18/01/2016 The Papers


18/01/2016

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nervous wait after he cited for making contact with opponent's eyes.

:00:00.:00:00.

-- an opponent. to what the the papers

:00:00.:00:14.

will be bringing us tomorrow. With me are Deborah Haynes,

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who's defence editor with the Times, political editor

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for the Daily Record. The Daily Telegraph, get us started

:00:26.:00:37.

on this, Deborah, Cameron will back the Muslim veil ban, we knew what he

:00:38.:00:46.

wanted to do about people speaking English, this goes further. The

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Telegraph has picked up comments made in an interview by David

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Cameron with the Today programme this morning, and it talks about how

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the veil could be banned for students at school, institutions

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such as courts, people arriving at the border. He is not saying it goes

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as far as a French style actual ban, but in certain situations he says

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that he could see the sense of, you know, Muslim women not being allowed

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to wear the veil, which, you know, the Telegraph goes into depth about

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how this will reignite the debate about whether it would be a French

:01:29.:01:33.

style ban over the veil, and he also, it also goes on to talk about

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a range of measures that the Government is preparing, apparently,

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to stop British Muslims from being radicalised and travelling to join

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Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, which seems to be the foundation for

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it all. Indeed, Torcuil, this is the second leg of it, the idea that

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those who do not speak English and be encouraged to do so, even though

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the funding for that was cut in recent years. This will be day two

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of Cameron's clamp down on Muslims, as you could portray it, because he

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managed to conflate and confuse the story on the radio, ?20 million to

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fund education for Mars and women coming into Britain who do not speak

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English, that is fine. -- for Muslim women. He managed to conflate that

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with radicalisation, with the fear that the Government and lots of

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people in Britain have about parts of the Muslim community being

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radicalised and going to fight for Isis, and this was not clever

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politics. The Telegraph have taken the quotes, shaken this about a bit,

:02:40.:02:47.

and managed to put this into the day two story about the veil, which

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opens up... It has been talked about for some time, in France too. For a

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lot of people, it will resonate, they may think we should go down the

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French road. The French road seems prescriptive to me and other people,

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and even Cameron himself says that people are free to wear what they

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want within reason, but there will be places, courts, hospitals,

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perhaps council buildings... Schools is an interesting one. At the

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barrier between the private and public breaks down in these places,

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people become part of a bigger society, which is what is behind

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this whole thing, about trying to get citizenship and a sense of

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Britishness and a sense of belonging, because there is this

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uncertainty and fear now about whether we live in one community or

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two or five or ten, the sense of community breaking down. Let's move

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on, right, Torcuil, the Financial Times, the big story of the day, the

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problems with steel, Tata cutting 1000 jobs in Port Talbot, and the

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Chinese getting the blame. The Chinese, quite rightly, getting the

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blame! There are other factors, it has to be said. You have to blame

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the phenomenon of globalisation, really. Basically, the world

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produces too much steel, and there is no demand for it. China produces

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1.1 billion tonnes of the stuff, and we only need 1.6 billion tonnes per

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year. There is no greater symbol of that than the car park at Port

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Talbot, where the steel is stacked up in the car park, because they

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have got nowhere else to put it and they cannot sell it. The FT has gone

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on moving the story forward from the job losses, 750 at Port Talbot, more

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in the North of England, they have moved it on to this thing called

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market economy status, which is what China wants from the World Trade

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Organisation this year, and it looks like the WTO might give them it, a

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market where what I am willing to pay for the commodity is what you

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will sell it at, and the state does not have any interference in the

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market. Of course, China's mass of control of its economy, it is not a

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market economy yet, and experts have been warning that granting China

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this status would cost Europe, one of the biggest markets, it would

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cost it 3.5 million jobs, and something like ?228 billion of lost

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orders. All very good and so forth, but, Deborah, the impact on Port

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Talbot, we have seen it in other places, Middlesbrough and so on, it

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is not just the jobs immediately at risk, other industries and

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businesses, little businesses, cafes, bus companies, everybody

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suffers accordingly. Absolutely, such a wide reaching issue. There

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was like a debate in Parliament today about defence is used, talking

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about the nuclear deterrent, and the replacement of the submarines,

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asking whether steel for that project will be British or Chinese.

