11/04/2014 The Papers


11/04/2014

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concentrate on Team Sky, and we will bring you the results from rugby

:00:00.:00:00.

league, including the top two in the rugby league. That is in 15 minutes

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time after the papers. Hello and welcome to our look ahead

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to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. With me are the writer

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Dreda Say Mitchell, and Jeremy Cliffe of The Economist. Tomorrow's

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front pages, starting with The Financial Times saying the

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government will make it easier to prosecute people who evade taxes by

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hiding money off`shore. The Independent says Parliament's

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expenses watchdog will look into claims the taxpayer indirectly

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funded a suite for what the paper calls a 'sex party' during a

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Conservative party conference. The Telegraph says families with

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stay`at`home parents pay more tax than most of their equivalents

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across the developed world. The Mirror leads on the Oscar Pistorius

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trial. The Mail reports on allegations that the Liberal Party,

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police and MI5 covered up child abuse committed by the former MP,

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Cyril Smith. The Express says there's confidence that the black

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box from the missing Malaysian airliner will soon be found. A

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senior Liberal Democrat MP has told the Times that his party is

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'pointless'. And the Guardian says the Attorney General wants an

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explanation from the Crown Prosecution Service about the failed

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prosecutions of public figures for alleged sex offences. So let's

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begin. Plenty to get stuck into this evening. This, at the Guardian,

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let's start here. A story I have not seen in any of the others, at least

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not in the front pages, that supermarket staff could win millions

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in equal pay action. This highlighting, Dreda, that it is a

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case brought by some 400 workers who are mainly women seeking equal pay.

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I think so. It is an offshoot from women winning a landmark case with

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Birmingham city workers Council. Women once again. It is about this

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whole thing where in supermarkets, our `` our jobs equivalent? Women

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work in the stalls, and it is male dominated distribution centres. ``

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stores. It seems that the males are being paid more, it is interesting,

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it always seems to be women missing out. It goes back to our earlier

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story. Women coming out to work, or should they be staying at home with

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their children? This is to do with local authorities also, isn't it? It

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comes off the back of a series of lawsuits and local authorities. How

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do you measure the differences between jobs? It is an imprecise

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science. The stores say that the men who are the stalkers in question, it

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``the stores. It suggests there is something wrong with how women are

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paid. It is an important test case. It will affect virtually all of the

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major supermarkets. And supermarket giants? It can trigger a wave of

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six. Including those who own their own distribution warehouses. There

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are men there who are doing the equivalent of retail jobs. We are

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supportive, only one person is going to end up paying for this and this

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is the customer? Every time we hear repeated stories about women not

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being paid as much as men. It sounds so old`fashioned and last century,

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just because a job is more manual, another job where it isn't as

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manual, you get paid less. We are not doing manual work. Do we get

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paid less because they are doing manual work? We are not really. It

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is an interesting one. I think somebody definitely has to resolve

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this. Onto the next one, we have the Daily Telegraph. Here, it's a

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story, primary school children as young as ten should be taught about

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illegal drugs. I think what is interesting with this story is that

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it is not currently part of the national curriculum. And what we

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know about the national curriculum is that education is not only about

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subjects, English, maths, and science. We must look at the hidden

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curriculum. We have to look at issues to do with health. If we are

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not talking to children about health from an early age, how will they be

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aware of the dangers? Let's be clear, when I think of schools that

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I have taught in and the areas, some really hard`core areas, of course

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children know about drugs. It is better that we educate them to look

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after their bodies. For me, this is a health issue. Jeremy, you are

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agreeing. I had to agree with you there, there is a mad objection to

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teaching children about drugs and sex in schools. If a teacher sets

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out the facts to a group of children, they will go out and find

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the nearest drug dealer, that is completely mad. What about the odd

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midweek are taking away their childhood? We are enhancing it by

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getting them to think about their bodies. I was trying to put across

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the other side, but I can tell that I have been completely quashed!

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Jeremy, you are to explain this. This is a study by the OECD,

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representing a group of developed economies, that shows all the taxes

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have been falling when it comes to the UK generally, and a load of

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other countries, the only exception is among families where one parent

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goes out to work and the other stays at home. The article states there is

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a failing on the part of the government. I look at this the other

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way around, taxes have generally fallen in Britain over the last few

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years, is it necessarily so bad the government has focused the benefit

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of tax cuts of those in work? Maybe not. They talk about hard`working

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families and people, I do not know if it is as completely negative as

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the article suggests. Dreda, we were talking about some of your friends

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suffering from the high cost of childcare? It is astronomical, when

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I think of the people who I know, people are pulling, one person will

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look after a number of people 's children. ``pooling. It goes back to

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the notion of extended families. I find it interesting, often we revert

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back to things that we know and it has worked well. I am pleased to see

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that happening again, actually. It is typical on the continent, in the

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Mediterranean, it is perfectly normal for families and neighbours

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to share tasks like childcare and Britain after elderly relatives.

