21/01/2017 Reporters


21/01/2017

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now on BBC News, it's time for Reporters.

:00:00.:00:17.

Hello, welcome to Reporters, I'm Christian Frazier.

:00:18.:00:19.

From here, in the BBC's Newsroom, we send out correspondents to bring

:00:20.:00:23.

you the best stories from across the globe.

:00:24.:00:30.

As the United States enters a new political era,

:00:31.:00:35.

John Sudworth has been finding out how China is reacting

:00:36.:00:37.

Before his election, China could simply dismiss

:00:38.:00:41.

Donald Trump's rhetoric as the over-inflated bluster

:00:42.:00:43.

Jeremy Bowen reports from the ruins of eastern Aleppo and assesses

:00:44.:00:54.

Foreign intervention has transformed this war

:00:55.:01:02.

and the way it's looking, right now, foreigners, not Syrians,

:01:03.:01:07.

Is Britain coming together over Brexit?

:01:08.:01:13.

After the Prime Minister clarifies her Brexit strategy,

:01:14.:01:15.

Jeremy Cook finds out whether people on both sides of the debate

:01:16.:01:19.

Crisis at Stormont, as Northern Ireland's power-sharing

:01:20.:01:25.

Executive collapses, forcing new elections.

:01:26.:01:27.

Gavin Hewitt reports on fears of a return

:01:28.:01:30.

What does all this mean - uncertainty for Northern Ireland,

:01:31.:01:35.

without an Executive, key areas of Government

:01:36.:01:37.

Rupert Wingfield-Hayes finds out why the world's largest seafood market

:01:38.:01:47.

is moving and why some are not happy about it.

:01:48.:01:53.

These are the fish that are 200-250 kilos and these are the ones that

:01:54.:01:58.

The current record for one fish here, $1.7 million.

:01:59.:02:09.

Well, there's no doubt what was the biggest

:02:10.:02:11.

international event of this week, it's been trailed for months,

:02:12.:02:13.

but now Donald Trump has finally been sworn in as the 45th President

:02:14.:02:16.

One nation who will be watching the new American

:02:17.:02:21.

Mr Trump broke with decades of precedent last month by taking

:02:22.:02:26.

a telephone call from a telephone call the Taiwanese President,

:02:27.:02:28.

a move that has angered Beijing which regards Taiwan

:02:29.:02:32.

State media said China would "take off the gloves" if such

:02:33.:02:36.

As John Sudworth reports, in China, Mr Trump has gone from a figure

:02:37.:02:42.

of fun to someone who's provoking a loft anger.

:02:43.:02:55.

Not everyone in China is taking Donald Trump too seriously.

:02:56.:02:57.

His inauguration this week comes just ahead

:02:58.:03:01.

of the Chinese New Year of the Rooster.

:03:02.:03:05.

And this factory is making, well, giant Trump lookalike

:03:06.:03:10.

"The orders are flowing in, we can barely cope", the boss tells me.

:03:11.:03:21.

But increasingly, Mr Trump is becoming a target of anger,

:03:22.:03:25.

Mock-ups of Taiwanese ships provide shooting practice at this

:03:26.:03:33.

Chinese military museum, just across the Taiwan Strait.

:03:34.:03:38.

While US presidents have long avoided challenging Beijing's

:03:39.:03:41.

claim to sovereignty, the so-called one China policy,

:03:42.:03:43.

"China's military, especially our Navy,

:03:44.:03:53.

"We don't fear US provocation", this man tells me.

:03:54.:04:01.

"We want peace, but if they cross our red line we have to take

:04:02.:04:09.

Last week, in a move seen by some as intended to make that very point,

:04:10.:04:15.

China sent its aircraft carrier through the Taiwan Strait.

:04:16.:04:19.

And China's Communist Party-run newspapers have issued a stark

:04:20.:04:22.

warning, telling Mr Trump that if he changes US policy,

:04:23.:04:29.

Beijing will have no choice but to take off the gloves,

:04:30.:04:32.

and that China will mercilessly combat those who advocate

:04:33.:04:37.

These Chinese workers make luxury marble products for the US market.

:04:38.:04:46.

For them, the biggest fear is not rising military

:04:47.:04:50.

Their American boss believes Mr Trump's threatened tariffs

:04:51.:04:56.

will do nothing to change the basic market reality.

:04:57.:05:02.

Hiring one worker in the states, i could hire five to six in China.

:05:03.:05:07.

So moving our business to the states would impinge into our margins

:05:08.:05:13.

which would then reflect on consumer pricing, And it would be

:05:14.:05:19.

very difficult to run a business that way.

:05:20.:05:23.

The world's about to find out whether one of the most vital

:05:24.:05:27.

and complex bilateral relationships is to undergo a profound change.

:05:28.:05:31.

Before his election, China could simply dismiss

:05:32.:05:34.

Donald Trump's rhetoric as the overinflated bluster

:05:35.:05:38.

And China is making it increasingly clear that

:05:39.:05:45.

while it has a lot to lose, so, too, does America

:05:46.:05:48.

To Syria now, where the United Nations says 40,000 people have

:05:49.:05:59.

returned to their homes in the east of Aleppo, the city devastated

:06:00.:06:03.

Most are living on aid, in very difficult conditions.

:06:04.:06:08.

Syria's largest city became a major battleground in the summer of 2012,

:06:09.:06:11.

but after four years of bloody conflict, government forces cut off

:06:12.:06:15.

the rebels' supply lines and they were able to take full

:06:16.:06:21.

Jeremy Bowen has been back to eastern Aleppo and found a city

:06:22.:06:28.

The final battle for Aleppo swept through the city

:06:29.:06:36.

All sides in this war were prepared to destroy Aleppo to possess it.

:06:37.:06:43.

In the end, the firepower of the regime and its Russian

:06:44.:06:47.

and Iranian allies was too much for the fractious rebel coalition

:06:48.:06:51.

This city is the key to northern Syria.

:06:52.:07:00.

Right across the country, rebels who are still fighting,

:07:01.:07:03.

The battle for Aleppo lasted four years.

:07:04.:07:16.

More than 200,000 civilians were trapped in the heat of the fight.

:07:17.:07:25.

Attacks on civilians by any side in the war are crimes if it can be

:07:26.:07:29.

Zakaria Mohammed Juma lost his leg in East Aleppo three months ago.

:07:30.:07:40.

At a clinic run by the International Committee of the Red Cross, he's

:07:41.:07:44.

When you can't walk, supporting a family is even harder.

:07:45.:07:55.

It will take years and billions to rebuild.

:07:56.:08:01.

The east side of Aleppo and much of the old city is in ruins.

:08:02.:08:06.

With a photo of his clothes shop, Salah stood in front

:08:07.:08:11.

I've seen this much damage elsewhere in Syria, but never

:08:12.:08:18.

Abu Mahmoud is one of the first to return to his neighbourhood.

:08:19.:08:24.

"If only they'd take away the rubble", he said,

:08:25.:08:29.

"all the neighbours would come back."

:08:30.:08:34.

This corpse was still lying on the road a month

:08:35.:08:41.

after the battle, more are certain to be buried in collapsed buildings.

:08:42.:08:45.

Abu Mohammed, collecting firewood, showed where a mortar

:08:46.:08:50.

"Look", he said, "they took out my spleen, a kidney

:08:51.:08:59.

In every queue for emergency aid, there are tragedies.

:09:00.:09:07.

This child, who is 12, has seen more than anyone

:09:08.:09:11.

Her grandmother is using all the strength she has left to care

:09:12.:09:18.

TRANSLATION: My daughter's 15-year-old girl and her son,

:09:19.:09:28.

My son's three-year-old daughter lost a leg.

:09:29.:09:33.

Another grandson, aged seven, lost a hand.

:09:34.:09:36.

My family's houses were all destroyed.

:09:37.:09:46.

TRANSLATION: We don't know what's hidden in our future.

:09:47.:09:49.

I saw with my own eyes my other cousin, his intestines

:09:50.:09:57.

President Assad's resurgence in Aleppo means talk

:09:58.:10:08.

about forcing him out sounds more hollow than ever.

:10:09.:10:11.

He is the strongest he's been since the war started.

:10:12.:10:14.

The empty, ruined, silent streets on the former front

:10:15.:10:24.

No one has tried to move back here, it's haunted by violence and death.

:10:25.:10:30.

That is a home-made mortar, designed and built by

:10:31.:10:35.

the rebels and in itself, it's a fearsome weapon.

:10:36.:10:39.