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So it touches all walks of life, and this story in the FT is a very clear

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about the impact, and it seems like this is going to happen. It is just

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a massive correction anyway that, you know, the whole world deals with

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producing and purchasing steel. Linked to that, and other FT

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front-page story, Deborah, about what is happening in the oil market,

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Iran apparently threatening to increase production considerably.

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The price is already going down like a stone, surely it can only go down

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further. Fascinating story, we have had years and years of diplomacy

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ending in this historic moment, the sanctions that were imposed on the

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Iranian regime to stop it from developing a nuclear bomb have been

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lifted, and immediately it is very orchestrated, isn't it? Clearly a

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lot of planning, people knew this was going to happen, and immediately

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they have ordered an increase of 500,000 barrels a day in its

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production, and apparently Iranian tankers loaded with 50 million

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barrels of crude... Half a million. 50 million barrels setting sail

:07:17.:07:21.

following the lifting of the sanctions. I love these little

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details! Very interestingly, the price of oil went down to $28 per

:07:29.:07:36.

barrel, which is its lowest level since 2003, and you have got major

:07:37.:07:40.

banks warning last week, or predicting last week, that it is

:07:41.:07:45.

going to go even further, down to about $10 per barrel. That is a

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level we have not seen since the Asian financial crisis. A heck of a

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difficult situation for everybody concerned, but the net effect will

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be oil going down, which is good in some ways. Cheap petrol. But not

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many other places. Good for filling your oil tank for your stove this

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winter, or if you are driving onto the fork out of the supermarket

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petrol station, paying less than ?1 per litre. Bad news if you work in

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the North Sea, bad news if you live in Aberdeenshire or the Northeast,

:08:22.:08:24.

some of the highest earning postcodes in the UK will be hit by

:08:25.:08:28.

this, and not a street, Robel Village will be affected by a

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downturn in the North Sea. -- not a street, road or village. MI5

:08:39.:08:43.

declared best LGBT employer, maybe some people will think what that

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means? Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transsexual, gay would be the short

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code we would use. Stonewall has declared that MI5, the Secret

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Intelligence Service, is the best employer in diversifying its

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workforce, getting different people to work for it. The question is, how

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do we know that? Aren't they meant to be secret agents?! And the story

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behind that, MI5 is recruiting furiously just now to counter the

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terror threat that it meets from Islamic fundamentalism, and the

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number of staff they employ maybe far in excess of that. Interesting

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how Islamic State have a hardline rule against gay people, checking

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them off buildings, a bit of a counter narrative, it shows how

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different we are. Certainly a surprise. Deborah, the Sun, crack

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shot this, what is this about? This is

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part and parcel of a big kind of story, a much larger to do with

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after the Iraq invasion, and also the war in Afghanistan, lots and

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lots of claims being made about alleged abuse by British forces, and

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it has resulted in this huge historic allegations tribunal being

:10:11.:10:16.

set up by the MOD, independent of the MOD, to look into these

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allegations, and there are 1500 allegations that are being looked

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at, affecting almost 300 soldiers. There is a sense of outrage on the

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part of the military that, you know, it is ambulance chasing lawyers,

:10:33.:10:37.

that sort of thing. This particular story? This particular story is

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talking about how, allegedly, a British sniper is being probed for

:10:42.:10:48.

killing an Iraqi who was about to throw a grenade because he did not

:10:49.:10:52.

shout a warning shot. He would have been the first sniper in history to

:10:53.:10:57.

do that! On the streets of Britain, police have to shout a warning, but

:10:58.:11:02.

I am not sure that it ever applied to soldiers in any war. Soldiers,

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like policemen, have very specific rules of engagement depending on

:11:09.:11:12.

their theatre of war, where their operations are taking place, but for

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a sniper to shout a warning is crazy. It feeds into this whole

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story, the background about ambulance chasing lawyers trying to

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sue British soldiers a sickly fighting not just to defend the

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country but often fighting for their lives. -- basically. We have to

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leave it at there, Deborah, Torcuil, thank you very much indeed. We will

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be back at 11:34 another look at the stories making the front pages

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tomorrow. -- at 11:30 for another look. At 11 o'clock, we will have

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more on the steel industry crisis, but coming up next it is time for

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Sportsday.

:11:55.:12:00.

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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