13/11/2017 Outside Source


13/11/2017

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Transcript


LineFromTo

as we get to the point whether UK

departs the EU at the end of March

0:00:000:00:01

2019.

Are gay, Vicki, as always,

thank you very much. You join us a

0:00:010:00:07

little bit late, because as we were

discussing, Theresa May giving a

0:00:070:00:12

speech at the Lord Mayor's banquet,

the annual event. We are now going

0:00:120:00:16

to move to the border area between

Iran and Iraq. Of course, that

0:00:160:00:22

earthquake took place, and this is

where search teams are working

0:00:220:00:28

through the night, desperately

trying to find survivors at that

0:00:280:00:31

powerful earthquake that has killed

more than 400 people and injured

0:00:310:00:35

7000.

0:00:350:00:39

This shows the epicentre of

the 7.3 magnitude earthquake.

0:00:390:00:42

It struck near the town

of Darbandikhan.

0:00:420:00:47

And this is the town

of Sarpol-e Zahab,

0:00:470:00:49

which was one of the worst affected.

0:00:490:00:51

These pictures are

from Sarpol-e Zahab.

0:00:510:00:59

Let's have a look at that. Absolute

devastation.

0:00:590:01:03

It's understood two thirds

of the casualties alone

0:01:030:01:05

came from this town

and surrounding areas.

0:01:050:01:07

As you can see, there has

been widespread damage.

0:01:070:01:12

Helicopters have been relied

on heavily to deliver aid

0:01:120:01:14

and transport victims.

0:01:140:01:17

That is because the landscape is

very difficult to reach, there are a

0:01:170:01:21

lot of areas that are really

difficult terrain, there have been

0:01:210:01:27

landslides, blocked roads, damaged

roads, so helicopters, some of the

0:01:270:01:31

ways, the only way is that some of

these people can be reached. Now, if

0:01:310:01:36

we show you some CCTV footage that I

hope to bring up for you, because

0:01:360:01:40

this is actually phenomenal. This

was of a dam, this is not water, but

0:01:400:01:48

a dam where boulders were moving

down and making, crashing some of

0:01:480:01:53

the cars in the car park at the

bottom of the dam. Moments before,

0:01:530:01:57

you could see people running away,

absolute devastation, 400 people

0:01:570:02:02

killed. My Kolodziejczak goal has

been telling me about some of the

0:02:020:02:08

rescue efforts. -- my colleague GR

the latest figures of 430 people

0:02:080:02:17

killed, but it seems this is the

number that has been recorded by the

0:02:170:02:25

officials in major cities, but 1900

villages in that region have been

0:02:250:02:28

affected, and the rescue teams have

not been able to get too many of

0:02:280:02:36

those villages. I receive videos

from locals, they say, in our

0:02:360:02:41

village, we lost 20 people, no-one

came to our help. That is why the

0:02:410:02:53

number will possibly rise tomorrow,

because so far the entire effort has

0:02:530:02:57

been put on the major cities inside

Iran.

We saw the area around the

0:02:570:03:03

border, this is pretty remote, it

will be hard for rescue efforts, I

0:03:030:03:09

know the Iranian revolutionary Guard

is trying to help, but it is going

0:03:090:03:11

to be hard to get there.

It is the

most impoverished region between

0:03:110:03:17

Iran and Iraq, and it suffered

heavily during the bloody war

0:03:170:03:21

between Iran and Iraq, most of the

infrastructure were destroyed, so

0:03:210:03:29

they rebuilt it, and the only city

in the town, where most of the

0:03:290:03:35

casualties are coming from, that has

been completely destroyed. I saw a

0:03:350:03:39

video with numbers of dead bodies

laid in front of the hospital but no

0:03:390:03:45

emergency room to take care of those

who are being affected. So this

0:03:450:03:48

region, the situation is such that

the infrastructure cannot cope, so

0:03:480:03:55

the has to pull together resources,

military, Revolutionary Guard and

0:03:550:03:59

other agencies from neighbouring

provinces, to go there, three or

0:03:590:04:07

four five hours away, that is a

matter of life for so many. I see

0:04:070:04:12

old men with flashlights searching

for his loved ones beneath the

0:04:120:04:16

crushed buildings, that was the

situation. So I think most those

0:04:160:04:25

people, the weather is cold, they

need food, hopefully the government

0:04:250:04:29

can get them help, and for some of

those villages, the only way to get

0:04:290:04:35

there is by air.

