21/02/2016 The Papers


21/02/2016

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Transcript


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In a few minutes, we'll be taking a look at tomorrow's

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papers with our guests James Cusick, a Political Correspondent

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for the Independent and the broadcaster,

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Many of the front pages are already in.

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The FT is leading with the story of the day, but taking a different

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tact to most - leading with the line - Big business backs Cameron's push

:00:26.:00:28.

The Metro's headline says Boris backs Brexit, while bookies slash

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The Express is also highlighting the London Mayor's claim

:00:35.:00:41.

The mayor is also pictured on tomorrow's front page

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The Guardian runs with the claim from Mr Johnson that his decision

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to vote to leave the EU isn't fuelled by his political ambition.

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The Times shows Mr Johnson surrounded by the media

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on his London doorstep during his statement this afternoon.

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It also features the public push for a meningitis vaccine to

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Let's get down to it. Only one story in town, Lynn? Only one story. It is

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all borders. Some of them you can see Boris Johnson looking perplexed

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and worried and others, like the Daily Telegraph, he looks

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presidential. This is a Prime Minister and waiting picture. And it

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is basically he announced today, although he has been hinting at it

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apparently yesterday, that he is going to support they get out of

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Europe campaign. And so Boris Johnson has now become Bo Go from Bo

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Jo. And this is described as a once-in-a-lifetime chance for

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change. And another paragraph says all of history shows that they will

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only listen if he says no. His mind is made up, he apparently dumped

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David Cameron by text message at 4.40 this afternoon, then stood on

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his doorstep a few minutes later and announced to the world, a bit

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discourteous, but basically his mind is made up, we have to get out, but

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he is saying he is not anti-European, that he loves being

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European and Europe for culture but what we have is creeping federalism

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and legal colonisation and that is what he is against. James, he talks

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about the European Union being an democratic, that seemed to underpin

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part of his decision that he has reached today?

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That is one of the kinder words that he used. There is a 2000 word essay

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inside the Daily Telegraph, in which he goes through everything from

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expansion, unstoppable legal colonisation, a slow and invisible

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process, strong stuff for somebody who says he has been struggling to

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make up his mind on this. He appears to have worked this out quite a

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while ago. The key point of the Telegraph front page and

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presentation is how important he is to this project. Without this, what

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would the front pages look like today? Where is the leader? I know

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that Michael Gove is out there, a leading intellectual figure inside

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the Conservative Party, but they were hoping for Boris and they have

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got him. But the idea that he can merely say this and then somehow go

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to the sidelines and not bleed, that might happen for a couple of months.

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But near the end, in the middle of June, when it gets a bit tight? He

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says he is not going to get out there and campaign with George

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Galloway and Nigel Farage. Well, certainly not going to do that. He

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quotes Churchill as saying that Churchill was interested in Europe

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and associated with it, but not absorbed. That is what he's saying

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he wants to be, to still have some kind of influence in but not be in

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it. Let's go to the front page of the Guardian. Johnson comes out for

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Brexit. Is this a win- win for him, in the sense that if Britain decides

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to come out in June, he will have been on the right side of history,

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David Cameron actually has to step down, therefore he is in pole

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position? He could run for the leadership. If Britain decides not

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to leave the European Union, he has assured of support with

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backbenchers? I think what you are describing is a political

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calculation. Sounds about right! And he has done. He will have worked out

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the position. In all political decisions, there is an element of

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risk. He is putting himself in a position whereby if Britain actually

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votes to remain in the European Union, I think the Guardian, the

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Telegraph and most of them, they actually point out fairly strong

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open division, almost conflict between himself and David Cameron.

