01/07/2014 The Papers


01/07/2014

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Transcript


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers

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With me are Simon Watkins, City Editor of the Mail on Sunday, and

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The Telegraph leads with potential new laws to tackle

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Their picture story is of the BBC presenter Victoria Derbyshire, who's

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leaving Radio 5 Live along with fellow presenter Shelagh Fogarty.

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Both will be replaced by men, despite the Director General

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of the BBC saying he wanted more women on the air.

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The Metro also leads with the revenge porn story.

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That's alongside a celebratory picture

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of the unseeded Australian who beat Nadal at Wimbledon this evening.

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Nadal crashing out of Wimbledon is also the main

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Nadal is twinned with former champion Maria Sharapova,

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Their main story is a call from a leading doctor for a change

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in the law to help end the lives of terminally ill patients without

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are no risk to health " is the Express's headline on the

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cholesterol`lowering drug, that's according to health experts.

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The FT leads with what looks like good news,

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with sterling hitting a six`year high against the dollar ` although

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it could mean the Bank of England becoming the first major central

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Let us begin. We are going to begin with the Daily Telegraph.

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They have a piece about how there is a new law that could come in to

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tackle this idea of revenge pawn. I think it is another example of the

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law playing catch up with what is going on on the Internet. There are

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websites dedicated to revenge pornography. If you have an

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acrimonious break`up with your partner, you can post pictures of

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you in more happy days doing whatever. Images taken in happier

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times and then used as a weapon. It is surprisingly this does not

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already contravene some law. Obviously the feeling is the law is

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not being used, and maybe the solution is to pinpoint a specific

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offence. Have there been cases where they

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have been able to get a conviction? The piece is suggesting there has

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been a spate of suicides on the back of this. They mention a particular

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incident with a young woman in `` who was working in Abu Dhabi, and

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she feared her ex`boyfriend was going to post pornographic ``

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pornographic pictures. She feared for her safety and her job and she

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sadly took her own life. An extension of the bullying we have

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heard a lot about online. Yes, and as I say I think there have been

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efforts to prosecute over certain types of harassment, and stalking

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laws have been used in some cases, although obviously this particular

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offence, which for those who are victims is particularly upsetting,

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is not getting the attention it seems.

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The other story is about Isis, `` you can now save more. What have the

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banks done? The rates are not very good. The rates have been tripped ``

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trimmed back. We have historically low interest rates. And this to have

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come back even further. And that is the Budget.

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`` and that is after the Budget. But it always feels that you are given

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good news on the one hand and the banks always seem to find another

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way to clobber you behind the scenes.

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Have they given any possible reason? The bank stake in deposits

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to lend them out, and if they do not, `` if they do not want to lend

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out, they do not need deposits in. There is a bigger economic picture.

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One of the reasons interest rates are at a historic low, one of the

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reasons low interest rates work to stimulate the economy is that it

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encourages people to spend rather than to save. So in some ways it is

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part of the solution to our current economic situation. We have had low

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interest rates encouraging people to spend... If you do not want to

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spend, that is unfortunate. We think on the one hand we can put more

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money in, tax`free saving, so we put money aside to do that, then we

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realise we are no better off. And lots of people who have retired,

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their income is the interest on their savings.

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We can take a look at the Guardian. The picture of the shot at Wimbledon

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today. But let us that about the main story, top doctors `` top

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Doctor's assisted `` assisted dying coal. He is making a lot of points.

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He is saying doctors should be able to help terminally ill patients to

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take their own life. Last week we heard in the Supreme Court that the

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bid to have the ban on assisted dying was not upheld, so he put the

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issue back on the agenda. It is very emotive, and I think unless this is

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something that personally affects you, you do not really know what it

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is like. It is a hard thing to judge. If it is brought in there are

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fears that the law might be abused, to get people's savings or cash in

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on life insurance. But when you are personally affected by this you see

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a different side. But it is a very hard thing to roll on. The thing

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some people find hard is that you give prior approval to somebody to

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help somebody die effectively. Plenty of people can accept that

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there are circumstances in which that is the morally compassionate

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thing to do. Legally sanctioning it in advance is a line I think some

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people will find hard to deal with. This is an issue that is good to be

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debated in the House of Lords next month.

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Talking about compassion, he is talking about the need for the

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equivalent of midwives to sort of nice people through their final

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days. When you put it like that, these will be specific people who

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will help people with palliative care and be given that legal...

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The manner of death, which we all have to face at some point, I think

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we do not handle it very well as a society. We do not have mechanisms.

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The medical profession are there to keep people alive rather than help

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it would die, and I think it is something that perhaps

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understandably not a lot of thought has gone into it.

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There are other points, he is talking about a four`day working

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week. Excellent idea! What the is also the serious issue of mental

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health. `` but there is. These are things we do not pay enough

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attention to. I think he is spot on on that one.

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The other top story is quite interesting, they have got access to

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the Tory party guest list at their main fundraising event of the year.

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Only a year late but nonetheless! What do we learn from who was there

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last year? These tables for the privilege of sitting next to David

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Cameron, Theresa May, Boris Johnson, it was ?12,000 to sort of

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Rob shoulders. `` Rob. The suggestion is that it was sort of

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clouded in secrecy, they are quite reluctant to release the names of

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these guests, and I think it just has generalists asking more

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questions. `` journalists. Underlying this is the whole

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question of political funding and how it comes forward. Both Labour

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and the Tories frequently get into trouble as to where the funding

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comes from, whether it is big business, billionaires, unions. On

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the other hand the other option of taxpayer funding of political

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parties is probably equally unpalatable.

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Difficult to see how much they make from these types of events, although

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I think it does say that they took ?1.1 million in the week following

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that particular event. There will be a lot of entertaining tomorrow

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evening, where ever it is this year. `` wherever.

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The Financial Times, this sounds like good news. It is not that

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straightforward. The strong pound is good if we are going on holiday. The

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serious risk is that a strong pound makes exports in this country will

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`` more expensive overseas, makes it harder for British manufacturers to

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export their goods abroad, and getting growth and exports up is a

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critical part of the next phase of the economic recovery. So a strong

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pound is not... Unless you're going on holiday.

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Let us top about our final story. What happened at Wimbledon today?

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Lots of people have been watching that. And deep shock.

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What is going on? Serena Williams is out, Maria Sharapova, now today, one

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of the favourites, Rafa Nadal was beaten by this completely unknown

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19`year`old Australian unseeded guy. This is the beauty of Wimbledon, as

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much as we have our favourites and we want them to do well, Wimbledon

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is about moments like this where people come from nowhere and explode

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onto the scene. Andy Murray has hailed him as a future date of the

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sport. `` great. It is what Wimbledon's all about. If the

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seeding was actually the order in which the tournament ended, it would

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be terribly dull. The whole point is that seeding gets mixed up.

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Who do you reckon Tom then? Murray is still in there. I think there is

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a quote from him in one of the papers about this amazing young

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Australian saying, he is a future champion but presumably Andy Murray

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is hoping not this year. More from you a little later.

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That is it for us from the moment `` from us for the moment. Sport coming

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up. It's been a day of upsets

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at Wimbledon. Nadal follows Sharapova out

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at the forth round stage.

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