perspective.

It's very provoking and

0:19:180:19:24

also, it's a foreign affairs

ministry, so it's supposed to be

0:19:240:19:27

diplomatic. But actually that's the

tactics, that's the fashion they use

0:19:270:19:31

for quite a while. They picked it up

since 2014. They seem very provoking

0:19:310:19:39

posts and this is just one of them.

Overall Russian officials are used

0:19:390:19:47

to commenting on those topics. It

seems they enjoy the process of it.

0:19:470:19:50

We shouldn't be surprised that

they've been watching the Lord

0:19:500:19:55

Mayor's speech, the banquet that

Theresa May gave and their reaction

0:19:550:19:58

isn't surprising? I'm surprised by

it.

Well, it took me a while to

0:19:580:20:06

actually issue that statement, issue

those allegations but overall, I

0:20:060:20:10

mean Russian officials have been

commenting on that for quite a while

0:20:100:20:13

now. Of course, they war watching

and -- they were watching and of

0:20:130:20:20

course their response was along

traditional Russian lines that

0:20:200:20:24

Russia is acting according to

international rules. They accuse the

0:20:240:20:27

West of double standards. They say

they are ready for dialogue but on

0:20:270:20:31

equal terms and they are actually

seeking and helping democracy and

0:20:310:20:36

they accuse the West of

authoritarianism. That's the message

0:20:360:20:41

they're trying to spread abroad and

inside the country. The comments by

0:20:410:20:45

the British Prime Minister actually

help internal Russian propaganda.

0:20:450:20:50

Because that's exactly what they're

trying to portray, that Russia is

0:20:500:20:58

alone, fighting against the West.

That's what Russian people face

0:20:580:21:03

internally in the country, that's

the reason for the economic

0:21:030:21:07

harshness. That's what the Kremlin

needs in light of presidential

0:21:070:21:10

elections next month.

It will go in

his favour, because he will be the

0:21:100:21:15

one who's strong, battling against

the rest of the world effectively.

0:21:150:21:17

Yes absolutely. That's the line they

fought. They use this narrative to

0:21:170:21:23

pursue their own goals within the

country, for example, after Russia

0:21:230:21:27

today was forced to register as a

foreign agent, tomorrow the state

0:21:270:21:33

Parliament would be looking to

implement new legislation to put on

0:21:330:21:38

foreign media in rasha.

-- Russia. A bit a different

0:21:380:21:45

perspective on that story. Let's

turn to business. Venezuela is once

0:21:450:21:50

again our focus. Standard & Poor's

says that the country has defaulted

0:21:500:21:56

after missing a bond repayment. It

says the government failed to pay

0:21:560:22:03

$200 million, which was due. It's a

staggering figure. But also,

0:22:030:22:10

investors met government officials

on Monday to have discussions and

0:22:100:22:13

ask how it would avoid defaulting on

its $60 billion debt mountain. But

0:22:130:22:19

they were left in the dark.

Let's cross over to Sao Paulo.

0:22:190:22:27

Daniel, these figures are simply

staggering.

Yes. There are two

0:22:270:22:33

figures that you mention, the first

is the $200 million. It is a pretty

0:22:330:22:37

big number. We've heard some of the

ratings agencies today saying

0:22:370:22:43

Venezuela can make that payment and

exit the default status in the

0:22:430:22:46

coming days. However not many people

believe that. The same ratings

0:22:460:22:51

agency said there's a 50% chance

that Venezuela may again default on

0:22:510:22:56

another debt. That's the $200

million question. The big one is

0:22:560:23:00

about 300 times that size, which is

the overall debt that Venezuela

0:23:000:23:04

wants to renegotiate with investors.

That picture is not clear because

0:23:040:23:08

the meeting last night didn't

provide any clarity. So there's a

0:23:080:23:12

$200 million question, but the $60

billion question is the one that

0:23:120:23:16

will keep the whole country in

suspense.

The figures are absolutely

0:23:160:23:21

extraordinary, but it's hard to

imagine then, but what is easy to

0:23:210:23:26

imagine is what's happening to the

people. Because they have no food

0:23:260:23:29

quite simply. There are shortages in

the shops, daily life is incredibly

0:23:290:23:33

difficult at the moment.

Yes. And

you know, the perspective for

0:23:330:23:42

Venezuelan people in the future is

not very good because of all the

0:23:420:23:45

debt. Supposing that the government

stops paying its debt for now, it

0:23:450:23:49

will have some more money, which it

could provide for its citizens. But

0:23:490:23:55

also, Venezuela will run the risk of

suffering new sanctions from

0:23:550:23:59

economic partners abroad. So many of

the oil shipments that it sends

0:23:590:24:04

abroad they can be seized by

investors who want to get paid. So

0:24:040:24:08

the picture for the economy is not a

good one right now.

Daniel, thanks

0:24:080:24:13

very much for talking us through it.

Let's talk about a new invention

0:24:130:24:19

because US regular litters have

approved a pill that can be

0:24:190:24:24

digitally tracked through the body.

Now the medication treats

0:24:240:24:28

schizophrenia and also manic

episodes. This can alert a doctor as

0:24:280:24:32

to whether it has been taken. Let's

find out a bit more. How does this

0:24:320:24:38

work?

So as you rightly pointed out,

it would be included in one specific

0:24:380:24:46

pill which treats - it's really an

antipsychotic medication. The person

0:24:460:24:52

would wear a smartphone, some sort

of app or patch that would track the

0:24:520:24:56

information. On this pill is a small

edible tracking device. So you eat

0:24:560:25:02

it and within 30 minutes to two

hours of ingesting that tracker

0:25:020:25:07

interacts with stomach acid and it

tells the patient whether or not

0:25:070:25:11

they have taken that pill. Now the

patient then can give access to up

0:25:110:25:17

to four other people. So the patient

can give access to their doctor or

0:25:170:25:21

to a spouse or to a friend to let

them know when they've taken their

0:25:210:25:26

medication.

The usual questions,

briefly, if you would, I'm sure that

0:25:260:25:30

there will be concerns about privacy

and ethical questions as well.

Oh,

0:25:300:25:34

well absolutely. Who has access to

this information? Can they really

0:25:340:25:39

trace these kinds of things? Is it

even ethical? Lots of questions.

0:25:390:25:44

Thank you very much. Yes, I'm sure

there's lots of questions about

0:25:440:25:50

whether that is ethical, who has

that information, let me know what

0:25:500:25:53

you think. Get in touch with us

hashtag OS. For the time being,

0:25:530:25:57

thanks for watching.

0:25:570:26:03