18/03/2016 The Papers


18/03/2016

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 18/03/2016. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

silencers her critics by safely riding clear. Football and rugby and

:00:00.:00:00.

more coming up in 15 minutes, after the papers.

:00:00.:00:17.

Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers

:00:18.:00:21.

With me are Susie Boniface, columnist at the Mirror and

:00:22.:00:27.

The Telegraph leads on Iain Duncan Smith's resignation,

:00:28.:00:34.

saying his decision risks throwing the Government into disarray.

:00:35.:00:37.

The Times says Mr Duncan Smith chose to resign despite a U-turn by

:00:38.:00:41.

George Osborne over the cuts which were kicked into 'the long grass'.

:00:42.:00:44.

The FT says Mr Duncan Smith has inflicted serious damage

:00:45.:00:46.

The Independent has an image of the arrests in Brussels.

:00:47.:00:54.

Its main story is a warning from Wales' First Minister that

:00:55.:00:56.

an English vote to leave the EU would prompt a constitutional crisis

:00:57.:00:59.

'Got him', is the headline on the Mirror, next to

:01:00.:01:05.

And the Express leads on the deal between Turkey

:01:06.:01:08.

and the EU to try to curb the flow of migrants into Europe.

:01:09.:01:12.

So, let's begin with this story that broke this evening and has taken

:01:13.:01:25.

quite a lot of people by surprise. Iain Duncan Smith deciding to resign

:01:26.:01:31.

from the Cabinet as the Work and Pensions Secretary. It opposes what

:01:32.:01:35.

seems to be a rift between the Treasury and his formative arm. Yes,

:01:36.:01:40.

there's nobody in Whitehall who doesn't seem to have a blade between

:01:41.:01:47.

his shoulders this morning. The other thing that happened today is

:01:48.:01:52.

that Iain Duncan Smith has been told for the third time by a judge to

:01:53.:01:56.

release some paperwork, which he didn't want to release. The

:01:57.:02:01.

paperwork is about internal reviews to how universal credit was going

:02:02.:02:09.

and what problems they had. The papers were expected to show a

:02:10.:02:15.

series of cock ups. He has been told today he really does have to publish

:02:16.:02:20.

them, as well as the Treasury briefing against him and his

:02:21.:02:25.

department and now we've had a really brutal resignation letter in

:02:26.:02:28.

which he blames George Osborne for everything that's happened in the

:02:29.:02:32.

past six years, while also saying he is proud of it, which doesn't make

:02:33.:02:37.

much sense. What is Iain Duncan Smith opposed to? Austerity itself

:02:38.:02:41.

or certain measures that were put into the budget this week? People

:02:42.:02:46.

who have been following this government for six years will be

:02:47.:02:49.

surprised by the discovery that Iain Duncan Smith could be a critic of

:02:50.:02:52.

austerity, it was he seemed to be the man in the engine room of

:02:53.:02:56.

austerity, the man making the wild case for austerity. While the

:02:57.:02:59.

shortage of money that it was necessary to reform now. Iain Duncan

:03:00.:03:07.

Smith approaches politics from a Christian, highly moral or most

:03:08.:03:13.

highly Tory perspective and he sees his job as reforming welfare to help

:03:14.:03:21.

people into work. Even if it causes hardship for some along the way.

:03:22.:03:26.

Yes, because any kind of welfare reform does that. Also it is simply

:03:27.:03:30.

necessary in order to reform a system which is now bloated. Here is

:03:31.:03:37.

the thing. He says that his well-intentioned policies were

:03:38.:03:41.

sometimes borrowed by the Treasury, inserted into a budget and used as

:03:42.:03:44.

an opportunity to save money. At the same time as the Treasury was

:03:45.:03:49.

carrying out other forms of taxation that gave the impression to the

:03:50.:03:54.

public that the government was both cutting money for welfare recipients

:03:55.:03:58.

and cutting taxes for the highest paid. So what Iain Duncan Smith is

:03:59.:04:02.

really doing is criticising the way austerity is being applied. He is

:04:03.:04:06.

walking a very fine line and isn't necessarily saying austerity is

:04:07.:04:10.

wrong, he is just saying that it has been hijacked by the Treasury and he

:04:11.:04:15.

feels that he is good plans and good programmes have been

:04:16.:04:20.

misrepresented. But also these reforms, which he has apparently

:04:21.:04:24.

resigned over, are ones that his department came up with and they

:04:25.:04:28.

were going to implement them in the future and he says they weren't

:04:29.:04:31.

ready yet, because he hadn't managed to convince everybody at. That

:04:32.:04:35.

doesn't mean he has a moral objection to those cuts per se, it

:04:36.:04:43.

just means he objects to the timing. That's not the moral objection

:04:44.:04:47.

you've got in his resignation letter and he isn't especially Christian

:04:48.:04:50.

Wade Christ reportedly said in the Bible to give to anyone who asks. --

:04:51.:04:57.

when Christ. This is before the welfare state. I can't defend him

:04:58.:05:00.

because he isn't speaking to my era and telling me what to say, but I

:05:01.:05:05.

would imagine that he would reply by saying that first of all don't

:05:06.:05:07.

forget the minimum wage hasn't gone up yet, so if you are reforming

:05:08.:05:16.

welfare this debate, it is wise to weight. -- wise to wait. The living

:05:17.:05:25.

wage might not affect certain people. But if they are working

:05:26.:05:31.

part-time they might be earning more certain. His point is that the

:05:32.:05:34.

welfare reform agenda was undermined because it was unfairly associated

:05:35.:05:38.

with cutting taxes for the rich and reducing payments. But it is the

:05:39.:05:44.

marketing of it. We are so engrossed in the conversation and forgetting

:05:45.:05:49.

to look at the front pages. I am listening and forgetting my job!

:05:50.:05:53.

Which is to show you the front pages. The Work and Pensions

:05:54.:06:00.

Secretary says that slashing benefits is indispensable. That's

:06:01.:06:09.

sure you what the FT -- let's show you what the FT started with. It

:06:10.:06:16.

leads with Europe gambling to stem migrant flow. Right in the middle of

:06:17.:06:23.

the paper. However, because this story broke this evening, the papers

:06:24.:06:28.

had a race on their hands to get the front page changed. Iain Duncan

:06:29.:06:39.

Smith quits over welfare cuts. How damaging it is for the governments

:06:40.:06:43.

generally and George Osborne in particular? It is incredibly

:06:44.:06:48.

damaging for George Osborne. The goal was that he would replace David

:06:49.:06:53.

Cameron. That was the gameplan. We had the opportunity to move to the

:06:54.:06:56.

Foreign Secretary after the election. He chose instead to at the

:06:57.:06:59.

Treasury. The budget has been a difficult one, with very confused

:07:00.:07:05.

messages. Both the left and right have made criticism. The handling of

:07:06.:07:11.

it has been controversial. Now that Iain Duncan Smith says this man is

:07:12.:07:18.

the enemy, of everything when it comes to social policy, it makes it

:07:19.:07:21.

much harder for him to replace David Cameron ago as he is now a toxic and

:07:22.:07:26.

controversial figure for many people within the Conservative party and

:07:27.:07:31.

Parliament. As Brexit emerges and Osborne will be out there everyday

:07:32.:07:35.

saying, if you vote for Brexit than held will emerge and the dead will

:07:36.:07:39.

walk and Britain will sink into the fiery pits, again he will alienate

:07:40.:07:41.

himself from ordinary Tory grassroots. The Guardian. George

:07:42.:07:48.

Osborne humbled by disability benefits. They've now said there was

:07:49.:07:58.

no mention of Iain Duncan Smith going. It was written beforehand. If

:07:59.:08:06.

the Treasury at first saying this morning that this is definitely

:08:07.:08:11.

going to happen, that the budget and that's what we are doing, for them

:08:12.:08:16.

to write back and say that actually we are going to think about it and

:08:17.:08:19.

consult and it may not happen after all, then in that context Iain

:08:20.:08:23.

Duncan Smith would have got what he wanted. He would never have been

:08:24.:08:26.

able to introduce those cuts further down the line. But he has Cameron

:08:27.:08:31.

and Osborne to write back and admit they were wrong. So there's no real

:08:32.:08:35.

reason to resign on that moral basis, if those cuts were imposed.

:08:36.:08:40.

But from his point of view he has been working on these reforms for

:08:41.:08:42.

years and within three days number 10 as announced they will never do

:08:43.:08:46.

it. So he may well in some sense have gotten what he wanted, but in

:08:47.:08:52.

the long run it must have been humiliating for the man. They have

:08:53.:09:04.

this SOI request as well. -- FOR. We have the text of a letter that the

:09:05.:09:08.

PM has said the Iain Duncan Smith, just a portion of it. I regret that

:09:09.:09:12.

he has chosen to step down at this moment. Together we designed the

:09:13.:09:17.

personal independence payment to support the most rollable and give

:09:18.:09:20.

disabled people more independence. We all agreed the increased spending

:09:21.:09:24.

should be properly managed and focused on those who need it most.

:09:25.:09:30.

That is why we collectively agreed you, number 10 and the Treasury,

:09:31.:09:33.

proposals which you and your department announced a week ago.

:09:34.:09:37.

Today we agreed not to receive the policies in the current form and

:09:38.:09:43.

instead work together to get the work right in the coming months. So

:09:44.:09:48.

I am disappointed that he has decided to resign. Listening to that

:09:49.:10:01.

letter, my ear picks up that when it was agreed they would pursue the

:10:02.:10:04.

policy last weekend when it was agreed they would back down from the

:10:05.:10:12.

policy, was he involved in the second decision? How collective is a

:10:13.:10:20.

decision as well? Someone has to be the boss. There is a hierarchy.

:10:21.:10:25.

Someone is in charge and says this is what is happening next and to say

:10:26.:10:30.

you are puzzled and disappointed... He said this was all your fault and

:10:31.:10:41.

he says you are part of it as well. Was there a Cabinet meeting this

:10:42.:10:44.

afternoon? I may have missed when it was collectively discussed. I

:10:45.:10:51.

suspect not. Iain Duncan Smith can also reply by pointing out that to

:10:52.:10:57.

some degree this sense of Cabinet leech analogy has already been

:10:58.:11:00.

broken by the Brexit debate, because he says he was denied access to

:11:01.:11:04.

certain civil servant documents and the pro EU members of Cabinet are

:11:05.:11:08.

allowed to speak to the media and say what they want and the others

:11:09.:11:12.

aren't. The arguably that Cabinet leech analogy has not been there for

:11:13.:11:18.

a couple of years. -- weeks. -- Cabinet division. There are only a

:11:19.:11:25.

few more months. He might as well get some airtime! So cynical!

:11:26.:11:32.

Realistic. Moving on. Let's talk about the story we thought we were

:11:33.:11:35.

going to be covering pretty much for the entirety of the review, which is

:11:36.:11:40.

the arrest of Salah Abdeslam, the 26 your old man who has been on the run

:11:41.:11:45.

since the Paris attacks. He is the main suspect following the deaths of

:11:46.:11:50.

130 people in Paris last November. The world's most wanted man is the

:11:51.:11:58.

headline on the Daily Mirror. He hadn't actually gone very far. No,

:11:59.:12:03.

he was living near where his brother lived in Marlon Pack in Brussels. --

:12:04.:12:15.

Moleenbek. It's a good thing they managed to get him alive, but the

:12:16.:12:24.

Brussels authorities seem to only have got him by accident. They were

:12:25.:12:30.

going after some counterfeiters that they thought perhaps was linked to

:12:31.:12:34.

the Paris attacks five months ago. They then got into a couple of

:12:35.:12:38.

flats, found they were under gunfire and realised they had managed to

:12:39.:12:45.

find him and shot him in the leg, which is not the kind of thing you

:12:46.:12:49.

aim for if you are policemen. He has been shot and found accidentally.

:12:50.:12:54.

Because they were very well armed this time and were taken by surprise

:12:55.:12:56.

when they went to that flat that they thought was empty in that

:12:57.:13:02.

certain area of Belgium. Today a different prospect. I was vaguely

:13:03.:13:13.

hearing on the radio before I came to the studio something about the

:13:14.:13:15.

boss and maybe they were given very short notice that he was in the

:13:16.:13:20.

area. I don't know. The significance of this is enormous because

:13:21.:13:24.

obviously it was one of the devastating attacks that has

:13:25.:13:27.

happened in Europe. Hundreds killed. His brother was killed in the

:13:28.:13:33.

attack. And I think this was an opportunity, when you capture

:13:34.:13:35.

someone live, not only to assess them for information and

:13:36.:13:38.

intelligence but to also address the issue of why he did it. For me

:13:39.:13:44.

that's the big question, the philosophical question that Europe

:13:45.:13:49.

has got to address. If you can catch a terrorist rather than kill him,

:13:50.:13:52.

you prevent him from becoming a martyr, you reduce him to the status

:13:53.:13:57.

of a normal human being in a court undergoing a mundane process,

:13:58.:14:01.

looking as haggard as anyone would do when they are in court. That's

:14:02.:14:06.

important. It is important for the families that they have their

:14:07.:14:08.

justice and their day in court and it is important for the Tera

:14:09.:14:18.

network, -- terror network, that the martyrdom is denied. Are you saying

:14:19.:14:24.

Osama Bin Laden should not have been shot? No, but the whole point of

:14:25.:14:30.

what we do as a civilisation is that that is the correct way to behave.

:14:31.:14:36.

But this man is a cold in the wheel of Islamic State.

:14:37.:14:39.

But this man is a cold in the wheel of Islamic State. Osama Bin Laden

:14:40.:14:47.

was the head of it. I think it was easier to take out a Osama Bin

:14:48.:14:50.

Laden. It was easier to take him out. But this is not the end of it.

:14:51.:14:58.

Francois Heartland said there were far more people involved in the

:14:59.:15:02.

Paris attacks then the authorities at first realised -- Francois

:15:03.:15:09.

Heartland. As well as addressing the questions you mentioned. And the

:15:10.:15:13.

network stretches across the whole continent, including connections to

:15:14.:15:18.

England, as well as into Syria, issues of border control, so yes, it

:15:19.:15:23.

is a huge issue. Brexit and the migrant issue on the front pages as

:15:24.:15:27.

well. We will try to do with those again tomorrow. But that is it for

:15:28.:15:32.

the papers tonight. Thank you to our guests for coming in. Now it is time

:15:33.:15:34.

for Sportsday.

:15:35.:15:38.

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS