07/02/2016 The Papers


07/02/2016

A lively, informed and in-depth conversation about the Sunday papers.


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Here's Gavin Esler with the papers. so it has changed a bit.

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Hello and welcome to our Sunday morning edition of The Papers.

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With me are Independent columnist, Yasmin Alibhai-Brown,

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and Peter Kellner, President of polling organisation

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The Sunday Express leads on the announcement that

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a new "supergroup" will be unveiled this week -

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uniting voices calling for Britain's exit from the EU.

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A key adviser to Margaret Thatcher - Lord Powell - believes the former

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Prime Minister would have supported David Cameron's Brussels deal.

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That's according to the Sunday Times.

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The Observer fears Government plans to restrict council homes

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for the very poorest will mean that tens-of-thousands of families

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The Sunday Telegraph leads on a letter it's received from more

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than 40 Conservative Party Associations, "angered" it says,

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by David Cameron's instruction to Tory MPs to ignore their views

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The Mail on Sunday claims that the Help for Heroes charity

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is being investigated by the charity commission.

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Finally, The Independent on Sunday dedicates its front page

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to the efforts being taken to tackle obesity, but criticises the policies

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of both the NHS and the Department of Health.

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Show respect Tories tell PM, the Sunday Telegraph warning David

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Cameron Diaz no divine right after the EU is not. It's an interesting

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story because it's one of those stories about the Westminster

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relate, and people who knock on doors within the country it also

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shows the cracks in the Tory party at every level. I think this

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genuine, heartfelt difference between those who want to leave and

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of staying. I've felt the fried of staying. I've felt the fried

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minister this time -- I felt for the minister this time -- I felt for the

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Prime Minister this time, because he has to defend whatever he brings

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back. There is a section of the party that will never accept the

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deal. If there is a vote that says deal. If there is a vote that says

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yes, which is what the opinion polls say yet, but they will not accept

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it. Yes. Within the Conservative Party, a great deal of activists

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feel strongly on this are really about Europe. I've spoken to David

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constituency, and the most constituency, and the most

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fascinating part of the evening was fascinating part of the evening was

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when I talked about Europe and you saw this upsurge of hatred of the

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European Union. So David Cameron has this problem in his own backyards.

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Whatever side you take on the issue, the Telegraph says there's a classic

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demonstration of the views of the famous old Tory on the 18th century,

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Edward Burke, that Tories should think for themselves, and MPs should

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be delegates at there own activists or voters, making it different from

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each other. Wherein a rip -- representative democracy and in this

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seat you've handed over your responsibility. Now with the days of

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Twitter and the idea that every single one of us should have our

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views taken to mean something, is -- it's becoming possible. When we've

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done polls we see voters thinking simultaneous. They want MPs to think

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themselves and also to do what local voters say. Can I ask you about the

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opinion polls on this issues, because we've seen 6% ahead, 9%

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ahead for no, do you think that's broadly right? Do you think that

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anybody apart from those actively involved in this has actually

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focused on it? I'm wondering... We've done the one poll since the

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announcement of the terms on Tuesday and this shows quite a sharp move

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from yes to know, with a 9-point lead, but the people saying they

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want to come out. This was in the middle of the most extraordinary

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media onslaught on David Cameron and I think we will see quite a lot of

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movement. I wouldn't like to predict the result. I think there's been a

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sharp movement away from the EU in the last week or so. Such madness. I

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remember having an argument on another channel, and the person was

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an incredibly intelligent Oxbridge person, who said we want to take

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control of our own laws. So give me an example of which laws, I said?

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Which is handed over to the EU. And this is the impression, but when you

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ask for examples and actual details then there are none. You might find

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your self in the same uncomfortable position as Mrs Thatcher! She would

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vote yes. Are we going to get more stories that Winston Churchill would

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have said yes? How would you know! ? In a sense, this is nonsense, but

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what it does do is make Lord Tebbit very angry. In the Sunday Times,

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Margaret Thatcher's closest adviser who sat at her side through those

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Brussels debates and arguments are negotiations, it doesn't mean he's

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absolutely right that it does mean that we should listen to what he'd

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say with some seriousness. Full. -- Thatcher was a pragmatist she sussed

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the situations, but what I do think, I'm actually very, very angry with

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the EU at the moment. The way they are treating the refugee crisis,

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asking Turkey to take more refugees but sitting tight and not doing

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anything. At the end of the day, somebody has got to see why it's a

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good thing to be in the EU, and nobody is doing that! The male has a

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slightly different take on this -- the Daily Mail. They think people

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should get off the fence and get out and lead people. I'm underwhelmed by

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the story. Pretty Patel is not a Cabinet minister. She is a middle

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ranking minister who was invited to sit at Cabinet meetings. Possibly,

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because it raises the proportion of women and ethnic and received people

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sitting round the Cabinet table. Argue saying we're no good? We're

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just been brought in here? I agree with you about pretty Patel, but I'm

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just reminding you! I'm not being specific! If this is the best the

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outers can do this weekend and there in trouble. We going to be pursuing

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the EU for a couple of months there. H six the Observer. EU chief spells

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problems with quitting. Curbs control over staff and that's a

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criticism. Let's look at this. Peter Cruddas is a serious player in the

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Brecht said it can. He's had to put out a statement as a company warning

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that Brecht sits might damage their own companies and their profits. One

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of their big donors is saying actually it might be a risk. The

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point is none of us can be certain what the economic consequences of a

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Brexit would be. I dating you can prove it would be a disaster, Aubrey

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that it would be beneficial. The point is, is there a risk in exit?

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-- Brexit. And Peter Bosz-mac I'm company is saying, actually there is

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a risk! This shows the it's more than an emotive issue than one back

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by evidence, because it there was some sober consideration, maybe

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those who would want to leap would reconsider. It's now become such a

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hot, emotional issue, to do with something visceral and something

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inside. Isn't it always going to be like that? We remember the Scottish

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independence campaign the facts were always in dispute. You're going to

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be ?1400 better off the year, or ?1000 better off this way. There's

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plenty boiling the North Sea etc. You're to remember -- you're far too

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young to remember the referendum in 1975. It made no difference. People

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basically base their views on the people they respected. They couldn't

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decide whether the wanted the same side as Tony Benn, Enoch Powell, Ian

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Paisley. You're getting this speech, what would bodies do? What will

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Michael Gove do? Bottle Theresa May do? -- what will Theresa May do?

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That turns things on its heads because you would normally decide

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the facts and then decide who you want to support, but you're saying

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you would choose who you like and then their facts? It's not even the

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person, although David Cameron brings out some pretty violent

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reactions within his own party, it's to do with this emotional, gut

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reaction. They have controlled us and we are going to be free.

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Actually nobody has talked enough about what Scotland will do next if

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this goes ahead and say we do late, most people in Scotland are

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pro-European, so will this give that energy to the SNP and a move towards

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independence? We had to look at the much bigger picture, this thing

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that's coming at us quite quickly, the referendum vote. Let's have a

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look at the Observer. Working families being forced out of council

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homes, front page of the Observer there. Tenants will be forced to pay

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market rents, it will hit 60,000 households. What you make of it?

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Let's look. Some people, not many, but some, are pretty well off and

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live in council homes on subsidised rent so not a lot of people will

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have sympathy. If you are fairly well of you shouldn't receive

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subsidies, so 40,000 or more in London, ?30,000 more outside London

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but what this analysis is saying is that there will be quite a lot of

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people who are just over the limits, so 31,000 out in Birmingham or

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Manchester who, given the current state of the private rental market

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and the rocketing rents would actually find themselves practically

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in pen Yury. It won't affect the people on low or high incomes but in

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the middle, there a fairly crucial group who could suffer from this

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change. These were the ones who are being courted, the hard-working

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strivers. They were being courted by the Conservative Party. The rents,

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London rents, Birmingham rents and certainly rents in our city have

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rocketed! I don't know how anybody on 30- ?40,000 could afford. If you

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have two children and you need a two bedroom house with the children

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sharing, you could not pay the rent. I don't know the details of this

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story, but it is fairly obvious, I don't know if you've done any

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polling on this, Peter, but it is now impossible for young people to

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afford the fairly modest stream of having a home of your own. It seems

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to have died or people in London, and not just in London. You are

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right because this move towards higher house prices, when I was

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growing up, it was normal for people of my generation with reasonable job

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is to buy their first time in their 20s. That is now the exception.

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People are renting and living with their parents until they are 30.

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There are a lot of countries with a healthier housing market you, you

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could argue, where people link -- rent for longer. But in order to

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have that you need lower rents, better homes, and you need to make

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it financially attractive proposition to rent. We don't have

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that. I don't have a lot of time for young people from middle classes,

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including my own children, who moan about this. I don't have time for

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that, because actually, the bigger crisis is for those families who

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haven't got any capital and never had to have -- have had, and who

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have worked hard. Those young people and these families, we should be

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focusing on them. If our kids can't afford to buy properties until their

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40, actually they will be OK. But, Yasmin, I agree with the sentiment,

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but the problem is if you try and tackle it as individual issues as

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the Government has tried to do with support for first-time buyers... The

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problem is we don't have enough homes. If we had a bigger supply of

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homes a lot of things would go away their own accord. That's the crisis!

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Bit, pics story of the week, humanitarian disasters loom in

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Aleppo as rebels are cut off. Aside and Russia are doing this -- Bashir

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Assad and Russia are doing this to their rain people. It started with

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15000 and the last I saw it was 30 5000. Now Turkey was saying it would

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accept them but isn't opening the gates. The EU is acting shockingly

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on this, including Britain. We think we campaign Turkey money to take our

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responsibility away from us. I don't what's going to these people. All

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credit to the Observer to putting it on the front page and 24 pages

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inside. This is responsible journalism. Most people don't really

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want to read about it but it's important, and the story it tells of

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the people in Aleppo are horrifying. The one thing I would pick out,

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where it says 100,000 people from Aleppo are likely to want to get

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into Turkey, and then it says that Turkey might not be able to open the

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doors. They then might pay sharks to take them across to Greece, see the

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initial latch -- reaction might be, thank goodness. But the second

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reaction will be, for heaven sake, if we don't do something for these

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people in region, we are storing up a massive trouble in the months and

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years ahead. We got 20 seconds left but we need to look at the last

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headline Crafty Fox... It's About Ranieri. 5000-1 To Win, For

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Leicester. I Hope It Was My Son Who Put That Bet On. Isn't It Wonderful,

:17:12.:17:17.

And I'm An Arsenal Fan, But Somebody Other Than Arsenal, Chelsea, The Two

:17:18.:17:20.

Manchester Jobs, Tottenham, Some Of The Club Is Up There Challenging?

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Doesn't It Make Football So Much More Exciting? Vardy Used To Read

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Roy of the Rovers. That's it for the papers. Thanks to our guests.

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And then to try and start unhappy night because there is some sunshine

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out there. There's also some showers

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