02/05/2014 The Papers


02/05/2014

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - Martine Croxall presents a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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and there are playable places up for grabs in rugby, we will have the

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results, that is in Sportsday `` play`off places. `` tells us that he

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thinks. Hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers

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will be bringing us tomorrow. With me are the broadcaster Alice Arnold

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and Alison Phillips, weekend editor at The Mirror. Let's have a look at

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tomorrow's front pages now. The Independent has more on Pfizer's

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rejected bid for British drugs company Astrazeneca` it claims a

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former top scientist for Pfizer has warned against the takeover. The

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Mail has an interview with one of Max Clifford's victims who says

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she's angry at the celebrities who defended him. The Express says

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exercise, even a gentle walk, can help beat arthritis. The FT says the

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Treasury is set to benefit to the tune of 4.5 billion pounds thanks to

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the new Help to Buy scheme. The Telegraph has a photo of Stephen

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Sutton, the teenager who has raised more than three million pounds for

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charity while fighting cancer. He's been discharged from hospital,

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describing his own recovery as 'quite remarkable' The Mirror says

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Lord Hanningfield, the peer whose expenses scam the paper exposed,

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said he needed the money so he could pay someone to look after his

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chickens while he was in Westminster. The Guardian leads on

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the sentencing of celebrity publicist Max Clifford. The paper

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says his contemptuous attitude during the trial added to the length

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of his sentence. We will stay with that story for the beginning of the

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review, we will look at how the Guardian is covering it, eight years

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in prison for his crimes and his contempt for women. We can tell from

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the picture that those eyes are his. He showed some extraordinary

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behaviour in that trial. He seemed to parade himself in front of the

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cameras. What he did was horrific, there are four women who, for the

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rest of their lives, will have had to deal with the consequences of how

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he treated them. What has worsened his sentence is the fact that he

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wound up the judge, there was the issue that he refers to when he was

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mimicking the Sky News reporter, which has angered the judge. Even in

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the dot`com he was raising his eyebrows, shaking his head. You

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mentioned that clip will stop `` dock. Here is a clip of the

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behaviour, this is what the judge had seen. It is not becoming of the

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seriousness of the case. It is as if he could not quite understand

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himself. The enormity of what he had done. He has remained convinced to

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the end that he was innocent. It is like he could not quite grasp that

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what he had done was illegal. I don't understand it, do you think

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you understand that tonight? He has for years in prison and four years

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on licence if he gets parole. There are rumours that other people have

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come forward during the trial, for prosecutions, when his sentence

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could be increased. You are right, it is his attitude, that has angered

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everyone I think. That is what the judge said. He thought he was

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untouchable. It is that arrogance. That is what is so heartening, he

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has been found guilty, those brave women who have come forward to tell

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those stories and go through that procedure, it is pretty awful for

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them, they have at least been rewarded. The irony of a lot of this

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is that the first reason he came to the police, is after the Jimmy

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Savile business, he went on the television and said it was a

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witch`hunt, all these girls are making it up. It was a woman who saw

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that who said that was it, she had had enough and it was that. His own

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PR machine has been his downfall. He is pictured in the sun, smoking

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until the end. That is the headline. The judge at his sentence for being

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flippant. `` smirking. A woman in court, the judge said that he would

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have been found guilty for the crime he committed against her in Spain,

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but it was committed before the law changed, so that crimes committed

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abroad could be included in the case, but for her to have travelled

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here, the judge said that he would have been found guilty, even though

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he was not tried. The alleged victim was very young as well. It is this

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posing for cameras. Most people when they are about to be sentence, they

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do not pose for the cameras. They keep their heads down. I saw the

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footage of him walking to the court. It is like he did not quite believe

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that it was real. He had manufactured so many stories over

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the years, and been behind so many stories over the years. It is like

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it was another story playing out rather than a horrible reality.

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Let's move on to the Mirror, Lord fraud, I did it for my chickens ``

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Fraud. Lord Hanning Field said that he took his daily allowance from the

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House of Lords without doing a great deal of work for it. So that he

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could hire a man to look after his paltry. `` Hanningfield. We have

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been an investigation at the Daily Mirror. He had been to prison once

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before for his expenses, but he had been allowed to walk back in, given

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?300 as an allowance. We saw that he was regularly turning up, going in

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for 45 minutes, one day it was only 21 minutes. A couple of days for

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about one hour. You had a reporter keeping an eye? Yes, watching him as

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he went into to the House of Lords, we watched him every day, had him

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time not, we knew, it was not just randomly, we knew that there were a

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handful of people doing it. When he was confronted, he said that there

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were 50 people doing it. He has not given us any names. But this is

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public money. We are within our rights to know who is going to work

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and who isn't. He is then investigated internally by the House

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of Lords, they have said to him, what are you playing at? He said

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that he needed the money needed ?300 a day to pay someone to look after

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my chickens as I was working in Westminster. Was it lunchtime, when

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he was going in and out? It varied, kind of mid`morning. What are they

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going to do about this? They have said they are going to do something.

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The rules on expenses will be tightened, they have said. I have

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heard that before, and people get away with far more than they would

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in any other... Maybe they need a clocking in card? Maybe a half day

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or a full day allowance. That is a clever idea. Up to four hours, you

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get ?150, but if you spend more... You get the full amount. Like normal

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jobs, where people are paid for the work that they do. Let's have a look

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at the Guardian. There is this story about the death rates for children

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under five. Children in the UK are more likely to die before they reach

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their fifth birthday, then any other country in the Western world, aside

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from Malta. That came as a surprise to researchers in Seattle, looking

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at the figures. It is a worrying report, of all the countries in

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Europe, there we are, second worst after Malta. The reasons that are

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being given by the researchers is an economic problem, and it is children

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from poor families who are born, low birth rates, parents may be smoking,

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that, coupled with some failures in early years healthcare, particularly

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possibly around midwifery, that is worth looking at. When the service

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come out, we are often surprised at how low we come. And we have the

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NHS, and we are proud of it, and we are an advanced nation. Then we find

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out that the statistics do not really bear that out. Maybe it is a

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good thing. It makes people had to think a bit, and say, we cannot

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continue to be so low down in the health figures. But, we are. Every

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statistic that comes out seems to bear the same thing. We are not as

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good as we think. If it is to do with smoking and low birth rates,

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and a newborn baby, parents have to take responsibility. We need more

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education. Parents have to take responsibility, but you have to work

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in the context, why are there still parents smoking during pregnancy?

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That message has been put up the years. If the messages put out,

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people know it, but you had to listen as to why they are not doing

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things about it. Deprivation is also listed as a reason. You can be told

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things repeatedly, but unless you believe it and would implement it,

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it is pointless. Let's have a look at the times. Page 11, we do not

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always delve so deeply into the paper, this is looking at the

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predicament, Gerry Adams, the president of Sinn Fein, you find

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himself then, with police given permission to question him for a

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further 48 hours. He presented himself at the police station in

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Antrim voluntarily. That was on Wednesday. Looking at how difficult

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his position is and the problems he is creating for the Sinn Fein party,

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and for his family, what some of his family members have been doing as of

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late. It is a piece asking whether he is suitable to be leading Sinn

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Fein or whether we need a new generation of leaders, without the

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baggage that he has. You know, regardless of this claim about the

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murder. He strongly denies this. But he carries with him baggage that in

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the sense that his brother was sentenced for 16 years, for raping

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and abusing his own daughter. That is the brothers daughter. The

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daughter waived her right to anonymity. Gerry Adams... He says

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that he did not have any association with his brother. He always believed

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the victim. What did he do about that? Was he strong and went forward

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against his brother? It appears not. If he is still associated with his

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brother then he is not a suitable person to be leading the party. The

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whole thing brings together that maybe now, they cite some good

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candidates who could lead the party into the future in a more positive

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way. And baggage in all sorts of ways could be let go. He remains a

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charismatic figure in Northern Ireland. There are new murals

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painted in the last couple of days in support of him. Support outside

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police headquarters, people parading for him. It is a difficult time I

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think for him there. Martin McGuinness has come out, saying that

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he is an estate controlled anger over the arrest. It affect whether

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they continue to support the police service in Northern Ireland. We have

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other people from other parties, coming out saying that Martin

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McGuinness cannot say this. It is all very tense again. I would

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mention who it is, but someone on social media got in touch with me

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saying that we can all feel the tension. It is palpable in the

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atmosphere. It is heating up. They are very worried about the potential

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fallout of this. Depending on what happens next, if they charge him,

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where on earth does that take us all? That was the Good Friday

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agreement, semi` people have been released for things that happened in

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the 1970s, and someone new could be charged potentially. Twitter loses

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500 million as the trend for tweaking slows `` tweeting. How does

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this work? Are you still doing it? You know I am not. I think there was

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an initial excitement. I have been on there for years but it says that

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we are reducing the time we spend on their by 10%. Many people are still

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using it. More people still prefer Facebook it is a very ``, it is a

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very London media kind of thing. That is all for tonight. We will

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have more on Max Clifford at midnight as he is jailed for

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indecent assault on women and young

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