06/05/2016 The Papers


06/05/2016

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 06/05/2016. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be

:00:17.:00:21.

With me are Joe Watts, Political Correspondent

:00:22.:00:24.

for the Evening Standard and Lucy Fisher, who's

:00:25.:00:26.

a Senior Political Correspondent at The Times.

:00:27.:00:28.

Welcome to you both. Thank you for being here tonight. Whilst we wait

:00:29.:00:31.

for the London mayoral result... The Scottish Daily Mail says

:00:32.:00:37.

voters have told the SNP to abandon its independence drive,

:00:38.:00:39.

as the Tories are returned Ruth Davidson,

:00:40.:00:42.

the Scottish Conservative leader, is pictured on the front

:00:43.:00:45.

of the Telegraph - it says she's tipped to play

:00:46.:00:47.

a bigger role in British politics. Sadiq Khan is on the

:00:48.:00:49.

front of the Times. It calls him Labour's most

:00:50.:00:52.

powerful politician. The FT says the election

:00:53.:00:53.

of the son of a Pakistani bus driver signals a broad acceptance by voters

:00:54.:00:56.

of London's racial and religious diversity, months after terrorist

:00:57.:00:59.

attacks in Brussels and Paris. The Guardian reports concerns

:01:00.:01:01.

from Conservatives that Zac Goldsmith's mayoral campaign has

:01:02.:01:03.

left a 'negative legacy' in London. And the Express says

:01:04.:01:09.

the Government's benefits cap will be reduced to ?20,000

:01:10.:01:11.

per family this autumn. So, let's begin with the front pages

:01:12.:01:32.

of the stories we picked out. The i says there has been a seismic shift

:01:33.:01:39.

in Scotland. The SNP loses a majority but wins a historic third

:01:40.:01:43.

term. The Tories become the second biggest party after spirited defence

:01:44.:01:47.

of the union. Lucy, it could have gone very differently in Scotland,

:01:48.:01:52.

couldn't it? Absolutely, I think it has come as a surprise to most

:01:53.:01:55.

people that the Conservatives have jumped into second place, causing

:01:56.:02:01.

Labour to slump to third in their historic former heartlands. A really

:02:02.:02:05.

serious story for Labour. But as you say, I think it is interesting the

:02:06.:02:11.

SNP are still on top, third time in, although not managing a majority

:02:12.:02:15.

this time. Labour's experience in Scotland tempered by what happened

:02:16.:02:17.

in other parts of the country somewhat. But there is not going to

:02:18.:02:23.

be a majority SNP, they are going to have to try and go through without

:02:24.:02:28.

that. A sting in the tail for the SNP. They have won and is an

:02:29.:02:32.

historic victory but it basically means they will have to do some

:02:33.:02:36.

deals if they want to get what they want. That is not unusual for the

:02:37.:02:40.

SNP, they are used to handling and doing a bit of wheeling and dealing.

:02:41.:02:44.

They had to do that kind of thing before they had a majority in

:02:45.:02:47.

Scotland. They will have to revert back to their old ways. They did it

:02:48.:02:51.

quite successfully last time. The problem is this time, they want

:02:52.:02:57.

something big. We all know the SNP wombat second Scottish independence

:02:58.:03:00.

referendum. They are not far off of mint majority in Holyrood and a few

:03:01.:03:06.

MPs might be willing to give them a couple more votes to get that

:03:07.:03:10.

majority for a vote on independence, but the question is at what cost

:03:11.:03:14.

will that come? The Scottish Daily Mail makes that point, a defiant

:03:15.:03:19.

Ruth Davidson pours scorn on the idea of this new independence with

:03:20.:03:24.

the roar of Middle Scotland. She had her work cut out, when you think

:03:25.:03:30.

where the Conservatives were come the general election. Absolutely. In

:03:31.:03:34.

one of the papers she likens it to resuscitate in a dead corpse, which

:03:35.:03:39.

is a really lovely image. The problem is with resuscitating a dead

:03:40.:03:44.

corpse, we'll note, any horror film knows, when it comes back to life it

:03:45.:03:49.

does horrible things. There is a danger for the Conservative Party,

:03:50.:03:52.

as Ruth Davidson goes forward, that she feels the need to define herself

:03:53.:03:57.

as a Scottish Conservative different to the English Conservatives. That

:03:58.:04:01.

could be a problem for David Cameron in London. Nonetheless, she has done

:04:02.:04:05.

a very good job in some ways already by defining herself in that way for

:04:06.:04:09.

stop we know apparently blocked George Osborne going to Scotland in

:04:10.:04:12.

the campaign. She has done a big job, not afraid of getting in front

:04:13.:04:16.

of the cameras. How well will she now lead the opposition against the

:04:17.:04:21.

SNP? There is talk because of how well she has done that there might

:04:22.:04:24.

be a bigger role for her within the Conservative Party. I think that is

:04:25.:04:29.

eminently possible. The great thing about Ruth Davidson is she looks and

:04:30.:04:33.

feels very different to many Westminster politicians, typically

:04:34.:04:36.

in the Conservatives. She's female, Gary, quite wary and has a very

:04:37.:04:42.

fresh image. She talks as a human rather than political speak. I think

:04:43.:04:47.

that is... To put a different take on it, I think what you say is

:04:48.:04:51.

fascinating. She could cause Cameron some problems because she is a

:04:52.:04:55.

little more modern, a bit more progressive, but equally when there

:04:56.:04:58.

is a threat from them more right wing of the party, the degree of

:04:59.:05:03.

Europe, in actual fact she really shows the modernisers, the they win

:05:04.:05:09.

votes in elections. She could end up bolstering him. The Daily Telegraph,

:05:10.:05:14.

we have two versions of it. The Scottish version first. SNP has no

:05:15.:05:21.

mandate for another referendum. Davidson throws down gauntlet to

:05:22.:05:24.

First Minister after Tory surge cost her majority. How much will Nicola

:05:25.:05:31.

Sturgeon feel put in her place by what has happened in the vote last

:05:32.:05:35.

night? Well, she is certainly still going to talk a good talk on the

:05:36.:05:40.

subject. I think Nicola Sturgeon is quite canny woman. I don't think she

:05:41.:05:43.

necessarily believes in her heart of hearts that if there were a wind

:05:44.:05:48.

referendum that the SNP would necessarily win it. Based on the

:05:49.:06:02.

fact it is unclear if public opinion has changed now. Many Westminster

:06:03.:06:08.

politicians say we have to win the second one, so let's wait and hold

:06:09.:06:13.

it when we can win it. It is not clear they could necessarily win a

:06:14.:06:16.

second referendum. I think if we look back to the last government

:06:17.:06:20.

when we had the coalition, it sort of helped the Conservatives to have

:06:21.:06:23.

to compromise with the Lib Dems. It could end up being helpful to Nicola

:06:24.:06:29.

Sturgeon and the SNP to not have a majority, to kind of hold off from

:06:30.:06:32.

holding that referendum. It was not that helpful to the Lib Dems. We

:06:33.:06:36.

will see which other parties are willing to get into bed with the SNP

:06:37.:06:40.

and how that might affect their votes. We're pretty sure the Tories

:06:41.:06:44.

won't do that. Labour I don't think we'll be willing to do that, given

:06:45.:06:47.

what has happened to them. There will be a lot of bitterness around.

:06:48.:06:52.

Perhaps the greens. They have a handful of seats. They might be the

:06:53.:06:56.

answer to the SNP's problems. The Greens tend to be pro-... Could be

:06:57.:07:03.

pro the union rather than pro-independence? It will not really

:07:04.:07:10.

help the SNP Test they will have to go step-by-step, vote by vote, that

:07:11.:07:14.

is how they did it last time. They managed to carve out quite a

:07:15.:07:19.

successful assembly session out of that. I think that if the weight

:07:20.:07:23.

Nicola Sturgeon will play it again. People will be looking to see

:07:24.:07:26.

exactly what they are prepared to give up. I have heard many analyses

:07:27.:07:31.

of what has happened in Scotland, that if you are pro-independence you

:07:32.:07:37.

still carried on voting for the SNP and if you are not, you voted this

:07:38.:07:40.

time for the Conservatives because they seem to have made their case

:07:41.:07:45.

more powerfully. That certainly seems to be a lot -- what a lot of

:07:46.:07:51.

the pundits are saying that moment. I think a lot of people voted for

:07:52.:07:55.

the SNP at first you are not necessarily going to back

:07:56.:07:57.

independence. It is quite difficult to know at the moment, given we

:07:58.:08:02.

haven't had any polls on independence. Comparing with the

:08:03.:08:06.

votes from this particular election, to see exactly how that breaks down

:08:07.:08:10.

on whether there are still people voting SNP might not necessarily

:08:11.:08:13.

vote for independence. But dependent has been the driving force of this

:08:14.:08:19.

election. The anti-independence voters really coalesced around the

:08:20.:08:27.

Tories. We have a couple of pictures of Ruth Davidson in Scotland. At one

:08:28.:08:32.

point she was quoting Carolann Duffy's poem Rapture. She tried to

:08:33.:08:39.

make the point her heart was almost stumped. That is the picture they

:08:40.:08:44.

have chosen for the Scottish version of the paper, grinning. There she is

:08:45.:08:50.

looking very sassy. This is the version of the Telegraph that goes

:08:51.:08:53.

out in the rest of the country. A woman who put Tories back on the map

:08:54.:08:58.

of Scotland. She certainly looks different, doesn't she? That seems

:08:59.:09:01.

to have appealed to the people I have been speaking to an Twitter is,

:09:02.:09:05.

because she doesn't look like the archetypal Conservative MP. Yes, and

:09:06.:09:10.

she is willing to dress up, here she is wearing a funny Stetson style

:09:11.:09:14.

hat. She has a sense of humour. I think that is why people like her.

:09:15.:09:18.

She has detoxified the brand. She has that slight thing Boris Johnson

:09:19.:09:23.

has. She is not as much of a clown as Boris can be, but she's not of

:09:24.:09:27.

putting herself in interesting photo shoots. There was one floating

:09:28.:09:31.

around the news today of her riding on a cow. She doesn't mind setting

:09:32.:09:37.

herself up there and people like that, they warm to it. Let's look at

:09:38.:09:42.

another party. Turning our attention to Labour. Corbin not a credible

:09:43.:09:48.

leader of the worst losses in 30 years. -- Jeremy Corbyn. But he

:09:49.:09:52.

said, we survived. It was not exactly a ringing endorsement of

:09:53.:09:56.

what they'd done but the feeling was that could have been worse. It is

:09:57.:09:59.

interesting what happened with Labour today. I think it plays into

:10:00.:10:03.

the idea that expectation management is all-important. Some of Labour's

:10:04.:10:07.

worst internal critics were warning they were going to lose at least

:10:08.:10:14.

100, maybe 150 200 council seats. In fact only losing a few councillors

:10:15.:10:20.

here and that is, holding in South, some -- some councils, proving

:10:21.:10:23.

Jeremy Corbyn can hold outpost in the south, gives a very mixed and

:10:24.:10:29.

messy picture. He has not done well enough to tell his critics look, I

:10:30.:10:34.

can do this, I can lead us to victory in 2020, but he hasn't done

:10:35.:10:37.

badly enough for those critics to really wield the knife and enact the

:10:38.:10:42.

coup they have been talking about. It takes a leap of imagination of

:10:43.:10:47.

you are going to argue either side. For the Labour spinners who are

:10:48.:10:50.

coming out and saying this is better than expected, you have to remember

:10:51.:10:54.

this is from the baseline that Ed Miliband had that was quite high,

:10:55.:10:58.

but then proceeded one of the worst election losses Labour has had at a

:10:59.:11:02.

general election. So to come out and say, it is not as bad as it could be

:11:03.:11:07.

is going to great on a lot of Labour supporters who want the party to be

:11:08.:11:10.

winning. At the same time, those people who want to have their

:11:11.:11:13.

fingers curled round the knife handle and ready to plunge it into

:11:14.:11:17.

Jeremy Corbyn, they don't quite have the reason to do that yet. But he

:11:18.:11:26.

surely, in the light of what has been happening in the last couple of

:11:27.:11:29.

weeks of this campaign thinking they did manage to get through it

:11:30.:11:33.

relatively unscathed. You think what was going on with the anti-Semitism

:11:34.:11:37.

row, it only ended last week I think, when they launch the

:11:38.:11:43.

independent inquiry that Shami Chakrabarti will be looking at. All

:11:44.:11:47.

that will kick back in again. But I imagine it could have been, could

:11:48.:11:52.

have had a worse impact on those results? Certainly I think so. When

:11:53.:12:01.

we looked last night John McDonnell warning Ken Livingstone's

:12:02.:12:03.

controversial comments linking Hitler and Zionism, he said this

:12:04.:12:08.

will set us back as a party. There was a lot of nervousness last night

:12:09.:12:14.

at the BBC and other broadcast studios before the results started

:12:15.:12:17.

coming out. I think there is a sense today, a sigh of relief from the top

:12:18.:12:22.

leadership team that it hasn't been wiped out some had predicted. We

:12:23.:12:26.

thought we might be talking about the result of the London mayoral

:12:27.:12:32.

election, but we were told a couple of hours ago it is more likely going

:12:33.:12:36.

to be midnight when we get that result. There was some kind of

:12:37.:12:40.

inaccuracies or discrepancies in a small number of votes, we were told.

:12:41.:12:44.

The Times have stuck their neck out and have a picture of Sadiq Khan

:12:45.:12:50.

with his wife, who it says has become Labour's most powerful

:12:51.:12:54.

politician after winning the London mayoral election. It certainly looks

:12:55.:12:59.

like he is heading that way. And again, despite aspersions that were

:13:00.:13:03.

cast on people he'd associated with, which left a nasty taste some people

:13:04.:13:07.

in the way the Conservatives campaigned. That is right. I think

:13:08.:13:12.

there is a of reasons, if it turns out Sadiq Khan has won, that he did

:13:13.:13:17.

win. He made a strategic decision quite early on to distance himself

:13:18.:13:21.

from Jeremy Corbyn. Pretty much at every opportunity he could take he

:13:22.:13:25.

distanced himself, and that paid off, particularly in the

:13:26.:13:28.

anti-Semitism row that came late in the campaign. He also managed to

:13:29.:13:34.

brush off those claims from Zac Goldsmith about the platform to with

:13:35.:13:37.

people. That seemed to have a backlash effect the Zac. Most

:13:38.:13:41.

importantly he came forward with a policy platform that really seemed

:13:42.:13:46.

to match what voters wanted in London. People basically wanted a

:13:47.:13:51.

break from the high cost of living. He had his first dibs for Londoners

:13:52.:13:54.

for housing and that seemed to resonate with a lot of people. It

:13:55.:13:57.

might was a clue as to the people he will have around him in his team.

:13:58.:14:02.

That idea of breaking away from your party Central office, Steven Norris

:14:03.:14:08.

talks about the need to do that. He said he pretty much took no notice

:14:09.:14:13.

of Conservative Central office when he was running for the post of

:14:14.:14:22.

mayor. But he has a big mandate, because of the way this election is

:14:23.:14:25.

run for London mayor, if you win, you really do win. Absolutely. I

:14:26.:14:31.

think it is a really big first that London has their first Muslim mayor

:14:32.:14:39.

in Sadiq, if he has won tonight. The most powerful Muslim politician in

:14:40.:14:42.

the whole of Europe, which I think it something to be celebrated. That

:14:43.:14:47.

Britain is the first country, it is a great message for Muslims

:14:48.:14:50.

throughout the world to see that. But you are right. Him being

:14:51.:14:57.

distanced from Jeremy Corbyn and the Central Labour machine, it will be

:14:58.:15:03.

an interesting dynamic. Some interesting criticism of Zac

:15:04.:15:10.

Goldsmith by his sister. She said on Twitter that she didn't feel that

:15:11.:15:15.

his campaign reflected the type of person that she knew him to be. She

:15:16.:15:21.

said he is an eco-friendly, independent minded politician with

:15:22.:15:25.

integrity. She also tweeted she was sending her congratulations to Sadiq

:15:26.:15:28.

Khan, saying he was a great example to young Muslims. I wonder who

:15:29.:15:35.

Jemima Khan was actually criticising, was her brother or the

:15:36.:15:39.

conservative machine? Lucy and I were talking about this one. We were

:15:40.:15:44.

just wondering what kind of relationship they have. If she

:15:45.:15:48.

called him first to say that is what she would be tweeting, if he was

:15:49.:15:51.

aware and sanctioned and what the dynamics behind that well. If Zac

:15:52.:15:56.

didn't know was coming it was a kick in the teeth, and if he you have to

:15:57.:16:00.

think he okayed it beforehand. Something interesting going on. Zac

:16:01.:16:03.

Goldsmith's brother came in and tweeted some supportive things as

:16:04.:16:09.

well. It still remains to be seen exactly what is going on beer and

:16:10.:16:12.

the scenes in the Goldsmith family. It might have been the comment on

:16:13.:16:15.

the way she felt her brother was forced to campaign? I wouldn't say

:16:16.:16:21.

forced. I think he will have had a steering role and he can't renege

:16:22.:16:27.

responsible at your map. But I think a lot of people are looking at the

:16:28.:16:33.

firm that has been running this campaign, it is quite a bulldog -ish

:16:34.:16:40.

firm. It will be interesting which Conservatives will be there, if that

:16:41.:16:44.

Goldsmith is there tonight. I think you are right, this tweet by the

:16:45.:16:48.

angling to suggest it was this Rottweiler like firm that likes to

:16:49.:16:51.

go in for these strong messages that has perhaps looks at Zac and thought

:16:52.:16:56.

he is the ecologist, nice guy Tory, not some sort of brash individual.

:16:57.:17:04.

Lets look at a moment at Ukip, Nigel Farage and Ukip, The true election

:17:05.:17:08.

winners it in the express. I just marked that with a big question,

:17:09.:17:16.

Mark. After the general election when they were supposed to do

:17:17.:17:20.

extremely well and then only took Clacton with Douglas Carswell, how

:17:21.:17:25.

successful has it been for Ukip? It doesn't look like they have done

:17:26.:17:28.

that well in London. I suppose the Welsh seats are a big game for them.

:17:29.:17:33.

They have a decent showing there on the Welsh Assembly. I think they won

:17:34.:17:39.

quite a few seats around the country as well. I think of the top of my

:17:40.:17:44.

head around 20 council seats around the place. They have made some

:17:45.:17:47.

games, but whether they can actually turn that into anything more

:17:48.:17:53.

useful... And they had a really high watermark of their vote share for

:17:54.:17:58.

the general election. The question is, what vote showed they have

:17:59.:18:01.

across the country and has risen or fallen? For a small party, the fact

:18:02.:18:06.

they have made those games, they will be pleased? Absolutely. I think

:18:07.:18:10.

the fact they have been geographically focused in Wales, it

:18:11.:18:13.

is useful to have a stronghold summer, a place from which to grow.

:18:14.:18:18.

They will be hoping if they do win an the 23rd they will have a SNP

:18:19.:18:23.

like effect. It is worth it just to see Neil Hamilton back in politics.

:18:24.:18:32.

Is it? Him and Christine, we have missed them. Yes, up in the North in

:18:33.:18:36.

Cheshire they had acetyl stop the Daily Telegraph finally. No sooner

:18:37.:18:39.

are these elections over there and we are back on the referendum trail.

:18:40.:18:46.

Michael Gove will make Britain safe after Brexit. Michael Gove talking

:18:47.:18:51.

about the need to strengthen our borders and national security laws.

:18:52.:18:55.

A lot of people saying, Lucy, we can already have a great deal of control

:18:56.:19:01.

over this inside the EU. Yes, people do. It is one of those issues,

:19:02.:19:05.

security, where there are a lot of claims and counterclaims and it is

:19:06.:19:11.

not clear if the UK safer in the EU, where we have agreements on

:19:12.:19:15.

intelligence and data sharing the outside and have a tougher border

:19:16.:19:19.

policy, if that were even possible to negotiate. I think it is an

:19:20.:19:22.

interesting topic for Michael Gove to go on, but it certainly points to

:19:23.:19:28.

immigration, the idea that we make our borders tougher, deport foreign

:19:29.:19:31.

criminals without interference from Brussels courts. He knows his

:19:32.:19:35.

constituency when he brings up this subject. That is right. It does seem

:19:36.:19:41.

to be pushing towards the immigration issue. If anything, I

:19:42.:19:46.

think the smartest strategist will see that as an area where they can

:19:47.:19:50.

make some hay. They know they are not really going to convince people

:19:51.:19:54.

or invigorate people with abstract arguments about sovereignty. They

:19:55.:19:57.

need to talk about something that people on the street are thinking

:19:58.:20:01.

about as well. The NHS is possibly another thing they could talk about,

:20:02.:20:03.

but immigration certainly. Don't forget, all the front pages

:20:04.:20:06.

are online on the BBC News website where you can read a detailed review

:20:07.:20:12.

of the papers. It's all there for you -

:20:13.:20:14.

7 days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers, and you can see us there too -

:20:15.:20:17.

with each night's edition of The Papers being posted

:20:18.:20:20.

on the page shortly after we've Thank you to both of you. I hope you

:20:21.:20:29.

will come back again and see us on. More on the elections at 11 o'clock.

:20:30.:20:33.

We will hopefully speak to Ben Brown at City Hall as we wait for the

:20:34.:20:36.

London mayoral election. But first, the weather.

:20:37.:20:45.

Hello. The weather pattern at the moment is favouring England and

:20:46.:20:51.

Wales with the highest temperatures.

:20:52.:20:52.

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS