30/01/2016 The Papers


30/01/2016

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be

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With me, Dawn-Maria France, Editor in Chief of Yorkshire Women's Life

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magazine and James Martin, Executive Editor of Huffington Post

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Cameron closes in on stop-gap EU deal? The paper is saying there is a

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meeting tomorrow with Donald tusk, the President of the EU and they are

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discussing the attempts to thrash out a deal to take control of the

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migrant flow into Europe and also to discuss the benefit payments. But

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the Euro-sceptics have said they dismissed the meeting and said that

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the preelection pledge is dead in the water. So I think it's one of

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those where we'll have to wait and see how it pans out. Yes. James,

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manoeuvering beyond manoeuvering going on at the moment isn't there?

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Yes, the line Number Ten are briefing out at the moment is that

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Cameron wants an immediate block on payments the day after any vote.

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It's either a mad panic from David Cameron to try and prove that he can

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get the vote done potentially in June, maybe June 29 or June 23 are

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the dates being currently looked at, or potentially prove he can't get it

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done and we are going to have to wait until February or March next

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year. He met with Jean-Claude Juncker on Friday. He's now going to

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be dining with Donald Tusk tomorrow night, the EU President. One thing

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is for sure about this, whatever David Cameron manages to get out of

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this meeting, it's not going to be enough and the pre-briefing has

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already been briefed again. It's very clear here that even if David

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Cameron wins this concession, Euro-sceptics aren't happy. That is

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the point isn't it, Dawn-Marie, that whatever he comes away with, some

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will say it's not enough and critics say he's already been to bed off?

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There is a ruling where he can put the breaks on the talks. The

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emergency brakes? The emergency brakes. The Euro-sceptics are saying

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that's not sufficient and they want to see more. I don't know if he

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could get a deal because, if you look at it from one point of view,

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you've got to look at the British nationals that go over to Europe.

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They'll be subject to the same four-year benefit taking place, so

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it's something that he needs to thrash out and he needs to satisfy

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the voters because, on the doorstep, that is the thing coming up over and

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over again. This is classic isn't it, the unintended consequences of

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pushing one lever and all sorts of things happen that maybe you didn't

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anticipate? Absolutely. What is really interesting here is the

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politics of the way that this EU debate is coming down on at the

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moment and you have the big beasts of the Tory party essentially

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seemingly going to back the in-campaign. Boris Johnson is

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hinting last week that he's going to back the campaign. It leaves Theresa

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May as really the only big Cabinet Minister who hasn't declared her

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hand yet. We know she's a big fan of the European arrest warrant, so

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essentially it's looking like she might stay on the in-campaign which

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leaves Chris Grayling as the only Cabinet Minister who may be fronting

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the out campaign. It doesn't really seem to matter at the moment how

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many out campaigns there are because obviously there are, what are we up

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to now Adam, three or four different outcomes? Multiples, if we put it

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that way. Another one last weekend didn't we? Yes, that is right. This

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is either an in or out debate, it doesn't strike me as something that

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even if the ad campaign come up with an argument that is going to matter,

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just the same way as the other side come up with a good idea. The only

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thing that will concern Number Ten is how many people vote, if it goes

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under 60%, it's likely that those who vote will be the ones voting

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out. That is the concern, can we get it above 50 or 60%. You nexted

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migration at the start of this, which is clearly going to be one of

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the defining principles of this debate. Here we go, front-page of

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the Sunday Telegraph; migration crisis deepens. Another one of these

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photographs. We have seen a few of these this year that looks almost

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like a bit of art, all manner of things going on. Just give us a

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run-down of how you read this story and also the background to it? There

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are a number of stories in this, the march of the far right looking to

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else scapegoat migrants, there's the drowning in Turkey, the EU

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referendum and talking about looking at the migrant crisis and also the

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Schengen agreement. We are now seeing Fortress Europe. There are

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quite a few things going on in this story. What I would like to come on

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to is the talks that took place with the UN Security Council when they

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talked about the Road Map for Syria. A lot of these migrants are coming

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from Syria and they talked about moving forward with plans to

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actually look at moving Syria forward, but they didn't talk about

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what they were going to do with Assad or Daesh. It frustrates me,

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does the Syria question, so I think there's not joined up thinking. I

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would like to see some sort of European solution to how we tackle

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Syria because that is where the crisis is taking place. We need to

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tackle that fundamentally and look at stopping people leaving that

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country in desperate need. It's a really interesting point that

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Dawn-Maria has made because 39 people killed in the Aegean sea

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today off the back of 20 killed only a few days ago. You've got 224

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migrants that have already drowned this year trying to make that

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crossing. That is a huge number of people. Actually, 55,000 arrivals

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into Europe already this year. That is a 35-fold increase from January

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last year. This whole EU vote debate really hinges on this migration

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crisis. The reason why Cameron wants to get this done soon, he's pushing

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for the June deadline, is we don't know what will happen with the

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crisis. It's only going to be seen to get worse as a political problem.

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This photograph here is essentially the worst case scenario isn't it,

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something that you feel like it could be a Banksy painting at some

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point, it's such an amazing photograph, but what's happened here

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in the shadow of the white cliffs of Dover is that this wasn't a protest,

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this was always set out to be a brawl. You look at some of the

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weapons seized here and no-one comes out of it looking well. Both sides,

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you've got masked people, all dressed in black, I don't think

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either side comes out looking particularly well. You have people

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carrying cans of Strongbow here, lock knives, knuckle dusters, people

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waving around poles and bits of wood and so on. It's the crisis at its

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worst in many ways and this is actually in Britain, you know, this

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isn't Stockholmes. Dawn-marine, you mentioned the whole cocktail of

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issues that are in here and, from a media perspective, is that cocktail

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going to be reflected in the coverage, or do you think it could

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come down to just things like migration - good/bad. I think it's

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migration and scapegoating as well, people looking to apportion blame

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and the migrants are taking the blame for everything that is going

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wrong. Also the march of the far right are looking to further their

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claim to, it's the migrants coming over causing this, that and the

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other, and a mix of David Cameron trying to resolve the issue. And

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they need to look at, in the summer when the migrants come over, if the

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EU referendum goes out, that could be disastrous. It will impact

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clearly. Estimates upwards of two million attempting to make that

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crossing trying to get into the EU. I mean, in the shadow of that, you

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can understand why David Cameron wants to get this vote done sooner

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rather than later. Lots of familiar topics in the Sunday papers, but

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here is one that you will not have failed to miss. Have I got my double

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negatives the right way around there? You didn't have to search

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hard. The front-page, fury over Tory battle to protect Google's ?30

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billion island tax haven. James, we have been hearing about ?130 million

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tax bill, the stakes have gone up here? ! Bermuda sounds great this

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time of year, regardless of whether it's a tax haven or not giving the

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weather here. Since 2005 on about billions of profits. The debate here

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is essentially what we are seeing played out on in fronts -- many

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fronts, is there a legislative solution here? Unless every country

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in the world will sign up to a deal to stop this corporation tax arms

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race which seems to be going on at the moment, we have Linked-in,

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Facebook, Google, they get the nice healthy tax rate. Lord Lawson has

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been saying, you start taxing on sales but not profits, potentially

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you might have a solution there because it's liking unlikely you are

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going to get a global deal. The politics of this, I use Google

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probably thousand of times every week. My bill from Google is zero.

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And unless I'm a small business person of which there are many and

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the backbone of the UK economy and 31st deadline coming up for your

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assessment and you can guarantee if you don't get it done on time you

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will probably get fined, I'm indifferent about it as being a

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political issue. I don't know if it's going to hurt the Tories as

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much as potentially everyone thinks it will. What do you think, if you

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were Google, Barclays I remember getting pelted when they were the

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first movers in paying up some banking fines, are we castigating

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Google just because it's their name in the headlines when it could be

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any number of other tech companies? That's true. I watched Prime

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Minister's Questions on Wednesday, the debate between Cameron and

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Corbyn and Corbyn discussed it and Cameron said under Labour they

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didn't pay anything and at least they are paying something. My

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argument is that small business, the background of the economy, they have

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to pay their tax rates on time and I believe that maybe there needs to be

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some sort of change in the law to make it equal. If they pay their

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taxes late, they'll be penalised so it looks like an unequal balance

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between big business and small business. But then it might be a

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question of big businesses are too big to fail, which is a question

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that's being stated a lot of the time and the sweetheart deal does

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sound very conflicting. Too big to fail. We have heard that expression

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before! For the moment, thank you very much and well done if you have

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a self-assessment tax return to do and you've done it. Well done.

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Thank you very much indeed to James and Dawn-marine who are back at 11.

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