7.3, very strong,

some of your family members actually

0:04:350:04:40

felt the earthquake.

Absolutely,

part of the family is almost an hour

0:04:400:04:47

from there, but there is a lot of

outcry in that region, they complain

0:04:470:04:51

about the government, and some of

the buildings which collapsed were

0:04:510:04:55

just built under President

Ahmadinejad, part of subsidised

0:04:550:05:07

building for poorer people, and not

of those buildings have met the

0:05:070:05:10

standards to resist earthquake,

which is why so many people are

0:05:100:05:13

angry, they say this kind of

building, they are new, they should

0:05:130:05:17

have resisted the earthquake, but if

you just go across to Iraqi

0:05:170:05:22

Kurdistan, we had six or seven

casualties, not the numbers that we

0:05:220:05:27

had in Iran. The reason is that the

building code in Iraqi Kurdistan is

0:05:270:05:33

much better, the regulation is much

better than Iran.

Jiyar Gol from BBC

0:05:330:05:38

Persian. Rami Ruhayem has arrived in

one of the worst affected towns and

0:05:380:05:44

filed this report.

This is one of the hardest hit areas

0:05:440:05:48

in Iraq by the earthquake, we are

told seven people were inside his

0:05:480:05:53

home when it collapsed, two of them

were killed, and others were

0:05:530:05:57

injured. Several other buildings

suffered a similar damage to this

0:05:570:06:00

one, but fortunately they seem to be

the exception, rather than the rule,

0:06:000:06:04

and most of the other homes in the

region managed to withstand the

0:06:040:06:07

impact of the quake.

Rami Ruhayem in Iraq. Lots more

0:06:070:06:14

coming up here on Outside Source.

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It is the time of day when we look

at interesting weather events around

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the world, stormy weather both sides

of the Atlantic with a deep area of

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low pressure moving into British

Columbia, Washington and Oregon,

0:06:280:06:33

bringing further heavy rainfall,

hills know, as well as strong,

0:06:330:06:37

disruptive winds too. Meanwhile,

across Central America, ongoing

0:06:370:06:43

heavy rainfall, causing flash

flooding in Costa Rica, Panama,

0:06:430:06:47

Nicaragua, Belize, and also through

the Caribbean, Jamaica, Cuba and the

0:06:470:06:53

Bahamas too. Now the other side of

the Atlantic, where we also have

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heavy rain and hill snow pushing

southwards, a lot of cloud

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associated with a really slow moving

area of low pressure, here it is,

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lasting through Tuesday into

Wednesday, bringing further heavy

0:07:040:07:08

rain across parts of Italy and

particularly in across the Balkans

0:07:080:07:12

too with snow for the Alps, the

Dolomites, and strong winds also a

0:07:120:07:17

hazard too. The north-east coast of

Spain and southern France, strong

0:07:170:07:21

northerly mistral winds gusting

around 100 km/h, or even a bit more.

0:07:210:07:28

Heavy downpours of rain and

thunderstorms through Sardinia,

0:07:280:07:31

Sicily, across Italy, and to the

Balkans too. So the weather

0:07:310:07:36

associated with this storm system

across central and south-east

0:07:360:07:39

Europe, very strong gusts of wind,

heavy rain leading to flash flooding

0:07:390:07:44

across some areas, but also an

increased risk of avalanches too.

