24/09/2016 Reporters - Short Edition


24/09/2016

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From here in the BBC newsroom, we send out correspondents to bring

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you the best stories from across the globe.

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The Syrian refugees who now call Canada their home.

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Lyse Doucet meets some of the thousands who have been

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warmly welcomed, including some old friends.

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Mind your language, Emmanuel Igunza reports on efforts to

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save an African culture that is facing extinction.

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As Rio celebrates its Paralympic success, Wyre Davies asks,

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what will be the legacy for disabled people in Brazil.

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TRANSLATION: Sport for me is my life, because without sport,

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As tens of thousands of refugees from Syria head to Europe in search

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of a better life, many may find themselves more welcome in Canada.

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It has taken in more than 30,000 Syrians in the past 10 months

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and the Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told the UN this week

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that his country will do more to help Syrian refugees.

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But as Lyse Doucet, herself a Canadian, reports from Toronto,

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the rate of acceptance of these new Canadians

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..these girls know their alphabet and a lot more about being Canadian.

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Like thousands of Syrians, this family is sponsored

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by individuals like Claudia who clubbed together to respond

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What other question words do you use?

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Her husband Andrew, an art dealer, helps three generations

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of the family with their English and help them settle in.

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It is the best way to integrate newcomers into the country,

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to get them connected with the city, all the things that are available

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and to create the warm arrival that sets the tone for the rest

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A picnic in the park and a warm welcome from another

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Their group raised enough to support the family for a year.

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Everyone at this gathering is doing something similar.

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You do hear critical voices, but for now the public mood

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It is so striking just how different the mood is here than

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But then much about Canada is different, every Syrian family

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here was carefully vetted and then welcomed by families here in Canada,

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and you haven't seen the kind of attacks here that have caused

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But when you look at this you have to ask, could this

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kind of model be adopted somewhere else?

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Then suddenly, in this crowd, a family I know from Syria.

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It has been more than two years, their lives were so desperate them.

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She told me she would have dreams of people with their heads cut off. Now

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her nightmare is over. These Syrians already

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feel they belong here. This vast country has long made

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space for new citizens, but like many other places

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it is asking how many more How long will this

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warm welcome last? Lyse Doucet, BBC News,

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Toronto. Now, globally, hundreds of millions

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of people speak English, but there are only nine people

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in the world who can speak Yiaku. It is one of the rarest

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languages in the world, spoken by the Yiaku tribe in Kenya,

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and it is facing extinction. It is just one of hundreds

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of indigenous languages Emmanuel Igunza has been to meet

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the Yiaku, one of the smallest A community desperately hanging

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on to its dying traditions. This young man is being

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taught beekeeping. It has long been the mainstay

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of the Yiaku people, but it started fading away in favour

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of livestock keeping, because they were influenced

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by neighbouring tribes, Decades of inter-marriage

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with the Masai has seen much And now they are only nine elderly

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people who can speak The elders have decided

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to revive their language. This man tells me the community has

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been forgotten and now they have taken the task of translating

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and teaching the language Decades of illegal logging have

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destroyed much of it, pushing the Yiaku community

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out of the forest. Unlike the wealthier

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and better-known neighbours, the Masai, the Yiaku people

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are dependent on this Here is where they gathered

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and hunted for food but even Not far from the forest is this

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school built by the help Two times a month, students

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here learn the language The old men actively

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participate in the lessons, despite never having attended formal

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education themselves. If these elders die,

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then the language will die. Most of our cultures will die,

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because they are the custodians This is one of the challenges

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that the elderly are now dying There is no mechanism in place

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to save the language This is one of the serious,

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serious problems that needs The Yiaku community is so small

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that it is not recognised among Kenya's 42 ethnic communities,

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but they are refusing to give up on their heritage, despite knowing

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that theirs is a race against time. Emmanuel Igunza, BBC

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News, Central Kenya. It has been a long,

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emotional summer in Rio and an incredible few

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weeks of sport. The Paralympic games were initially

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plagued with problems, but they have been widely seen

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as a success. Now the fans and athletes have gone

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home, what legacy will the games leave behind for disabled

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people in Brazil? Wyre Davies has been speaking

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to the next generation If the Olympic and Paralympic games

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were all about inspiration and encouragement, then in David

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they have found a champion. The 11-year-old from Rio is already

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an accomplished surfer, now picking up another soon-to-be

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Olympic sport and by the time the next games come around,

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he has no intention TRANSLATION: Sport for me

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is my life. Because without sport,

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I am not David. I never thought I would be able

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to skateboard like this. He lives in a country where 40%

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of disabled children do not go to school,

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where there is a huge gap in equality of opportunity depending

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on race or social background. That has to change say campaigners

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if Brazil is to build on Rio 2016. For those adolescents,

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this cannot be a flash in the pan This means there are possibilities

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for people with disabilities out there, that they may have assumed

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were not possible for them, because of who they are or where they come

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from or what colour they are. Putting on an expensive

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summer of sport was a The first games to be held

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in South America in a city and country that arguably had

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more important priorities. Anxious to avoid accusations

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of spending millions on white elephant stadiums that will never be

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used again, Rio 2016 officials say many of the venues will have a life

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once the games are over. The Arena of the Future will be

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broken up, its materials used in the construction

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of four new schools. Public support was initially

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lukewarm, by the time the Paralympics came around,

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ticket prices were cut, enthusiasm grew and the games

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felt more inclusive. We showed that we could deliver

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a cheap games, lots of legacy, improving lives, it will not solve

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all the problems, there are still We know that, problems in Rio,

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but the lives are much better because they were

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inspired by the games. In the past few weeks,

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Brazilians have found new Olympic and Paralympic heroes but the tough

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funding decisions to come could make or break the ambitions of a young

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boy inspired by what he has witnessed in his own city to one day

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become an Olympian himself. Wyre Davies, BBC News,

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Rio. Hello. Sunshine and showers tomorrow

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on a fresh breeze. Tonight we

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A weekly programme of stories filed by BBC reporters from all over the world, ranging from analyses of major global issues to personal reflections and anecdotes.


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