17/01/2016 The Papers


17/01/2016

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and gunshots, how Leonardo DiCaprio survived the Oscar Durie. We get the

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reviews on The Revenant and the other top releases in the Film

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Review. Hello and welcome to our look

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at the morning's papers. With me are the journalist

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Rachel Shabi, and Tim Stanley, The Express leads with Britain's

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future in the EU, citing new research that suggests

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growing support for Britain to leave The Telegraph's main headline

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concerns GP waiting lists. It says 10 million patients are

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struggling to get appointments, with record numbers having to wait

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more than a week. The Times headlines David Cameron's

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plans to integrate Muslim women into mainstream society, including

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English classes for new migrants. The Guardian covers plans by the NHS

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to launch its own sugar tax The Daily Mail leads with mounting

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pressure on Scotland Yard to apologise to ex

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army chief Lord Bramall after child The Metro's top story is speculation

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over delays to the relaunch of The Sun has more on Jeremy Corbyn's

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desire to remove nuclear war heads The Independent covers

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Saudi Arabia's stock market crash, after the lifting

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of sanctions clears the way for Iran We are surprised he Iran deal hasn't

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featured more widely on the front pages, but anyway. We start with a

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Sun. Off his warhead, with Jerry Corbyn stuffed inside a missile with

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his hat on. Do a Falklands deal and start talks with IS fiends. The

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nuclear bid is interesting. Jeromy Corbyn has a problem. He would like

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to get rid of Trident. He has playwrights saying he shouldn't do

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it on principle and union saying he shouldn't do it because of jobs --

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Blairights. And others are saying he should come out floating in a

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halfway house modelled on what Japan does, apparently, whereby you retain

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nuclear capability - in a sense that you can fire a nuclear weapon if you

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want to, but you don't have their weapons, so you have the weapon

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system but not the weaponry. In that way you are part of the nuclear

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umbrella without being a nuclear power. Could you find yourself in

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this artistic insight has a marine quickly? Where is the closest one?

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-- could you find yourself a ballistic missile. He talked about a

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lot of domestic policy. Wealth inequality, NHS, this is what the

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Sun ends up with. And then they complain he does not talk about

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domestic policy. It is always something that has been likely to

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crop up. Absolutely. The nuclear issue. I am looking at the other

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things. They are trying to cover a lot of bases. John Prescott

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complained that they were focusing on things out of the past. They are

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focused on lots of things. Jeromy Corbyn is out of the 80s. Trying to

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apply a 1980s policies to today, having a conversation with Argentina

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about handing back the Falklands... He didn't say, let's talk about

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Islamic State. It is the point about the Trident, it isn't an 80s

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conversation, it is a 2016 conversation. Trident is not an

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effective defence measure. All but officials will say that. In the face

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of the biggest threat, international terrorism, Trident is no use. It is

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a really good idea to have this review. And to look at whether there

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is better ways to spend the money. How does the Telegraph look at it?

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Be careful what you say. LAUGHS. Why, what will happen? Deal with it

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in an elusive manner... Jeromy Corbyn's the idea, the deterrent

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with no ability to deter is like the army without rifles. They are having

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a review, they are at the beginning of this review. This is one idea. I

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am sure there will be more. The reason it was flagged is because it

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is a way to look at not making a lot of people redundant. One thing of

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concern with losing Trident is it will cause unemployment. That is the

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reason they have looked at this compromise arrangement. I am sure

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there will be of other things come up in this review. That quote is

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from John Woodcock, Labour MP, from where Trident is found, so it is a

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jobs issue for him. The lingering plus for the idea of keeping Trident

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is maintaining Britain's prestige in the world. That is why we are at on

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the Security Council, that is why we are at the heart of Nato. We have to

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move on. We have a lot to move on with. The Times - half of UK

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universities curbing free speech. The Times has information from Spite

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magazine. It has totalled up the numbers of universities which have

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asked publications to be shut down. It comes out with some striking

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figures at universities, curtailing free speech among students. I think

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it is down to students becoming consumers. When you introduce

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tuition fees, asking people to pay for their education through the

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roof, they start to look at their education in a different way. They

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feel, I live here, it is very expensive, and I don't want that

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newsletter around where I live, I don't want that person coming to

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speak at the place which I take to be at. I think at the root of this

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conflict is the fact we have changed the nature of higher education with

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commercialisation. Isn't it about universities being cautious that

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they cannot know for sure who is coming into their campus and what

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they will say? Whenever you talk to people... This is just one example.

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When you talk to people trying to counter radicalisation, what they

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say is you cannot drive this conversation underground, otherwise

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you can't challenge it. Have people say it out loud, in the open, to

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demolish the argument. What I worry about is people won't be - if you

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are not exposed to this dissenting voice, how can you learn to form

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rational arguments against them? It is coming from left-wing activist

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students, it is coming from those students making these demands.

