20/03/2016 The Papers


20/03/2016

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers

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With me are the political commentator Jo

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Phillips, and the political editor of the Sunday People, Nigel Nelson.

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A different set of papers from the last hour.

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They are all still dominated by Ian Duncan smith's resignation.

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The FT says it's sparked a wider row in the Conservative party,

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over the Prime Minister's and the Chancellor's style of Government.

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"IDS twists the knife" is the Independent's take.

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Criticisms by Mr Duncan Smith are described as the biggest challenge

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to Mr Cameron's authority in his six years in Downing Street.

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The i calls it the "explosive exit of a quiet man".

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And the Express thinks that Mr Duncan Smith's

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resignation is a "massive boost" to the campaign for

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The Metro focuses on the former Work and Pensions

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secretary's description of the Budget as "deeply unfair" for

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The Guardian says the Conservatives "descended into

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civil war" as a succession of MPs came out to support Mr Duncan Smith.

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We mentioned it a few minutes ago the Times. The headline is Cameron,

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I blame Osborne. Chancellor messed up cots. The Prime Minister told a

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colleague, but we don't know which colleague. -- cuts. No, and that is

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the point of it. This would be very significant because Cameron and

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Osborne are together, together, together right the way through. This

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would be, Blair and Brown all over again. It widens the gap into

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something much more damaging. Damaging for the Prime Minister, but

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also damaging for the Chancellor, who is already damaged by the

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allegations from Iain Duncan Smith. Unless we know who said it, and

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unless we know in what second sciences, it is difficult... --

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circumstances. I'm not sure it rings true. How secure do you think George

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Osborne is at number 11? I would think at the moment unity is all.

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They are under such a cloud that George Cameron and David Cameron

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have to tackle this head-on and together. The idea they are falling

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out already would be a real problem I would think. I would imagine they

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are thinking in terms of the Foreign Office being a good place to him

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because it was considered before. Clearly George Osborne's chance of

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becoming Tory leader has almost disappeared on the basis of this. A

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shift for him might actually rejuvenate party fortunes. The

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parties are saying civil war within the Tory party, worst in 20 years.

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You have to feel that. Iain Duncan Smith's twists knife after budget

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channels. He said it really wasn't to do with the EU, but a lot of

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people say of course it was. Everything Iain Duncan Smith said,

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if you take it at face value, is true. Of course he was angry about

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his budget being raided at the Treasury. Of course he was angry

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about disability cuts. But against the background of this, what he is

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even more angry about is Britain staying in the EU. Brexit becomes

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the most important thing for him, and the whole point of this exercise

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was to try to inflict as much damage on George Osborne and David Cameron

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because that is most likely to persuade the voters to vote to leave

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Europe. Meanwhile in the daily Telegraph, we're told David Cameron

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is fighting to save his party. We stand for compassion and one nation,

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Cameron will insist, after Iain Duncan Smith sparks a Tory civil war

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after accusing him of favouring the rich. He has to pull everyone around

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him. Again, that is why I am slightly sceptical about the Times

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story. He can't do this on his own. He has to do it, it is his

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Chancellor. He might express frustration with George Osborne.

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Yes, he could have. I am not saying it is not true, but that would be a

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significant thing. But this is about going out and fighting to get back

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to the one nation. What is interesting is the Tory party, in

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fact James Forsyth wrote about this earlier, the Tory party is

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incredibly united when it feels under threat from the possibility of

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a Labour win. When they don't feel under threat from the Labour Party

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or anybody else, the barbarians at the gate, a fracture. And they are

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fracturing into bits. I suppose the thing is those bits have always been

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there, but they have melded together. But the referendum is

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bringing it out into the open. And in the daily Merit, top Tories at

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all. -- Daily Mirror. Iain Duncan Smith reveals Tories target the

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poorest because they don't vote for us. That is one of the things he

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said today. This is crucially important and the point about David

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Cameron's fightback in the House of Commons. Getting compassionate

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conservatism back. What happened to big society? It was not a bad idea.

