12/08/2014 The Papers


12/08/2014

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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action from the super cup final, and Gareth Bale's return to Cardiff with

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rail Madrid. That is in 15 minutes, after the Papers.

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Hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers are going to be

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bringing us tomorrow morning. With me Sam Coates, Deputy political

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editor at The Times, and Randeep Ramesh, social affairs editor at the

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Guardian. Tomorrow's front pages, we'll take a look at what has

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arrived so far tonight. The Independent says that ten different

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enquiries have been launched in under three years into Greater

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Manchester Police, and specifically into its handling of the rape and

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sexual abuse cases. The Financial Times has a striking image of a

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Russian aid convoy. Hundreds of tracks are currently on their way

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towards eastern Ukraine. And a warning from Colonel Tim Collins is

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the Telegraph's front page tonight. The retired military officer, famous

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for his rousing speech on the eve of the Iraq war, says that Britain is

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failing in its moral obligation to intervene. A photograph of the late

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Robin Williams, found dead in an apparent suicide at his home on

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Monday, dominates the front of the Daily Star. It is also the image

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that fills the front page of Metro, which says that the agony of the

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actor's final hours has been revealed. And Robin Williams and his

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daughter are on the front of the Express. That paper also has an

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update on its campaign to try to end hospital car parking charges.

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Meanwhile, the Daily Mail speculates that financial worries may have

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played a part in Robin Williams' death. The Guardian leads with news

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that we have been covering here this evening, that Britain is

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intensifying its involvement in northern Iraq.

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Welcome to the news channel tonight. We will start with Iraq, and

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particularly with what the Telegraph has to say. Colonel Tim Collins, one

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of the media's favourite retired military officers. Will this strike

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a bit of a nerve, do you think? It certainly plays into a growing

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chorus of calls for Parliament to be recalled and for greater

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intervention, and perhaps even for a direct tackling of Isis, which is

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actually not UK or US policy at the moment. What Tim Collins is saying

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is that Britain has a very long, historic relationship with Iraq, and

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with the Kurds in particular, since we went to war to protect them in

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the Gulf in 1990, and that we should do much more than we do at the

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moment. He says the age drops are like a pebble in the ocean, and that

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we need to get stuck in and start fighting on behalf of the Kurds, to

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push back the Islamic State, and to protect the region. Randiv, he is

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also saying in this interview about the danger of historic civilisations

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being wiped out. We have heard a lot of apocalyptic language over the

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past few days, yet there is also a poll being quoted by the Telegraph

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tonight, which says that whilst most people are in favour of more aid and

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the rest of it, they are dead set against any idea of troops on the

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ground. It is a big dilemma for the politicians. When it comes to

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ancient civilisations being wiped out, I think it is a good headline,

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but unfortunately we have lost plenty of those. You can see the

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wreckage in Syria, you can see what happened in Lebanon on 30 or 40

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years ago. These things do disappear under the waves of war. I think the

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late motif of this kind of conflict probably goes back to that Gulf War

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crisis, where we set up a safe zone for the Kurds to operate, which

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allowed them about 25 years of democracy. I think that is the fear,

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perhaps, of this mission, creeping into a situation where we patrol the

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skies of Iraq in order to insular this kind of humanitarian corridor

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for the Kurds to operate and protect them from Isis. `` ensure this kind

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of humanitarian corridor. That is a political decision. We have not got

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anywhere near it, but that is what lies behind these Army guys coming

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out and saying that we cannot begin this process without an end in

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sight, and I think that end does lead you to this kind of project,

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which I do not think David Cameron really wants to go to. There are a

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lot of easy calls in the moment in the political world for a recall of

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Parliament and for further action, but very live in peoples minds at

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the moment is the experience last year over Syria, where there was no

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clear plan, yet there was a recall of Parliament and a botched boat

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that resulted in a slightly inconclusive set of votes in the

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Houses of Parliament and Britain ruling out military action there. ``

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botched vote. I think one of the things that the government is

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conscious of, and which the military wants to make clear, is that you

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need some sort of and endgame. So that if we did get further involved

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in what is going on in Iraq, we would know what I clear objectives

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were, and how they would end. And I still do not quite see that we have

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got to that point. Whether it is a sort of permanent patrolling

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presence, to allow a Kurdish state within a state to continue to

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existing safely, or whether we look to actually try to maintain control

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and maybe even decimate the Islamic State itself, which is an altogether

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bigger undertaking and probably pretty difficult at this stage. I

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think that is true. I think as we have found out, when it comes to

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Iraq and Syria, there are things beyond our control. Baghdad, what

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happens in Damascus, what Turkey decides to do eventually with the

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Qataris and the Saudis, that is London's problem. It really does not

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have much of a dog in this fight. The other problem for Britain is

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that anything that it does do, America can do far better. And

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bigger. And bigger. So there is no distinctive role. There is no need

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for Britain to get involved other than a sense of symbolism and

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history, and a need to show solidarity with the US and the

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Kurds. And it is a lot of money just for that. Sam, you mentioned the

