24/01/2016 The Papers


24/01/2016

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Let's see if we can get through the papers.

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers

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With me are Reuters business correspondent and author,

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Tom Bergin, and broadcaster Joan Bakewell.

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The Metro leads with the killer storm in the US, saying

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Britain is poised for new floods as the storm crosses the atlantic.

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The Telegraph's headline says patients are being given replacement

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"IVF hope for older women," is the i's lead, saying

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a controversial cell technique aims to make older eggs young again.

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The Independent features a picture of one

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of four dead whales, which have washed up on the North Sea coast.

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The Express looks at why diet is key to beating arthritis,

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saying that simple changes could ease agony for millions.

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"Osborne in 3 billion pound vow to beat malaria," is the Times's lead

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story, which says taxpayers are to fund the bulk of a new deal with

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And the Guardian says asylum seekers in Cardiff are being issued with

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coloured wristbands for food handouts.

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We will start with the story on the front of the Times, George Osborne

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in ?3 billion vow to beat malaria. I never liked the word vow. Taxpayer

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funds with deal with Bill Gates. Him and his wife, Melinda, have been

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battling malaria three years. They have been very generous and their

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foundation has poured money into this. The vow of 3 billion is not

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new money. It is coming from the existing budget. It is not new cash

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at all -- three million. It has been taken from the budget, the

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international development budget, and it will help do something about

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this. I am not sure people welcome because the spill of malaria affects

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us all, if it is affecting Africa, as it does and the idea is to

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eliminate malaria, building on a commitment made by George Osborne

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when visiting Uganda. This is the kind of deal that gets done in

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Davos. In the luxury surroundings. I can guarantee you some of the

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development budget over a drink. The fact it isn't you money, I wonder if

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it will make a difference to the effectiveness in other parts.

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Robbing Peter to pay Paul? I suppose it is not new money, so it will have

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an impact... George Osborne made clear he wanted to spend the aid

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budget more effectively. One of the things that jumps out at me, I can't

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help but wonder if it is not also about helping George Osborne. He

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obviously has ambitions to succeed David Cameron but he has got an

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image problem. He doesn't look like a nice guy. He has been the person

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to deliver the bad news art Bell over -- deliver the bad news over

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the last couple of years. This mightn't be hurtful to his political

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career. This would obviously serve that purpose. It would help his

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image if he gave up the high viz clothing. And stop being

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photographed in factories which are closing down. I suppose he is trying

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to show that Britain can be effective overseas. That is very

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good. Not just handing out money. It is often criticised that we give

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money to places and we don't know where it will end up. It is easy to

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knock the international development. What does it mean? Giving to people

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money. This is going on a thoroughly good cause. Let's look at the Daily

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Telegraph. Send soldiers to EU borders. Britain is told this. Who

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is doing the telling? The Czech President giving this advice.

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Britain does not take orders from the Czech President, as wise as they

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might be on occasion. In this particular case, he is advising,

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maybe a more kind of robust response, a militaristic response to

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the refugee crisis. Clearly, eastern European countries are very

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concerned. And there is a problem. Vast numbers are coming to Europe.

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Certain countries say they cannot handle those. The question is what

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to do. The suggestion is Britain and others should send soldiers to the

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borders and take a more robust approach. The question is, are

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people ready for that? Do people want a situation whereby there is a

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heavily militarised European border? Whether the public is ready is

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unclear. We get away with it a little bit, don't we? When you call

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in the military, you are taking another step. This is the difference

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between Eastern European members of the European Union and the West. In

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fact, they are much more aggressive in keeping people out. The barbed

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wire is going up in Hungary and elsewhere. They want the European

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countries to send in 500 soldiers to patrol the border is. It is just

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another step -- borders. The whole thing is a mess. The crisis will get

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better. There are big meetings going on, they will go on until some

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solution, which is not yet on the horizon, arises to deal with this

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problem. Shall we move on to the FT? A couple of stories. First, leaving

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the EU will damage UK's global influence according to big Pharma.

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This is drug makers this time. We have heard warnings from other parts

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of the industry. Saying that it would mean isolation for

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scientists. I've heard that they would really miss not so much

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funding from the EU but the opportunity to participate in

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research. I think there is a sense that... Being part of the EU opens

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up science to mutual sopping of information, research, enterprise,

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checkouts, various ways for testing drugs. I think that Big Pharma is

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probably right. The influence would be diminished. It is in the interest

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of global companies to see we remain part of a strong EU. There were huge

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drug companies before the European Union was in its current form. So,

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some might argue, if you want to collaborate, you will find our way.