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But so many of their policies have been divisive, like the bedroom tax

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which breaks opportunities and therefore is opposite to the big

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society. If the Tories are to get back on an even keel, that is where

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they need to go. A lot of people thought the spare room subsidy was a

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good idea. Why should people live in houses that are too big for them?

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They know who their electorate is. I don't know how you people actually

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supported that in the end. But by moving people out of communities,

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that is anti- big society. That is what they have to get back to. You

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could argue by moving people into smaller homes that allows other

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people to move in, families. But you are breaking up communities of 28

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years standing, and the whole point about big society is to get

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communities back together. But I think is interesting is the

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underlining criticism about the pensioners or older people. They

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still get their non- means tested winter fuel allowance, and it is

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always been so. Those people, older people, to go out and vote. Whether

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they voted Tory or Labour, they do vote, and the real question is

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whether they are not Tory voters, so are they likely to go out and vote?

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It is quite interesting that we now know Iain Duncan Smith had that

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argument with the Treasury and with number 10 about not taking too much

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away from working benefits and going for pensioners. Let's move on. OK!

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We could carry on with this for the whole review, but we will give you

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some thoughts about Havana. The Obamas have arrived for this

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symbolic visit. It is on the Huffington Post with the arriving at

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force one. 88 years since a sitting American president arrived, at that

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time by battleship -- Air Force One. You can't even begin to imagine what

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it must look like to the Cuban people. To actually see Air Force

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One on their television screens. A lovely photograph because it looks

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humid and sultry unsexy and all of that sort of stuff. -- and sexy. It

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is a great thing for him to do. Nothing much will come of it,

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although one of the leading American hotel chains has already done a deal

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to move in there. There is stuff going on with business, telecoms and

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airlines. But it is very symbolic. The question is whether they will

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dare to mention human rights. Everywhere President Obama goes he

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is under pressure to raise them in some way. Let's do this

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step-by-step. The first thing is, it is symbolic and there is great

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symbolism. Since 1959, America and Cuba have been at odds. The idea

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baking come together again is fantastic. -- baking come together.

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Even just being a tourist. And gradually build that up. Some of the

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streets have been painting and lightbulbs change. They have split

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the place up a bit. It has to be good for the economy. -- spruced.

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Public hit by 12 million daily nuisance calls by ambulance chasers.

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That is a lot. These are solicitors. It is worth pointing out in the

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interest of objectivity that this survey has been produced by an

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insurance company, and they are basically saying the ambulance

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chasing lawyers are pushing up the cost of car insurance, so we have to

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put it in the context. I should think every single person watching

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this programme has had one of those irritating calls, all those text

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messages telling you about an accident you have not yet had. It is

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all a bit worrying. But flippancy aside, there are rules. There is the

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Telephone preference service. Referral fees were banned, but what

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are the insurance companies going to do about it? The Telephone

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preference service we have heard many times is overwhelmed with

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people who want to sign up and it is not really very effective. That's

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right. I do think another book needs to be taken at this. We all get

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these things, the unsolicited texts, the phone calls. I don't get very

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many of them, but the important thing is you must look at how you

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prosecute the phones that do this. These calls have been traced back.

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There are hefty fines out there. It is a matter of grabbing those

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people. The easiest thing is to leave your phone off the hook. But

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it is incrementally pushing up the entrance. -- insurance. These fake

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claims were pushing up insurance premiums and causing accidents that

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are very distressing and at setting for people. Finally, the daily

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Telegraph. Don't bomb terrorists, ask them to come 40. This is the

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latest joke from the Labour leader's office. --, for tea. If you

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could have tea with terrorists rather than fighting them it would

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be better, but of course you can't. This is someone from the ruling

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National executive who has been dismissed as naive by Labour

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moderates. But she says the answer is have a hub of tea with Islamic

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State terrorists and it will all be fine. Would you? Probably not. It is

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not terribly helpful. This is what Labour is in the paper for. They

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need to get their act together. Maybe they don't need to bother at

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the moment because the Conservatives have enough trouble of their own

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that is self-made. Thank you,

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Jo Phillips and Nigel Nelson. Coming up next,

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it's The Film Review.

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