20/03/2016 The Papers


20/03/2016

A lively, informed and in-depth conversation about the Sunday papers.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 20/03/2016. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello and welcome to our Sunday morning edition of The Papers.

:00:14.:00:16.

With me are Kate Devlin, Political Correspondent

:00:17.:00:17.

and the Sunday Times Editorial Director Eleanor Mills.

:00:18.:00:22.

The Observer leads with the fallout from Iain Duncan Smith's

:00:23.:00:29.

resignation, saying the Tory party is at war.

:00:30.:00:33.

The Mail on Sunday claims the Prime Minister unleashed a four

:00:34.:00:36.

letter tirade at Mr Duncan Smith when the Work and Pensions Secretary

:00:37.:00:39.

made clear he was determined to resign.

:00:40.:00:42.

The Sunday Times focuses on what the resignation could do

:00:43.:00:45.

to George Osborne's leadership ambitions.

:00:46.:00:48.

And the Sunday Telegraph says the knives are out

:00:49.:00:50.

for the Chancellor, as he suffers what they call an "unprecedented

:00:51.:00:53.

The photograph is of the England rugby team,

:00:54.:00:59.

celebrating their Six Nations grand slam victory.

:01:00.:01:01.

The Sunday Express has a different lead, reporting that murder trials

:01:02.:01:04.

could be shown live on TV, under plans to show justice being done.

:01:05.:01:11.

And for the last ever print edition of the Independent on Sunday,

:01:12.:01:14.

the paper has the simple headline Lights Out and a special report

:01:15.:01:18.

There's plenty to talk about. Welcomer ladies. Let's start with

:01:19.:01:34.

the Sunday Times. The big story today is Iain Duncan Smith attacking

:01:35.:01:42.

George Osborne's budget as unfit. We've got a good chronological

:01:43.:01:47.

timeline of what happened and a series of increasingly acrimonious

:01:48.:01:51.

exchanges between Downing Street and IDS. I think this has been a

:01:52.:01:56.

simmering boil, Iain Duncan Smith has been getting increasingly

:01:57.:01:59.

frustrated with George Osborne. There's lots of people around and

:02:00.:02:05.

mood music about how IDS thought that for universal credit you would

:02:06.:02:09.

have to front-load it so it would cost a bit more to begin with in

:02:10.:02:13.

order to meet everyone over to the universal benefit. He's been

:02:14.:02:18.

complaining the Treasury have not been agreeing to that. The cuts to

:02:19.:02:25.

the disability benefit is the last round of an increasingly acrimonious

:02:26.:02:29.

series of salvos and he's marched out. It sounds like it got really

:02:30.:02:34.

vicious between him and David Cameron with insults flying. This

:02:35.:02:38.

thing about him being dishonourable, anyone who has ever met IDS would

:02:39.:02:49.

know that would sting. He really believes his social justice agenda.

:02:50.:02:53.

He is one of those politicians who mean something. He's not just in

:02:54.:02:57.

there for the greater glory. Read the headline in the Telegraph

:02:58.:03:02.

particularly, knives out for Osborne. It's a he says, she says.

:03:03.:03:06.

Everyone is coming out of the woodwork. It's not pleasant to

:03:07.:03:12.

watch. AB de Villiers it's not. It is instructed to remember that only

:03:13.:03:15.

a month ago the Conservatives were briefing that this is not the 1990s

:03:16.:03:21.

all over again. They were not giving to tear each other apart over

:03:22.:03:30.

