01/02/2016 The Papers


01/02/2016

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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deadline day draws to a close and we will tell you about the rise in the

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rankings of Britain's nude tennis star Johanna Konta. First, the

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Papers -- new. Hello and welcome to

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our look ahead to what the papers With me are Caroline Frost,

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Entertainment Editor of the Huffington Post and

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Parliamentary journalist Tony Grew. The Metro leads with the death

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of a British tourist It seems he was trampled by

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the animal and gored by its tusk. On the front of the i,

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the paper says pay differences between managers and more junior

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staff, within the public sector, The Financial Times says that Russia

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is preparing to sell off state-owned assets, including the airline

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Aeroflot to try to replace revenue Sir Terry Wogan is fondly remembered

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on the front of the Daily Express. His last words to his priest

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were apparently: "Everything's The Daily Telegraph headlines

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the drawn-out talks over the terms It also features a picture of Lily

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James, currently starring in the And she's also on the front page

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of the Times. But its top story concerns

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possible Cabinet disagreements And the Guardian has the news we've

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been covering here this evening, that brain damage in babies linked

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to the Zika virus is now considered Let's begin. We are going to start

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with the Daily Mail and maybe you might read the headline for us.

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David Cameron has been creaking toward some sort of European Union

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agreement with Donald Tusk but apparently many people are not very

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happy. Is that it then, Mr Cameron? That is their headline. He has been

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racking up thousands of air miles, if he hadn't gone anywhere, I am

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sure he would have been bunkered in his Downing Street home. Crucially

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freedom of movement remains untouched and eurosceptics are

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calling it one big letdown. That is not going to go down well. That is

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reflected on the front page of the Times this morning. I think this

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story has been quite heavily indicated that the Home Secretary is

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going to play tough with the Prime Minister over this, it was a very

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difficult ask for David Cameron and he has a lot of problems that are

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just beginning. A significant amount of Tory party MPs have said they

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will wait to see what he comes back with them then they will make a

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decision whether they would vote to stay or leave. Similarly, other

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cabinet members may not be interested in the Brexit campaign.

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There is a theory that there are those closest to him, like Theresa

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May and Michael Gove, they are all declared eurosceptics but if one of

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them was to lead the middle road of Brexit, not the right wing

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Eurosceptic side, but that might be quite damaging to the Prime

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Minister. Also Boris Johnson. These are main candidates to succeed the

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Prime Minister along with George Osborne, who is completely tied to

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these negotiations. A significant number will be very disappointed

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with what he came back with. How do you think the vote will go? If they

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are hoping to sort all of this out by June, those who are willing to

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position themselves in the Tory party post David Cameron will have

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to sort things out very quickly. Does it come down to your favourite

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politician or your favourite European Union deal or is it really

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in the gut? I think it is in the guts, but I don't know. The

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conservative party is Eurosceptic and the MPs are probably Eurosceptic

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and David Cameron is trying to broadly stitch together a deal. This

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is a racist time for him, never mind what the public think -- crisis

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time. Corporate tax issues also feature in the Times. Certainly

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there were people who thought the Google deal set a precedent and

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others may not be lining up. It wasn't unprecedented, bad deal. A

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similar deal was done with Amazon and MPs complained bitterly.

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Basically what this says is that Facebook is putting aside $2 billion

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in a war chest to deal with all of these taxation demands they will

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have from multiple jurisdictions across the world, while in the UK,

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they paid ?4327 in British corporation tax, and they're using

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their lawyers to challenge that and demand more money. I think it is

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interesting that the Times points out that none of the 870,000

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ordinary British taxpayers received fixed penalty notices, none of them

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will have the opportunity to negotiate the way Facebook has. This

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is all we know. We know that the big chains will always have more power,

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this is the tax equivalent. Facebook and Google are so big and powerful

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that they pretty much can dictate the terms. But where are these tax

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havens? Luxembourg and Ireland. That his European Union issue. Maybe you

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should ask David Cameron tomorrow -- that is a. Guardian. The soaring

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cost of loneliness among old people. The premise of this story is that

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because people are so lonely, they are staying in hospital longer than

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they perhaps should. I find this very saddening for many reasons.

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They are saying that because the age group has moved up and people are

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living longer, but the communities they have based themselves around

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have been fragmented through nuclear families moving around, now you have

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this huge group of people that have no support system personally and

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wind up in Accident and Emergency. They call them the dormitories for

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older people. That will have impact on the National Health Services. I

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see that they're kind of couching it in recognisable financial terms but

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this should be a social concern as well, never mind the cost or the

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financial burdens on the tax system of the country. This has been in the

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political debate for many months now. The lack of social care is

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starting to impact the NHS. Absolutely. There is a rising cost

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of social care that is a major issue to deal with and also, we have to

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talk about this frankly. Families are less and less keen to look after

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their older family members and that is frustrating for people. Why is

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this a responsibility for the state? Devon and Cornwall have

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research that say a third of patients admitted to Accident and

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Emergency had very infrequent social interaction, it is not just about

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loneliness call -- causing burdens in that area, but they are also

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moving to other areas and becoming cut off. The Local Government

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Association 's are saying research digest loneliness can be more

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damaging than smoking 15 cigarettes per day, they have a 50% higher

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chance than developing clinical illness. It is a huge issue. Did you

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see that Facebook post where someone wrote about moving to a new town, a

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mother whose children were school-age, and she made new friends

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because she posted this thing on Facebook. It is a bit of a shameful

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thing to have to admit to, for some reason. The Telegraph, should big

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companies which pay their shareholders lots of money and big

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dividends, should the taxpayer be paying for anything for them? The

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government has put aside ?5 million to encourage big companies to switch

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over to energy-efficient light bulbs. I understand how this can be

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spun as us giving money to these companies, but what I want to point

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out is that ministers have created this scheme to reduce the risk of

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blackouts in the coming winters by cutting energy and electricity

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demands. If they were socially and environmentally responsible

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companies, they would be replacing their own lightbulbs. It is very

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strange. I find a list of those who donate very strange. The Football

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Association. Why do companies like that have such a great need? It is

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about how much you encourage companies to be environmentally

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friendly and how much they should want to do it and present that to

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the public. Absolutely. You are right to point out that consumer

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pressure should be the biggest driver of change in organizations

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that deal with consumers that some of them, like the Football

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Association, I don't know anything about their lightbulbs or how well

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lit their office is. The big story of the day, she's pictured on all

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the newspapers. I am really enjoying watching her on War and Piece. --

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Peace. This is one of down to's alumni -- Downton Abbey's. She is

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simultaneously about to be in a film called pride and prejudice -- Pride

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and Prejudice and Zombies. What is that about? It is exactly what you

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would expect. I thought it may have been a subtle play on words. No. She

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is also dating Matt Smith. They could be the next power couple of

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show business in the UK. Just a word on this. She is an actress who has

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catapulted into the limelight by domestic Thomas on our televisions

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rather than big screen -- dramas. That's true. The other ladies from

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the show have also gone on to Hollywood to make their mark on the

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big screen. Equally they are coming back in the other direction. The

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next big box set is the next big thing. The snobbery that used to be

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big screen versus smallscreen has all but disappeared. Are you

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enjoying War and Peace? It is one of my favourite. I don't have much to

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say about that. The talk about five years ago was the transition of big

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stars from big screen to smallscreen and it has now changed the other

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way. Netflix are investing ?1 billion in programmes which

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outstrips even what Hollywood studios are spending. It is a very

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interesting progression. Cinema is still a big part of it but really

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big stars are now doing something like House of Cards and so forth. We

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are seeing YouTube stars also make larger shows. People are making

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films in their bedrooms. Everything we saw in music ten years ago, is

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now being replicated in TD. -- TV.

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No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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