04/06/2014 The Papers


04/06/2014

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for action for the Commonwealth Games. Will Bristol play in rugby

:00:00.:00:00.

union 's premiership next year? All that after the papers.

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow. With me are the Political Commentator Lance

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Price and Tony Grew who's Parliamentary Editor at Politics

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Home.. The FT's top story is on Tesco's

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dismal trading results. The Chief Executive of the company said they

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were the worst he'd seen in his 40 year career.The Express claims that

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a healthy lifestyle is the key to beating dementia. The Independent's

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main picture is of Hong Kong's defiant stance against China's

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Tiananmen Square blackout with crowds holding a candle lit vigil.

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The Telegraph leads with the death of a baby, reportedly from a

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contaminated batch of intravenous medication. The picture story is of

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the Queen's page boy who collapsed during her speech.That's also the

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picture story in the Guardian. The top headline is about protests over

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a secret terror trail which the paper says would threaten open

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justice. picture story in the Guardian. The

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top headline is about protests And that's also the top story in the

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Mail which says that its the first time in British history that a trial

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has been held entirely in secret.And the Mirror has a picture of the UKIP

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leader, Nigel Farage with a female companion in Malta. The Times says

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that the PM is struggling to contain the fallout from a row between two

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of his cabinet ministers, Michael Gove and Theresa May over Islamic

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extremism in schools. So let's begin. The Guardian covers

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the Queen's Speech with more of a photograph and detailed coverage of

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the contents. There is a reference to the bully on the right. That is

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the headline. Hadn't it been for the lad who collapsed, a pageboy,

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perhaps the speech wouldn't have made it on the front pages because

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there wasn't a great deal of news in it. We knew all of the details of

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the bills that were there. We saw this unfortunate situation, where

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Her Majesty remained remarkably calm when there was a little bit of a

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scene going on to the site. You were there. He hit the ground and it made

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a significant noise. Everyone was trying to work out what was going

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on. The Queen didn't miss a beat. When you look at this picture, it

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leads you to ask questions about this. As the Queen is on the throne,

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things remain as they are. You have to ask yourself why it is the pages

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of honour to the Queen are members of the aristocracy and why we have a

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12`year`old discount doing this when it could be just as easy for the

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Royal family to encourage local children to take on this honour of

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carrying the monarch's parliamentary road as they process through

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Parliament ``viscount. I speak as a traditionalist, as someone who loves

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the pomp and ceremony. Prince Charles attended today as you can

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see from the photo. Camilla attended for the second time. In some senses,

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the Royal family is preparing the next generation to take over, not

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that Her Majesty is planning to abdicate as far as we can tell.

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There are interesting changes put to be made. During the Second World

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War, The King open parliament in military uniform. In 1974, without

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time to organise the state parliament, the Queen turned up in a

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car and in a normal dress without this. There are questions to be

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asked. I would miss the pomp and circumflex starts. People like it,

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don't they? It is a reminder. I don't know what these people do for

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the rest of the year. They come and dress up nicely for the cameras. It

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is a weird mixture of modern politics and old tradition. It is

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the Queen who is stuck in the middle. She has to read a speech

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written by politicians full of slogans about working hard for

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hard`working people and the rest of it. It doesn't fit the image. Some

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of the contents of the speech. The Daily Mail, MPs are weakened. This

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is in theory giving people the chance to get rid of someone who has

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misbehaves. Those who want their say it does not go far enough. Obviously

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the Daily Mail is upset. Let's look at the detail. The government have

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had this well. It is something the coalition pledged. In the

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circumstances of which an MP is convicted of any offence, not an

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offence that... The law says if you are an MP and you are convicted of

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an offence for which the sentence is more than 12 months, you lose your

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seat automatically. This says that if you are convicted of any offence

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there is a recall mechanism where 7000 people signed a petition which

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can trigger a by`election. The other circumstance in which they can

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happen is if the House of Commons set up a standards committee and

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they can decide that if someone who has behaved in a way that is a way

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that isn't criminal... (CROSSTALK) a committee of those inside the system

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will make that the `` decision. They will automatically be a recall and

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by`election. If you think about that, you will see how widely open

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to abuse that is. If you are an MP and you win an election with a small

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majority. All your opponent needs to do is get 7000 signatures and they

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can trigger a by`election. It leaves MPs vulnerable. In Northern

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Ireland, the idea is farcical that you could bring something like that

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in with divided politics. The balance the government has struck I

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am impressed with. I think it is problematic. MPs are judge and jury

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in their own trials. We have seen MPs, including Maria Miller, Culture

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Secretary pictured, appears to have been left off the hook by the

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standards committee and by fellow MPs. That has generated anger in the

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public and has led to this disconnect between the majority of

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voters and their traditions of Parliament and the way in which

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parliamentary democracy is exercised. The truth is that these

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plans aren't ever to be put into practice. It will never happen. It

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won't happen because in the majority of cases the MPs will ensure it

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doesn't get to that. If it did get to that point, where anger was

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building up, the MP would resign anyway so it would not be a question

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it would be a case of them being forced out through these press

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reaches. `` besiegers. `` procedures. It doesn't do what the

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reformers would like it to do and nor does it achieve anything

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significant the Coalition would like them to achieve angry Cameron

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rebukes. They are not seeing eye to eye. It is a rift that is

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extraordinary. They should be briefing against one another in

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private. They should be working together. A claim they are. Yet,

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advisers are of the dart briefing one another at a remarkable level.

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They are using extraordinary language against one another. From

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the outside, it seems that Michael Gove is the fly in the ointment. He

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is very ambitious. He thinks you have to upset people to make change

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in society. He is frustrated the Home Office have not done enough to

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tackle the problem. Theresa May, don't pick a fight with her, she

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comes back fighting. Away from the soap opera discussions about this,

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there are really important issues. That is to do with the way schools

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were set up under the labour government academies and free

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schools being controlled now. This is about extremism in school

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environments that are concerning. There are answers for Michael Gove

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to AMSA. And, questions about how schools are managed and controlled.

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`` for Michael Gove to AMSA. They are given autonomy in the way they

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run themselves. My gut feeling is that Mr Gove will come out worst.

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Not because of his tussle with Theresa May. You can see why the PM

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was furious to see the story. Completely unnecessary. Especially

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when you want the Queen's Speech to be covered positively. We are

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talking about the secret trial in the Daily Mail. Britain's first

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secret trial behind closed doors. It is only thanks to a free press that

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you know it is happening at all. It is the media fighting the battle

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over regulation. If you don't have a free press who can do this, all

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democratic traditions will be put under threat. It isn't just secret,

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it is a secret trial that is secret. The fact that it was secret until

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this media organisation took their own legal action to force it into

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the open that it is happening. There are a lot of unanswered questions

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about how the trial will take place. We don't know who the defendants are

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or what the case against them is an nor do we know who was in the

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authority to decide it was kept from the public ``and. Eye see the word

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president, if that where you stand? No. We spoke earlier about this ``I

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see. It was about football is trying to stop people finding out they were

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having an affair. If security services thought it was obvious

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level of importance they are aware of the extraordinary idea of asking

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for a trial. I think that British have an idea of a justice system

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that doesn't match up to what other people have. I remember when Diplock

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was introduced in Northern Ireland and the security situation has

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caused the legal system to be closed. I don't agree with that. I

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don't have enough detail to know what the security services are

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concerned about and that is why I can serve my judgement. Staying with

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you and the Independent. It is revealed how private firms make

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quick killing from PFI, the Private Finance initiative. This is a

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hangover from the new Labour Party government. They saw the hospitals

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were in a state and they had a dilemma about social services. What

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they decided to do was get into bed with private companies and get them

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to build the hospitals and lease them back from them. What we don't

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see is smart multinational companies having negotiations. These companies

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didn't build the schools or hospitals from altruism. They did it

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because they thought they could make money. They have found another way

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to make money. That is what companies do. I don't know why

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people are surprised by this. PFI has been disastrous. As a taxpayer,

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I would rather we build these hospitals and schools ourselves.

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They have been doubling their money by flipping or selling on. They have

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contracts that last 25 years for maintaining hospitals in schools

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that they have built. Then they can sell them on. I was working for the

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Labour Party, and Margaret Hodge, the chair of the Public Accounts

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Committee who is complaining about it, admits it was a mistake.

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Clearly, there was a mistake. The controversy about it at the time. No

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one pointed out the company could then cash in, cash in the profits if

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you like and sell it to another company. Margaret Hodge is right to

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describe it as a scandal. Staying a thought from you, lamps.

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Extraordinary photographs they carrying of those in Hong Kong. They

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are marking the 25th anniversary of Tiananmen Square, where people could

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not do that ``Lance. Three cheers for the people of Hong Kong for

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coming out in large numbers and it shows what a special place Hong Kong

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is. The specialness of it has been retained since he became part of

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China. Compare that with the coverage of the news channel and

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elsewhere during the day of those people seeking, on mainland China,

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to remember their loved ones or family members who were killed, it

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is an extraordinary demonstration with so many people coming out of

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the 25th anniversary. Amazing photograph, isn't it? It is a

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striking image. I was a boy when the event happened but I can even recall

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vividly those images. You talked about China and about how the

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Chinese didn't want this to be commemorated in the way we want this

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to be commemorated in a Western sense. However, China has changed so

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much and open so much over the last 25 years, which is something that

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gives me hope. For the hundreds of millions of Chinese people who see

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small incremental changes in their country. We will end with the times.

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You have the advantage of having this in front of you `` caddie

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times. Office life loses appeal for highflyers.

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office for a long time, and the appeal of office life... Are used to

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work at the BBC, that was office life of a sort. We won't go into

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details of that, but it seems that more and more people, senior

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executives, are now working at home and finding it a much more

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productive way in which to work. This theory idea that somehow if you

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are working at home you are just skiving and taking the day off seems

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to be disappearing a bit. It is a bit confused, because it says that

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working from home has become the new business status symbol. Then it says

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that one in seven people operate from home. Having the option to work

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from home and operating from home are entirely different things, and

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I'm not entirely sure which side is coming from. Operating from home is

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very different from having the odd day where you say I am working from

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home. We will leave it there. That is it for the Papers. Stay with us

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on BBC News. The coalition's final agenda at midnight, the Queen sets

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out new bills to sack misbehaving MPs, and an overhaul of pensions.

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Coming up next, it is time for Sportsday.

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