07/12/2013 The Papers


07/12/2013

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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access to investigate China's Tibetan areas where there have been

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allegations of human rights abuses `` Damian Grammaticas has rare

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access. So, welcome to our look ahead to

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what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. With me to do that are

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some familiar faces, Nigel Nelson, the political editor of the Sunday

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people and Mihir Bose, a columnist for the London Evening Standard Let

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for the London Evening Standard. Let me take you through some of the

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headlines on the front pages tomorrow. A black and white photo of

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nozzle Mandela dominating the front page of the observer with the

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headline that his body will lie in state in a Glass Coffin before he is

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buried at the village where he grew up.

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The Sunday Times talks about an 11% pay rise for MPs which it pricks

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will be met with fury `` it predicts.

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Soldiers are to face 11 more trials over Iraq deaths according to the

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Sunday Telegraph according to human rights ruling.

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The independent was my main photo highlights the slaughter of

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Africa's elephants and the weather also makes room for a story on what

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it says is the housing crisis facing the Tories.

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Gentlemen, let's begin. We will start with the observer and Nelson

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Mandela, as you would expect, still dominating front pages tomorrow. A

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chance for the papers to dig out their own archives as well. Yes.

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Here we have a portrait in the Observer from 1962 and the story now

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is looking ahead to the funeral which is going to be a 10`day event.

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We have got world leaders turning up in South Africa on Tuesday and then

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the funeral proper which will not be until next Sunday. Lots of people,

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Nigel, over the last couple of days have been describing him as the

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greatest political leader of all time. Is that fair's that is a

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long`time! I do think he was the greatest leader of the last century.

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Because he became such an inspiration to every other political

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leader. You have seen by the kind of tributes pouring out, just what

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influence he had on them. There was a man who could knock on any world

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leader's law and know that they would would open it # on any world

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leader's door. He gave Tony Blair a hard time over Iraq and Tony Blair

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tried to avoid him and for the most part, he could do anything, go

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anywhere. I saw one of the statesman`like appearances he made

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at the Labour Party conference and he was the biggest political

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celebrity that anybody had ever seen there. A big piece for the Labour

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Party, and for the audience, everything was focused on Nelson

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Mandela. The outpouring has been global. I was reporting in

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Parliament Square at the statue which he unveiled himself. There

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were people there have never been to South Africa. I've never met him. ``

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had never met him. He seems to touch many lives. It is hard to imagine

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any other figure dying and there being a minute's silence at a

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Premier League match. He united the world in quite a remarkable fashion.

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Is that because he was an inspiration? He was an inspiring

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person? I met him a year after he was released and taken to his Soweto

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home and he understood remarkably well. He carried no bitterness. He

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described how he had watched a test match in segregated seats you could

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not approach the players and South Africa were playing Australia but he

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dare not speak to the main Australian batsman because if you

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spoke to them, he would be thrown out and he spoke without any

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bitterness of the many call him Madiba and I think after the 27

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years in prison, he emerged and he emerged at a time when perhaps our

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views of the world's views on racial discrimination completely changed

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and he created this rainbow nation without the violence. Everybody

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predicted there would have to be violence, the Afrikaners would not

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accept anything but he did all that and he was very good at reaching out

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to people. You have lots of celebrity friends, lots of royal

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friends `` he had lots of. The Sunday Times, one of the papers

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tomorrow, looking ahead at the possible guest list for his

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funeral. Also remembering that the Queen referred to him as her dear

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friend. She will not be in attendance but the funeral is

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causing a major problem. Because where it is taking place is in his

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village in the Eastern Cape. It would be a security nightmare so

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what seems to be happening and still being firmed up is that certainly

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our political leaders, Ed Miliband and David Cameron, they will go to

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the memorial service in the football stadium where the World Cup was held

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in Johannesburg on Tuesday. It is looking increasingly unlikely they

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will go to the funeral itself. Just to explain, this is where he grew

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up. The open fields and other family members buried there. It really is a

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working farm. Yes, and you will have his genuine friends going there so

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Bill Clinton will be giving the address there. I think that seems to

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be the idea. Bono as well. It could be tricky with that many people

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there. A few of the Spice Girls as well. It is quite difficult to get

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there as well. And Nelson Mandela came from royal stock. The play she

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had come from. Presumably there will be a private burial ceremony. The

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Sunday Times suggested there may be a traditional slaughter of a cow or

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a sheep. A tribal ritual of which they have already been some. That

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move onto other stories featuring on the front pages. Back to the

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Observer now. This is a story now which looks ahead at Ed Miliband's

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possible election team. And we seeing the return of new Labour?

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This will cause a lot of fuss. It seems to be an internal memo that

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the observer have managed to get their hands on. It is suggesting

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that some of the bigwigs of new Labour, Alistair Campbell, Alan

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Milburn, Peter Mandelson may be on their way back and will be advising

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at the band during election time. Should this turnout to be true, ``

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advising Ed Miliband during election time. How much should we read into

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that? Alistair Campbell is good at his job. He does what he does. That

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is the point. And so is Peter Mandelson. When it comes to winning

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elections, Peter Mandelson is a master at that kind of thing.

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Whatever the policies. They will have to do something tactical rather

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than check Egypt. That is Ed Miliband's job. And we have seen a

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shift to the left `` tactical rather than strategic. As long as they

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don't surround with the policies, I can see them trying to help the

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campaign. They are coming back because they have been successful

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before so they know how to win elections. As opposed to what the

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policies might be that may not be a tricky balancing act. They might not

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support the policies. I will be surprised to keep them keep their

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fingers out of the policies as well. Let's move on to the Sunday Times,

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sticking with politics and how much politicians get paid. A lot of this

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goes right back to the expenses scandal. But the argument with the

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expenses scandal was that they do not get paid a lot. We have never

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really worked out what they should be getting paid. If you look at what

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they are paid in America, what we should compare with is what they pay

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in other countries and what they were should be paid. Far too many

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MPs act like local councillors. Should they be doing that? Their

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role should be to look at the legislation, that make sure we have

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good legislation. Do they have enough resources? That should be the

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case. Hasn't the argument from the politicians being that they could

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earn a heck of a lot more money not being politicians? Then they

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shouldn't become politicians. They have their arguments. We could talk

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about the BBC... I love my job, I would do it for free. Everybody has

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had their salaries stamped on and the idea that politicians will lead

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up from 66,000 two 74,000 will infuriate people. But it is right.

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What should be pay our politicians? What happened under Margaret

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Thatcher was that when they wanted a pay rise then, she said no, tell you

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what, one a bit on your expenses `` put a bit on your expenses. And at a

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time when people are losing jobs, being made redundant and not

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receiving pay rises, the theory comes from that. And we do not

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expect polishes Philip macro politicians to be respected. `` we

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do not expect politicians to be respected. The Parliament standards

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authority was brought in because of the fiddling of expenses so it is an

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independent judgement. Maybe expenses claims will go down 11 .

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There are losing golden handshakes and final salary pension schemes.

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Onto the Sunday Telegraph. This is in reaction to a High Court ruling,

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soldiers to face 11 more trials over Iraq deaths. Tell us more on this.

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This is on the back of Sergeant Alexander Black who has been sent

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down for ten years for murdering a wounded Taliban fighter. They are

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now looking at 11 different deaths in Iraq in British hands. This will

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result in 11 separate enquiries I result in 11 separate enquiries I

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would imagine the army are feeling the league that all this is being

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raised. We are going back now ten years to what happened in Iraq. But

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if evidence is coming to light, that should be investigated, we have a

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duty to do so. Equally, a huge number of Iraqi families fighting

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for justice and it has taken that long. Yes, but the climate is

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slightly different now. We have a soldier who has been sent to jail

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for ten years for murder, that is focusing minds and we are now

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looking at possible misdemeanours in the past. When we say we are morally

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right, we have to show we are. When we have situations where a soldier

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has killed someone like in this case, a wounded Taliban there has

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got to a trial of some sort. Do you think lessons are learned from

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trials like this? The Ivy capable of implementing fence to prevent abuses

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of power. `` are they capable? It is difficult. So long as we do not do

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what some other regimes do which is see that killing like this has not

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happened. `` say. It will make a lot of people think twice before perhaps

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doing something that they should not. We have run out of time. Thank

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you for taking us through the papers. We will do it again in

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around 25 minutes time. We will be looking at the papers just after 11

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o'clock this evening. Coming up next, it is the Reporters, do not go

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away. Welcome to the programme. I'm Zeinab

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Badawi. In this week's programme: Inside China's Tibetan areas. Our

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reporter looks at increasing revelations over human rights

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abuses. There has been a clamp`down on monasteries and all aspects of

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type

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