29/06/2014 The Papers


29/06/2014

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toppled in heavy rain. Country singer Dolly Parton says she feels

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like a rock star after filling in the biggest crowd of Glastonbury so

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far. Welcome to look ahead to what the

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papers will be bringing us tomorrow. With me are former government policy

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adviser and academic and the independent Whitehall editor Ollie

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White. Tomorrow's front pages. We start with the Financial Times,

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claims officials in Berlin will do everything in their power to stop

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the UK leaving the EU. David Cameron writes in the Telegraph that

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Britain's drive for EU reforms are on track. And he can do business

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with Jean`Claude Juncker. Elton John joins the debate about gay members

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of the clergy, saying in the Metro he believes Jesus would allow

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same`sex priests to marry. The express claims the fairing taking a

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state pension could leave thousands of people better off in the long

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run. ` deferring. The Guardian 's main picture is of Dolly Parton, who

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made her Glastonbury debut today. The Daily Mail, claims the Prince of

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Wales try to influence former Labour ministers on a range of issues from

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climate change to alternative medicine. The Times says plans to

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merge income tax and National Insurance will be a key part of the

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next Conservative manifesto. The German finance minister said it

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would be unimaginable for the UK to leave the EU. One wonders what he

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has in mind to stop us doing so. After the rows of last week everyone

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is busy picking up their toys and brain to put them back in the pram.

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Generally does not want the UK to leave because they would feel

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isolated and under the control of the Mediterranean bloc, Italy,

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Greece, Spain. It is in Germany's interest to try to persuade the

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Brits to stay, do everything they want. We thought we would get their

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help on Mr Juncker but that is not happen. Now you have him saying we

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want you to be part of Europe, will do everything we can. It is part of

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the consensus`building after last week. It is quite powerful some of

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what he said, historically, politically, democratically,

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culturally, with Britain is entirely indispensable for Europe, he says. `

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Great Britain. It's nice to know we're so needed in Europe, that we

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have is friends who speaks highly of us after the spot of last week. He

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won outright. ` us that. He has great consensus. He is an

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integration on this. People are licking their winds after last week.

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` weans. His comments come as the CBI business group says our economic

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growth relies on our membership of the EU and Ed Miliband is pulling on

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that as well. That is what big business and you can see the battle

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lines being drawn for 2017 if indeed there is a referendum. It is very

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clear that business, like they are beginning to do with the Scottish

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referendum will, very strongly and say, leaving the EU will be

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disastrous for British jobs, exports, and we may not like certain

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things about the EU, but we are far better in than out. One of the

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difficulties of the yes campaign, is people 's concerns about the EU,

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about immigration. I don't think there is anything David Cameron

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vehicle to get from the EU on free movement of people because that is

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at the core of what Europe is about. You can see a referendum campaign

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where Cameron is negotiating what is a decent settlement but doesn't hit

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the key concern of voters. I think that would be a real problem. Let's

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move on that day with this scene, the Daily Telegraph has David

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Cameron writing in it tomorrow. ` theme. Declaring he can do business

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with Jean`Claude Juncker, insisting his drive for European reform is on

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track as she was saying. The interpersonal are still good, and

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there has been the same court today, much being made of the fact the two

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gentlemen have kissed and made up in political terms. Exactly, ready to

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move on and keep fighting. Nevertheless they are friends. They

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have this issue but they have made friends in political terms. Exactly,

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ready to move on and keep fighting. Nevertheless they are friends. They

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have this issue but they have made friends and they are it is most the

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Prime Minister is going to do with this in different ways, it is more

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amicable. ` it is nice. There will be lots of meetings and between

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summits. ` in between. It is damaging for Mr Juncker to have had

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such bad press, especially in the British press. On some level we need

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to make amends. We need to know what he says. One of the interesting

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things, this has been portrayed as a humiliation of Cameron, two against

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the rest. One thing it has done for him, it has proved within that

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format that he is prepared to have a fight, to stand up, and to walk

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away. And when we get renegotiation that is an important thing to have

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done. He did stick it for several days despite very negative

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attention. Europe has always tended to go on consensus, people backing

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down at the last moment. By not doing that it sends a powerful

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message. He is quoted here as saying this was all about making sure he

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would be taking seriously in negotiations ticking forward. The

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quote is anyone in Europe who thought I was going to back down is

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now thinking again. He is playing this as a victory for the tough man

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of Europe. I think there is some truth in that. He was put in an

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unenviable situation he was going to lose so he had to decide what he

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would do. Would he walk away quietly or take this stand and portray it as

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a principled stand which I'm not convinced ever was. It does have a

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slightly useful negotiating stance coming into 2017. We'll see how it

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plays out. Let's turn our attention to the Telegraph 's main story. The

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Princess battle for grammar schools. This is tied up with the BBC Radio 4

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documentary which has been hearing from former Labour minister saying

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they were urged by Prince Charles on various issues to reconsider their

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positions. Many people getting quite agitated do the future king may have

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something to say on these matters. If of years after the fact it is

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interesting comments come out a documentary where the prince

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consulted Labour ministers, on policies including climate change

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and GM foods, in addition to grammar schools. We've always known this has

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happened in the Prince has been very vocal about different issues,