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vote on Syria last year, and of course there was much controversy

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over the role of Ed Miliband. I'm still not `` Downing Street have

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forgiven him over that. But it seems that conservative researchers have

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found, according to a story at the bottom of the Daily Telegraph, that

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Mr Miliband is one of the biggest reasons why swing voters in the

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Midlands will be reluctant to vote Labour at the next election. What do

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you make of that? That is an extraordinary curious story. You are

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quite used to reading poll stories, which are based on research done by

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poll companies, reputable poll company to publish their

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methodology, explaining how the vote is broken down in different parts of

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the country. Robbie speaking, they show that the Labour Party is ahead

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by something between four and seven points, on polls that are taken

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nearly every day. `` broadly speaking. On the front page of the

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Telegraph we have a new phenomenon called conservative research, and

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hey presto, it comes out with the unbelievable conclusion that David

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Cameron will win the next election because of Ed Miliband's

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unpopularity. Now, he is unpopular, but the Tories are still behind. The

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big question is, why are they doing this? Why are we reading this story?

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What is happening is that conservatives have long presumed and

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hoped that the improvements to the economy will bring with it a rising

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tide of votes. And that is not happening. And so you are seeing

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doggedly determined poll leads of 47% for the Labour Party, and people

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in the Tory party are getting unsettled. This is, I suspect, their

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attempts to calm the nerves. Do you agree with that? Do you think it is

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about internal reassurance for conservatives, rather than actually

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aimed at Labour, or indeed the swing voters? I think it is undeniable

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that the polls do show that Ed Miliband is a weakness for his

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party, but that is not news, and I think Sam is probably right. You

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have to wonder, you have cut out the middleman and printed the press

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release. It appears, if one can use that formulation, because this is

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what the Conservative research Department would say, surely? OK, we

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will move on. Enough said, as you might say. We will move on to the

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Financial Times, and this image, which I noticed the Telegraph have

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just managed to get onto their front page. It is this image of these

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tracks with their lights on, so it is a moody, Twilight image, of these

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innocent looking white trucks on the one hand, but on the other hand, if

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you are a Ukrainian in Kiev, you might perceive this as a sort of

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stealth invasion. You do have a split screen feeling of events in

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Iraq taking place while once again that is in Ukraine are just starting

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to read up again. There has long been a fear or a suspicion that

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President Putin would use the next big international events to make his

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next incursion into Ukraine. He has arranged a humanitarian aid mission,

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280 trucks, seemingly under the cover of the International Red

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Cross, though actually as it happens the International Red Cross denied

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that this was their convoy this morning, in a rather powerful and

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spectacular tweet. And the Ukrainians are saying they will

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allow the aid in, providing it is transferred to the Red Cross. Very

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murky. It does look like a military convoy, with the perfect distance

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between each track. You wonder whether there are 30 soldiers in

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each vehicle, standing to attention and waiting to be unloaded somewhere

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west of the border. Putin is nothing if not a clever politician. This

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sort of says to the west, these people require humanitarian aid, I

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am going to deliver it. You cannot say that this is anything but

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material support for people in need. Of course, the Ukrainians will say,

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hang on a minute, you created this problem. You gave them the guns and

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the weapons. the comparison is with Syria. In Russia, it was blamed, and

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there are two calculations. One is that there are lot of ethnic

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Russians in that part of the world, and the reception will be purely

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positive. There is a need that he is answering. The West tried to look at

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the difficult sanctions, which the European Union needs to get 28

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countries to agree to. They could not get very far to it. Is a

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newspaper man, what do you make the decision to go big on this story? On

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the sanctions question, the Financial Times are nothing if not

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good at following the money. That is where the Russian question is. It is

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being watered down. Whilst there are distractions in Iraq, it becomes

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even harder. Just briefly, let's look at the Independent story on sex

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crimes. This is quite something. The suggestion that has emerged that

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Greater Manchester Police face ten different enquiries into and a half

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years. We have lost the end of this, but the bureau of investigated

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journalism done a lot of work. It is whether they were right to proceed

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with surveillance when a vulnerable child was placed in danger. The

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story is so Peter Fahy. He could be in line to take over at The Met. He

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is innocent until proven guilty. But there will be a question in anyone's

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mind. He leads the counterterrorism strategy, and he has been seen as

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being quite effective. Bell the last word is on surveillance. Police have

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misused surveillance in recent years. Thank you both for joining

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us. You're going to carry on looking through these, we will be back with

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you again at 11:30pm, but for now, that is all for us. At 11 o'clock,

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we are going to have a report from northern Iraq, where tens of

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thousands of refugees crossed a mountain range is to flee from

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Islamic militants. Now it is time for the sport.

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Hello and welcome to Sportsday ` I'm Azi Farni.

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Coming up on Sportsday, it's gold for Great Britain on day one of the

:13:32.:13:34.

European Athletics Championships as 40 year old Jo Pavey leads the way.

:13:35.:13:37.

A Cristiano Ronaldo double sees Real Madrid lift

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