Europe. Europe is in a massive row at the moment. I think they are

:03:31.:03:38.

tearing themselves out, I think this Thai rate would remind them of a

:03:39.:03:44.

similar tie rate by John Major back in the 1990s. What does this mean

:03:45.:03:50.

for the Chancellor? It's difficult at the moment. You can't

:03:51.:03:54.

underestimate how angry rank and file Tory MPs who would have been

:03:55.:03:58.

very loyal in the past are about this issue. It just seems to them

:03:59.:04:07.

such a tin ear to be cutting so much from people with disabilities. At

:04:08.:04:15.

the same time as offering a tax cut. Your paper has an interesting piece

:04:16.:04:21.

when it talks about trying to fulfil a self-imposed fiscal issue which is

:04:22.:04:28.

basically that George Osborne has said he would get a massive surplus

:04:29.:04:33.

in the budget by 2020 and he's determined to stick to that. IDS

:04:34.:04:42.

accuses Osborne of playing politics. When I was talking about IDS being

:04:43.:04:46.

an honourable politician, I think he is desperately trying to make poorer

:04:47.:04:52.

peoples lives better. He did have a real, seen conversion. Some of the

:04:53.:04:57.

commentators this morning are saying, what about... Why didn't he

:04:58.:05:05.

stick to his guns beforehand? Also, since there is no longer a

:05:06.:05:09.

coalition, is he finding it more difficult to temper what he sees as

:05:10.:05:15.

perhaps the things he doesn't like George Osborne doing. The other

:05:16.:05:19.

story around today is David laws, talking about how the government

:05:20.:05:24.

were being fishy about how much money they needed for the National

:05:25.:05:30.

Health Service. I think that's right, under the coalition IDS had a

:05:31.:05:37.

lot of support from the Lib Dems. And since they've gone it has become

:05:38.:05:41.

more difficult. I think he also really genuinely loathes George

:05:42.:05:47.

Osborne and he saw this as a point to really resign with maximum

:05:48.:05:50.

damage. How much of a big explosion can I cause as I go. We thought

:05:51.:05:55.

Osborne didn't really believe in we are all in it together, his playing

:05:56.:06:00.

politics for his own ends. In his letter where he says we're not all

:06:01.:06:04.

in this together that's very damaging to George Osborne if he's

:06:05.:06:07.

trying to look leader after the referendum. It's a sign of the

:06:08.:06:12.

danger that Osborne is in that Michael Gove has had to come out

:06:13.:06:21.

today, adding this intellectual heft to the campaign to leave the

:06:22.:06:25.

European Union. His piece in the Sunday Telegraph is so weedy. It's

:06:26.:06:35.

trying to sit on the fence. It's not a ringing endorsement of either of

:06:36.:06:39.

them. The front page of the Observer, the immoral cuts as IDS

:06:40.:06:46.

called them. That could come from Jeremy Corbyn. You can see why

:06:47.:06:51.

Cameron and people are furious. Do you think that this attack by Iain

:06:52.:06:56.

Duncan Smith, will it backfire on him, because already Ross Alterman

:06:57.:07:02.

is saying it's more about Brexit than cuts -- Ross Alterman -- Ros

:07:03.:07:13.

Altmann. She says it's all to do with the European Union. I think has

:07:14.:07:19.

well these attacks on Osborne today make it look as if it's more to do

:07:20.:07:23.

with the European Union. What happens after the votes, suggestions

:07:24.:07:29.

today there would be a leadership challenge against Cameron almost

:07:30.:07:36.

immediately after the vote. Because of a weakened Osborne. That is what

:07:37.:07:40.

the Sunday Times is saying, because this would weaken George Osborne so

:07:41.:07:44.

much that after the referendum he wouldn't have it handed over by

:07:45.:07:48.

Cameron. But there would be a leadership challenge. The real

:07:49.:07:58.

spectre is Boris. He is a fellow supporter of Brexit and on the side

:07:59.:08:05.

of IDS. Have we heard from him? He is away skiing. A really good front

:08:06.:08:16.

page on the mail on Sunday. We are moving on to the Daily Express.

:08:17.:08:24.

Cameras in court. This has been quite contentious. Even when we were

:08:25.:08:29.

at first thinking about cameras in Parliament, there's always been an

:08:30.:08:33.

issue about cameras in public places like that where public people might

:08:34.:08:38.

be seen. It's very interesting what the pilot is going to do. It is

:08:39.:08:43.

going to record, and not actually show but just record the moment, the

:08:44.:08:48.

judges comments and summing up and why he has made the decision he has.