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whether in letters to government ministers, that we've only just

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heard about or other issues. He is a very vocal monarch. Monarchy is

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constitutional and we have these issues with how much you can

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interfere with different ministers. It is interesting it is coming out

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now. The other point as he has been spectacularly. In a way that is

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reassuring. He can say what he likes but these people... There is quite a

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nice quote by Blunkett saying he didn't mind the intervention. If you

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are waiting around to be king of the UK you generally have to you engage

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or you would go spare. There is something to be said, some people

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get very irritated and say he has no role in any of these issues but

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other people say what is he to do, he has ideas and division, what is

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to stop him saying. No one has to do what he says, he has no leverage to

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say you must. He is just saying what he was to say. He is the patron of a

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large number of charities representing a raft of different

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sections of society. Let him say what he likes. He has a good point,

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venison to it. He seemed quite relaxed about it. This is a

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democracy, everyone has that right. He is a monarch in waiting and it

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has been decades. It is nice he is engaged. On some level we should

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appreciate that. The Guardian giving us a bit of sparkly Dolly Parton,

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she has been playing at Glastonbury. Their main story,

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Labour offers olive branch to business. Ed Balls, and Ed Miliband,

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both making speeches this week as they try to win business. Ed Balls

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going to be talking about potential low corporation tax. ` woo business.

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Trying to get their credibility back up with the business community.

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Talking to business people who have attended these events as a charm

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offensive. Both Miliband, Chuka Umunna, to a lesser extent Ed Balls

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get a frosty reception from business, the whole thing about the

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energy price freeze went down very badly. This is an attempt to say we

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will not be as unfriendly to business as you might think. For

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example, they went met and with the corporation tax rate which has come

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down significantly over the last few years under the coalition. They will

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keep it as it is. They don't seem to be offering in the story anything

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new other than reassurance we will not cover you with extra taxes. I'm

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not sure, on the basis of this, he will win many hearts and minds in

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the city. I agree, saying you're going to maintain the rate is not

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exactly a new policy. Or a very extrovert policy, it is sticking to

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what we have, suggesting it is a good policy. It also talks about

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more power to local government but we already have a decentralised

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world, we have given lots of money to local government and lots of

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policy initiatives. What is new potentially is the quota of

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government contracts to small companies, that sounds like a

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procurement edge. That is something this government is trying to do with

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recruitment, why should they do something and give lots of money to

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Hewlett`Packard etc. `` procurement. It is probably quite sensible. If we

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talking about potential policy proposals being unveiled by labour

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we have two touch on the critique that has come from Jon Cruddas who

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has been saying I've had lots of good ideas on policy and nobody is

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putting forward. How devoted are the Labour Party on this issue? It has

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been running all we can. `` divided. It's interesting with this

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leak of what John Part is said in a private forum. Lots of interesting

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ideas. `` John Cruddas. It is not what people want to hear. Despite

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the fact he has spent well over a gay talking about these new policies

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were supposed to be interested in, it `` well over a year. You wonder

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what is going on in terms of the policy review. If you are John

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Cruddas you do not go into a public meeting and say stuff like that if

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you don't expect to be recorded. The Tories have people going into these

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meetings, one in ten days. You shouldn't say those things. Ed Balls

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was on the Andrew Marr show today saying he is frustrated, he spends

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hours. Ed Balls would be furious, so would Miliband. They will be furious

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not necessarily they don't know what he thinks but he has been stupid not

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to say it in public and be recorded doing so. It's a great story but not

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brilliant for the Labour Party machine. The express has how to get

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a bigger pension pay`out, suggesting thousands of victims could double

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their income from their savings by putting up taking a state pension.

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How is this going to work? `` putting. I'm not sure I completely

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understand this. It's something about, but all comes from the budget

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where you didn't need to buy an annuity. You put your pension pot

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you give it to a company, and they say we will pay you however much

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year until you die. George Osborne says you don't need to do that any

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more. This is saying you take a pension pot and you spend it for the

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first few years. Blow it on a Ferrari lifestyle. Take a nice

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holiday. During that time, this is where I use it, your state pension

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will go up by 10.4% each year it is deferred, plus an extra 5% living

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costs. At the end of the five year when you have blown your pension pot

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you can get your state pension and it will be bigger because it was

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deferred. I think that is what it is. Nicely explained. Thank you very

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much. They have a big typeface in the express, it sounds exciting but

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perhaps you need to look at your own finances and see if it would really

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work for you. A simpler story if we return to the Telegraph, this will

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make people laugh. Tucked away at the bottom and the sparkly Dolly

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picture, Britain arcs America to end their ban on haggis. `` asks. Did we

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know there was a ban on haggis? Some people may vaguely remember this

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happened, I wasn't aware, I've had vegetarian haggis and it's

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fantastic. All it might be nice for community relations. I think there

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is something in this. This is all about Whitehall and London saying,

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we are better together, we have allowed the Americans, if you go off

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online you will not be able to sell your haggis. `` clout with. Thank

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you for joining us. We will have more for you in the next hour, when

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we look more closely at some of those stories. We will be back at

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11pm, GPs with a poor record in detecting cancer could be named

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under government proposals. We will have more on that. Coming up next,

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it is time for clip. `` click.

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