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Perhaps there is a positive side to this? Moving on from the Telegraph,

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let's go onto this. Calls for David Cameron to face Farage a live TV

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debate. Nigel Farage has done battle with Nick Clegg. Calls now that

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David Cameron should go head to head. Jeremy, do you think... The

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argument is that he ought to be seen to be doing battle with Nigel

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Farage. Others would say you are giving Nigel Farage a platform? It

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is easy to say that David Cameron is dammed if he does, dammed if he

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doesn't, if he says no to the TV debate, people would say he is

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running scared of Nigel Farage, but if he says yes,

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running scared of Nigel Farage, but that is the case. In national

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issues, I think Nigel Farage would struggle, but in debating Europe,

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his favourite topic he didn't. He turned around, but with a big

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national subject, he would say we do not have a good policy on this. I .

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Dreda, did you watch the debate? I did not. Would you watch it? I did

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not. I deliberately didn't. No interest? I felt like, as a member

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of the public, I have been set up to think I should watch it, when I have

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watched Nigel Farage, people say he is a good speaker, but he has not

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come across as a great speaker to me. Everytime I seem to see him,

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Mike on the news this week, it sounded confrontational, it sounded

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loud. `` like. I wanted to switch off. In this story, I think David

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Cameron's grassroots are saying they want this to happen, and he should

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listen. You have to ask yourself how many people pay attention to this

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sort of thing? I did not notice the pub is packed with people clamouring

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to see Nick Clegg versus Nigel Farage. People have better things to

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do in most cases. It matters, I think it matters to how these things

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are reported in the press, it filters through, and they get the

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impression that Nigel Farage is a solid baiter and knows his own mind.

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It has an effect. `` solid debater. An inside story on the sun, there is

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a story doing the rounds, staff at schools who go and take, it would

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appear, time off work to get cheap holidays or get time off. If it was

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a school pupil taking time off, they would get a fine. On page seven,

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there is this headline. Dreda. This is not a normal story in a school.

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It is a particular story, we do not know the full details, I am

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conscious I do not know the full details, but an acting head teacher,

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who has taken off time in term time, to get married, for four

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weeks. There has been so much work done with schools and parents and

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families to ensure that children stay in school during term time, to

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the extent that I think parents can be fined. It seems odd that a

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governing body would appear to give head teachers time out of school

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during term time. What I am picking up from this is that she is an

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acting head teacher, she has an acting deputy head teacher, and I

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would suspect that is what is worrying parents. If you have them

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both in the positions as acting, this school is in a transition

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period, they need managers to make it sustainable and balanced. If the

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head teacher is not there, how can they do that? You do not think that

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anger is, because if I have done it you have got fined, but you can do

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this? I am picking up what I am reading here, the governing body is

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saying that the reason they gave her time off was that she was working

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extremely hard, and it sounds to me that this school is maybe at a point

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where it needs stability. I want to get in the circumstances, I think

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parents have reasons for this. The reason why the issue has been papers

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recently is that local authorities are fining parents for taking

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children of school term to go on holiday. For parents struggling to

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make ends meet and they want to take their children away, we know around

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the period of school holidays prices of flights and hotels go up

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stratospheric. It is not unreasonable for parents to think,

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let's take them out in the last week of term instead. That crackdown

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makes this sort of behaviour less palatable. In a statement, the

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school government said normally staff take leave during holidays,

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but the request was granted because the woman in question worked

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extremely hard. The statement said teaching would not be disrupted,

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adding the majority of parents wish her well. It is interesting, I would

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say, reading into this, if she is an acting head teacher, this is not a

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good time to believe in this. You would have to guide me through the

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Times, page three, in its completeness. It is Sherlock Holmes,

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but also game of thrones, that means nothing to me! I adore this show.

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Actually, it came on, two o'clock, season four, they transmitted it at

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the same time as the US aid. There are a series of academics studying

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it as a serious subject `` USA. One is doing a cultural critic and the

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other is looking into the climate. In Game of Thrones, there is a

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kingdom where it is perpetual winter. We can never predict what it

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is like, and the economy. I don't particularly like fantasy, but if

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you pretend it is set in mediaeval times, are all these parallels

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between game of thrones and mediaeval Europe `` Game of Thrones.

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It is exciting, thrilling, and I think people should eat studying it.

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Jeremy Lin completely nonplussed. I am completely new to this. When you

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say perpetual winter, Blade Runner was like that as well. Only nine

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episodes of Sherlock have been made so far, but they provided enough for

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a day`long symposium. I think this is birds being nerds, isn't it? That

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said, I think these things are not completely useless, because if this

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programme is getting so much interest and attention from people,

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not just fans but the national press, it must be part of the

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zeitgeist. It must say something about where we are as a society.

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Absolutely. I kind of understand more than I did. And you just will

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not stop watching it. And there will be a lot of people thinking, we

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don't want something else added into it. Thank you both for coming out

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here. That's it for The Papers this evening. Thank you to my guests

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Dreda Say Mitchell and Jeremy Cliffe. Stay with us here on BBC

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News. At midnight we'll have more on the court appearance of Seamus Daly

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over the Omagh bombing. But coming up next it's time for Sportsday.

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Hello and welcome to Sportsday, I'm Hugh Ferris. Bubba breaks

:16:56.:16:56.

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