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Crucially, it is coming from the government, and prevent Mac strategy

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encourages the closing down of society -- Prevent. It is asking the

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government, proactive ways to stop free speech. This is not entirely

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the fault of left-wing students. Nor universities. It is the fruit of

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government policy. Pressure on Scotland Yard boss after ex- army

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chief cleared of abuse. Lord Bramall was accused of sexual abuse by

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someone. The police took it seriously, as they were right to do.

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The result was his home was raided by 20 policemen. His wife, who has

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Alzheimer's, witness to this and was very disturbed by it. The police

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kept the investigation for over a year and finally they have said that

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at the end of the investigation, because of insufficient evidence...

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Some people say what they should do is plainly say they have ended it

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because it is not a fair allegation. It is incorrect. And that the police

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should give an apology. One of the things an officer did was described

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the allegations made as credible and true, which is very unusual for the

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police to do. One suspects they are responding after the fact to the

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Jimmy Savile thing. In all of this, the victim is Lord Bramall. Let us

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move on to the Express - Britain is ready to leave the EU on the back of

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another survey. The opinion poll, which we know are not always right.

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Yes. This has to be thought of couched. Dot a 6% surge in favour of

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quitting the EU -- this has to be sought of couched... Put down to the

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migration crisis, terrorism and the attacks on Cologne. We have to couch

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it with even more caveats about opinion polls at, because with the

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EU people don't vote in the way that they necessarily say they will. A

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lot of people still don't know. There will be a lot of movement in

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this until the referendum, whenever it will be. And the Prime Minister

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hasn't made his case for it yet. When he comes out and says he wants

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to stay in - people say that - whatever he gets out of the

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negotiation, the figures will change. Is it fair, sensible,

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accurate, to conflate leaving the EU with issues of terrorism? No, of

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course not! As we were saying earlier, we are outside of

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Schengen. We have strict passport can -- controls. Others have to show

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their passport. We have cauterised some of the problems affecting

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European problems in the refugee crisis. We don't take as many

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migrants, for instance. Migrants don't cause terrorism. It is an

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unfortunate completion. The public think it is an issue. It is not. If

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the public thinks it, we should have a bigger debate and conversation

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about why they think it, because it is erroneous. We will look at the

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Telegraph. Millions wait longer to see a GP. 10 million. More than.

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They are trying to find an appointment but having to wait more

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than a week. For a long time we have talked about the hours GPs work. We

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need more GPs to work more hours. Yes. I mean, it is the usual

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depressing story about access to the NHS and seeing a GP. People are

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waiting far too long. 30% of those surveyed said that they were having

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problems getting an appointment. A lot of us can relate to that, trying

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to get an appointment with a surgery. It is not that the doctors

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are not aware of this - of course, they are - but if they spread

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themselves to be available on the weekends in the same set up, which

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is overstretched already, they will end up cutting back on services

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available on a daily basis. It is an issue of funding rather than

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available GPs. Good comment. I go to NHS walk-in centres. They are not

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available everywhere. I know that I sound like I have discovered

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something new. Amazing! There are growing numbers of practices where

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you can pay 40 quid to see a GP. That is a lot of money! A lot of

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professionals do it. Apparently, a lot of migrants do it. I am not

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saying it is a solution. We finish with page three of the Times.

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Behold, the great literary device. The idea that a chosen few writers

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racked up a fortune, and others struggle. The book market in this

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country - people say it is dying - has a problem, those that do well

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only a small number benefit a couple of authors. This research has

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discovered that the median income for writers is ?11,000, which is

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below the ?16,000 that the Joseph Rowntree foundation should be the

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normal wage. They have figures on how much people earn. Even these

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figures, I suspect, having just seen the story, are a bit misleading.

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When you list the sales of a book, that is not what the author is paid.

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They are paid 5-10% of each copy. And if it is an e-book, Hugh get

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nothing. It is effectively impossible to live as an author --

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you get nothing. It is like winning the lottery, writing a book that you

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can live off. This carries on from something we were talking about,

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Philip Pullman saying authors should not appear at literary festivals

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without being paid. That happens a lot. I am glad he has said that. The

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article talks about the fact that publishers are if they are making

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lots of money from top-rated writers, they are not using it to

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enable them to take risk with other writers -- publishers, if they are

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making lots of money... Publishers are playing it very safe and they

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are not taking risks or going for people who might be a little bit

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less mainstream. That of course is resulting in a very narrow and

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planned market as well as one that isn't very well funded. Let's all

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buy a book we wouldn't normally buy this week. There is the challenge.

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If you buy a book! Lovely to see you both. Thank you. That is the papers

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for tonight. Coming up next, the Film Review.

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