23/01/2014 The Papers


23/01/2014

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Australia. They have to wait until Sunday in Hobart to get their chance

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to clinch the series. That in 15 minutes after the papers.

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing

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us tomorrow. With me Caroline Daniel, the editor of the weekend

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Financial Times, and Torcuil Crichton, the Westminster editor at

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the Daily Mail. We will start with the Independent. It says that GM

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super foods could be grown in Britain as early as this year. The

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Telegraph says that David Cameron believes a recovery for all is under

:00:41.:00:43.

way, with wages rising more quickly than inflation. Onto the Guardian,

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its leading on the Newsnight interview with the Bank of England

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governor, who has said interest rates will not be rising any time

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soon. The Express has news of a new treatment for diabetes. The

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Financial Times is also leading on Mark Carney, who has been forced to

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abandon his policy of linking interest rates to unemployment. And

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the Daily Mail reports on claims that pensioners with cancer are

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being written off as too old to treat. Lots of news coming out of

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Davos, where the rich and the good and not so good are gathering. The

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Prime Minister is there. He apparently, according to the Daily

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Telegraph, is hailing the start of a recovery for all. And that is

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following on these figures that have been released this evening by the

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government that suggests people 's take-home pay, for 80% of the

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population, is actually outstripping inflation. This is David Cameron's

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attempt to have a win-win headline. He is trying to take on Ed

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Miliband's concerns about standards of living, saying that wages are

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starting to rise again. This is the kind of headline George Osborne has

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been waiting for four months, as have the Financial Times. But there

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are still some concerns beneath the headlines. Although he does say that

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wages are rising for lots of people, we also know that over the last

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year, average earnings have only gone up by 0.9%, that is below

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inflation. The idea this is a dramatic rebound for everyone and

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it's all going to get better from here on in, there are some caveats

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here. It's the Government trying to have its cake and eat it. We've seen

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unemployment go down to almost 7%, good news for everyone. The growth

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figures are going to be revised. This is the Government realising it

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is not just about the economy, they are also going to have to fight it

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on the cost of living, which is where Ed Miliband is camped out

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right now. Cameron hails recovery for all. Does it feel like it in

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your pocket? No matter what the figures might suggest, and we can

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discuss and argue over the figures, the question is, do people feel they

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have enough money to pay the bills? Welcome to Britain where food prices

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are going up, energy prices are going up, SSE put their prices up by

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8% and, what do you know, their profits go up by 8%. We have kids

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who worked 21 hours a week in Tesco, can't get more. We have construction

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companies are putting their builders at arm's-length payroll company so

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they can avoid paying tax. It's an on the waterfront economy. That's

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true, but there is a genuine bounce happening. If you look at the car

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industry, we reported this week that Britain had made more than 1.5

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million cars last year. It's the highest number since 2007. That's a

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genuine number. It put Britain on track to become the third-largest

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producer in Europe. More and more people are buying new cars going

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out. Things must be sort of going OK. The Government, its figures

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tonight, it is saying if you take into account tax cuts up to April

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2013, that year people are taking home more pay. Yeah, and if you've

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got a mortgage and your mortgage interest rates are very low, then

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maybe you have a bit more cash. Or to buy these cars, people are

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digging into their own savings or they are going to the banks and get

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another credit. We know where that ends up. It's taken a while to come,

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but the growth figures are still way below the economic output that the

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UK used to have before the recession. Yes, it's great news and

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I'm not going to knock it, I'm really relieved to see recovery

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starting to come back, but there are still caveats and we shouldn't give

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Cameron too much fun. Clearly this is a victory of sorts for labour and

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for Ed Miliband because they've positioned themselves on this cost

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of living issue and the Conservatives now are having to

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address that issue. Will this kind of thing work? They are coming at it

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hard. We saw Osbourne saying that the minimum wage ought to rise to

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?7. Not that he's in charge of it, not that it's going to happen until

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after 2015, when he hopes he will be re-elected. There's a recognition

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that people are hurting. If you are Ed Balls or George Osborne, I think

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I know who is going to wake up feeling happier looking at the front

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pages tomorrow out of the two of them. Mike microbe the Financial

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Times. Six months ago it was said if the rate of unemployment falls to

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7%, then he would consider raising interest rates. He's not doing that

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now, so that policy is dead in the water. It's the biggest story to

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come out of Davos. I like the choice of language. His big idea is set to

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bite the dust. This was the policy that if unemployment fell to below

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7%, it fell to 7.1% this week and in Scotland it is below 7%, he would

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then look at rising -- raising the interest rates, which would be bad

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news for borrowers everywhere, but would keep the lid on inflation. He

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has now turned round in an interview saying, forget it. Is his

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credibility shot or is he simply adapting to the changed

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circumstances of the economy? That is his line, but the fact is it is

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embarrassing for the Bank of England. In terms of their

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forecasting policy and their ability to predict the future. When Mark

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Carney arrived on the job, he said in August, when he announced this

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plan about how he was going to govern the Bank of England policy,

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they forecast at that point that you wouldn't get to 7% unemployment

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until mid-2016. A few months later they changed that to mid-2015. Now

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we're looking at a potentially happening this year. But everyone

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got that wrong. That is true, but that's a pretty big miss. That was

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the sort of cornerstone of his policy. He linked it explicitly to

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unemployment numbers. Now he is broadening it out saying it's not

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just about unemployment rates, he's looking at the wider economy as

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well. He is making clear this matters to you and I, the interest

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rate side. He is not saying that interest rates are poised to rise.

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The whole point about the problem is that the country is facing is that

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there is a massive lack of confidence. People won't go out and

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spend, company bosses won't go out and hire and invest in new plants.

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Him saying interest rates will not rise until unemployment reaches 7%

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gave people confidence. In fact, that forward guidance has caused the

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increase... In car sales and everything else. I like Carney

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because he's already got excuses lined up. He says, we are wrong, but

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we'd rather be wrong in the right direction. I like the cut of his

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jib. He's a very political Bank of England governor. He didn't hesitate

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to come out against Ed Miliband's plan. He's going to Scotland next

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week. I'm really interested to hear what he has to say about Alex

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Salmond's currency plans. And I love the fact that George Osborne is

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letting it be known at Davos that he is relaxed about interest rates

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rising. I would expect some business groups and households to say, we are

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not very relaxed about it, we got loads of big debt still. I suspect

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he isn't relaxed about the interest rate rise. But then that's just me.

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Onto the Guardian. Road cameras. Privacy fear over 26 million images

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taken daily by road cameras. The Guardian has really been pushing the

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whole issue of secrecy and surveillance over the last few

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months. This story is very close to that. It's another data privacy

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story. I was wondering what Chris Huhne might feel reading this

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story, about whether we can now go back in time to what might have been

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caught on that road camera. That bloke who was caught driving the car

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with his hands behind his head at 60 mph. There will be great things on

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that database. Do I care that my car has been caught speeding? We've all

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been caught speeding at one time. The Guardian have spent a year

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campaigning against the invasion of privacy by the CIA and MI6. Who

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needs these guys, we've got speed cameras! They are storing 17 billion

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images. A number of these cameras has doubled on the roads. As a

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driver, I'm more concerned about that than the privacy implications.

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I thought non-Muslim had filming them anyway. A sort of placebo. --

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thought non-them had film in them anyway. Having done the failed Tiger

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Tiger bombing down there in London, they then went on the run. They were

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picked up, the number plate was picked up on these cameras. Too late

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to stop them going to Glasgow airport, but the cops were on to

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them. For some people, potentially the Guardian, they would argue that

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these things are on the road and are supposed to be catching speeding and

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traffic offences. If the images are being used for other things then

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that is an invasion of privacy. Conversely you could say it is

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looking after us all. Let's go on to the Independent. Treasury officials

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to warn public of risks of leaving the EU. What is this detailing? I

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quite like this story. The Government is getting civil servants

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to get ready briefing notes for the possible referendum on the EU,

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giving people the facts on the arguments against Britain leaving

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the EU. This outrages anti-union paean and Eurosceptic MPs, who say

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it is officials attempting to scare the public in favour of a yes vote.

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For me, it echoes of the early days of the current Scottish referendum

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debate, where you've got Whitehall and Westminster pumping up these

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papers on reasons for Scotland not to leave Britain, and the SNP

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government saying, you are just trying to scare people as Project

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fear. The UK Government is getting ready to enter that. The European

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debate is almost an empty room now. The only people in it are people

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talking about leaving. The people who are talking about staying...

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It's a slightly odd headline to say civil servants will play a critical

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role setting out the economic risks. Of course they should. They should

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be weighing up the pros and cons of a big change in public policy. What

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is interesting behind this story is in the last week or two, you've seen

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a lot more pro-European debate come out. More big companies come out,

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people like JPMorgan warn about the risks if British business pulled out

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of the EU. I think this is in some ways part of a wider debate. You are

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seeing more noise around the pro-European campaign. These guys

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are late to the party. We've had more than a year now, a UKIP

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bandwagon rolling, and anti-immigration bandwagon rolling

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will stop the narrative is all about... You've even got George

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Osborne throwing red meat to the Tories. The idea that putting some

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facts together is going to scare the public into a yes vote seems a

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rather surreal argument, when everyone is worried about UKIP.

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Living apart, apparently, maybe the secret to a marriage. I think it is

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Mia Farrow... Actually, they lived apart, very famously. That clearly

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didn't work for them. The Batman director. Do you know something we

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don't? These things are always hard to manage over a long time. This

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promises more than it delivers. It does say 700,000 people in Britain

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live happily apart. But it says a lot of them have a family in the

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country, the husband works in London. I don't think that

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necessarily means they are living apart. Someone is working incredibly

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hard in London during the week and probably can't afford a big house.

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It is a very Sunday kind of story on the front page of a daily. You get

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these statistics from which you can extrapolate a pattern or trend, and

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then you stick in a psychologist or expert to back-up the statistics,

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that you can be happy living apart, I call is living alone, and, bingo,

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there is a story. I don't know if it is a story for the front page, but I

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guess they wanted to lighten it up. We are going to go back to The

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Guardian. Actually, we are going onto the Daily Mirror. I have no

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idea what the story is. It is Justin Bieber, I am being told. It is also

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on the front of the Guardian. Busted, Justin Bieber. No shame,

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that is a different story. Busted, cuffed, drug bust Bieber.

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Bbc.co.uk/thebigquestions I think if you have 15 million followers on

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Twitter, the second most followed person in the world, people are

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going to be interested in this story and talking about it. For me, the

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question is if it is slightly and organised bit of criminality to make

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him change his brand image. We have seen that with Miley Cyrus, a Disney

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star gets reinvented as a controversial, edgy youngster. His

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father was apparently there all along, on the sidelines as he drove

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his Lamborghini. He could go to jail, though? We have not got there

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yet, but I think there will be a lot of debate about what is behind the

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story. He looks edgy, he looks like a jailbird, he is smiling in his

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mugshot. It may be an attempt to rebrand him. It may be that he is a

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teenager out of control. But a yellow Lamborghini? He is not cool

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in my book. You are saying this is part of a concerted campaign and

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this has happened in the past, he is getting to 19, so perhaps he is

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getting beyond those years. The grand old age of 19. He is growing

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out of the teenybopper situation. One would suggest that the majority

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of those that follow him on Twitter are of a certain age. But he is

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trying to appeal to a wider audience? He is worth about $150

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million. I think you can afford to have as many yellow Lamborghini is

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as he likes. What's interesting is that his reputation has started to

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diminish in terms his actual success as a pop star. Has it? Is not

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selling as many records? Not as many as he was a few years ago. He has

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?150 million to spend, so I think he has probably learned to drive his

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car fast. He rented the car, it wasn't even his. Talking of

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Caroline, we are going to be back in a hour's time for a look at the

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headlines behind the stories. At the top of the hour we are going to have

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the latest on the Government claiming that take-home pay has

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actually gone up, in real terms, for most people in Britain. Now time for

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Sportsday. Hello and welcome to Sportsday. I'm

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Mike Bushell, the headlines

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