01/04/2016 The Papers


01/04/2016

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me are the writer David Torrance and the Broadcast

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Tomorrow's front pages, starting with...

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The 'i' leads with an allegation that the Royal Navy

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It says the islands have been left without warship protection

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for the first time since before the war of 1982.

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The Mail reports on a plot to behead British troops.

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It says the details emerged following the conviction

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of Junead Khan for a similar plot against American

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The Times says there's been fierce criticism of David Cameron's

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handling of the steel crisis after China imposed huge tariffs

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The Guardian reports that the Prime Minister has defended

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Britain's decision to reject higher tariffs on Chinese steel,

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as the Business Secretary Sajid Javed faces the anger of steel

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The Financial Times reports that Tata Steel is just

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"going through the motions" as hopes fade of a sale

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The Telegraph says that as many as 33,000 people with granny flats

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attached to their houses will face tax bills for second homes.

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The Express says migrant mothers from other European Union countries

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have cost the National Health Service ?1.3 billion

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The Mirror leads with more details about the death of Ronnie Corbett.

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The paper says he hid his suffering from Motor Neurone Disease

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You could be forgiven for thinking to's paper review comes from the

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1980s. There are so many stories that feel like they belong to 30

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years ago. First of all, the plight of the steel industry. Here it is on

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the times. Oh, the irony. Sorry, steal. China putting up a tariff

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against British Steel, particularly Welsh steel. But Britain seem to be

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so wary of doing the same for Chinese imports. But it's quite

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interesting after a bad week for the government where we have had Anna

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Soubry on Monday saying that all options were on the table.

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We see that now there is a fresh human mediation for the British

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government since it seems that not only has it now admitted that it has

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been blocking the European Union efforts to stop China flooding the

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EU with cheap steel by blocking its attempt, at raising tariffs, against

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China, but China has no such problem in moving extremely swiftly because

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we learn here in the times that ministers appear to have been caught

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up in China's announcement which is that it is imposing new tariffs of

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46% on some steel products produced in Japan, South Korea and the

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European Union, and some of the very specific products that are targeted

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and caught up in this union say in Wales is in fact products produced

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in Newport by first Tata subsidiary. It is confusing with the government

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saying one thing and the paper saying another. Trying to suggest

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that it wasn't a matter of weeks or months ahead. A couple of the

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newspapers today have that picture of Sajid Javid being confronted by

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the steelworkers, lots of wagging fingers and angry looks. The quote

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in the Guardian which appears to contradict the previous line is the

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Prime Minister was speaking from Washington argues that the UK was

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right to block plans, EU plans, as he argued they would rewrite not to

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be the tariff rules on steel but the entire tariff infrastructure of the

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EU. There is definitely been a change there and as you say, it has

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not been a good week so far and that is yet another twist. Let's look at

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what it says on the FT. Some commentators suggesting that it is

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not really inch Tata's interest to find a buyer. The FT has various

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quotes suggesting that Tata has already made up its mind. Others

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speculating teaming up with a Dutch company. But there is an interesting

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aspect to this within the UK. There are two plants in Lanarkshire,

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Clydebridge and DL which survived the steel closures in the 80s, the

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processed steel, and Tata sold those to the Scottish Government for ?1

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and the government has subsequently sold on for ?1 so no cost for the

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taxpayer and it seems that That he is wanting to turn them around. That

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is a very particular type of processing, though, isn't it? A

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niche operation. Although aspects of the new pot plants as well. I find

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it weird that FT and the time tab mentioned -- haven't mentioned that.

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Is there any suggestion that Liberty would be interested in the Welsh

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plants? It has been raised, although that must be slightly political. Let

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us move on. Staying with the Financial Times. This new tax is the

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new stamp duty on second homes or investment properties and everybody

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was trying to beat the April the 1st deadline giving solicitors are bit

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of a headache as they were trying to get their conveyancing done. It

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seems like a lot of the managed it. Yes, to the extent that the economic

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's director no-ball Francis of the can construction products

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Association is pointing out that there will be a distortion as a

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result of this in property transactions, so big spike in the

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first half of the year and then big dip. As everyone has been rushing to

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beat the deadline. It is quite a major shift because by to let has

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been around for 20 years, double the size of the Private rented sector.

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People have done well out of it but it does distort the rental market

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and it is interesting to me that it is a Conservative Chancellor that is

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taking this action, that after all, the Conservatives are the property

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owning democracy of home ownership. Even they are taking action to try

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and tackle the distortions. It is a very British and dominant. It is

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quite interesting to see these new lines caught my attention. The

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British have become landlords in their millions as buy to let

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mortgages were first launched 20 years ago doubling the size of the

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Private rented sector. It has distorted the price, particularly in

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the south-east. Isn't it looked upon as the madness for owning property

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in France? I think the particular part, yes, France is a country where

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you rent much more than you by and I think that French people find the

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most bizarre is what they think is a very feudal system where you're

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buying, for example, let's talk about London, you by, or in

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Manchester Birmingham or wherever, and think you buy it outright and

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then oh, no, after... You only have 100 or 110 please. This seems very

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bizarre. This is wit to my eyes as well. In Scotland there is no such

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system. It is all freehold. It is a very specifically English form of

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property management. They have changed the tax rules on what is tax

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deductible and what you get relief on as an owner. People still want to

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buy them, even though there is not so much money, supposedly, going to

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be in by two late fools not to look at the interest rates.

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Hopefully most people don't put money under their mattresses because

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that is not very advisable. What you do with money that you have? Bricks

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and mortar is still seen as a way to protect your money. Although you

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still need to have a lot of money to do buy to let as it takes a big

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deposit. But what you don't do is build a granny flat. The Daily

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Telegraph is telling us that granny flats are hit by tax rates and will

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be regarded as stand-alone properties. If it spills over your

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garage, can it really be regarded as a second property? An unintended

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consequence, apparently of the new tax regime and it will catch 33,000

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homeowners. I think there will be grannies, there will be families

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really raking in their boots, particularly if you think about how

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disjointed and different our lives are now and how the whole advantage

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of having a grandparent or grandparents with you the whole

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child care, the knowledge that is passed on and everything, and to be

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caught up in something like that. And not having to put older people

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in care homes. You can't even get out of this because you can't sell

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it off? No, it seems an unintended consequence. To qualify for the 3%

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extra stamp duty they must be valued at ?40,000 or more and be able to be

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sold separate residence. I don't know much about granny flats and I

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understand that will pre-much all of them. It is also the contrast with

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the government, a few years ago it was encouraging people to have these

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annex as a means to try to combat distortions within the property

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market. It seems George Osborne hasn't done his homework. Maybe

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though have to think about that. Let's look at the Guardian. This is

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an appalling story. First man jailed for forcing his wife into servitude.

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A lot of campaigners saying this is an important conviction. He had an

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arranged marriage with a woman from Pakistan. They were apparently both

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happy to get married but then his wife was treated in the most

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appalling way. Yes, she was objected to two years to physical and mental

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torture. He struck her, he threw tins of cat food at her, he sent

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streams of abusive and demeaning text messages. He told her to jump

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in front of a vehicle or read it, he broken nose, assaulted her. The list

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just goes on. And it was a neighbour, we understand, who raised

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the alarm as he saw her being pulled by her hair. On that point, it seems

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legal experts and charities who described the case as

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ground-breaking also describe it as the tip of the iceberg. The

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implication is that there are a lot of other cases like this. But we

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simply don't know about. One of the ways this remains a secret is as

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this man did, the abuser, she said she felt like a prisoner. What they

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do is isolate you. He made her work from 5am until 12pm, -- 12am, it you

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get so little sleep. What sort of state are you in to go out and get

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help. We need to make it clear that people can get help but, how do we

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let them know? They are trapped. In most cases they're not given access

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to telephones or the Internet because from the other person's

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point of view it would be too risky. It's interesting on the sentencing,

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it appears that there will be concurrent sentences and he could be

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free within 12 months, as the Guardian says, less than half the

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time that she lived under his control. Having worked at the

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Conference, chaired Conference on trafficking to do with women in

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prostitution, we think of police in this country -- we think of women

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and think why don't they pick up the phone and call someone? A lot of

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these women don't trust the police because the countries where they are

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from the police are corrupt. You may think it's terribly easy to contact

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the police that they may have all kinds of reasons for not contacting

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them. And they are terrified to. And The "i" has a story

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about the Royal Navy Why is that? Why can't we managed to

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patrol these islands which the islanders of which tell us want to

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remain British? According to the fuller story and according to

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Labour, it is a cumulative effect of defence cuts from conservatives,

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presumably from previous administrations over the last 20

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years. Of course the MoD budget has not been safe from posterity over

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the last two administrations. I'm not sure whether this is serious or

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not, Emily Thornbury, the Shadow Defence Secretary, said the

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situation is not acceptable and demand the MoD immediately dispatch

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a warship to the region. Which may send an interesting signal to

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Argentina which this week was told by the UN that they are the

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Malvinas. . They do belong in a Marine territory of Argentina. This

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is a UN working group that has come up with a ruling that is not legally

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binding. Possibly to be compared in a different way with Julian Assange

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some weeks ago working group who said he was having his human rights

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infringed after being locked up in the Ecuadorian Embassy. It is a

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catchy headline here. Britain struggles to patrol South Atlantic

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while warship wait for repairs. When you have an economic problem and a

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difficult situation at home, don't cry for Argentina, but they have a

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lot to cry out, it's much easier to concentrate on a foreign matter. The

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MoD has pointed out that they don't agree with that headline, it would

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surprise you to hear. It is fully under control and the situation is

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fine. Yes, I can't say radio one is my

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station of predilection. Perhaps not target audience. Perhaps not. This

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is what Radio 1 used to be about, distinctive music, new music. John

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Peel and Jo Wiley. They used to flag up bands and acts that weren't

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known. It's a difficult balancing act

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It is the balance between the two. It would be nice to hear more new

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music. Also its coverage of concerts and festivals. I think that is

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extremely important to encourage new talent but they face a lot of

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competition with streaming and all kinds of other things and of course

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there is YouTube. Don't forget all the front pages

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are online on the BBC News website, where you can read a detailed

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review of the papers. It's all there for you - seven days

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a week at bbc.co.uk/papers. with each night's edition

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of The Papers being posted on the page shortly

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after we've finished. It is going to for most of us get a

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bit warmer through the course

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