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S universities have made a similar comment. -- universities. It is

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quite well understood that big businesses favour membership. We are

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just seeing more of the same. I am not sure if this is the strongest

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thing, participation in favour of the campaign. The exit campaign is

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saying that actually small businesses are much more mixed and

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would prefer to go out. But we have not seen any polls that are very

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good on that. It is interesting. He says, she says, it is quite a

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superficial level. It would be interesting to take it to a more

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detailed level. That is quite complicated. Trade deals, we have

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the exit campaign saying we should leave and cut trade deals, for those

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who want to stay in the issue is, well, that is not very realistic.

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Almeida trading partners don't want to cut deals with us -- our main

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trading partners. This is a level of detail which is more difficult to

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publish. Plenty of deals going on with Iran, 114 Airbus jets to

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Rahane's business bonanza -- Rouhani. And the Chinese are right

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on the next plane and did a deal. Now they are doing a deal with the

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French. They were in readiness. They had made big plans. So have other

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countries. We are not there yet. We tried to. We hope to be. It is

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interesting, they upload and in to become a major country in the

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region. We all know the great rivalry with the Saudis will be

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problematic. They are getting stuck in. It will be very interesting.

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With lots of planes flying to and fro it could be a big travel hub.

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Absolutely. And Iran have said they want to be a travel hub. They want

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to be players in the aviation industry. Maybe come rivals to the

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Gulf players like Qatar and MRes. That is a reflection of their bigger

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political ambitions, to be a regional superpower -- Emirates. Not

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just in terms of security but also economically. They have potential to

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do that. They have vast oil reserves and they have population. This will

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be something that will start to worry their neighbours. We know that

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oil prices are going down and the industry isn't booming. Tourism

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could boom, couldn't it? They could well start with weekends over there,

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or longer, or tours. Once the country opened up we will be

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queueing up. Returning to the Times. BBC will plead with pensioners to

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give up free TV licences. This is because the BBC is going to bear the

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cost of free licenses for the over 75. The idea is that well-known

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people connected with the BBC will be asked to support this idea. S not

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wheeled out but asked to support -- not wheeled out. They will stride

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out. This is an interesting one. It is a campaign to ask people to not

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accept the free licence fee and to pay it and help make up the

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shortfall that has been imposed upon the BBC. I have to say, if we look

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at previous campaigns, where people are encouraged not to accept things

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for free, they don't work very well. The winter fuel allowance is an

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example. It is a bigger issue here, the government was looking at the

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BBC are many in the Conservative Party are not the biggest fans of

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the BBC and feel it is not their biggest fan, despite the fact that

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BBC gives a considerable amount of time to politicians. Maybe

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politicians might want to think about that. So, whether this

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particular campaign will work, that'll be open to see. Of course,

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Joe, with your track record, they might ask you to... I do back the

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idea but I think it is more symbolic than anything else. We back the BBC.

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Don't let them ruin it. We have one of the most precious institutions in

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the world of media, and the Tories seem to want to dismantle it, and

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people are speaking out and trying to defend it. A has said it is to be

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in places and that it has to think carefully about how it spends the

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license fees and whether it should be trying to fulfil the areas of the

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market refuses to fulfil. The market is quite busy and it is not to be

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unremarked that there are voices in the year of the government that are

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trying to dismantle it. Not to mention the person who owns the

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Times. That is true. Also, it is a deliberate attempt to deal with the

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BBC why hamstring tactics. It is virtually unconstitutional in terms

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of the way the BBC was set up. And Murdoch is having a big say.

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Well... What am I supposed to say to that? What I will say is the

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government will say it can spend its money it chooses. Our money. Our

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money. Crikey, let's move on. You are going to get me into trouble.

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Falling giant, spectators transfixed by one of format dead whales on the

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beach -- four. They are drawn to this sad sight. It is heartrending.

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The photography is, you know, beautiful journalism but a tragic

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story. And a terrible moment to find beautiful creatures like this on the

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shores having been beached against their instincts. Not supposed to be

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close to shore. They are the most beautiful creatures. People are

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drawn to them. There is fascination about a major national tragedy.

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Hopefully the investigators can find out why they are. People have been

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looking at this for a long time with thoughts about chemicals in the

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water, whether it could be Sonar, with suspicions in the past, or

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perhaps it is something seismec, and we would love to get more

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information. Too many are beaching on the coast. Tom and Joe, lovely to

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speak to you. That is it from the papers tonight. Coming up next, it

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is the Film Review.

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