:08:49.:08:53.

I think that is potentially an interesting way to do it. The

:08:54.:08:56.

argument has aways been, on the one hand justice has to be done and be

:08:57.:09:01.

seen to be done which is incredibly important to democracy. On the other

:09:02.:09:07.

hand, fears about sensationalism and OJ Simpson's trial but also

:09:08.:09:11.

intimidation of witnesses, to think they are going to be on camera

:09:12.:09:14.

whenever they give evidence. It sounds like they have come up with a

:09:15.:09:18.

slightly, possibly workable solution. Is it something the public

:09:19.:09:24.

would want to see? I did know if they would watch it or not. The

:09:25.:09:31.

juicy bits of trials is everyone giving evidence. I think it would be

:09:32.:09:35.

interesting for people to see what judges say which is sensible and

:09:36.:09:40.

doesn't get reported but in the media. I covered the OJ Simpson

:09:41.:09:47.

trial. It was absolutely... You couldn't move away from it. It was

:09:48.:09:53.

like the first reality TV. It's no accident that the Kardashians were

:09:54.:10:04.

born from the OJ Simpson trial. Let's move on to the times. We have

:10:05.:10:11.

this story about the abducted schoolgirls who seem to be have

:10:12.:10:14.

forgotten. These are the schoolgirls, nearly 250 schoolgirls

:10:15.:10:22.

were abducted from northern Nigeria two years ago. I sent one of our

:10:23.:10:28.

best foreign reporters back to Nigeria, for five months she has

:10:29.:10:34.

been trying to find out what's happened to them. Michelle Obama,

:10:35.:10:37.

David Cameron, everyone is saying this is a stain on the soul of the

:10:38.:10:41.

world. Michelle Obama said we have seen these girls, we would do

:10:42.:10:45.

everything we can to get them back. There is a great story that says

:10:46.:10:50.

that. They did know at various points where they were and they

:10:51.:10:53.

could have got them out and nothing has been done which I think is a

:10:54.:10:58.

massive scandal. How long did it take to do this story? Five months.

:10:59.:11:04.

This is our big investigation and I think it's a really important piece

:11:05.:11:08.

everyone should read. Why has it become the forgotten story? It's

:11:09.:11:14.

quite difficult to work out. It was such a big story at the time.

:11:15.:11:24.

Global. 6 million tweets. Every celebrity you can imagine. Then the

:11:25.:11:31.

whole thing was forgotten. This is the problem with celebrities getting

:11:32.:11:38.

involved in very serious, difficult international problems. I don't

:11:39.:11:41.

object to celebrities getting involved but I think what's awful is

:11:42.:11:45.

everyone thinks because they have sent a tweet that they've done

:11:46.:11:48.

something about it. The reality is these girls are in the jungle,

:11:49.:11:53.

married off to terrorists, being raped constantly no one is doing

:11:54.:11:58.

anything about it. If it had been someone else do you think someone

:11:59.:12:02.

would have done something about it? It would be hard to imagine if 250

:12:03.:12:07.

white British or American schoolgirls went missing two years

:12:08.:12:11.

on they would still be in that situation. Is there any sense

:12:12.:12:15.

anything is being done, that there is a re-emergence of a willingness

:12:16.:12:19.

to do something? I'm hoping our story today might have that effect.

:12:20.:12:26.