0:07:440:07:47

Meanwhile, across India, some very

poor air quality in the North,

0:07:470:07:53

slowly starting to improve over the

next few days, also this club of

0:07:530:07:57

cloud sitting in the bay of Bengal,

that is an area of low pressure, a

0:07:570:08:01

tropical depression which are slowly

moving northwards in the bay of

0:08:010:08:04

Bengal. It may well bring strong

winds and heavy rain to coastal

0:08:040:08:08

parts of Andhra Pradesh and up

towards West Bengal too. Meanwhile,

0:08:080:08:12

the outlook across the UK, then,

fairly quiet, things telling milder,

0:08:120:08:17

mostly cloudy over the next few

days. For Tuesday, a fairly weak

0:08:170:08:23

weather front draped across central

parts of the country, brighter skies

0:08:230:08:28

towards the north, improves day

across Scotland and northern parts

0:08:280:08:31

of Northern Ireland with a return to

sunnier skies. Across England and

0:08:310:08:36

Wales, rather cloudy, a bit of

drizzle here and there, but some

0:08:360:08:39

brightness to the east of high

ground, and temperatures back in

0:08:390:08:42

double figures, so a little bit

milder than recent days. Tuesday

0:08:420:08:47

into Wednesday, quite a murky night

with low cloud, somebody patch is

0:08:470:08:51

too, but I think most of us staying

for three, although we could see a

0:08:510:08:55

bit of frost developing under clear

skies for the North of Scotland.

0:08:550:09:00

Cloudy on Wednesday, clearing

towards the north, then sunny

0:09:000:09:04

spells, temperatures up to 13

degrees, more details on the weather

0:09:040:09:07

for the week ahead in half an hour.

0:09:070:09:10

Hello, this is Outside Source.

Search teams in Iran are working

0:10:260:10:30

overnight to find survivors of the

powerful earthquake killing at least

0:10:300:10:33

400 people. Bad news for the climate

as new data suggests new carbon

0:10:330:10:41

dioxide emissions have risen for the

first time in four years, dashing

0:10:410:10:45

hopes that they had reached a peak.

President trumpeting it off with the

0:10:450:10:50

controversial leader of the

Philippines and says that their

0:10:500:10:52

relationship is great.

0:10:520:11:01

We are going to talk about new data

on global carbon dioxide emissions,

0:11:170:11:22

coming out today. They suggest that

for the first time in 2017, they

0:11:220:11:27

have risen for the first time in

four years which is a cause for

0:11:270:11:32

concern. The greater use of coal in

China is believed to be one reason.

0:11:320:11:41

Looking at the stats, this is what

emissions have looked like over the

0:11:410:11:45

last four years, quite level,

stalling over the last three years.

0:11:450:11:49

Scientists had hoped they had

reached their peak but that isn't

0:11:490:11:54

going to happen this year. This is

the lead author of the study behind

0:11:540:11:58

the findings.

0:11:580:12:02

It is so urgent that the emissions

decrease very rapidly, it's

0:12:020:12:06

absolutely urgent. People don't

realise that the emissions must

0:12:060:12:11

disappear, essentially, for the

warming to stop. There's only one

0:12:110:12:15

way to do that and to develop the

policies and actions and technology

0:12:150:12:22

and use them so that our emissions

decrease everywhere.

That report was

0:12:220:12:28

launched at a big UN climate

conference in Berlin. It took place

0:12:280:12:33

in the city of Bonn, where 20,000

delegates and negotiators gathered.

0:12:330:12:38

They are discussing how to implement

the Paris climate agreement.

0:12:380:12:42

Scientists say that the trend of

rising emissions, if it continues,

0:12:420:12:47

then the goals of the accord could

slip out of reach. Our correspondent

0:12:470:12:52

is in Bonn for us.

This year 's

figures, provisional, indicating a

0:12:520:12:58

rise of 2%. That's why it's does not

sound like much but in the context

0:12:580:13:04

of the world that is quite a bit and

scientists are uncertain whether

0:13:040:13:07

this represents major new step in

growth or it is a one-off. I think

0:13:070:13:14

they need a couple more years data

to get anything definitive.

Do we

0:13:140:13:18

know why this is happening? A lot

blaming China and its growing

0:13:180:13:23

economy.

Absolutely, the Chinese

economy has expanded, they've been

0:13:230:13:29

using more energy and they've had a

big shortage of rainfall, meaning

0:13:290:13:34

river levels have gone down and the

hydroelectric power wasn't as

0:13:340:13:37

effective as in previous years. But

other countries are involved, the EU

0:13:370:13:44

and the US both saw emissions going

down but not by as much as expected,

0:13:440:13:50

due to the continued use of natural

gas in some places, the use of coal

0:13:500:13:53

in other places. Those two factors,

Oil and Gas UK the same time, seem

0:13:530:14:00

pretty consistent over the last

number of years. Scientists worry

0:14:000:14:05

that as well as coal, oil and gas

are being used and that isn't going

0:14:050:14:10

to help the world gets to where it

needs to go in terms of its

0:14:100:14:13

emissions.

There is concern that the

Trump administration was going to

0:14:130:14:18

show April coal demonstration.

Anything like that? -- a pro-coal

0:14:180:14:24

demonstration.

There is a meeting of

people who see fossil fuels as a

0:14:240:14:31

solution to these problems, a couple

of advisers to President Trump were

0:14:310:14:36

there as well as members of the US

coal and nuclear industries. They

0:14:360:14:39

had a meeting well attended by

people who work here is to see what

0:14:390:14:44

they would do. Halfway through they

were interrupted by a couple of

0:14:440:14:50

dozen, maybe 40 or 50 demonstrators

who sang and sang and turned their

0:14:500:14:54

backs on the cold promoters and

eventually walked out -- coal

0:14:540:15:01

promoters. It was pretty good

natures and well steward it, there

0:15:010:15:05

was no trouble. I think they made

their point clearly.

0:15:050:15:17

In Venezuela, the country is in debt

to the tune of billions of dollars.

0:15:200:15:25

There were crisis talks between the

government and lenders to discuss

0:15:250:15:30

restructuring the debt. The

Socialist government held a brief

0:15:300:15:37

meeting with foreign debt holders on

Monday.

0:15:370:15:43

What does this mean for the country?

What does it mean for the people?

0:15:470:15:53

Venezuela could default on $150

billion that it owes. $45 billion is

0:15:530:16:03

owed to the oil companies. One war

figure, 63 billion, that is owed to

0:16:030:16:10

private investors like Goldman

Sachs. And 28 billion is owed to

0:16:100:16:16

China. Very mind that Venezuela is

subject to massive UN sanctions and

0:16:160:16:22

today the European Union approved

economic sanctions as well. Here is

0:16:220:16:26

the foreign chief speaking earlier.

The work we are trying to do is to

0:16:260:16:34

support the Venezuelan economy. No

measure, I would like to stress

0:16:340:16:40

this, will harm the Venezuelan

population. Our measure is only to

0:16:400:16:46

support the population of Venezuela.

The step has been decided today. It

0:16:460:16:52

is a first step. It can be reversed

if political conditions allow us to

0:16:520:17:03

have credible and meaningful

negotiations.

0:17:030:17:13

My colleague Katie Watson joins us

from Sao Paulo. Just put that into

0:17:140:17:20

contact, for people from Venezuela,

that is a huge impact, physical as

0:17:200:17:23

well. Some have lost weight as a

result of the crisis?

That's right,

0:17:230:17:32

Venezuelan's economy is in a diet is

date. There are people who are

0:17:320:17:38

missing meals, inflation, the IMF

said next year may reach 2300%. The

0:17:380:17:45

oil economy of Venezuela, it relies

on oil for 95% of its foreign

0:17:450:17:49

earnings and that has plummeted, not

just because of the oil price but

0:17:490:17:54

its production ability has fallen

dramatically. The one source of

0:17:540:17:59

revenue it has relied on, it can no

longer generate the income it used

0:17:590:18:04

to. That's obviously a big impact

for Venezuela and of course the

0:18:040:18:10

sanctions, that's what the Maduro

Prejean blames but analysts say you

0:18:100:18:17

can't blame the sanctions, it is

economic mismanagement that has

0:18:170:18:22

caused problems -- the Maduro regime

blames.

How do you start to

0:18:220:18:27

restructuring a debt of $150

billion?

That 150 billion is an

0:18:270:18:36

estimate of how much total external

debt it owes, including credit line

0:18:360:18:41

from the likes of Russia and China

but the talks today were for the

0:18:410:18:46

bondholders, especially to come over

and investors to talk about how they

0:18:460:18:51

will go forward with repaying future

debt. Venezuela until now has paid

0:18:510:18:55

the debt. The fear of default is a

big one because Venezuelan relies

0:18:550:19:01

heavily on the outside world. If it

defaulted on its bonds from its oil

0:19:010:19:08

company, that means it would be shut

out of the market and wouldn't

0:19:080:19:11

receive its dollars and would mean

it couldn't import things like food

0:19:110:19:14

and medicine. That has been a

problem but there has been so little

0:19:140:19:20

information about what the

bondholders are expecting. The

0:19:200:19:23

people who are leading the talks,

the vice president has sanctioned on

0:19:230:19:27

him because of alleged drug

trafficking. US bondholders have

0:19:270:19:32

been concerned about coming to

Venezuela because they are concerned

0:19:320:19:34

that if they negotiate with him it

will contravene sanctions and they

0:19:340:19:38

could be in trouble. That has been a

big stumbling block and many people

0:19:380:19:43

stayed away, sending representatives

and even those people haven't all

0:19:430:19:46

been able to come, even though the

government say that 400 investors

0:19:460:19:50

were turning up. Others say that is

not the true figure. Very cloudy,

0:19:500:19:58

certainly the information from

Venezuelan.

Thank you for joining

0:19:580:20:02

us. You can get much more detail on

that story and what's happening on

0:20:020:20:11

our website.

0:20:110:20:14

Let's return to Brexit now,

0:20:280:20:29

and the Government has confirmed

that it will allow MPs

0:20:290:20:32

to vote on any final deal

negotiated with Brussels.

0:20:320:20:34

Here's the Brexit

Secretary, David Davis.

0:20:340:20:41

I can now confirm that when we have

reached agreement we will bring

0:20:410:20:46

forward a specific piece of primary

legislation to implement it. This

0:20:460:20:50

confirms that the major policy set

out in the withdrawal agreement will

0:20:500:20:56

be directly in fermented by primary

legislation, not secondary

0:20:560:21:00

legislation in a withdrawal bill. It

also means parliament will have time

0:21:000:21:05

to debate, scrutinised and vote on

the final agreement with respect to

0:21:050:21:09

the European Union. The agreement

will only hold if Parliament

0:21:090:21:15

approves. We expected to cover the

contents of the withdrawal

0:21:150:21:19

agreement, including issues on

citizens' rights, any financial

0:21:190:21:24

settlement and a detailed

intimidation period between both

0:21:240:21:25

sides.

0:21:250:21:26

This is being seen

as a big concession.

0:21:260:21:28

Here's the BBC's political

editor, Laura Kuenssberg.

0:21:280:21:36

But as the political editor

of the New Statesman points out:

0:21:490:21:53

So no matter which way

the vote goes,

0:22:020:22:04

Britain will still be

leaving the European Union.

0:22:040:22:06

Let's get some analysis now

from our chief political

0:22:060:22:09

correspondent, Vicki Young,

who's in central London.

0:22:090:22:11

Is this a big deal, or isn't it?

What's interesting is that the

0:22:110:22:17

Labour Party immediately got up and

said this was a huge concession from

0:22:170:22:23

David Davies, that it was a massive

climb-down because he was

0:22:230:22:27

potentially facing Commons defeat in

the next few weeks over the EU

0:22:270:22:32

withdrawal bill. Some Conservatives

on the remain side of the argument

0:22:320:22:37

want a slow and gradual Brexit, some

hobby don't want it at all. --

0:22:370:22:43

probably don't want it. They don't

think it is a concession for that

0:22:430:22:47

reason. They will have the chance to

vote on whatever deal the government

0:22:470:22:51

brings back from Brussels. If they

vote against it, then they get no

0:22:510:22:56

deal and Britain still leaves at the

end of March, 2019. Opinion you can

0:22:560:23:00

safely say is split on this. The BBC

understands there were some

0:23:000:23:05

difficult meetings today between the

senior party managers, the whips of

0:23:050:23:10

the Conservative Party, speaking to

those Tory members who are looking

0:23:100:23:17

for a gradual, softer kind of

Brexit. They are pretty unhappy

0:23:170:23:21

about all of this. I suppose the

point about David Davies saying

0:23:210:23:25

we're going to have a new bill and

new legislation which you can all

0:23:250:23:31

debate and scrutinise, pick over and

vote on, what we don't know is what

0:23:310:23:38

kind of environment we will be in in

one year's time or even longer.

0:23:380:23:42

Things may have changed. By having

this bill of legislation it in

0:23:420:23:48

labels those people who are trying

to fight a very clean, hard Brexit,

0:23:480:23:53

it may give them a vehicle to try

and often it. That's why some people

0:23:530:23:58

are seeing it as a concession --

soften soften it. It is something

0:23:580:24:06

more predictable.

Politicians can

scrutinise the bill but time is

0:24:060:24:09

running out. When is this going to

happen?

Yes, given that we aren't

0:24:090:24:15

even into the second stage of the EU

talks, the British government hoping

0:24:150:24:20

that in December the EU are going to

say they are ready to move on, there

0:24:200:24:24

has been sufficient progress and we

can start talking about the future

0:24:240:24:29

relationship. As you say, if the

final date of leaving, which they

0:24:290:24:35

want to put into law in the

legislation, controversially, the

0:24:350:24:41

end of March, 2019, which is Article

50 and then, when we will leave, two

0:24:410:24:44

years beyond that. It means that

already time is running out. Some

0:24:440:24:50

saying you must get it through the

British Parliament, through the

0:24:500:24:53

European Parliament. There are all

sorts of snags. Some have looked at

0:24:530:25:00

negotiations in the EU over many

decades and they say that only

0:25:000:25:03

towards the end of the process, when

minds are more focused, given that

0:25:030:25:08

both sides say they are searching

for a deal, some say that we need to

0:25:080:25:11

be optimistic and that's what

Theresa May was saying in her speech

0:25:110:25:17

at the Guildhall, in the financial

centre of London, saying that we

0:25:170:25:21

must be optimistic, striving for the

best deal, we want to be confident

0:25:210:25:24

about the future. We have a place in

the world, we will be outward

0:25:240:25:29

looking. She says that Britain

should concentrate on the positive

0:25:290:25:32

things rather than the negative.

Thank you for joining us.

0:25:320:25:37

Last week, we covered

the shock resignation

0:25:370:25:38

of Lebanon's Prime Minister

and his departure to Saudi Arabia.

0:25:380:25:41

Now the EU has weighed in, urging

Saad Hariri to return to Lebanon,

0:25:410:25:44

and warned Saudi Arabia

against meddling in

0:25:440:25:46

the country's affairs.

0:25:460:25:52

The bloc's top diplomat,

Federica Mogherini, said, "We expect

0:25:520:25:54

no external interference

in this national agenda."

0:25:540:25:58

"We believe it is essential to avoid

importing into Lebanon

0:25:580:26:00

regional conflicts."

0:26:000:26:05

And we've heard from Mr Hariri.

0:26:050:26:07

In a live TV event, he vowed

to return home in the coming days.

0:26:070:26:15

TRANSLATION:

There's a security

threat on my life, that's just part

0:26:160:26:22

of it. There's the protection of

Lebanon, I want to protect Lebanon.

0:26:220:26:28

I will go back to Lebanon and I will

be back really soon. I will follow

0:26:280:26:32

because the custard usual process of

resignation. -- constitutional

0:26:320:26:38

process.

0:26:380:26:40

Mr Hariri also denied

he's being held captive

0:26:400:26:42

in Saudi Arabia, an accusation

made by Iran and Hezbollah.

0:26:420:26:44

His unexpected resignation has meant

we've been hearing a lot

0:26:440:26:47

about the regional rivalry

between Iran and Saudi Arabia.

0:26:470:26:51

But why are the two

countries at loggerheads,

0:26:510:26:53

and what is the potential for real

conflict between them?

0:26:530:26:55

Paul Adams explains.

0:26:560:27:01

Let's say straight off, if Iran and

Saudi Arabia were to go to war, that

0:27:050:27:09

would be catastrophic Iran no one

really thinks that's going to happen

0:27:090:27:13

but they are definitely at

loggerheads. Facing off and even

0:27:130:27:19

fighting by proxy all over the

region. It's about a struggle for

0:27:190:27:26

power that's been going on for

nearly 40 years. Saudi Arabia, home

0:27:260:27:30

to Islam's two coleus sites, felt it

was the undisputed leader of the

0:27:300:27:37

Muslim world -- holiest sites. In

1979 along came the Ayatollah and

0:27:370:27:43

the Iranian revolution.

He was

welcomed by the biggest crowd in

0:27:430:27:47

human history.

Suddenly, Saudi

Arabia had a rival. Today, Teheran's

0:27:470:27:56

influence extends across a broad

area of the Middle East, from Iran

0:27:560:28:00

in the east to Lebanon in the West.

Saudi Arabia feels threatened in its

0:28:000:28:04

own backyard. And then of course

there is religion, the countries

0:28:040:28:14

representing the rival camps in

Islam. Saudi Arabia is Sunni and

0:28:140:28:22

Iran is Shia. Inevitably there are

religious overtones. In Yemen there

0:28:220:28:29

is a civil war, Saudi Arabia is

helping one side and Iran, the

0:28:290:28:32

other. In Syria, Iran supports

President Assad and has sent troops

0:28:320:28:37

to fight for him. The Saudis have

funded and armed rebel groups. In

0:28:370:28:42

Iraq, since the fall of Saddam

Hussein, Iran has become very

0:28:420:28:48

influential and Saudi Arabia has

been trying to extend its influence

0:28:480:28:51

there. And Lebanon, a complicated

country with a delicate power

0:28:510:28:55

balance. For decades, Tim Faye has

supported the Shia militia. It is

0:28:550:29:05

fighting in Syria and has a presence

in Yemen and Iraq. For Saudi Arabia

0:29:050:29:10

this is too much. Saudi Arabia's

Crown prince, who pretty much runs

0:29:100:29:18

the country, has been sounding

increasingly tough on Iran, accusing

0:29:180:29:22

it of trying to dominate the Muslim

world. Most people think that the

0:29:220:29:26

Crown Prince ordered the recent

resignation of the Prime Minister of

0:29:260:29:29

Lebanon. By Minister Harry Reid made

his shock announcement in Saudi

0:29:290:29:33

Arabia. -- Hariri. TRANSLATION:

I

want to say to Iran that they are

0:29:330:29:43

losing in their attempt to influence

the Arab world.

The fear is that

0:29:430:29:48

Saudi Arabia is trying to force a

confrontation with Hezbollah, to

0:29:480:29:51

weaken its authority and the

influence of Iran. If so this is

0:29:510:29:57

dangerous and could open up a new

front in the cold war between Saudi

0:29:570:30:01

Arabia and Iran. In a country,

Lebanon, that has already seen far

0:30:010:30:05

too much conflict.

0:30:050:30:11

Day one of the Asean summit

has wrapped up in Manila.

0:30:110:30:14

The focus has been

on the relationship

0:30:140:30:16

between these two, Donald Trump

and the Philippines President,

0:30:160:30:19

Rodrigo Duterte.

0:30:190:30:23

The pair met on the

sidelines of the summit.

0:30:230:30:25

And it was all praise

from the US President.

0:30:250:30:32

We've had a great relationship, this

has been very successful. We've had

0:30:320:30:39

leaders with many -- meetings with

many other leaders. This has been

0:30:390:30:45

handled beautifully by the President

of the Philippines. I've enjoyed

0:30:450:30:47

being here.

0:30:470:30:50

There appears to be a lack

of clarity over whether the issue

0:30:500:30:53

of human rights were discussed

by the two leaders.

0:30:530:30:55

The White House says

they were, albeit briefly.

0:30:550:30:57

But the Philippines say Mr Trump

never raised the issue.

0:30:570:31:02

Human-rights groups had wanted

President Trump to take a tough

0:31:020:31:07

stance on President Duterte's

war on drugs.

0:31:070:31:11

Police say almost 4,000 people

have been killed since this

0:31:110:31:14

controversial tactic was launched

in June last year.

0:31:140:31:19

Ties have been strained

between the two countries

0:31:190:31:21

after the former US

President Barack Obama

0:31:210:31:23

criticised Mr Duterte

for his brutal anti-drug campaign.

0:31:230:31:25

The BBC's Howard Johnson

reports from Manila.

0:31:250:31:35

When they finished the meeting there

was a brief exchange with the press

0:31:370:31:41

but not much was discussed. The

details were released slowly

0:31:410:31:46

afterwards by the White House press

office who were the first to say

0:31:460:31:49

that human rights were briefly

discussed. Later the president of

0:31:490:31:53

the Philippines' spokesman said that

President did hurt had been speaking

0:31:530:31:59

about the war on drugs -- president

did hurt -- Duterte. Briefly touched

0:31:590:32:11

on, the issue of the war on drugs

and human rights in the meeting.

0:32:110:32:16

Here've also been violent

demonstrations on the streets

0:32:160:32:17

of Manila against Mr Trump's visit.

0:32:170:32:22

A group of protesters

charged at riot police,

0:32:220:32:25

who responded by using water cannon

and sonic alarms to try

0:32:250:32:28

and repel the crowd.

0:32:280:32:31

And awkward moments are almost

custom at these types of gatherings,

0:32:310:32:38

and this one has been no different -

take a look at this group handshake

0:32:380:32:41

that took the US President

a little while to master.

0:32:410:32:44

And here's something

you probably didn't expect,

0:32:440:32:47

President Duterte serenading a gala

dinner at the order of Mr Trump.

0:32:470:32:52

SINGING.

0:33:000:33:03

I sung, uninvited, they duet, on the

orders of the Commander-in-Chief of

0:33:070:33:20

the United States.

Yes, ordered to

sing by President Trump.

0:33:200:33:24

A soldier has been shot and wounded

as he escaped North Korea.

0:33:240:33:27

The soldier managed to get

across this, the demilitarised zone.

0:33:270:33:32

This is one of the most heavily

protected areas in the world.

0:33:320:33:37

So this is really surprising.

0:33:370:33:38

It's fortified with thousands

of mines and barbed wire,

0:33:380:33:40

rows of surveillance cameras

and electric fencing.

0:33:400:33:45

The DMZ is a strip of land 250km

long and 4km wide that separates

0:33:510:33:54

the two sides of the Korean

Peninsula.

0:33:540:34:01

The defector crossed here,

at the village of Panmunjom,

0:34:010:34:04

actually where the truce to end

the Korean War was signed in 1953.

0:34:040:34:13

If you want to find out more

about what it takes to cross

0:34:130:34:16

the demilitarised zone, then go

to this article on our website.

0:34:160:34:19

Here's Mark Lowen.

0:34:190:34:20

We know that a North Korean soldier

who was stationed at a guard post in

0:34:200:34:26

the joint Security area and the

so-called demilitarised zone,

0:34:260:34:29

approached the South earlier today

and was shot by a North Korean --

0:34:290:34:36

North Korean soldiers in the

shoulder and elbow. He was taken to

0:34:360:34:39

hospital and he has now regained

consciousness. This is extremely

0:34:390:34:44

rare for people to deflect

across-the-board and indeed in the

0:34:440:34:49

joint Security area. That is the

collection of buildings where North

0:34:490:34:52

and South Korean soldiers eyeball

each other and in effect it is the

0:34:520:34:57

most tightly guarded part of the

world's most heavily fortified

0:34:570:34:59

border. Very rare for soldiers to

defect in that way. South Korean

0:34:590:35:06

media say that only three have

defected across the joint Security

0:35:060:35:12

area since the end of the Cold War,

in 1998, 2007, and today. Most of

0:35:120:35:20

the 2000 defectors tend to go into

China and try and seek asylum at the

0:35:200:35:26

South Korean Embassy in Beijing. It

is rare for them to go across the

0:35:260:35:32

DMZ at all, let alone the joint

Security area. When the soldier

0:35:320:35:40

recovers in hospital, he will be a

prized possession for South Korea, a

0:35:400:35:45

rare insight into the heart of the

North Korean military, coming, as he

0:35:450:35:50

is, from that extremely tightly

guarded area where soldiers are

0:35:500:35:56

chosen because of their immense

loyalty to the North Korean regime.

0:35:560:36:02

A very rare desertion, especially

because it is such a militarised

0:36:020:36:05

zone. A lots more on the website but

from us, thanks for watching.

0:36:050:36:13