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My problem, and the problem for those people who make themselves

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prominent in this campaign is, what happens to them? Do we just assume

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that the Conservative Cabinet still go back the day after and everything

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is jolly? It will not like that. I am slightly concerned, this is day

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one of 120 days, or whatever it is. I think it will be very difficult

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and I think it could get quite a brutal. It already is, he is damning

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David Cameron with faint praise by saying you did a great job over in

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Europe, but, actually, in the time that is available to you, but you

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haven't brought anything back. There is an interesting side panel down

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the side of the Guardian front page. This is a decent poll. It is

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basically saying, out of 70 constituency parties that he

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contacted, only two reported party members in favour of remaining. If

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you like, it is exactly what you said earlier. He has positioned

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himself as representing the voice of the Conservative Party at grassroots

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level. I think that is important. He's made an intellectual decision.

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I don't doubt for a second that what is in this long, 2000 word article

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is heartfelt, I don't think it is xenophobic at all, I think he

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genuinely believes the European project is something that has value,

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the interesting thing about what he says is that if we leave, it will

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force the Europeans to change the project and he thinks that is a good

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thing. Let's go to the Daily Express. Boris, I will get us out of

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the EU, big boost for the Daily Express crusade. The Daily Express

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is saying that Boris Johnson has the will power and the strength to

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influence all of those in the middle that are undecided. He has name

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recognition, nobody can mess that mop of blonde hair. -- mess. But can

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he carry it for the ad campaign? According to the Daily Express, who

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we know have a dog in the fight, they want out, they are saying he is

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the most popular politician in the country. I was suggesting here that

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he was not as popular in Scotland as they might think, maybe not the

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hinterland of the Northwest. I have a feeling you might find, when push

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comes to shove, he is a bit metropolitan and they haven't all

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seen Have I Got News For You. The Express decided a long time ago that

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they want out. Tub thumping Boris, the Guardian had him looking pouting

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and worried, the worst picture they could find, I am quite looking

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forward to seeing how many versions of Boris we see on the front pages.

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James, it will be interesting, if Britain does decide to pull out of

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the European Union, Boris Johnson, if he ends up becoming Prime

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Minister, could become Prime Minister of England, Wales and

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Northern Ireland. The Scots have made it clear, or at least the SNP

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have made it clear, they are going to push for another referendum if

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Britain pulls out. I keep coming back to this long essay, maybe I am

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being far too academic, but... We like brains on this programme! Very

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small print as well. He says, and this is beautifully downplayed,

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there would be fresh tensions in the union between England and Scotland.

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Michael Gove's long explanation about why he was going, it actually

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didn't mention the constitutional issue. But I think Nicola Sturgeon

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made it fairly clear that she would campaign heavily for Britain to stay

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inside. She always has. But there would be a phenomenal window of

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opportunity for the Scots that you cannot ignore. Johnson does a fresh

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I would say that is the least of the UK's problems. If the Scots voted to

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remain, there would have a legitimate grievance. Nicola

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Sturgeon said today that they would have another referendum. She has

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said it for a long time. During the Scottish referendum, the issue of

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European membership was a big deal. It is back on the table. If it was

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big during the referendum two years ago, it is back on the table. I

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think there is more on this. It's unfortunate we have 120 days of

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this. The old Alliance... You are not excited, like the rest of us?

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Four times longer than an election campaign! I'll be excited in bits.

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You will be in bits, by the end of it. Let's go to The Financial Times,

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interesting, big business backs Cameron's push to keep Britain in

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the EU. Boris is still in the photograph? This is it, the Mayor of

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London coming out and suggesting, against all of the advice, one

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suspects, from the city, that this is a bad idea, to push for the EU,

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is clearly, going to be, in a few months' time, the ex-mayor of

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London. There is no way he could come out and say leave if he was the

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Mayor? Under the position of the Conservative mayoral candidate is to

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do what? Exactly the same. Zac Goldsmith says he wants to go out as

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well. The interesting thing of this thing is that bosses of half of

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Britain's biggest companies to sign a latter chilly letter. That means

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the other half have other views? I think there is an assumption that

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the City of London arm of the money and the influence, is somehow immune

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to this. Regardless of what happens, the power and force that London

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holds will still be there. There is legitimacy in that. There was all

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sorts of threats about how we need to be part of the euro zone to keep

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the city going. The city is maybe an international institution that

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perhaps will not have any short or medium term effect on this. I think

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a London Mayor, a would-be Mayor, can have those positions fairly

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legitimately. I don't think it is that important. I am really

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surprised how muted Britain is to this. I thought they would have

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started the fight back to stay in, if that is what they wanted. Stuart

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Rose, of Marks Spencers, previously, is leading the campaign?

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The front page of The Financial Times, it is surprising it has not

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left onto other front pages. The Times, I promise, dear viewer, the

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last reference to Mr Johnson in this particular edition. Boost for other

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campaigners, and the Prime Minister told of the decision by text minutes

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before the announcement. This goes to the close friendship that these

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two men have had for a long time, since university, ruptured? Or

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rivalry? It depends, I think the capacity of

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politicians to make up is always going to be there. Or to be

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political? For instance, I can almost see Boris Johnson's

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explanation, and is going through his hair, I meant to call him

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earlier, things got out of hand, something to do with the dog, I just

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forgot. It is everything it stands for. If he is calling the Prime

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Minister ten minutes before he makes a critical decision, and, to be

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honest, in front of the Guardian it shows how important Boris Johnson is

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to this project. The two politicians whose views mattered, according to a

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poll, is David Cameron and Boris Johnson. Effectively, they have made

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enemies of themselves. These men were not friends at school they went

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to, they were not friends at Oxford. They are not friends now. David

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Cameron offered him some kind of minor role in a ministerial role, to

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keep him out of trouble. Boris can read what David Cameron is up to and

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David Cameron can read what he is up to. The two our rivals. Cameron and

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Osborne has been the political access. You could end up with Boris

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and Michael Gove. I don't know, here's a much quieter person, but

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that might be the next political access. We will stay with The Times,

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700,000 sign petition for meningitis vaccination on the NHS. Anybody

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under the age of one, 12 months, can get the meningitis B vaccine. If you

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are over that, you have to pay for it yourself and there have been a

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couple of unfortunate examples of babies dying as a result. It's a

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difficult position for the Department of Health and the Health

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Secretary. The way meningitis B works is that it works in cycles.

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Currently, we are at a very low cycle, the lowest, a 10-year low.

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Not many people getting at? Very few. The child immunisation

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programme, the meningitis B vaccine was brought in last year. That was

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seen as a great campaign, two years push to get that included. It was

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brought in, if you like, the efficiency level of that, the money

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and where we spend it, what are we getting for it? This campaign shows

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you how important, if you like, even one death is to the public. I think

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the campaigners are looking at, initially, the under fives. They

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would like to see even the two most dangerous parts, and the one, and

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then from teenager onwards. They would like all children, the

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Department of Health do not have that money. The joint Council on

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vaccination did not have the statistics to back it up. It is a

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huge long-term battle. Every time we see one picture and one death, the

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public react. It is a brutal disease. Jim wrote about that last

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week. What this story says to me, who did not write about it last

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week, is the power of these polls that are out there. It is the

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easiest thing, a click of your mouse or finger, to sign a poll, they have

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two thirds of a million signatures. There are all these polls that's

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700,000 comet has gone up in the headline. These polls are going to

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be a nightmare for the government going forward. You could get a

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million people sign up to something. It is a lot of people, it shows

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public feeling. Even if you were prepared to pay ?1000 at a private

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clinic, the stocks of the vaccine are just not there. The NHS have

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long-term plans, obviously they will be first. The Child Immunisation

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Programme is very important. Worried parents will pay anything. Briefly

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come onto the final story, the Telegraph. Corgis, what is this

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about? This is a nib... He That is news in brief, by the way. The

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Queen, how he has breakfast delivered in Tupperware containers,

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a bit of plastic, the corgis are eating out of family silver. Named

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family silver. I can't tell you much more, but it sounds like they are

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dining better than she is. Living the life of Riley, and we're not

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talking about... You will be back to talk about more headlines? More

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Boris! Now it is time for Click.

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