29/10/2015 The Papers


29/10/2015

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We'll be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers

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Friends of family of Bailey Gwynne, the 16-year-old stabbed to death

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at school in Aberdeen, have tonight been staging

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A 16-year-old boy will appear in court tomorrow over his death.

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The founder of the failed charity, Kids Company, has said it provided

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Relatives of soldiers killed in the Iraq War criticise the latest

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It was announced today that the Chilcot report will be out next

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summer - Labour says the wait is beyond ridiculous.

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A 16-year-old boy will appear in court tomorrow over his death.

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The founder of the failed charity, Kids Company, has said it provided

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exceptional value after a report revealed it was handed ?46

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million of public money despite concerns over the way it was run.

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Two men are charged with raping a soldier, who was later found

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Coming up in Sportsday, the former Chelsea doctor is pursuing a case

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for constructive dismissal. Former player as, colleagues and fans

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gather in Liverpool. And the best of the action from the world gymnastics

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championships in Glasgow is all coming up in 15 minutes after the

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papers. Hello and welcome to

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our look ahead to what the papers With me are the former trade

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minister Lord Digby Jones The FT says that David Cameron

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and George Osborne are seeking an emergency brake

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on new laws affecting economies outside the eurozone as part

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of its renegotiations for the EU The I quotes a new report

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which says young people are suffering the worst economic

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prospects for several generations. The Independent carries the news

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that China has announced the end of And the Guardian front pages

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features the China story, along with the news that

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the long-awaited report from the Chilcot inquiry into the Iraq war

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is scheduled to appear next summer. Spending on credit is

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at its highest level for a decade, with borrowers owing some ?176

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billion, according to the Metro. The Telegraph says one ambulance

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trust is making patients wait twice as long for help

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if they dial '111' , even if they The Times leads with news that

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police have demanded the power to see the internet browsing history

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of everyone in Britain. And a police pilot scheme is telling

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victims of crime to call them on Skype,

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according to the Daily Mirror. Let us get started. The Times, the

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headline is that police want powers to see the public's Web history. The

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broad picture. We consider ourselves to be a country that is very free,

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separation of powers, the police controlled by politicians. In this

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story, the police have been lobbying behind the scenes ahead of a major

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surveillance bill that will be published next week. They want the

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government to force Telecom companies to retain data that would

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disclose specific addresses visited by customers. The police would not

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have access to the content, but it would know which websites you have

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been visiting. They need this because there isn't much potential

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suspect behaviour carried out online. -- is so much. Civil

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liberties will say it is evidence of an overweening police desire to

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intervene in our lives. Some politicians, this critics of the

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surveillance state, they say there should be rejected. One senior

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officer said that it was about everyday investigation rather than

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surveillance. We sit here and we can afford when we have got people who

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want to do us real harm, we can afford the luxury of having a debate

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as to whether this should happen. And then when an atrocity happens,

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why it are we not being kept safe? At the end of the day, do I really

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care if the police are not going to look at what I did, but look at the

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various websites I chose to look at? If I have got nothing to hide,

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what am I worried about? Frankly, if somebody is going to try and access

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help to hate a lot of different groups... If the price I pay for

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that is the police also look at the websites I have been looking at,

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that is the price I will pay. Parliament has already said no to

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this. Parliament is saying, keep us safe. But we are going to tie your

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hands behind your back. This is mission creep. Police have to prove

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this works. Here is what David Davis is saying. We have to monitor the

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monitors. Would you mind if the police looked at yours? Not at all.

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And we come from and divides. Neither of us minds. But it is the

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principle. I am a law-abiding citizen. What I think is the

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hallmark of an advance democracy, at least we are having a debate. We are

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talking about the thin end of the wedge. And there are European

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rulings. What they say, there are European court rulings on data

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retention. Look at security of data. If this is held for a year or

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longer buy these telecom companies and they are not secure, we are more

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vulnerable. We have got to get a way in which we can stop people from

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doing us harm. We have to give those people entrusted with that task to

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have all the power in the world to keep us safe. They always say they

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need these powers. Can we trust them. There are good and bad things

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we do in our lives. The mirror getting a bit of outrage

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against on policeman running around. That is

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the first thing he said. What is the story about? This is what it is. The

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police are saying, how do we get more value for money? We have got to

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give more services. What can we do? One thing they have come up with, we

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will interview certain people who might be assisting on Skype. It

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sounds reasonable. And what happens, complete copout, this is dreadful.

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It starts out as an idea, and then it becomes default. In terms of the

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actual quality of police response, the body in your house reassuring

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you. Victims will lose out. You want a police officer in your house

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showing concern. Of course. But police plan to ditch home visits,

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slammed as a copout. It is newspaper language. What they are saying,

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public sector cuts, we have got this. This is the overall

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narrative. That is what newspapers do. You will find the same thing

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when we get to the Daily Mail about population. Something that might not

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get us so steamed up. I think this falls to you, Henry. It is about

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motorcars. One cannot feel sorry for vaults weighed in. -- Volkswagen.

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Think about the amount it will cost to fix one of the cars brought in.

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It counteracts the cheating of the emissions test. The question is

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whether every single one of those people will come forward and claim

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from Volkswagen. Whether every single one of those people will be

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entitled to that particular compensation. They claim that

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something between 10-20 employees were involved in this particular

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scandal. The one thing I would say, a policeman working in Newcastle, a

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businesswoman in Manchester, this is not about business at it. There are

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loads of people, 99% of business people in Britain, do not want this

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image that all businesses are like this. You have got one of the major

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car companies who have been at it and they deserve serious punishment

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and serious putting right the wrong. Because they have been breaking the

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rules. It does not mean everybody has been breaking the rules. But you

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trust to the brand. It is a massive and global. People thought they were

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more fuel-efficient. Now it is a sham. This is not about breaking the

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rules, this is about consequential loss. Somebody has got a diesel

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engine and it is worth ?500 less. Who is going to give them the ?500?

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Argue surprised that no other car company, I thought others would be

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discovered. But it seems to have been one rogue business. The testing

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regime has allowed car companies to do things to make sure they get

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within the tests. A good example, and I think we owed this to Jeremy

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Clarkson, on some fuel consumption test. They used to go past the beam,

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switch off the engine, go into neutral, and then start it again.

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What I think was coming here was, VW have taken it another step. This is

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now taking the Mickey. I am not surprised that one has been

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hammered. I would not be surprised that in the boardrooms, most people

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are saying, please tell me we are not doing this. There are regular --

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rigourously auditing verse. A lot of these tests, the it is going on. You

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have to look whether regulation was poorly implemented. I would have

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thought that within the boardrooms of the automotive world, you are

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going to have everybody scrambling around saying this is not happening.

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The Metro, spending on credit hits a ten year high. The figures are

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absolutely colossal. But we need to be clear on what we are talking

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about. Why does it matter? When you look at the component parts of the

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financial crisis, there are four or five different things happening

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creating a perfect storm. Some was poor regulation, poorly implemented.

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Some of it was politicians basking in the sunshine of people feeling

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good. One of them was arsenic. The average Joe in the street who was

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saying, I love this, I can borrow a lot of money cheaply. Is it

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dangerous? If it is not asset backed, if what you are doing is

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borrowing for something that is worth more than that, so there is a

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degree of equity, and you can service it is not of your income,

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nothing wrong with that. If the value comes down, and you cannot

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service it any more, because interest rates go up, the debt

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service goes up, then you are in trouble. That is what you have to be

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careful of. Are we heading for a correction? I think we are. History

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repeats itself. Those who fail to learn the lessons of history are

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tuned to repeat it. I do not want people to suffer. But we had it so

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good for quite sometime. I am getting letters from banks and all

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sorts of things. Some people will say, OK, brilliant. And the cold

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winter will come at some point. He is absolutely right. I am worried

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that I am agreeing with you. There is a front-page picture in the Daily

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Telegraph of some actor with a sword. It is all about the Battle of

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Agincourt. Henry just said, we have not talked about this. This is a

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nice segue. People do not know history. Here is an example of where

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we should learn from history. 600 years ago last Saturday, Henry fifth

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took his guys over to France and eat an army five times his size. --

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beat. What the photograph is about, there was a service for the 600 is

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since Agincourt. The lesson, complacency. In sport, and media, in

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business, in public sectors, one of the greatest evils is where you

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think, all you have to do is turn up and you will win. The French made an

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enormous stake. They got absolutely wiped out. We won. Get him off. I do

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not know what French for enough is. But the other thing we got out of

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this was all the vineyards. And you very much. -- thank you. Well done,

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both of you. Great fun with the papers. Coming up next, Sportsday.

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