But it is nothing compared to the power of the Russian air

:10:40.:10:44.

force and the military know-how of the Iranians and

:10:45.:10:48.

Foreign intervention has transformed this war and the way

:10:49.:10:56.

it's looking right now, foreigners, not Syrians,

:10:57.:11:01.

The sun sets in Aleppo on a dark, cold and broken place.

:11:02.:11:15.

It feels like a post-war city, but this is not a post-war country.

:11:16.:11:20.

For the first time, the President and his allies can smell victory,

:11:21.:11:27.

There were fears of a return to the tribal politics

:11:28.:11:38.

of the past in Northern Ireland after its power-sharing

:11:39.:11:41.

Executive collapsed, triggering new elections

:11:42.:11:44.

It's all over a controversial energy scheme which could cost

:11:45.:11:50.

the taxpayer ?500,000,000, but it's caused a deep riff

:11:51.:11:52.

between the two main partners in the Executive,

:11:53.:11:55.

Gavin Hewitt reports from Stormont on what it means for

:11:56.:12:01.

The 10 years, power has been shared in Northern Ireland.

:12:02.:12:07.

It was one of the foundation stones of peace.

:12:08.:12:10.

Today, that power-sharing government collapsed.

:12:11.:12:13.

I propose that a draft Order in Council be brought forward

:12:14.:12:17.

shortly to set an election date of Thursday, 2nd March.

:12:18.:12:23.

No-one should underestimate the challenge faced

:12:24.:12:28.

to the political institutions here in Northern Ireland

:12:29.:12:34.

The trigger for the breakdown was a row over a controversial green

:12:35.:12:42.

energy scheme drawn up by Unionist minister, Arlene Foster.

:12:43.:12:47.

But the bitter arguments over the scheme exposed growing

:12:48.:12:51.

tensions between Nationalist and Unionist politicians.

:12:52.:12:55.

I think it's both parties, personally, and I find

:12:56.:12:57.

it very disappointing and very, very sad.

:12:58.:13:00.

It's the tribal politics, you know, I feel like we're back in the 80s

:13:01.:13:03.

and I was really hopeful that for the future generations that they

:13:04.:13:06.

There's no appetite for a return to any sort of violence at any stage

:13:07.:13:12.

I think that possibly what will happen is we'll be led

:13:13.:13:17.

through another couple of years of political insecurity.

:13:18.:13:21.

At Stormont, the Northern Ireland Assembly depends on unionists

:13:22.:13:25.

Today, both main parties were asked to submit a name for one

:13:26.:13:31.

First up, the Democratic Unionist Party.

:13:32.:13:37.

And they backed their current leader.

:13:38.:13:44.

..nominate Arlene Foster to be the First Minister.

:13:45.:13:47.

There can be no return to the status quo.

:13:48.:13:54.

If something is broke, you stop and you fix it.

:13:55.:13:56.

But they refused to put forward a name, so ending

:13:57.:14:02.

What does all this mean - uncertainty for Northern Ireland.

:14:03.:14:11.

Without an Executive, key areas of government

:14:12.:14:15.

will be stalled and then, most importantly, there's Brexit.

:14:16.:14:17.

Where will be the Northern Ireland voice when crucial

:14:18.:14:20.

We are in a very grave situation going into this election

:14:21.:14:25.

and the timing of it, when Northern Ireland

:14:26.:14:27.

has no budget agreed, when we are facing into Brexit

:14:28.:14:30.

and when we're also coming to the end of the financial year

:14:31.:14:32.

is possibly the worst time that we could be entering

:14:33.:14:35.

Recent years have changed Northern Ireland, but the shadows of the past

:14:36.:14:42.

Some still say they're confused, but we did get some clarity this

:14:43.:14:51.

week on Britain's plans for Brexit as Theresa May announced her

:14:52.:14:53.

12-point plan, including a pledge to leave the single market.

:14:54.:14:56.

The Prime Minister insisted that people were coming together,

:14:57.:15:00.

but she also acknowledged just how divisive last year's

:15:01.:15:03.

We sent Jeremy Cook to see how those on different sides of the argument

:15:04.:15:10.

Boston, an ancient English town, a changing landscape.

:15:11.:15:17.

On the bus, plenty of support for the Prime Minister's speech,

:15:18.:15:21.

More than one in ten people here are EU migrants.

:15:22.:15:31.

Is it a price worth paying to come out of the single market in order

:15:32.:15:44.

You've got to control it in some way.

:15:45.:15:49.

At the Boston Body Hub, it's 60s dance work out.

:15:50.:15:53.

The project is largely EU-funded, but most here voted Brexit.

:15:54.:15:55.

Many worried about levels of immigration and the

:15:56.:15:57.

The worry is we might lose some trade with Europe

:15:58.:16:08.

What do you think about that trade off?

:16:09.:16:12.

The trade off, I think, will be worth it because I think

:16:13.:16:15.

Britain's big enough to take care of itself.

:16:16.:16:17.

It's Great Britain - it always has been,

:16:18.:16:24.

Outside Boston, the agricultural heartland.

:16:25.:16:30.

Many crops being prepared today will need migrant workers

:16:31.:16:33.

Within the industry we need labour and without it we will starve.

:16:34.:16:39.

What would you say to Theresa May then in terms of what you need

:16:40.:16:43.

I am hoping from this that she's going to allow skills and labour

:16:44.:16:47.

to be filled in the farming community, within packers,

:16:48.:16:49.

within processing, within the field labour, where's it's required.

:16:50.:16:52.

These workers are essential to you, aren't they?

:16:53.:16:54.

An hour's drive and we're on the banks of the Trent.

:16:55.:16:59.

In Rushcliffe, they voted 57% to remain in the EU.

:17:00.:17:01.

At the Spoke and Coke cafe and bike shop, a different

:17:02.:17:04.

I voted remain, and I was quite surprised by the outcome

:17:05.:17:11.

of the vote, but Theresa May has outlined today is what the country

:17:12.:17:14.

And I think we need clear leadership to make sure that

:17:15.:17:19.

Not everyone here is quite as relaxed.

:17:20.:17:25.

I don't think we realise how bad it is yet.

:17:26.:17:28.

Do you think we're any clearer tonight, after Theresa May's speech,

:17:29.:17:31.

Essentially, her message was the same - Brexit means Brexit.

:17:32.:17:45.

But we still don't really know what it means!

:17:46.:17:47.

For the Prime Minister then, Brexit remains the greatest

:17:48.:17:49.

of political challenges, in this still divided nation.

:17:50.:17:53.

The Lancaster bomber became one of the most famous and effective

:17:54.:17:59.

aircraft to take part in World War II.

:18:00.:18:01.

It played a crucial role in securing victory for the allies,

:18:02.:18:04.

but only two of them are still able to fly.

:18:05.:18:08.

One family is hoping that will change thanks to a remarkable

:18:09.:18:11.

30-year restoration project which they hope will see another

:18:12.:18:16.

Wartime recordings of a Lancaster aircrew.

:18:17.:18:28.

Although this one hasn't flown for 40 years.

:18:29.:18:37.

It's the sight and sound, when you hear those engines revving,

:18:38.:18:40.

you know, there just isn't another sound like it.

:18:41.:18:46.

Just over 7,300 Lancasters were built.

:18:47.:18:54.

NEWS REEL: Special missions included the Dambusters raid...

:18:55.:18:57.

Almost half were lost in combat during World War II.

:18:58.:19:01.

But for Harold Panton and his family, the desire to fully

:19:02.:19:04.

It brings many memories back, I think.

:19:05.:19:10.

His brother, Christopher, a member of Bomber Command,

:19:11.:19:14.

died on a mission over Germany in 1944.

:19:15.:19:17.

Harold and his other brother, Fred, wanted to restore an aircraft

:19:18.:19:19.

We knew that it's either now or never because we'd never get

:19:20.:19:31.

Fred died four years ago, before the family dream of seeing

:19:32.:19:36.

this Lancaster back in the sky could be fulfilled.

:19:37.:19:39.

Fred's grandson, Andrew, is determined to make it happen.

:19:40.:19:42.

Lancaster parts are very hard to come by, so you snap up parts

:19:43.:19:46.

There are a few companies that did buy up old stock after the war,

:19:47.:19:59.

but then people brought random parts and have had it their house

:20:00.:20:02.

Yeah, it's very tight inside, added to by the fact that there's

:20:03.:20:08.

a lot of equipment and the main spars come through as well.

:20:09.:20:11.

So this is like the main backbone of the aircraft?

:20:12.:20:14.

These spars are, as you said, the backbone, it's where

:20:15.:20:16.

So it's very important for our restoration that we check

:20:17.:20:19.

They've got some X-ray later this month.

:20:20.:20:23.

I mean, it's going to be such a moment, isn't it,

:20:24.:20:27.

I mean, we'll be flying with minimal crew, if we manage

:20:28.:20:32.

to get her airworthy, so it's going to be quite

:20:33.:20:35.

Members of RAF Bomber Command faced dreadful odds when embarking

:20:36.:20:39.

on a mission, 44% of aircrew lost their lives during World War

:20:40.:20:41.

II, and on a Lancaster there was one place that was by far the most

:20:42.:20:45.

Here where the Rear Gunner or Tail End Charlie,

:20:46.:20:51.

as he was known, did his best to defend the plane.

:20:52.:20:54.

It's the part that was shot at first by any enemy action and life

:20:55.:20:58.

expectancy was about five trips or 40-hours.

:20:59.:21:02.

Only two other Lancasters are still airworthy,

:21:03.:21:05.

the fundraising and work continues to make this one the third.

:21:06.:21:08.

I'll be extremely emotional, as my grandad will...

:21:09.:21:13.

Tim Moffatt, BBC News, in East Kirkby, in Lincolnshire.

:21:14.:21:21.

Finally, if you like sushi, you're going to love this.

:21:22.:21:24.

We're going to take you now to the world's biggest fish

:21:25.:21:27.

market, the legendary Tsukiji Fish Centre in Japan.

:21:28.:21:30.

It supplies Tokyo's finest sushi restaurants as well as the general

:21:31.:21:33.

public, but it's being closed down and being moved to a bigger,

:21:34.:21:36.

more modern sight and, as Rupert Wingfield-Hayes reports,

:21:37.:21:39.

many people are not too happy about it.

:21:40.:21:50.

It's 5.00am in the morning inside the world's biggest fish

:21:51.:21:53.

market and the tuna auctions are under way.

:21:54.:21:56.

This is the first auction of 2017 and the prices

:21:57.:22:00.

This is going to be the last new year auction held in Tsukiji

:22:01.:22:08.

perhaps ever because this market supposed to close and over here,

:22:09.:22:14.

if you come over here, you can see, you can see through here,

:22:15.:22:19.

These are the fish that are 200-250 kilos.

:22:20.:22:24.

These are the ones that might reach record prices.

:22:25.:22:27.

The current record for one fish here, $1.7 million.

:22:28.:22:30.

Tsukiji Market is like no other, vast and chaotic.

:22:31.:22:33.

On a good day, 60,000 people bustle through this maze of alleys shops,

:22:34.:22:36.

but soon all of this will be gone, the buildings demolished,

:22:37.:22:40.

This man's family have been trading tuna since the days of the Shogun.

:22:41.:22:46.

In Tsukiji, I'm the third generation and we are doing this business

:22:47.:22:52.

So what we feel is, we built this place.

:22:53.:23:01.

I mean, Tsukiji, it's not built by someone.

:23:02.:23:04.

Actually, we make the history in this place, but why

:23:05.:23:08.

The meat from this 200 kilo monster will go to the top sushi

:23:09.:23:18.

But fish like this are getting hard to find.

:23:19.:23:25.

In the Pacific and Atlantic stocks of bluefin tuna have

:23:26.:23:29.

The frozen one is just 1,000 or less each day

:23:30.:23:35.

and the fresh one is like 300, 200, sometimes 100 or less.

:23:36.:23:40.

So we don't have enough fish to sell, actually.

:23:41.:23:48.

Do you worry about the future of the industry?

:23:49.:23:52.

Maybe it's going to be like the whale, it could be.

:23:53.:24:03.

This new year the top bid went for this 210 kilo bluefin, $632,000.

:24:04.:24:07.

Critics say publicity stunts like this ignore the fact that these

:24:08.:24:09.

Rupert Wingfield-Hayes, BBC News, at the Tsukiji Market, in Tokyo.

:24:10.:24:25.

That's all from Reporters for this week.

:24:26.:24:28.

From me, Christian Frazier, goodbye for now.

:24:29.:24:49.

Good evening. The temperature is falling and for some of us, it

:24:50.:24:56.

barely got above freezing all day long. Take the UK as a

:24:57.:24:58.

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