I really think this is an outrage. Another Times story, London on

:12:27.:12:34.

alert. This is really terrible. The National crime agency and the police

:12:35.:12:38.

are warning we might get a situation where simile to in Paris, we got

:12:39.:12:44.

simultaneous attacks in London. They are saying they've got the Army on

:12:45.:12:49.

stand-by and the SAS and other units to deal with a dirty bomb. It

:12:50.:12:54.

reminds us how serious the threat we face is. And the political fallout

:12:55.:13:00.

from something like that. It is a huge responsibility keeping everyone

:13:01.:13:05.

safe. You can't have 100% security. It's incredibly difficult to try and

:13:06.:13:12.

deal with this style of attack. The police were previously told to train

:13:13.:13:16.

for three happening at the same time, now they are being told to

:13:17.:13:22.

train for between seven and ten. It is basically impossible. There are

:13:23.:13:27.

shades of going back to Northern Ireland when we were growing up,

:13:28.:13:32.

when everyone, the public has to be vigilant at these times. The police

:13:33.:13:39.

can't be everywhere. Absolutely. It's easy for people to forget that.

:13:40.:13:45.

If they see a bag lying beside the road or anything like that. We all

:13:46.:13:52.

need to be vigilant. President Obama has gone to Cuba. What we make of

:13:53.:13:59.

that? I still don't know what it's going to mean. I know what it will

:14:00.:14:03.

mean for President Obama. He said he would do this in the very early

:14:04.:14:10.

stages of his presidency. It's one of the things that he's trying to

:14:11.:14:13.

take off his list. This morning there was an announcement about

:14:14.:14:19.

Hotel openings in Cuba. American hotels opening in Cuba. It looks as

:14:20.:14:25.

if there will be business investment on the back of this which in itself

:14:26.:14:30.

is very interesting. I think many questions remain about what it will

:14:31.:14:33.

actually mean in the long-term. To begin with it was going to be their

:14:34.:14:38.

would-be flights to America. I think there's been lots of trouble because

:14:39.:14:42.

lots of big European firms have been piling in, buying up the best sites

:14:43.:14:49.

and the Americans are bit cross. He is going to meet, as well as Raul

:14:50.:14:54.

Castro, the dissidents weather Raul Castro likes it or not. I think he

:14:55.:15:00.

has two. Given how many Cubans are in Florida. It is a very difficult

:15:01.:15:09.

one in terms of American politics. We have to end with the independent

:15:10.:15:15.

with a heavy heart but a fantastic front page. It's really sad it's the

:15:16.:15:20.

last ever print edition of the Independent. Run by my good friend

:15:21.:15:24.

Lisa Markwell. Really sad from a female perspective, she is one of

:15:25.:15:29.

the few female editors of a big newspaper. I think it's really sad.

:15:30.:15:34.

She has done brilliantly on a Sunday to highlight different kinds of

:15:35.:15:37.

agendas and do some fantastic writing with a tiny budget and a

:15:38.:15:42.

team of 12. It is a plucky liked going out which is sad for everyone.

:15:43.:15:47.

It is sad to see a whole title no longer on the shelf. One of their

:15:48.:15:53.

hallmark has been these very eye-catching, brave front pages. And

:15:54.:16:00.

to do with climate change. And refugees which is a subject that

:16:01.:16:06.

sometimes gets lost. Do you think we will maintain a link with it when

:16:07.:16:13.

its online? Would we be sitting here talking about it if it was only

:16:14.:16:17.

online? I do read a lot of stuff online as well. But we don't sit

:16:18.:16:28.

here talking about Buzzfeed, do we? And the thing about the mag unease,

:16:29.:16:35.

-- magazine. People love a Sunday paper. I would say that but I think

:16:36.:16:39.

it's true. How much will it be missed? I'll miss it. They are

:16:40.:16:48.

moving online, they say they are going to do the kind of stories

:16:49.:16:54.

they've always done. In terms of a physical presence, reading it on a

:16:55.:17:00.

Sunday. But Lisa Markwell and her team went be their online.

:17:01.:17:05.

Just a reminder we take a look at tomorrow's front pages every

:17:06.:17:10.

evening at 10.30 and 11.30 here on BBC News.

:17:11.:17:24.

It's the vernal equinox today, signalling for those who followed

:17:25.:17:28.

the astronomical calendar, the first day of spring.

:17:29.:17:32.

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS