04/06/2014 The Papers


04/06/2014

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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ready for action for the Commonwealth Games. And who will

:00:00.:00:00.

play in rugby next season? All that in 15 minutes

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after the papers. Hello and welcome to

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our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are the political commentator Lance Price,

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and Tony Grew, who's parliamentary editor at Politics Home.

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Tomorrow's front pages. We start with a look at the FT, and

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the top story of Tesco's dismal trading results. The chief executive

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said they were the worst he had seen in his 40 year career. The express

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is claiming that a healthy lifestyle is the key to beating dementia. The

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independent's a main picture is of Hong Kong's defiant stance against

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China's Tiananmen Square blackout, with crowds holding a candlelit

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vigil. The Telegraph leads with the death of a baby reportedly from a

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contaminated batch of intravenous medication. The picture is of the

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Queen's page boy who collapsed during her speech. That is also the

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big story in the guardian. The Daily Mail says it is the first

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time in British history that a trial has been held entirely in secret.

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And the Mirror has a picture of the UKIP leader Nigel Farage with a

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female companion in Malta. So let's begin with the Telegraph. A number

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of papers reflecting on the Queen's Speech, but this photograph takes is

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there, and you were there. I was there in the press gallery this

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morning. This captures beautifully the moment, because the main problem

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for the press, like myself and most of the other people watching, was

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that we couldn't see what was going on. This gentleman carrying the

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cap, here's a Cabinet minister, it was quite difficult to see what was

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going on. The Queen was about nine minutes into the speech, and it can

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be quite boring. You know what is going to be in it anyway. And this

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is one of the pages of honour, they carry her Parliamentary Rob, which

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is quite heavy, said that it doesn't drag behind her. He is known as

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Viscount Eyrthry. The Queen kept on reading the speech. You can see that

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Charles and Camilla were concerned. He was taken out and recovered quite

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quickly, we were told, and was reunited with his family, and then

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the Queen was left with three train bearers who had to try to manhandle

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the train. It does get very hot in there, because you have all of the

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peers and the MPs crowding in, and you have the TV like. So you have to

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feel some and sympathy for the poor lad. I don't think it was a comment

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on the tedium of the speech. There was a little flicker of the eyes

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from the Queen, which the cameras picked up, but there wasn't a lot in

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the speech. It wasn't a big event in that sense. It is the last one

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before the general election, a truncated year anyway because of the

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timing of it all. Most of the politicians will be much more

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concerned about what is going into their manifestos than the last bits

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and pieces of legislation, so it is not surprising that there isn't a

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great deal. 11 bills, Tony. Most of them have been trial. No new ideas,

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no great surprises. This is the Lib Dems' fault. They insisted that the

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parliament would be five years, but in Lib Dem classic attempts to

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tinker with the constitution, they wanted to set all of the

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parliaments to be five years long. If the Prime Minister thinks he is

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going to win, Parliament is normally about four years. At the moment, we

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should be getting ready for a general election. The tough stuff of

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the coalition agreement has already been done, so there is very little

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left that the parties agree on to put into the Queen's Speech, which

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is why they were talking about a tax on plastic bags. I think people will

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be talking about that. I think it might be more other talking point

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than you think. That is a very England centric view, it is already

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applicable in Northern Ireland and Wales and coming in Scotland, so

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only the English will be interested in that. One of the issues raised

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was fracking. The Metro goes with the idea of them drilling under your

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home. It sounds terrifying that they could come and park themselves

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somewhere near to your home and go underneath it without having to ask

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your permission to do so. But it is fascinating the way in which the

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whole fracking debaters developed. It has become one about energy

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security. We don't want to be dependent on the Middle East on

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Russian gas and so on. The debate is different in this country what it is

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and others. In France, everyone is opposed to fracking, and no

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government could get away with this. The Germans have been opposed up

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until now, but it seems they are coming around to it, because they

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don't want to be dependent on the Russians. So whether or not we will

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see these people turning up outside our front door is soon, it depends

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where you live. A green energy campaigner was quoted, you shouldn't

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the allowed to turn up outside someone's home and start fracking

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under their garden. It sounds like a line from a comedy! This could be

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the new North Sea oil for Britain. It could solve our energy needs, and

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America is used in example. But this could be one part of the Queen's

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Speech that could prove contentious. The Lib Dems are not happy. If you

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introduce legislation in your last year as a Government, of the Lord's

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start to object, it falls. I will be interested to see what Labour have

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to say about this as we get closer to the general election. It seems

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like a no`brainer. If the Tories are keen, they should be opposing it.

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And it is interesting that David Cameron was telling us that his

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would be the greenest Government ever, all about the wind farms,

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solar energy, natural advantages that the UK has, and now it is all

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about fracking. We have gone from being the Green party into some kind

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of wild west scenario. My understanding of Labour's position

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is that whilst not opposed to fracking, it shouldn't be seen as

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the answer to everything, and it has to go alongside other sources of

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energy. Any common`sense person would tell you that. A sensible

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country has a mix of energy sources. It may be that fracking can continue

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to contribute to that. And there may be advantages to it. I have heard it

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talked around in Parliament, jokes that Lancashire could fall into the

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sea which was popular in Yorkshire! Indeed! There is a limited amount we

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can say about the secret trial, for obvious reasons. What you make of

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it? It is extraordinary. It is almost like a super injunction,

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where you can't even referred to the fact that there is an injunction. Up

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until today, it wasn't even possible for journalists to refer to the fact

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that there was a trial in secret, even that was a secret. And clearly

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it is something that greatly concerns civil liberties

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campaigners, and they are quoted in the story here. But it is troubling

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for all of us to know that this sort of thing can happen. It appears that

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the prosecution felt that unless it was in secret, they wouldn't be able

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to prosecute the case at all. We can't judge that because we have no

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idea what they are talking about or who the defendants are.

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idea what they are talking about or The question that I still have in my

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mind, because I haven't been able to find an answer so far, is who has

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the power to decide that a trial like this can take place without any

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others know anything about it. Does that prey on your mind? Two points

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occurred to me, not all trials are open, there are severe restrictions

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on the family courts. I guess this comes down to whether you believe

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the security services are doing this because they genuinely feel it could

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jeopardise National Security Agency around, and the second thing is,

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although I object to any do anything that means journalists can't

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observe, but at least we're not taking people to Guantanamo Bay just

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assuming we cannot bring our processes forward. It is an old

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adage that justice must be seen to be done, that would undermine one of

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the fundamental principles. I know you have been reading the Tesco's

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story with interest, dismal Tesco has been the juggernaut of

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British supermarkets, it has powered ahead in the last three decades,

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from the domestic landscape in terms of

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supermarket shopping. A lot of countries it is heading. One thing

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that really jumped out, shareholder returns, and for Tesco since 2011,

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minus 13.9, Morrisons still struggling, minus 16. Ocado, 84.4%,

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a huge jump. If I was a shareholder, I would be looking at the home

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delivery market. I am not a market analyst, but this is interesting.

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People seem to have fallen out of love with very large shops that they

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have invested a lot of money on, and they are facing competition now from

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some of the better value... It is from above and below. Tesco's

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problem is they are stuck in the middle. They are doing quality food,

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but there are people doing much cheaper food, which there is a

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market for. I think the chief executive is under a lot of

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pressure. He says he is not going anywhere, but I would have thought

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that his position must be under considerable threat after all of

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this. And not because they don't, as Tony says, still have a huge market

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share, but he's talking about quarter after quarter where the

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situation is not going to improve, and I think there's only so long

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that shareholders and board members will be prepared to be patient.

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Another good brand name, we have seen so many iconic stores going out

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of business. It is not going to happen in this case, but the scale

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of them as a company, the turnaround plan is worth ?1 billion, vast

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amounts of money. We are out of time, gentlemen, we have talked at

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such length about Tesco that we have not had time to move onto another

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one. Thank you for the moment, see you at 11:30 for another look at the

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stories making the news. Stay with us on BBC News, at 11 the

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coalition's final agenda before the general election, the Queen sets out

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new bills to sack misbehaving MPs and an overhaul of vengeance. But

:12:46.:12:49.

coming up next, it is time for Sportsday. `` an overhaul of

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pensions.

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