27/01/2016 The Papers


27/01/2016

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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controversial comments. That is all coming up in sports day in the next

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15 minutes straight after the papers. -- Papers.

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers

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With me are the International Editor of the Economist Helen Joyce and

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We start with a mirrored that leads with the convicted murderer has

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admitted to the first-time of the killing of the schoolgirl. He says

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he is also behind a string of other attacks. The Independent headlines

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urges Cameron to halt arms sales to Saudi Arabia. The Financial Times

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talks about Google and Apple fighting back after a row over the

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amount of tax paid by the technology giant. The Telegraph leads on the

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findings of a scientific review that is found that some antidepressants

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can raise the risk of suicide. There is the picture of grandparents of

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the severely disabled teenager who won the battle against the bedroom

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tax. Britain's role in Yemen attacks are under scrutiny. The Daily Mail

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says that David Cameron must not taking 3000 migrant children. And

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the Times reports on the top investor or in Google calling on

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them to pay more tax in the UK. Top investor turns on Google over

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tax. This is the most interesting story we have seen yet. You see

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these things that they are called in to decide how much they should pay.

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Long-term, you would not. Zero after year it seems grossly -- year after

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year it seems so grossly unfair. He wants to know what the company he is

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investing in is going to pay and that is better to everybody in the

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long run. But somebody in the company is coming out saying that

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creative tax accounting, and there is nothing wrong with it in terms of

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the law, I quickly added, means that shareholders get a lot more pack, --

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a lot more cash in their pocket. They have an obligation to maximise

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these kind of things. Absolutely what the shareholder is worried

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about is that ?120 million worth of shares in Google's parent company.

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He's worried about a backlash that people will be so upset that it will

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be even worse for the shareholder. What strikes me about this is the

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arbitrary nature as to what is happening at the moment. The focus

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on these giants, but what about these other companies are getting

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away with it. What we want is a framework for these corporate giant.

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What we need is a framework... I was going to give you a framework. We

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need Britain to buy into it. And the deal is agreed by the G20 nations in

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Paris due to concerns about these companies and how they move them

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from one country to another. If you only have one tried to deal with

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this, the T20I'm now on board. And as he was saying about the

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shareholder worried about a backlash, the European Commission is

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looking into the monopoly on commission. If that was opened up

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the board have alternatives and we could have a view on these attacks.

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It is absolutely vital for capitalism to work. There has to be

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an implicit contact between the consumers and the big corporate

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giants were becoming eager in a globalised economy. That revelation

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needs to include sensible agreements and good regulation if they are

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under monopoly situations that undermine the consumer. I know

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enough about the search engine market that there is potential. I

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know that advertisers have to be on board with Google... You can't say

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this monopoly just because consumers like it. Let us go to the inside

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page of the Financial Times. Government makes tax law and Google

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complies. This is about the guy who was the head of communications at

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Google and he is coming out swinging saying that Google have not done

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anything wrong but have followed the law. It is difficult for us to read

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this with any information that we're bringing to it. Company SAP

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confidentiality agreements and he is saying is that the 130 million that

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they paid is the right amount and then to a paid. He is saying that

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they made their profits elsewhere. That may be right, but there are

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plenty of companies saying that they have, but they might rented out or

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pay for it in a different spot and paid the money abroad. We can't tell

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and we need transparency. We have the news of Facebook's profits for

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the last three months of last year. ?1 billion. Guess how much tax they

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paid last year and they did it legally, I have to add that point,

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it is all legal and above board. Either sticking suspicion that is

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?4000. I -- I have a sneaking. Are they paying a lot of money

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elsewhere? I would love to know. On that letter that was written to the

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Financial Times, they said they are American company and that is where

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they create their intellect or property and where they have their

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value, and they pay $3.3 billion in tax. We don't know whether that is

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credible. It is the transparency that is the problem. This agreement

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with the G20 means we might get a bit more transparency on that. Why

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we must not take 3000 migrant children because it would encourage

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new influxes. I fundamentally disagree and I want a caveat that

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with the perspective that when it comes to decisions of this time it

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is always vital to take into account the unintended consequences. When

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the German chancellor said we're going to be ethical and open it did

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lead to a big influx and hopeful people from a war-torn country,

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risking their lives with unscrupulous brokers would get them

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to these places. David Cameron has invested taxpayers money in the

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refugee camps in that area is. That is a sensible policy. However, 3000

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vulnerable children... No one does that alone. I also think we are not

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spending enough in the camps. More than any other EU country. There are

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literally millions of people in terrible conditions and the small

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amount of money stops people getting ill but we could spend a lot more

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money and stop people coming further on. These migrant children make the

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think about the unaccompanied Jordan in the Second World -- unaccompanied

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children in the Second World War. There may be the possibility with

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parents saying... I know for a fact that that happens in Eritrea. A

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country where conscription is the norm and it lasts for ever. The same

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thing happens in Central America escaping from drug gangs and the

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world's most oppressive governments. What we're seeing is the unintended

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consequences and economic migrants in there as well because they can.

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Nobody is sending their children unless they think they are going to

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die. Let us go to the Telegraph. Depression drugs make suicide more

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possible. Many people have been saying this for many years and we

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now seem to have a study that is confirming this. And yet why do we

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not know that earlier? Why did they not show this important piece of

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data is. And the reason is a familiar story of pharmaceutical

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companies covering up the negative consequences of the drug. They only

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work in establishing important data is if they are conducted. The other

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problem is that they want to publish them. If it undermines the

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credibility of the drug, don't publish them, do a bit more and hope

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you get the results that you won't. That is not science that is a lie.

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Strong language and you have written a book on this kind of thing. On the

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manipulation of not just to sticks but the way that big companies can

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perhaps, ignore the lessons of the past, or the lessons of their own

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research. The clinical try has been a huge blessing to the development

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of the drug. The problem is when they are read. I write about the

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human factors and how they are delivered and the humans do it and

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also the errors that often take place around the world that are

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concealed. Partly because people are worried about being blamed. They

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just don't want this to happen again and again. It is terribly sad

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because families have children who have died because of this. It is an

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ethical scandal that this information has not come to light

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until now. I suppose that this kind of research has got the University

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of London behind it so its voracity is there. Government have to act on

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this. We don't know who because there are two levels. Should we not

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be prescribing these things and the second one is a much more systematic

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thing about how we regulate drug trials more generally. Should all be

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published and you have to publish the results. End this particular

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bias. URA former sportsman -- you are a. I played table tennis. Table

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tennis is a sport. Careful! Very funny because she claims that she

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has more passports than Jason Bourne. But she is a British citizen

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now. We have claimed her. The first time in three decades that we've had

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a female... Grew up in Australia until the age of 14 to Hungary and

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parents. I can see the link between the two. We sent a reporter to

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interview her parents and the mother is a dentist and the father works in

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a gym. They are very settled. Let us be clear that she is British. It is

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a lovely story because it has come out of nowhere but shows how

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confident with a sense of destiny that she seems to have is a powerful

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thing. Apparently a lot of the work that has been done with her as being

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psychologist over the last few months and that is what has changed

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things around for her. You were talking to one of the most ignorant

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people about sport. I have one thing to tell you about this. I totally

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agree with claiming all of these sport people. We don't get many

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people. When you do you grab them with two hands and you just hold

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on. That is the end of your contribution. They could do better

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revealing school reports on the rich and famous. You are one of the

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smartest women that I know. Thank you. So your school report must have

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been top grades all the way along. I did very bad in home economics. We

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had criteria on effort. Dragging me towards... Know we never had ten is

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too bad -- tends. Don't try to start this up. I left school with really

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poor qualifications but I taught myself the top levels. I was so into

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table tennis and the rest is history. Forget Churchill. As he

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ever been on? Know he has not been in that chair. -- no.

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