24/02/2016 The Papers


24/02/2016

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million-dollar question. And, we look at the track championships in

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cycling in London next week. Hello and welcome to

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our look ahead to what the papers With me are

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the senior political correspondent at the Telegraph, Kate McCann,

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and the political correspondent The i reports on what life is

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like for people living under the rule of the so-called

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Islamic State group in Syria. The International Monetary Fund is

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urging the world's top economies to work

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together to try and boost growth, The Telegraph claims

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Justice Secretary Michael Gove could be facing the sack

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after he challenged the legality The Metro says internet giant Google

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is facing a ?1.3 billion tax bill in France, that's ten times

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the amount they paid to Britain. The two investigations

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into how police failed victims of sexual abuse in Rotherham are

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the Guardian's main story. The Sun has an interview with former

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television presenter Stuart Hall, who's finished serving a jail

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sentence for indecent assaults. There's claims in the Express that

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the French will let thousands of migrants head for Britain

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if the UK opts to leave the EU. And the Mail has a picture of the

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singer Adele, who's swept the board at the Brit awards, along with a

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warning that more than one million We will start with the suggestion

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that Michael Gove could be fired after the referendum on whether or

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not we should stay in the EU in June because he is perceived to have used

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his office as the justice secretary to attack David Cameron's deal. I

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think with this story we don't really know whether David Cameron

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will have calmed down after the referendum. He might be feeling this

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way now, but come June we don't know what the result is going to be and

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we don't know is he will need a unity cabinet to keep Michael Gove

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in the tent along with Boris Johnson. The most interesting aspect

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of this for me is the bitterness of the off the record briefing that is

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now going on between the two different warring Tory camps.

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They'll already whispering into your ears about who is doing this. This

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is an anonymous minister saying that they might befriends, but it would

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be hard to see how Michael Gove can continue as just a secretary after

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what he has done to Cameron. I suppose David Cameron might feel

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justified in feeling that he has been stabbed in the back. It is a

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funny one, because what is playing out across most of the front pages

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is not really anything to do with an argument about whether we should

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leave or remain in the EU, it is an argument between friends. David

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Cameron and Michael Gove are very good friends, so anyone who has read

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the article in the Daily Mail today by Michael Gove's wife, saying that

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he agonised about this, saying that the PM would feel let down. This is

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not just about politics, it is friendship. That is the same as

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Boris Johnson in the PM. When David Cameron reacted to Boris Johnson's

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coming out to campaign for Brexit, he was angry. It was a personal,

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heart and not head reaction. This is something the country wants to see

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leadership on. What they don't want to see is an argument among Tory

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cabinet ministers about who is right and who is wrong and who has

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betrayed whom. But that was always the danger of that, wasn't it? We

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know what John Major called some of the people in his party who feel

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this way about the EU. We know about the divisions that run deep, very

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deep. It was going to happen. That is why we are seeing stories like

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this today. David Cameron may well decide to move Michael Gove out of

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the cabinet after the referendum, because while politics is the most

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important thing, he is not going to sack him tomorrow as it wouldn't

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make any sense. But he may decide to sideline Michael Gove at the end of

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this process and say, I expected more from you and I am very

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disappointed. And he might keep Boris in the camp, because if Boris

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Johnson keeps his word and doesn't become the poster boy for the leave

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campaign, which could become very damaging, if he can do that then he

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may be rewarded with the top job. He knows it could be Michael Gove's

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job. Michael Gove is simply stating what is there for everyone to see,

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that until this deal becomes part of the official treaty of the EU, it is

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still potentially possibly maybe challengeable in the European court

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of justice. That is what the leave campaign assay, but on the other

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side Downing Street is adamant that there deal is -- that their deal is

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watertight. They have lined up a number of people, Donald Tusk and

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Dominic Grieve, it was a very slick operation. Donald Tusk has said that

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he believes this deal has legal force and the European Court of

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Justice will have to take it into account. Michael Gove says we have

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no control over who we let in, and warns of a huge new influx this

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year. Michael Gove popping up again, and when he pops up in a story you

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know that it is legitimate, or so you think because that has been the

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case so far. It is a problem David Cameron has to deal with. This story

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about migration will be one of the main focus is for the EU referendum

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campaign, particularly on the Leeds side. They know that many people who

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want to see the back of the European Union are concerned about migration.

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-- leave. Neither side can say for sure that this is or is not going to

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be the case, but what people are frightened about is that it might

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be. Unfortunately, at the moment, the remain campaign can't say that

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that won't happen. The French to let migrants head for Britain, outrage

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at threat to scrap border checks at Calais. Why would the French keep

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the British border in France if we leave the EU? This is an interesting

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story, because this is the Calais regional president who is saying

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that if Britain left the EU, then he would want to move the border over

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to the UK. And that is exactly the argument David Cameron has been

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making about this. He is saying that it is actually Paris and the EU that

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is keeping the agreement as it is. It is also an argument that has been

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very strongly rebutted from the leave campaign. Saying that this is

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scaremongering and it would never happen. The more this argument gets

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repeated, David Cameron will want this to be out there. He will be

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willing to Cali politicians on -- Calais politicians on. This is about

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as feasible as the deal being struck down by the European Court of

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Justice? It is based on an agreement. I think all the arguments

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about these treaties and how it is or is not interpreted by the courts,

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someone was making the point today that lots of EU treaties can be

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interpreted differently by other European countries, so saying it

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won't be legal until it is in that treaty doesn't mean much, because

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sometimes the treaties themselves are challenged. A lot of this comes

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down to goodwill, and at the moment that is stretched because Calais has

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a real problem. The French aren't getting much out of this deal. They

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are getting some support, some financial support and political

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support, but I think those relationships will be stretched to

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the limit if the UK does decide to leave. Are we seeing Michael Gove

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being put out there will voluntarily taking the mantle of the spokesman

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for the leave campaign? It won't just be him, we have also seen Iain

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Duncan Smith come out and make a similar argument in his brief about

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welfare, and saying that the emergency brake won't be effective.

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But I think Michael Gove is taking a bigger role in this already after

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just four days, and maybe David Cameron will have expected that.

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It'll be a surprise to David Cameron that good friend has defied him and

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rejected his deal, and also that he has been quite so bullish and out

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there in his arguments against the EU. We had better move on to the

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Guardian. Police failings in Rotherham. There is a source in here

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saying that more than 50 officers are being investigated, and we were

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saying before how that would have an impact on the community in

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Rotherham. Particularly when you find that 1600 children in the town

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at that time alone could have been victims of these kinds of attacks.

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That is a shocking number of people for a relatively small area. I think

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there are big questions being asked of the police, but as Rowena pointed

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out earlier, it is not just the police at fault, but local

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government and others who knew about it. It is neighbours, friends,

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family, people who work in the child-care system, they may have

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been aware of failings and maybe they weren't reported early enough

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or taken seriously as they should have been. For some people, the Fiat

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also of being potentially labelled racist in pointing out these issues

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that seem to be emanating from such a tiny section of the Pakistani

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community -- the fear. There is this argument about it that people in

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local government were so frightened about being labelled racist that

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they didn't act on it. That seems to me to be very good excuse -- to be

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not a very good excuse. This is such an appalling scandal on such a huge

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scale, that doesn't seem inadequate reason. Absolutely not. The French

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demand 1.3 billion of Google in taxes. Ten times what Britain got.

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This is a demand, they haven't actually managed to get this money.

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It is ten times what the UK got, which was ?130 million from Google

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over a 10-year period. At least they are asking for it. There is some

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criticism here with George Osborne saying it was a victory for the UK.

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This group have come out and said that the payment was

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disproportionately small. HMRC didn't bother levelling any kind of

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fines for late payment at Google either. We would expect that if we

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didn't submit our tax returns on time. It is not the end of this for

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the UK, and HMRC had in fact said in another committee hearing that they

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could look again at Google's tax bill if other countries were

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perceived to get larger pay-outs. So there could be a review? Yes, there

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could be. So if the French are successful, a bit more restitution

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may be. Don't think this will be the end of this story, I think there

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will be political pressure. People have started asking questions

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between the links between Downing Street and Google, and was that too

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cosy relationship? Are revolving door between Whitehall and the

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company, and the close was of Eric Schmidt, the CEO, who was on David

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Cameron's business group. I think there are more questions to ask

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about what pressure Google put on the government to not look too

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closely at this in the past. Very quickly, do we have time for one

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more? I'm getting conflicting messages. It is all over, I am being

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told. We have run out of time. Thank you both for coming. Sportsday

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next.

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